Campuswide Senators

    On a slate whose goals are constantly distracted by internal bickering, Katie Hall isn’t afraid to criticize this year’s self-interested council and stand up for the student body’s best interests. That’s why when councilmembers refused to run a referendum that could have gathered sorely needed funding for the Loft, Hall recognized its value to students ‘mdash; despite its ties to university administration ‘mdash; and dissented.’I think the students are smart enough to make their own decisions,’ she said.

    Hall’s pledge to focus on improving already-existing programs shows she recognizes the limitations of a 10-month term, but that doesn’t mean she lacks ambitious goals for next year. Besides hoping to keep the Loft afloat, Hall plans to bring programs she’s worked hard on as a Revelle College senator ‘mdash; like career-development seminars for humanities majors’ ‘mdash; to the greater campus. And just to make sure she’s giving you what you want, she’ll be pushing for more online forums where students can voice their opinions.

    Alex Vu

    After nearly two years of involvement in both the A.S. Council and Student Council at Eleanor Roosevelt College, Alex Vu has an acute understanding of the intricacies of college politics and an ability to gauge his constituents’ needs.

    In speaking with Vu, it becomes clear that he has not taken his service to the student body lightly. He demonstrates an ability to pinpoint issues of importance not only within the context of his own work but also within the larger scope of A.S. activity, suggesting well-informed strategies for how to better integrate college councils with the A.S. Council while offering concrete goals to improve campus spirit among students.

    Vu is new to the A.S. Finance Committee, but has already developed knowledge of the means necessary to efficiently allocate council funds. He promised to use his time as a senator to improve upon this allocation process, a promise that he appears likely to honor given his interest in the field.

    Adam Kenworthy

    Unlike the cliquish squabblers currently drawing A.S. meetings into the wee hours, Eleanor Roosevelt College councilmember Adam Kenworthy knows we’re all in this together. Along with bringing representatives from the Student Center co-ops into A.S. negotiations, he prioritizes patching things up with the student organizations alienated by past councils.

    ‘If you’re not on an org on good terms with A.S., you’re kind of left out of the loop,’ he said.

    Kenworthy also has a grasp on what it takes to reach out to students ‘mdash; aka, more than enlarging the A.S. logo on event flyers. He wants to hold more frequent town-hall forums for students unwilling to sit through tedious council meetings, open a voicemail hotline to be updated weekly with campus event info and establish a committee dedicated to gauging effective ways of gathering student input.

    Even more important: He’s pretty much into doing whatever Stephanie Usry wants to do.

    Bryant Pena

    A pimped-out campus calendar and free Doritos on finals week are all fine and dandy, but the council needs at least one (competent) member who remembers there’s a world of hurt beyond the eucalyptus grove. Unlike many unfocused Student Voice! candidates pushing the same-old minority/diversity/culture awareness package, Earl Warren College councilmember Bryant Pena has a cause ‘mdash; and a plan. He wants to unify campus philanthropy groups into ‘almost a UN panel’ that would meet monthly, streamlining their efforts by redirecting to increase overall efficiency.

    He also appreciates that your average 20-unit stress case will need more than a photocopied flyer to care. ‘Tupac taught Biggie this idea where you make a hit and it gets people to listen to the rest of your album,’ Pena said. Cue the hip-hop awareness events, indie film screenings and strategically placed anti-admin flyers; Pena’s got you on lock.

    Carli Thomas

    Carli Thomas dreams of an A.S. Council that does more than just show up for meetings. But her emphasis on accountability and her ability to set and accomplish goals puts her ahead of the pack. Thomas wants to institutionalize communication within the A.S. Council’s framework, so councilmembers know what they need to do, when and why.

    And her track record proves she can make it happen. In her current position as a Thurgood Marshall College senator, Thomas’ excellent attendance and meaningful contributions at A.S. Council meetings are more than gold stars ‘mdash; they demonstrate her commitment to both councils, facilitate communication and help keep both parties informed.

    Even her work on the upcoming ‘Know Your Rights’ campaign ‘mdash; something she hopes to offer throughout all three quarters next year ‘mdash; shows she’s listening to students and working to meet their needs.

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    RESPONSIBILITIES

    • Complete at least two projects each year, one of which must benefit the entire campus
    • Serve on at least two campuswide committees
    • Vote on the council floor

    The A.S. ballot will allow students to vote for their top eight choices for campuswide senator. However ‘mdash; after a run of disheartening interviews with candidates either unaware of their own platforms or unable to locate the Student Center altogether ‘mdash; we can only express confidence in the following five.

