Author
edward

Horoscopes

Aries (March 21-April 19) Make trivia your passion on Monday, and your chances of success improve. You’ll want to travel that day, but it’s not a good idea. On Tuesday and Wednesday your partner comes to your rescue. The two of you can fit all the events you want to attend into your schedule. Your group wants to spend money Thursday and Friday. If you lose control of the finances, you could end up in the hole. Do paperwork and errands on Saturday. On Sunday travel to investigate something interesting you’ve heard about. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Romance finds a way on Monday. You’re persistent, so this won’t be impossible. Improve your financial situation Tuesday and Wednesday with careful preparation and a few long-distance phone calls. On Thursday and Friday expect pressure to cinch the deal. Catch an error first. If you’re selling or giving things away, wait until Saturday. Tithe to yourself, too, on Sunday. The money you’re saving provides security sooner than expected. Gemini (May 21-June 21) Fears that you’ll lose are unfounded Monday, but pay back an old debt. Thereafter, you’ll start to see possibilities. By Wednesday you can achieve one. Go ahead; take the risk. Pull back on Thursday. A new venture then won’t work as well as hoped. Ditto Friday. Curtail travel both days and fix broken things instead. Do housework Saturday so you can invite a favorite friend over Sunday. Take care in a game of chance, however. The other guy has a trick up his sleeve. Cancer (June 22-July 22) A conversation with your sweetheart on Monday leads to new plans. You’re eager to take action, but don’t start until Tuesday. An older friend can help with a household plan Wednesday. Get something for free that would have cost good money. Spend Thursday and Friday nights with the ones you love. Nothing else is more important. Your list spills over into Saturday, so be flexible. Turn down another invitation in favor of family. A healthy outdoor exercise is great for Sunday, but get back home before dark. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You may have trouble deciding which way to go on Monday. Your social and love lives are in competition. Don’t get all tangled up, or you’ll miss a career opportunity Tuesday. Study Wednesday and flush bugs out of your systems on Thursday. You may have to get expert help with that job on Friday. Dump your trash on Saturday and find a treasure in another’s discards. You’re in for a pleasant surprise on Sunday. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The others don’t know what they’re doing Monday. If you do, you have the advantage. Take charge and reap the rewards Tuesday. You’ll work for the money on Wednesday, untangling a puzzle. Go back to the rule book Thursday and Friday. Don’t take any chances with that mess. New information gives you a new perspective Saturday, and that improves your odds. Fix your place up just the way you want it Sunday. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Travel’s enticing Monday but could be fraught with peril. Make a phone call instead. The money you save will be welcome on Tuesday. Go on Wednesday, as far as possible. Your sweetheart’s in a blue funk Thursday. Dig deep to help bail that one out. On Friday pinch pennies to get by and sell something to bring more Saturday. Or, get what you need for free from a neighbor. A party with close family and friends goes well Sunday. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) Financial woes keep you hopping on Monday. You’re dancing fast to keep everyone happy. Wait until Tuesday and Wednesday to write the checks. Also, watch for a wonderful household item at a price you can afford. Save your time and money Thursday and do the reading instead. Clip ads and coupons, but don’t rush off to shop on Friday. On Saturday a friend or your mate finds the missing piece to the puzzle, and things fall into place. You could profit nicely from your castoffs Sunday, with a sale or trade. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Your head is full of worries Monday, from too many options. They start to thin on Tuesday. Chill out and heed a friend’s advice. The solution becomes apparent around Wednesday, with help from a textbook. Obligations keep you busy until late Thursday, so postpone a meeting with friends. Check incoming information for errors on Friday. Schedule your coming month Saturday and make it a lot easier. Drop a bad habit on Sunday and launch a new lifestyle. Get yourself a new outfit to match your new persona. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don’t bother to get an early start Monday; you’ll run into a traffic jam. The later the better on travel. An older adviser can help you increase income on Tuesday. Extra work brings in extra bucks Wednesday. On Thursday the money’s flowing to a worthy cause. Make sure you know how it’ll be spent before you write the check. Don’t waste any on Friday, either. An outing with friends interferes with family plans on Saturday. Reschedule private time with loved ones for early Sunday. Chores get in the way later. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) A sweetheart’s concerns upset you on Monday. By Tuesday you can solve the problem. You love that. Romance and travel look good on Wednesday. Start new projects, too. Don’t argue with an older person Thursday or Friday. Your meaning could be misunderstood. Write a note, instead, and keep it. Be respectful of an older person on Saturday to avoid a power struggle. You won’t win that one, either. Plans with friends on Sunday go awry and take longer than expected. Let family know you may be late. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Things are changing fast on Monday, but skill gives you the advantage. If you’ve done the homework, you’ll win on Tuesday. Find a tech-gadget that you want, on sale Wednesday. Contact with a distant friend brings up dreams of far-off places Thursday. Don’t travel then or Friday. There are way too many complications. If you go on Saturday, you can’t do something else. That’s OK; you didn’t want to do that other thing anyway. Visit your folks or another respected older person Sunday. There are changes you’ll be glad to hear about. Birthdays This Week Oct. 23: A passion for perfection is your motivation. Keep at it and achieve the wealth you’re after. Oct. 24: What you learn through the grapevine gives you the advantage. Make networking a fine art and succeed brilliantly. Oct. 25: People love to tell you secrets, and you love to collect them. Put together the clues to find the buried treasure. Oct. 26: Your plans could lead to success, but keep them private for awhile. Let worries motivate you, not slow you down. Oct. 27: This year you’re powerful and smart. Use those brains to avoid repeating a mistake you made before. Oct. 28: You’re holding all the aces this year. Make this hand count! Oct. 29: The money’s available to you. Don’t let it slip through your fingers. ...

