Author speaks about the virtues of kindness

    Author Tim Sanders signed copies of his new book, “”Love Is the Killer App: How to Win Business and Influence Friends,”” and shared his business strategies with attendees at the UCSD Bookstore on March 7.

    Chris Padfield
    Guardian

    Sanders said people who are “”lovecats”” do well in business.

    “”A lovecat is a businessperson who defines himself by sharing and being kind,”” he said.

    Sanders explained that contrary to the common conception of the shrewd, mean businessperson who gets ahead, it is the opposite kind of person who gets far in life.

    “”Nice, smart people succeed,”” Sanders said.

    Sanders highlighted the lovecats hierarchy in his book: compassion, networking and knowledge. He gave the example of a person sharing his rolodex with another person without expectation.

    Sanders also explained how his book has special importance in the Sept. 11 aftermath.

    “”When I went to New York, people talked about how irrelevant work really was,”” Sanders said. “”Everything was made up and the only real thing was that people were alive. People are now searching for meaning in their lives, not money.””

    Sanders encouraged students to read books to deal with change in life and at work. He explained that a person’s worth to an employer cannot be measured by age, but by his knowledge and other skills.

    Sanders said he wanted his book to be appealing to all audiences, including students.

    “”Young people need to get hope,”” he said. “”Everything I’ve heard about corporate America is not always true.””

    Sanders’ book did have an impact on some students in attendance.

    “”[The book] almost goes against the grain of being mean and self-interested to get ahead,”” said Eric Goldman, a senior at Earl Warren College and a bioengineering student. “”It makes you think about what you can do for others. Because of this book I’ve just bought eight more books.””

    Goldman said he liked the examples Sanders used in his book. Sanders praised Southwest Airlines for being a compassionate, family company that follows the kind of business philosophy he writes about in his book.

    “”Southwest hires nice people first, qualified people second. [After the airline layoffs of Sept. 11], they are taking venal people and requisitioning their jobs,”” Sanders said.

    He said that with competition in the job market, friendly people are less likely to be laid off because people don’t want to put up with people who are negative.

    “”The book helps to deal with people and build initiative,”” said Huong Lai, an economics major. “”I have read some of it and I thought it had good concepts on business-building.””

    Sanders is currently on his national “”Winter of Love”” book tour and is the Yahoo chief solutions officer. Before working for Yahoo, Sanders worked for the Discovery Channel and Southwestern Bell Mobile. He said he has always enjoyed working on the cutting edge of technology.

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