Vote ""no"" on recall : Election turned circus no longer maintains original meaning of democratic proc

    The motivation for the recall, as it is conveyed to Californians and now the hordes of onlookers worldwide, is that Davis is at fault for a number of problems that have directly and effectively caused the $38 billion deficit in the 2003-04 general budget. Various reasons for the deficit include the tech bubble burst and sluggish economy, translating into much lower state revenues from taxes on capital gains, corporate income, individual income and retail sales; the deregulation of the California energy market, which led to price gouging by companies and state spending to save consumers; and increased spending on public programs.

    The governor has also been charged with not passing a state budget by the June 30 constitutional deadline.

    Davis¹ decisions regarding the above issues have not often won public applause, but these decisions have been made without legal malfeasance or intentional wrongdoing. The once-booming economy of the 1990s has rescinded across the nation in every state, not just California (the deficit per capita at the federal level is seven times the size of California¹s). Californians have every right to be angry about the economic landscape, but perhaps just as much (or even more) should be made of the nation¹s outlook and federal lawmakers¹ policy decisions. Unemployment rates, budget deficits and consumer confidence have all taken drastic hits across the United States at levels on par with California¹s struggles.

    Energy deregulation in the state was born by former Gov. Pete Wilson and Davis has conceded that he was slow to act on the horrific consequences. It takes two-thirds of each legislative house in Sacramento to pass the budget, so why isn¹t the leadership of the Senate and Assembly to blame as well for not passing the budget punctually?

    The recall process was a progressive move to guard against bribery, coercion, fraud and secret financing of campaigns in 1911 to clear the state capitol of railroad barons¹ grip on public policy through corruption. There has been much argument that Davis is guilty of all of the above as well, but comparatively, the current governor is no guiltier than any politician in Sacramento. There have been no allegations against Davis for actually operating illicitly while in action, and to support a recall where the official in question has not committed any prosecutable crime is an abuse of the recall amendment.

    Special interests have occupied the capitol in the fifth largest economy of the world because these interested parties know what kind of implications public policy has on the resources of California¹s diverse and abundant population, vast land-area, and potential for profit.

    Special interests will never disappear from politics in California or the United States for that matter, and have played a vital part in the financing and promotion of this recall in the first place.

    These special interests are largely involved with the Republican Party, who lost an election less than a year ago and are seizing the opportunity of our state¹s misfortune to push their own political agenda. This includes promoting a very marketable individual in Arnold Schwarzenegger, who can be molded by advisers later but has the selling power now. Schwarzenegger has been used for his popularity, Rep. Darrel Issa (R-CA) has been used for the financing of the recall, and now the Republican Party is using Californians¹ frustrations over a larger economic problem to push their prerogative ‹ seizing control of the state at whatever cost.

    And it has undoubtedly cost us enough. This election will run a tab upwards of $60 million, a figure dwarfed when compared to California¹s large budget, but will be unfairly shouldered onto the counties who have much smaller resources at their disposal and have already been hit hard by state funding gaps.

    The recall has allowed 135 Californians to voice their opinion in a stronger light than would usually be available, and the Guardian applauds their collective ability to bring certain issues to the public¹s attention without necessarily being career politicians. However, the Oct. 7 recall election is an effort by Republicans to undermine the gubernatorial election in November 2002. It is in the best interest of the state to defeat the recall and allow Davis to perform the job he was re-elected to do 11 months ago.

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