The Editor's Soapbox

OK, so I didn’t get an apartment like I wanted to last year. That’s no big surprise. Despite this minor disappointment, I’ve grown quite fond of my living situation. After all, being surrounded by first-year UCSD students isn’t exactly a bad thing. Where else can you find in one place so many people who haven’t yet experienced all our school has (and doesn’t have) to offer? Even after half of a quarter, it’s still nice to see that they are relatively content with their brand-new lives. Living with freshmen as a sophomore has taught me a lot. I’ve noticed that, for many, the transition from home to dorm has been a smooth one. Unfortunately for others, the shock of living in a completely different environment with strangers, all the while managing a heavy class load, has been a lot more dramatic. It’s precisely this drama that I feel compelled to elaborate on during my rant. Perhaps in the process, a few readers may even find my suggestions on leading a life less turbulent a little helpful. Now, I acknowledge that we all have problems, no matter how old we are. How we deal with our problems, however, makes all the difference. It would be nice to think that as we climb the ladder from freshmen to seniors, our problems would lessen. Alas, this isn’t the case. Should I be optimistic and say that problems are not bad, and that they make life interesting; in other words, that it’s all about having perspective in a bad situation? Of course it is. Maybe it’s also just a matter of being mature. Let’s not forget that maturity is a relative thing, independent of factors such as age or sex. My point is that how we deal with our problems has a lot to do with who we are. On one hand, if you’re more level-headed and arguably more mature, you’ll probably deal with emotional problems much better. On the other hand, if you’re really losing your mind, I suggest a more proactive approach in alleviating your madness. It’s true that some deal with their issues productively, whether by means of work, music, art or simply through the most direct approach, which is talking to a person, like a trusted friend, counselor or even a psychologist. The truth is that too many students cope by avoiding their problems or simply acting out their impulses. Whether it is by experimenting with the latest available drug on campus, having promiscuous sex with various partners, or just being over-the-top with their personalities, students often resort to making drastic changes to divert their anxiety. While I’m all for college being a time of challenging one’s beliefs, trying new things and having a great time, I’m still an advocate of most things in moderation. It’s one thing for college students to occasionally act like idiots, get drunk or smoke a little weed if they have a grip on their lives and don’t have any serious issues. What’s entirely different is when a person who does those same activities as a means of coping, or perhaps more accurately, fleeing from problems, most of which can be rather severe and repressed. It’s very impressive to see how bright and ambitious the incoming class of 2004 is. Many have already become good friends of mine. Sadly though, this year’s same pool of bright freshmen are no different than many of the classes that preceded them, at least emotionally speaking. At the risk of sounding overly cynical, they may even be worse off. With each passing year, competition into higher education is more and more cut-throat. No doubt, the stress levels of this year’s incoming class is at a record high. Many of them already seem burned out, both mentally and physically. College offers them a refreshing change of pace, but by the time fifth week rolls by, all the stresses they thought were gone pay them a familiar visit. It’s important not to forget that school isn’t the only cause of stress in students’ lives, however. There are innumerable other factors. For the majority, growing up is still a pain and remains at the root of emotional problems. Already, I’ve been fortunate enough to have a few students open up to me in deep ways, exposing a side of themselves that they would normally hide from others. Their problems include everything from family abuse to high school alienation. What fascinates me is how so many of these same people with deep-seeded issues are the ones we usually envy. They are the ones who always seem to get the highest grade on an impossible test or appear to be having the most fun at a party. They are the valedictorians speaking at graduation or the select few who made up the “”in-crowd”” in high school. In short, we never would expect these sort of people to have problems, but they do. As trite as it sounds, people who are “”successful”” are no more resistant to emotional suffering than the rest of us who aren’t successful. In one respect, we probably have it easier, for at least we have no qualms about admitting our frailties. The “”successful”” ones, on the other hand, run a much higher risk of damaging their reputations as perfect people. For them, admitting that they have serious problems is almost unthinkable. So what’s the solution? There are many options, but the common denominator is always common sense. It’s something we all learn about (one would hope) from when we’re little: If you have a problem, talk to someone about it. Bottling it up and pushing it back further and further only perpetuates the problem. Take it from someone who has experienced his share of bad moments, both firsthand and from those closest around him. Dealing with any emotional problem head-on feels so much better in the long-term than avoiding it for the short-term. In addition, acting out only seems to mask the problem, albeit in a sometimes pleasurable way. The bottom line is being honest with oneself and seeking help to deal with it, if necessary. For everyone out there who is happy, healthy and content, more power to you. As for everyone else, keep fighting and always remember that you are not alone. I am reminded of what a dear friend once told me. It is something I won’t soon forget. She said, “”We’re all in the same boat, so let’s paddle together.”” Those were wise words, indeed. ...

