Letters to the Editor

    Editor:

    I want to inveigh against those who automatically assume that it’s a bad thing to have student photos available on Studentlink. All the press for this measure has been negative, and some A.S. candidates are even including a revocation of the photos as part of their campaign pledges.

    At first, I felt the same way many students do about the photos, but I don’t believe they are such a bad thing after all. I’ve had a few professors and TAs who have quickly memorized the names of all their students in fair-sized classes because they used photo printouts of the class roster from Studentlink. Instead of creating a divisive atmosphere, the instructors’ familiarity with their students made it easier for us all to participate in class discussions and feel welcome, which, I think, is probably the high hopes that the administration had for this measure all along.

    If people are worried about vindictive instructors misusing the Studentlink photos, that is a reasonable concern. However, that points to a problem which is in and of itself very different from the issue of the professors knowing the names of students; the matter of biased and unfair instructors is a serious concern that should be handled separately.

    Students should stop worrying so much about having their identities compromised in class and should instead enjoy the good that can come from being known by their instructors (a benefit which, dare I say, we would enjoy if we were at a private university).

    — Lauren Etterson

    Communication Major

    Thurgood Marshall College junior

    Editor:

    My name is Denny Oh and I am a student at UCSD. I have known and been (and continue to be) a close friend of Peter Butcher for the past four years, and have even lived with him for a portion of this time. I am writing to address the article that the Guardian printed in its April 8 edition on Butcher’s arrest, as well as all of the other ridiculous accusations that have been made. The media has obviously not even investigated his arrest, as he was not even in Santa Barbara, Calif. when the last attack occurred. Accusing him of being some sort of psychotic pervert is not only absurd, it is entirely uncalled for, as it only serves the media to cause a stir and increase their ratings.

    Anyone who knows Butcher would say that he is incapable of such an act and that he did not do it. While the Guardian has done a better job at only reporting what the police are saying, I still feel that it is unfair and unethical to condemn an innocent person by labeling him as some sort of pervert with a fetish. While these news reports and articles do not and will not change the views of Butcher’s friends, little can be said about those who do not know him.

    In conclusion, all I have to say is that this event has placed a great deal of doubt in the minds of many as to how well our police force does its job. As for the media, I guess little more can be expected.

    — Denny Oh

    UCSD student

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