Mexican Artist Featured at University Art Gallery

    Meyenberg and the other two artists whose works are being presented at the UAG all draw inspiration from science, producing unique works of art based on their own aesthetic as well as the collection and organization of scientific data.

    “The theme here is the intersection between science and art,” UAG Exhibitions Manager Merete Kjaer said. “We have artists looking towards science and methodical ways of analyzing data, and thereby creating an aesthetic.”

    The collection, which was brought together specifically for UCSD by independent curator Lucía Sanromán, features two bodies of work by conceptual artist Charles Gaines in the 1980s, both of which break down images of trees into grids of numbers and colors.

    “He reduces this actual image of a tree into a display of data, a grid of colors, and associates different numbers and shades on the grid with different colors in the image,” Kjaer said. “That’s where the aesthetic component comes in.”

    Perhaps the most perplexing installations in the gallery are the works of Erick Beltrán and Jorge Satorre. The two young Mexican artists compiled comic-book narratives involving famous contemporary and historical philosophers and cognitive scientists, including UCSD’s own Vilayanur S. Ramachandran, a professor and pioneer in the field of neuroscience.

    According to Kjaer, Beltrán and Satorre actually interviewed Ramachandran prior to composing their “Modeling Standard,” which is featured in the UAG. This interview, as well as Ramachandran’s revolutionary mirror box device, are incorporated into the storyline of the comics.

    They created artificial connections between historical events and figures to create a narrative that brings together Ramachandran and fictional characters like the villain Fantomás, Kjaer said.

    Altogether, the ANOMALIA exhibit is an experiment in reinterpreting facts, perceptions and data. The result is an exhibit that toes the line between art and science, and that challenges the audience to see data in a different way.

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