5-k Run to Raise Funds

The fifth annual Chancellor’s Challenge 5k run will commence this Friday at 12:15 p.m. Over 1,000 participants are expected. In the past, the Challenge has been run exclusively on the cross country course, but this year things are going to change. The new route begins by RIMAC and takes runners down through Marshall college, along Library Walk, then back up to the start/finish line with only part of the race going through the eucalyptus grove, the traditional cross country haunt. The Chancellor’s Challenge is much more than just a 5k run however, and last year it raised over $158,000. “”Right now, it looks like we are definitely going to beat last year’s total of $158,000 and much of that is due to Charlie Robbins,”” said Brian Daly, who is in charge of donations and scholarships for this year’s race. Robbins, a former UCSD trustee, will match up to $15,000 in donations and has done the leg work behind many of the corporate sponsorships at this year’s Challenge, including sponsorships such as a $15,000 donation from Fisher Scientific and $10,000 apiece from Audrey Geisel and the Doctor Seuss Foundation, and John Moores and the San Diego Padres. “”Charlie has just been terrific and we really owe him a big thank you,”” Daly said. All the money that Robbins and others have raised goes to two scholarships. The first is a research scholarship and the second is a community service scholarship. The research scholarship is for students who mentor with a teacher and is competitive, meaning it is applied for individually. The community service scholarship is for incoming freshmen. The freshmen are nominated by their high schools for what the schools perceive to be outstanding service to the community. The winners are then picked by UCSD. Dynes is providing another $40,000 dollars in matching funds, which comes from unrestricted funds that, as chancellor, Dynes has control over and can spend toward the university as he sees fit. This makes a total of $55,000 in matching funds to be provided by Dynes and Robbins, and assures that this year’s Challenge will bring in at least $110,000 in added need. Beyond matching up to $40,000 dollars, Dynes will provide $25 out of his own pocket for every person that beats him. However, this is not as easy as it may sound, for the Chancellor is one tough competitor Last year the Chancellor finished 170th with a time of 23:42, a donation of $4,250, but that still leaves over 800 people who did not have enough in them to beat him. Ken Grosse, assistant athletic director at UCSD, and coordinator of the athletic side of the race, says even some of the athletes who are competing in the event should be worried about Dynes beating them. “”Chancellor Dynes is out there every day running the course and getting ready for the event,”” Grosse said. “”He is serious about this. I know that the coaches and athletes that are competing are always saying, ‘we’ve got to beat the chancellor,’ but they need to be careful.”” Dynes also has a standing bet running with the A.S. president such that if the chancellor beats him, Doc Khaleghi must wash Dynes’ car. On the other hand, if Khaleghi happens to pull out the victory over Dynes, the chancellor has to donate funds for an A.S. barbecue. In addition to the Chancellor’s Challenge of $25 for every person that beats him, professor Frances Dynes Hellman is donating $25 for every woman who beats her, and Vice Chancellor of Health Sciences Ed Holmes will pay $25 to every person from Health Sciences who beats him in the race. For those who want to participate in the race, there are many ways to apply. The application is available with Adobe Acrobat Reader directly off the Chancellor’s Challenge Web site, http://www.ucsd.edu/5k, and there are application forms handy at RIMAC, Geisel, Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Faculty Club. All mailed applications are due by Oct. 25 and walk-in applications are being accepted at RIMAC on the 26 from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. “”This is really a great deal for students,”” Grosse said. “”You get a free t-shirt and food, plus you get to be a part of something that has really turned into a campus signature event.”” Registration is $5 for students and $10 for anyone else. “”Day-of”” registration is available and will be $10 for students and $15 for others. “”Every year the event gets bigger and better, and this year is going to be no exception,”” Daly said. For more information about the Chancellor’s Challenge or to sign up and see how you rate aginst the chancellorand others, go to the Web site or contact Brian Daly at (858) 822-8236 or Kyra Randle, who is charge of entrants and volunteers, at (858) 822-1537. ...

