Letters to the Editor

    Ethnic affiliation source of pride

    Editor:

    The opinion piece from the Feb. 2 issue of the Guardian titled “”‘Diversity’ has an unusual connotation in college”” seemed to be an attack on students participating in cultural clubs and ethnic minority organizations. The article said such students “”stay with their ethnic group, show a lot of pride, and refuse to interact with other ethnic groups.””

    This statement is a sweeping generalization that is by no means a reflection of all student cultural organizations on campus, in fact probably none at all. First of all, most students in cultural clubs do have friends outside of their ethnic group with whom they interact.

    To say they only converse with people inside their group is ignorant and presumptuous. Some students may prefer to spend a greater amount of their time with friends involved in the same organization, just like athletes on a sports team find themselves hanging out with their sports friends.

    I think the writer should recognize that some people enjoy their ethnic club affiliation because it provides a safe outlet for them to interact with others who speak the same language, or eat the same food back at home, or just identify with a common cultural background.

    The writer himself expresses bitterness that there is no “”white”” club on campus. If he so wishes there was a group that he could identify with, isn’t it contradictory to assail people who do have that certain group?

    It seems that “”diversity”” in the context of a college campus should imply exposure to and acceptance of all different kinds of people. It also implies respect. And if UCSD wants to work toward an environment that facilitates respect, it needs to start with each individual respecting other peoples’ needs to perhaps spend some time with those they identify with, and eventually become more comfortable with themselves to open up to new people around them.

    -Alicia Sabuncuoglu

    Eleanor Roosevelt College

    freshman

    Principles of Community ignored

    Editor:

    I am writing because I am concerned with the stance many of the Guardian writers have taken on the issue of The Koala being shredded on Library Walk. One thing I have not seen mentioned in any of the articles, however, are the UCSD Principles of Community, which state that as UCSD students “”We value the cultural diversity of UCSD because it enriches our lives and the university… We seek to foster understanding and tolerance among individuals and groups, and, we promote awareness through education and constructive strategies for resolving conflict. We reject acts of discrimination based on race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, religion and political beliefs, and we will confront and appropriately respond to such acts. We affirm the right to freedom of expression at UCSD… within the bounds of courtesy, sensitivity, confidentiality and respect …””

    I can’t seem to find where the Koala fits in there, anywhere. As for the shredders, one could argue that encouraging the destruction of the Koala is not “”appropriately respond(ing) to such acts,”” but one must also ask, “”What kind of university do we attend where not only do our student fees fund the Koala but we also condemn those who actively seek to change the status quo by destroying it?”” The shredders are not the enemy on this campus ó hate and discrimination are not the result of those Thurgood Marshall students.

    Furthermore, Guardian writer Ed Wu in “”Koala critics cross with shredding antics on Library Walk”” (Jan. 29, 2004) proclaims that “”If something does offend our sensibilities enough, we should write and speak out in protest, not destroy the publication in question.”” Students have written and spoken out against the Koala in the past and nothing has changed. American citizens actively destroy their own flag in protest when they disagree with its policies- why should a crummy old hate-filled newspaper be any different?

    -Geoffrey Peppler

    Thurgood Marshall College

    sophomore

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