Album Reviews

    Ten years after their explosion into the mainstream, Green Day have released a controversial rock opera — the daring American Idiot.

    Reminiscent of the Who’s Tommy, this is a concept album in which the band narrates a story through a roller coaster of fast punk, enigmatic melodies, slow tempos and seemingly innate acoustic ballads.

    For better or for worse, Green Day is no longer a punk band. The trio takes a turn for experimentation and creativity on this latest release. Though the album includes such nostalgic sounding tracks as “St. Jimmy,” the album as a whole is too melodic and even serene at times to be labeled a punk record. Overall though, it works.

    Despite seeming to be a bit lengthy and drawn out, the record possesses a very strong backbone. It is filled with such notable songs as the politically charged track, “Boulevard of Broken Dreams,” “Holiday” and the nine-minute symphony “Jesus of Suburbia,” which contains Beach Boys-influenced chorus sections, piano solos and Billie Joe Armstrong’s still-youthful voice expressing his ever-bleak views on the world.

    Green Day throw a plethora of ideas on the wall with American Idiot, but most stick quite pleasingly. If you pick up the album in hopes of hearing the predictable Green Day of a decade ago, you will be shockingly disappointed. Nevertheless, the band has grown up and is taking strides that require more than a banging head to appreciate.

    More to Discover
    Donate to The UCSD Guardian
    $200
    $500
    Contributed
    Our Goal

    Your donation will support the student journalists at University of California, San Diego. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment, keep printing our papers, and cover our annual website hosting costs.

    Donate to The UCSD Guardian
    $200
    $500
    Contributed
    Our Goal