Web Site Offers Services for Students

Think back to Welcome Week of your freshman year. What was the one thing you were most excited about? Was it the new environment, lack of parental authority or the proximity to Tijuana? If you were like most freshmen, it was probably none of the above. The most exciting thing about college life for many students is the incredibly fast T1 Internet connection to which each student in the dormitories and apartments has access. However, many students soon become disappointed at the severe limitations that are thrown at them from their e-mail servers and digital music lockers. There are problems ranging from a lack of file sharing between Yahoo! Mail and Myplay to there being only six megabytes of storage capacity on Yahoo! Mail. Students need not worry about these problems any longer, as a new Internet-based company is revolutionizing the electronic industry. In 1999, Edward C. Yu, along with his brother, Irving Yu, created e24/7 Inc., operating out of their Santa Monica home. The Internet company, which can be found on the Internet at http://www.e247.com, provides all-in-one e-mail, audio/video streaming and storage, free of charge. This is welcome news to poor college students looking for a quality e-mail provider and storage system for their precious digital music. HISTORY Edward, who is the chief executive officer of e24/7 Inc., previously worked as an international financier and ventures investment fund professional, a job that required him to travel frequently. In order to lighten his load on cross-country trips from New York to Los Angeles, as well as trips throughout Asia, Edward was inspired to find a way to stay connected to his office without having to carry his laptop and suitcases full of office files, presentations and CDs. After searching for a centralized service that would allow him access to his communications, data and entertainment, Edward was prompted to create one of his own. The result was the genesis of e24/7 Inc. Edward became the CEO of the company, while his brother, Irving, became the company’s chief strategy officer. TARGET AUDIENCE The primary target audience for e24/7 is college students and online entertainment enthusiasts. Its secondary market is small businesses and home offices. Online companies are getting an increasingly larger audience. Recent estimates from the eStats Report of Oct. 1999 state that more than 92 million people use e-mail. The report speculates that the number of people using e-mail will grow to 135 million people by 2002. The company is targeting this audience because, according to a Greenfield Online survey from this year, 15 million college students are e-mail enthusiasts. Of those 15 million, the survey reports that 27 percent of them cannot send or receive large files because it exceeds their online mailbox limits. Of those who were able to receive the files, over 25 percent reported not having enough virtual storage space with which to save the files. In the same survey, 75 percent of college students reported that a service similar to e24/7 would be extremely valuable. SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEMS The technology used by e24/7 is an open-source platform that was developed using the Java language. It utilizes Java servlets on the backend and Java server pages on the front. The site architecture is powered by LinuxOS on a server farm. The site also uses foundry gigabit switches, routers and multiple Network Appliance F760 Filers on the site, all maximizing the storage and speed it offers. SERVICES One of the main features on the e24/7 Web site is its e-mail service. The e-mail centric service allows users to access the system from any Internet-capable PC or Mac, ideal for working from home or on a business trip. The service allows users to transfer files of up to 25 megabytes and also offers features such as consolidation of up to 10 different accounts, advanced bulk filtering and an e-mail attachment manager that saves and organizes incoming files automatically to the user’s audio, video or document storage folders. The e-mail centric service attachment manager is a patent-pending application available only through e24/7. Another service offered by e24/7 is its virtual storage, which can be fused with other applications such as e-mail or content streaming. The company also offers up to 100 megabytes of free storage, which allows for fast files transfers via the e-mail centric service. Unlike other online companies offering virtual storage, e24/7 does not require the download of any special software or the need to accept any Java applets. The services provided by e24/7 also includes streaming capabilities. The company has optimized its infrastructure so that it will not be a limiting factor at any connection speed. The content can be easily retrieved and stored with the e24/7 service. With this service, users can send and receive high-bandwidth files such as MP3s and digital video without having to download the file to their computers. The transfer will also not degrade the user’s connection speed, regardless of his connection method (broadband or dial-up). The video and music manager is another service offered by the company. It allows users to store music and video files, create personalized audio playlists and stream audio and video files directly from their e24/7 accounts. COMPARISON When compared, e24/7 holds several advantages over some of its major online competitors, including Yahoo! Mail, Myplay and X-drive. While e24/7 and Yahoo! Mail both offer Web-based e-mail, neither Myplay nor X-drive do so. The maximum e-mail attachment for e24/7 is 25 megabytes, while Yahoo! Mail only offers two megabytes. X-drive is the only other company that offers file sharing to its users and virtual storage for all content. Out of the four companies, e24/7 is the only one that offers streaming video and an e-mail attachment manager. While X-drive offers 50 megabytes of storage capacity, compared to six megabytes on Yahoo! Mail and none on Myplay, e24/7 offers 100 megabytes of storage. Finally, e24/7 offers 100 megabytes of music file storage, compared to 50 megabytes on X-drive, three megabytes on Myplay and none on Yahoo! Mail. ...

