Remembering September 11

    “”Remember those who lost their lives, those who have been left behind, the injured, the survivors, the caregivers and the rescue workers. Do your part to sustain the healing of your family, friends, neighbors, community and nation.””

    Lyon Liew
    Guardian

    — Chancellor Robert Dynes

    “”Campus responds to acts of terrorism,”” Sept. 18, 2001

    Pat Leung
    Guardian

    “”[Sept. 11] was the first time I have ever felt a physical threat on my life. By the time we got outside, the streets were overflowing with people and everyone was panicking.””

    — Muir senior Amanda LaRoche

    “”University community hit hard Tuesday,”” Sept. 18 2001

    “”My great concern is that there’s sort of a hysteria … and my concern is that some of this hysteria will be targeted against specific groups of students. I think we need to be very careful … we can’t assume anything about anyone. We need to be able to connect with people as individuals.””

    — Rabbi Lisa Goldstein from the Union of Jewish Students

    “”Campus responds to acts of terrorism,”” Sept. 18, 2001

    “”Confusion and dismay gave way to pain, anger and the cold certainty that it was a deliberate terrorist attack. Then, cold fury as one mantra-like phrase stuck in my head: Those bastards!””

    — Parisa Baharian

    “”Eye on D.C.,”” Sept. 18, 2001

    “”I don’t know if it is because of the new patriotism, but I’ve got to tell you, it was not only refreshing and surprising, but it was really appreciated. People just said, ‘Here, let me help you.'””

    — Bob Worth, parent

    “”Students lend helping hands,”” Sept. 18, 2001

    “”It was strange, but that day you evaluated everything as a potential target.””

    — UCSD alumnus Terri Duggan Schwartzbeck

    “”University community hit hard Tuesday,”” Sept. 18, 2001

    “”We all have something in common now. No matter what part of the United States you live in, you were affected by these events, and because we all have this shared experience, there is a sense of unity among all Americans following the tragedy that took place.””

    — Muir senior David Butler

    “”University community hit hard Tuesday,”” Sept. 18, 2001

    “”I believe that football should not have canceled its games and that baseball should have waited until a day or two after our national day of mourning and rememberance to begin again … Sports comfort people. Sports offer people an escape from reality, a shining example of honesty and fairness in a world and culture that rarely upholds those values. Rules are made and followed, and those who break them are punished. It’s so simple, yet so captivating for millions of people who know that on any given day, their team has an excellent chance of winning, and whether it wins or loses, it will have been a fair contest.””

    — Isaac Pearlman

    “”Stoner Steps,”” Sept. 18, 2001

    “”I noticed the posters that some nice people had made and placed on every freeway overpass for a good 50 miles. My favorite slogan on these posters was, ‘A nation in pain is a nation united.’ Just what are the authors implying? Perhaps we should have a national tragedy every week. If we could line up the Oklahoma City bombing, Columbine, Pearl Harbor and the World Trade Center bombing all in the same week, we’d be super-united. We’d be the Super-United States of America.””

    — Bertrand Fan

    “”Stop that!”” Sept. 24, 2001

    “”They were let in through a back door, so to speak, and rode through the streets in the back of an Army van. Apparently, thousands of people stood on the street side waiting to help as well. Thousands. A lot of them had to wait all day, and after waiting all day, many were turned away because there was too much help. But they were all still cheering on the volunteers and shouting out love for America, waving flags, singing, etcetera.””

    — Skidmore College student Libby Gowen

    “”Though distant, attacks rekindle desire to help,”” Sept. 24, 2001

    “”Q: What where you doing when you heard about the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks? A: I was at home eating breakfast. My mom came in … and said to my dad that terrible things were happening in the world.””

    — Muir freshman Jeanine Wood

    “”10 questions,”” Sept. 24, 2001

    “”On a recent outing with a few of my Iranian friends, during which we were discussing the collapse of the World Trade Center, an older man leaned over to say, ‘You guys should have been the ones to die in there.'””

    — Divya Runchal

    “”Bigots engender a misguided hatred,”” Sept. 24, 2001

    “”Hate crimes, hate language, violence, blame and/or defamation directed against persons or groups associated, through grievously false logic and presumption, to the acts of terror is a violation of the tenets of equality, liberty and justice upon which our nation stands, as well as the Principles of Community of UCSD.””

    — A.S. resolution condemning acts of terror upon the United States, requesting the prevalence of justice and the rule of law and denouncing hate

    “”A.S. passes anti-hate resolution,”” Sept. 27, 2001

    “”This tragedy did not discriminate by race, religion or sex when it struck, so we will not discriminate ourselves from one another as we stand here, people of this nation and of UCSD.””

    — Muslim Student Association member Nadia Aziz

    “”Students attend A.S. vigil,”” Oct. 1, 2001

    “”The citizens of many nations are grieving with the same intensity as Americans, as if international borders matter little when people are faced with such devastating and pointless loss of life.””

    — Claire J. Vannette

    “”Finding solidarity in disaster,”” Oct. 1, 2001

    “”Violence, no matter how brutal and twisted, has a reason.””

    — Academic Senate Chair Michael Bernstein

    “”UCSD supports peace and unity with another vigil,”” Oct. 4, 2001

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