‘Eurotrip’ travels the same old path

    Yet another raunchy teenage comedy, “Eurotrip” makes it painfully obvious why Americans, particularly American teenagers, have a bad name everywhere. Incorporating every cliché in the book and using blatant excuses for nudity and partying, the film leaves little to the imagination. Movie trailers that boast, “from the producers of ‘Road Trip’ and ‘Old School,’” simply advertise the fact that it has all been done before.

    Courtesy of Dreamworks

    The leading roles of Scott Thomas (Scott Mechlowicz) and Cooper Harris (Jacob Pitts) were breakthroughs for both actors. And, as one might expect, the acting is subpar. However, what they lacked in dramatic expertise, they made up for in personality. Mechlowicz creates an endearing, not to mention attractive, leading man — or, perhaps more appropriately, boy. In Pitts, viewers will find the classic loyal side-kick, not nearly as good-looking, but who bears the comedic brunt of the show and who might remind audiences of a younger David Spade.

    Jenny (Michelle Trachtenberg), who some may remember from “Harriet the Spy” and “Inspector Gadget,” is the typical girl who’s one of the guys, despite the fact that she is rather attractive. Trachtenberg’s character manages to grate on one’s nerves, compounded by the fact that her acting abilities are pitiable.

    Viewers hoping to at least see some of Europe’s more famous and artsy landmarks will be disappointed. In countries where the drinking age is nonexistent and marijuana is legal, filmmakers sadly found the coffee houses of Amsterdam and nude beaches much more appealing than, say, the Louvre in France.

    However, setting aside the baudy clichés, the obvious European stereotypes and the unmistakably uncultured group of American teenagers, “Eurotrip” is not necessarily a bad way to spend an hour and a half of one’s life.

    Director Jeff Schaffer has created, for the most part, a likable group of characters and entertaining scenarios. Unexpected cameos from well-known actors in atypical roles will surprise and amuse all audiences. And one would be hard-pressed to find someone leaving the theater and not humming the catchy tune “Scotty Doesn’t Know.”

    Taking “Eurotrip” for what it’s worth (a rather unoriginal film about a group of recent high school graduates looking for a good time), one can sit back, relax and laugh themselves silly at the sexual and alcohol-influenced antics and adventures of four American teenagers lost in Europe.

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