Highlights at Football's Midway Point

Sunday marks the midway point for the NFL. Well, at least kind of, as with the bye week there is no real midway point. This is as close as it gets, so it is time to weigh in the surprises and disappointments of the season. The Rams look like Coroebus, sprinting past all contenders while scoring more prolifically than any team in history; but will they fall dead at the finish like Pheidippides, the originator of the marathon, yelling with their last breath? No. The Rams will continue their march to a second straight Super Bowl, and although they will not do it undefeated — no team with a defense like that could — their offense will carry them through. Then there is Narcicuss, wait, I mean Terrell Owens, dancing on the Cowboys star. People bemoaned the loss of respect in the game when someone would do that, desecrate the most holy of holies, the home team’s logo. Hey, if it was anyone else I would agree that Davis was out of line; but Jerry Jones’ Cowboys, the leftover remnants of that coifed wannabe dandy, Jimmy Johnson? Do it again and again Davis and let the whole world revel in that team’s ineptitude. Ricky Williams, “”arise from the dead my son and be worth the Saints draft of 1999,”” said the Saints pundits. Four straight 100-yard rushing games and a 30-yard touchdown pass later, Williams is proving he is no Ryan Leaf. Leaf, by the way, just decided he was not going to play this week nor next week, either. The thing is, the guy did not tell his coach first, but instead went first to the media. It’s like every spoiled brat with a silver spoon stuck up his butt got rolled up into Leaf and sent to Chargers for the express purpose of making the people of San Diego suffer. Leaf is Midas but instead of gold, everything he touches turns to horse manure. Dump him, pronto. Every great defense has a name, the Steel Curtain for instance, so instead of calling Warren Sapp and the rest of the Bucs’ defense by their given names we should just rename them Sapp’s Sackers, or wait, here is a better one, They Who Get no Support From Their Offense. They give it their all and are the best defensive unit that has been around in a long time. However, when you are on the field for 36 minutes, like they were against the Lions, you cannot keep points off the board. The Bucs’ offense needs to give these guys some support. What about the new reigning fat man of the NFL, Sebastion Janikowski. That guy’s paunch is bigger than Fatty Arbuckles at his worst, and taking him in the first round is starting to look like a mistake for the Raiders as he only made six of his first 11 field goals. However, he has picked it up, making his final two kicks last week, both 40-yarders, including the game winner. The Raiders neighbors across the bay, the once dynastic 49ers, are now looking oh-so-bombastic, but take hope Niners fans because as some of us like to say, every loss is a ‘Vick’tory. Now, if only the Chargers and Bengals would start winning. Here is a question: Why don’t the Bills start Doug Flutie? The guy is a winner, he won at Boston College, he won in the Canadian Football League, and he won with the Bills. He took them to the playoffs last year where Rob Johnson started and lost the game, albeit, on a trick play, but he still lost. When Johnson got hurt last week, Flutie brought the Bills back to win. Flutie is the Rudy of the NFL, but he is better than Rudy because the guy deserves to start — he’s earned it. And finally, my super bowl prediction: The Rams will defeat the Dolphins in a laugher, 40-2. You gotta give the Dolphins’ defense something. ...

Respect Their Authori-tah!