    One or more of the nine unendorsed candidates expressed that: cancer awareness was his biggest concern, yet he was unaware of the cancer cluster at the Literature Building; Chancellor Marye Anne Fox makes a million dollars a year; free speech is something you can ‘do;’ students would be down to listen to podcasts of eight-hour A.S. meetings while at the beach; UCSD spends $700 million each year on public transportation; it is the right of the A.S. Council to seize land from the university without reimbursement; trusting one’s gut and friends is the most reliable way to make decisions on council; Grove Caffe Manager Cleveland Thomas runs the entire Student Center; Student Affirmative Action Committee organizations are underrepresented on the council.

    Katie Hall

    On a slate whose goals are constantly distracted by internal bickering, Katie Hall isn’t afraid to criticize this year’s self-interested council and stand up for the student body’s best interests. That’s why when councilmembers refused to run a referendum that could have gathered sorely needed funding for the Loft, Hall recognized its value to
    students ‘mdash; despite its ties to university administration ‘mdash; and dissented.’I think the students are smart enough to make their own decisions,’ she said.

    Hall’s pledge to focus on improving already-existing programs shows she recognizes the limitations of a 10-month term, but that doesn’t mean she lacks ambitious goals for next year. Besides hoping to keep the Loft afloat, Hall plans to bring programs she’s worked hard on as a Revelle College senator ‘mdash; like career-development seminars for humanities majors’ ‘mdash; to the greater campus. And just to make sure she’s giving you what you want, she’ll be pushing for more online forums where students can voice their opinions.

    Alex Vu

    After nearly two years of involvement in both the A.S. Council and Student Council at Eleanor Roosevelt College, Alex Vu has an acute understanding of the intricacies of college politics and an ability to gauge his constituents’ needs.

    In speaking with Vu, it becomes clear that he has not taken his service to the student body lightly. He demonstrates an ability to pinpoint issues of importance not only within the context of his own work but also within the larger scope of A.S. activity, suggesting well-informed strategies for how to better integrate college councils with the A.S. Council while offering concrete goals to improve campus spirit among students.

    Vu is new to the A.S. Finance Committee, but has already developed knowledge of the means necessary to efficiently allocate council funds. He promised to use his time as a senator to improve upon this allocation process, a promise that he appears likely to honor given his interest in the field.

    Adam Kenworthy

    Unlike the cliquish squabblers currently drawing A.S. meetings into the wee hours, Eleanor Roosevelt College councilmember Adam Kenworthy knows we’re all in this together. Along with bringing representatives from the Student Center co-ops into A.S. negotiations, he prioritizes patching things up with the student organizations alienated by past councils.

    ‘If you’re not on an org on good terms with A.S., you’re kind of left out of the loop,’ he said.

    Kenworthy also has a grasp on what it takes to reach out to students ‘mdash; aka, more than enlarging the A.S. logo on event flyers. He wants to hold more frequent town-hall forums for students unwilling to sit through tedious council meetings, open a voicemail hotline to be updated weekly with campus event info and establish a committee dedicated to gauging effective ways of gathering student input.

    Even more important: He’s pretty much into doing whatever Stephanie Usry wants to do.

    Bryant Pena

    A pimped-out campus calendar and free Doritos on finals week are all fine and dandy, but the council needs at least one (competent) member who remembers there’s a world of hurt beyond the eucalyptus grove. Unlike many unfocused Student Voice! candidates pushing the same-old minority/diversity/culture awareness package, Earl Warren College councilmember Bryant Pena has a cause ‘mdash; and a plan. He wants to unify campus philanthropy groups into ‘almost a UN panel’ that would meet monthly, streamlining their efforts by redirecting to increase overall efficiency.

    He also appreciates that your average 20-unit stress case will need more than a photocopied flyer to care. ‘Tupac taught Biggie this idea where you make a hit and it gets people to listen to the rest of your album,’ Pena said. Cue the hip-hop awareness events, indie film screenings and strategically placed anti-admin flyers; Pena’s got you on lock.

    Carli Thomas

    Carli Thomas dreams of an A.S. Council that does more than just show up for meetings. But her emphasis on accountability and her ability to set and accomplish goals puts her ahead of the pack. Thomas wants to institutionalize communication within the A.S. Council’s framework, so councilmembers know what they need to do, when and why.

    And her track record proves she can make it happen. In her current position as a Thurgood Marshall College senator, Thomas’ excellent attendance and meaningful contributions at A.S. Council meetings are more than gold stars ‘mdash; they demonstrate her commitment to both councils, facilitate communication and help keep both parties informed.

    Even her work on the upcoming ‘Know Your Rights’ campaign ‘mdash; something she hopes to offer throughout all three quarters next year ‘mdash; shows she’s listening to students and working to meet their needs.

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