Guardian A.S. election endorsements

    Jeremy Paul Gallagher

    Jeremy Paul Gallagher

    Out of the five presidential candidates, one has emerged as a leader who accomplishes projects, designs attainable goals and has the passion and understanding to direct the A.S. Council toward progress while undergraduates’ rights and priveleges contintue to be a low priority for UCSD administrators.

    Jeremy Paul Gallagher, the Unity slate’s presidential candidate, has demonstrated the know-how and dedication required of any individual attempting to make change on a campus as highly politicized and bureaucratized as UCSD.

    The 2002-03 A.S. Council, sometimes criticized for putting too much focus on external issues and not enough on campus matters, featured a successful stint by Gallagher as commissioner of services and enterprises. In Winter 2003, his colleagues named him “”Councilmember of the Quarter”” for exhibiting a passion for progress this year and for completing goals he realistically set at the beginning of his term.

    As commissioner of services and enterprises, Gallagher oversaw the Grove Caffe, an A.S. enterprise that generated more profit in one quarter under Gallagher than it had in the previous two years combined. Gallagher also estimates that by merging the A.S. Internship Office with internship services at the Career Center, the council will save $6,000 per year.

    He has also worked to successfully split his office into Enterprise Operations and Student Services, a move that will allow the enterprise officers to focus on generating revenue for the A.S. Council. He is currently working on merging the Lecture Notes and Soft Reserves enterprises to improve the efficiency and solvency of each. Gallagher has also looked to generate further revenue by building a ropes course, a joint venture with UCSD recreation that will undergo construction after it passes through one last committee.

    Gallagher looks to accomplish short-term goals while in office, such as the improvement of campus atmosphere and diversity. He believes that encouraging students to get involved keeps them at UCSD, which is why he plans to improve funding for Triton Tide, concerts and events as president. Gallagher argues that transfer issues are not addressed sufficiently at UCSD, and that helping these students connect with a new campus is more difficult than enfranchising freshmen, but receives significantly less attention. He is fighting to establish transfer housing at UCSD as the student representative to the North Campus Housing committee.

    Diversity, he said, is another issue he hopes he has the opportunity to address. He has worked with and will continue to aid the Student Initiated Outreach and Recruitment Commission. He looks to allocate A.S funds to SIORC amidst state budget cuts.

    While chairing the Co-op Oversight commitee during the last school year, Gallagher fought on students’ behalf when he came to the aid of the Che Cafe when the UCSD administration cracked down on the content of the burn.ucsd.edu Web site.

    Gallagher is largely realistic about most long-term goals, and has proven that he is able and willing to work toward them whether he sees the end result come to fruition or not. He has proven that he can handle the pressure of large projects and will work toward common goals with others. Gallagher’s ideas have already yielded savings for the A.S Council, a crucial element in the wake of funding shortfalls that have recently plagued university services. The Guardian endorses Jeremy Gallagher for A.S. president because he has been productive in the empowerment of and progress for UCSD undergraduates.

    OTHER CANDIDATES

    BRYAN BARTON

    Independent presidential candidate Bryan Barton has one issue as his priority and his passion: parking. He has many ideas about how to increase “”S”” spots at UCSD, such as creating unpaved parking spots on campus; seeking corporate sponsorships of parking spaces; and decreasing the numbers of “”A”” and “”B”” spaces on campus.

    Barton has no experience in A.S. Council, but as he is aware of council issues, this is not a pressing concern. More troubling are the gaps in his knowledge about parking — Barton was not aware that the UCSD Master Plan existed, or what its implications for parking were.

    While Barton’s carefree attitude and lack of pretension could inject energy into A.S. politics, the Guardian believes he is unqualified for the position of A.S. president.

    KEVIN HSU

    Independent candidate Kevin Hsu did not schedule an interview with the Guardian. However, it is apparent from his candidate statement and the behavior of the Committee to Elect Kevin Hsu that his candidacy is not to be taken seriously. The levity Hsu injected in the campaign was appreciated, but he is hardly qualified to be A.S. president.

    KEVIN SHAWN HSU

    Currently serving as A.S. vice president internal, Kevin Shawn Hsu has the most hands-on council experience of any presidential candidate. His goals for his potential term as A.S. president are realistic. Hsu would adequately represent UCSD students were he elected to our student government’s highest position.

    However, Hsu lacks concrete plans to execute his ideas. Also, he is less articulate than Gallagher. Finally, his support for A.S. resolutions and activities pertaining to national issues as opposed to campus ones make him a less attractive candidate than Gallagher.

    BRIAN UIGA

    The New Students First of the Unity Action Parking Wave Slate Slate’s presidential candidate, Brian Uiga, has identified an excellent priority for any member of student government: decreasing student apathy. Uiga is passionate about this issue and has many intriguing and promising ideas for “”inciting”” the student body. Uiga also wants to focus attention on campus issues instead of sending council members on A.S.-funded trips to lobby or attend conferences.

    Uiga’s main disqualification, however, is his campaign, which began as a joke, and recently culminated in a boorish performance at the presidential debates. Despite this, the Guardian encourages Uiga to involve himself in A.S. Council next year.

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