For 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year, they patrol the UCSD campus to keep students safe. They are the UCSD police officers. In their navy blue uniforms, metal badges and patches that read “”University of California Police Department,”” these officers can be seen all over campus. Eddie Tsang/ Guardian One of them is Jeff Cox, who has worked at the UCSD campus for 11 years. He is also a UCSD Revelle College alumnus who graduated with a political science degree. UCSD has one police department office, located behind the Price Center near the cluster of ATMs. This police department takes care of all crime on campus and within a one-mile radius around the campus. Despite any misconceptions, the police officers in this office are not just hired employees of UCSD. “”This is an actual police station,”” Cox said. “”We have all the same authority as the city police have. All the police officers here have been through the training at the police academy and are fully sworn police officers. Anything you can think of that a city police officer would do is what we would do. With any problems or domestic violence problems that occur on campus, we would be the ones they would come to, and we deal with it from there.”” The UCSD police office is a typical one with the difference being that it provides service mainly for UCSD students. “”There are 28 sworn officers, including patrol sergeant, detective sergeants, training officer, motorcycle officer, chief and assistant chief,”” Cox said. “”There are also RSOs, part-time dispatchers, full-time dispatchers, and some student clerical staff working there.”” Dispatchers are the people who answer the phone calls, either when students call 911 or (858) 534-HELP. They are always in radio contact with the police officers around the campus so that in the event of an emergency, police officers can get to the crime scene quickly. The UCSD police department also offers other services. “”We provide a full range of police services, from investigating traffic collisions, writing traffic tickets, writing traffic citations all the way on to crime against people and crimes against property,”” Cox said. When a student calls 911 on campus, the call immediately connects to the dispatchers inside this police office. Computer screens display the exact location from which the phone call is made, and the police officers are dispatched to respond to these phone calls. The dispatchers also reply to the phone calls from the yellow call boxes that are all over campus. These yellow boxes are intended for use when there is an emergency, a crime in progress, or if a student needs to call for an escort home. The Campus Security Officer escort program is also affiliated with the police department. This program is designed so that students will not have to risk walking home alone at night. Students can just call (858) 534-WALK or approach a CSO who is not with another student in order to get a CSO escort. They are usually in uniforms that distinguish them. This service is available during night hours. Cox strongly advised against females walking alone at night. “”Walk in groups, walk in well-lit areas, and use the escort service because that is what it’s there for,”” Cox said. “”Don’t walk alone at night. It is not a good thing.”” The UCSD police officers also patrol around the campus, both on foot and in cars. “”We do routine patrols through the buildings and vehicle patrols through the roadways,”” Cox said. “”There are also Residential Security Officers, which are not sworn in as policemen, who patrol the dormitories during nighttime hours only. One can distinguish these officers because they wear a patch that says RSO. They also do not have the guns and batons that other officers will have.”” The most common reason students go into the police office is to report crimes. According to Cox, the police station typically receives up to 70 -100 calls per day, and an additional 70-100 students go in the office. Most students report missing backpacks, keys or other valuables. The more extreme cases are when vehicles are stolen. In addition, students also return lost items to this office. Fingerprinting service are also offered. “”This is a safe campus, but crime does happen,”” Cox said. “”We get a lot of crime against property. A lot of times people leave their backpack unattended for a few minutes, but that is all it takes for it to be stolen. We get one or two rapes reported in a year, but obviously more go unreported. If a suspect is known, it would be just like if it happened in the city. Arrests will be, and have been made. The victim will be taken down to the hospital.”” Cox also recommended some safety precautions. “”Don’t walk alone at night,”” he said. “”If you see something suspicious, don’t hesitate to call us. Even if it turns out to be nothing, we would rather go out there and have it to be nothing. Any suspicious people you see on campus, give us a call. Make sure you always lock your doors at night, on or off campus. That’s a big thing where people go into dorms and steal things. It is a safe environment, but crime does happen. Everyone should take precautions.”” In addition, Cox said there is always a chance that many criminals see the campus as a good opportunity to commit a crime because there are a lot of cars concentrated in small areas. Students should always lock their cars, and if possible, use devices such as the Club and an alarm system in their cars and never leave valuables in the car. The police station is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to ensure student safety. In the event of an emergency, students can use the yellow call boxes to ask the dispatchers for help, or call 911. For issues that are not emergencies, call (858) 534-HELP. ...

