SF Heartbreakers Return With Soul on Sophomore Effort

    “Honey Bunny,” the upbeat surf-rock opening track, is most reminiscent of Girls’ previous releases. The sunny guitar and rumbling drums, highlighted with backing gospel harmonies, works as a great transition before Father, Son, Holy Ghost begins to explore its country, gospel and soul undertones more deeply.

    “Die” borrows elements of ’80s metal, using a distorted guitar intro to lead straight into an aggressive head-bobbing riff reminiscent of Black Sabbath — a completely new stylistic venture for the band. Meanwhile, Christopher Owens’ fragile and pained lyrics assure that “no, nothing’s gonna be okay” and “we’re all gonna die.”

    The sentiment marks a transition from Owens’ yearning for love to his acceptance of failed dreams.

    But Father also has its share of Girls’ expected tenderheartedness. On the dreamy gospel “My Ma,” shimmering electric guitars float in a chorus of angelic backing vocals. Easily the most powerful track on the album, “My Ma” reveals Owens’ strive for happiness and love, as his honest, half-whispering voice weaves through the four-minute track. 

    Following suit with the nostalgic styles and forlorn themes, “Forgiveness” presents the peak of Father’s passion. The track’s country-ballad style, full of spacious guitar and slow, acoustic strums, details Owens’ most straightforward thoughts of forgiveness from his own family.

    The eight-minute epic strives to bring positive out of life’s struggles while conceding that bad news is something tough to ignore and forget.

    A more frustrated, technically mature story of love and heartbreak, Father, Son, Holy Ghost’s hook-filled gems create a flawless soundtrack to the first crushes and lost loves of a summer long forgotten.

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