Women's Volleyball Wins a Long One

The UCSD women’s volleyball team headed up the coast in pursuit of a crucial Collegiate Conference Athletic Association victory and were successful in their endeavor, pulling out a victory in one of it’s most hotly contested matches to date. Tyler Huff/ Guardian Sonoma State University proved a worthy challenger, which is something that most teams are unable to claim as of late. Sonoma State took the Tritons to a full, five-game match at Rohnert Park before finally succumbing to defeat. Both came out strong in the initial set, and it took extra points for Sonoma to take the game 17-15. David Pilz/ Guardian This early struggle did little to discourage the Tritons, however, as they blasted back in the second set for a 15-9 win. Fatigue set in for both sides come the third game. Playing three games against a tough opponent takes a lot out of a team, but UCSD had the little bit of extra strength necessary to take the fourth game 15-13. Sonoma State, though, was not about to just roll over and die after all the hard work, and it came out fired up for the fourth, beating the Tritons 15-12 to force the fifth and deciding game. Both teams dug deep in this final set, and came out with an infused intensity. It just was not in the cards for the Sonoma Stat squad, however, as the Tritons took the game and the match with a narrow 15-13 victory in the final game. UCSD was led by standout performances from some of the athletes that have been outstanding all season. Laura Santerre was brilliant on the court. Agan she really rose to the occasion under the added pressure. Her 27 kills led the Triton side in the match, and her 23 digs were second only to teammate Leslie Punelli, who compiled an outstanding tally of 37 for the night. Jennie Wilson also had an impressive evening, chalking up 20 kills and 14 digs for the blue and gold in helping her team pull out the big victory. Sonoma’s losing squad was led by Christine Shiba, who had 21 kills for the home team in the losing effort. The Tritons also had a big match at San Francisco State on Saturday. Unfortunately, results were not available to the Guardian at the time of publishing. Next weekend will be another huge opportunity for the Tritons side to pick up key CCAA victories. They play both Cal State Bakersfield and Cal State Stanislaus in some tough divisional play. ...

Cross Country Holds Own

The UCSD cross country team held its own at the biggest meet of the year this weekend. Lyon Liew/ Guardian The Tritons compared their mettle to other teams of equal caliber at the California Collegiate Athletic Association Championships in Turlock, Calif. this weekend. The men finished in third place out of seven schools while the women took fourth out of 11 schools. The top men’s team was UC Davis, which was unstoppable with only 21 points. Second place was another team from the North, California State University Chico, which tallied 48 points. “”They definitely dominated,”” Ted Van Arsdale said. “”They have a high standard and good traditions in both genders. There were some tough runners on Saturday, it’s just that they were tougher. Davis is the class of the Western Region.”” The Tritons were well behind the top two schools, clinching their third place title with 95 points. Cal State Stanislaus was fourth with 123 points. UCSD’s men were led by a number of underclassmen on the 8,000-meter course. The top Triton finisher was freshman Julian Nahan. Nahan finished 17th in a time of 26:06. Right behind Nahan was sophomore teammate David Dunbar in 18th in a time of 26:07. The third UCSD finisher was junior Jonathan Wong in 24th with the time 26:26. The fourth Triton was sophomore Ana Shapiro in 27th with a 26:33. On Shapiro’s heels was freshman Nik Bringlason, who ran a 26:35 for the 28th spot. The overall top men’s runner was Davis’ Jeff Kaiser, who ran the course in 24:53. Davis and Chico dominated the top spots, taking the first eight positions and 13 of the top 14. On the women’s side it was a similar story. UC Davis dominated, taking the top spot with a untouchable 23 points. Second place was Chico with 61 points and third saw Cal State Los Angeles with 124. UCSD was not far behind, placing fourth with 131 points. Sonoma State was in close pursuit, gathering 138 points for fifth place. “”Some of our women did a terrific job,”” Van Arsdale said. The Tritons’ Mary Peate, who has been performing well all season, finished seventh despite that she was suffering from a cold. The top Triton women finishers for the 6,000-meter competition were also dominated by youth. Sophomore Audrey Sung came in 16th in a time of 23:13. The second Triton finisher was sophomore Caren Jordan in 18th at 23:14. The third finisher from UCSD was freshman Emily Vala-Haynes. Senior Amy Kitchen was the fourth Triton finisher in 35th overall with a 23:56. Fifth place for UCSD went to the Tritons’ junior Amy Wu, who finished 27th overall in 24:03. Next up for UCSD is the NCAA Division II Western Regional Championships at Chino on Nov. 3. ...