Film review: Sexy humor marks 'Amy's Orgasm'

    In “”Amy’s Orgasm,”” Amy Mandell (Julie Davis) has written a best-selling self-help book titled “”Love Doesn’t Work,”” stating that women do not need men or sex to feel complete. But when she falls for radio shock-jock Matthew Starr (Nick Chinlund), all her aphoristic advice flies out the window, and she begins living a lie. She neurotically confides in her controlling, lesbian publicist, Janet (Caroline Aaron), her happily married friends Don and Elizabeth (Mitchell Whitfield and Jennifer Bransford), and, despite the fact that Amy is Jewish, a Catholic priest (Jeff Cesario).

    “”Amy’s Orgasm”” sardonically addresses the dilemma of the postfeminist, heterosexual woman of the 21st century. The film ultimately throws all feminist assertions out the window because this icon of feminine strength and independence gives in to her repressed need for a man in her life. Even more than this, she does it for the epitome of the male pig, whose character bears an undeniable resemblance to Howard Stern. Yes, feminists might not enjoy the trajectory that their hopeful takes in this film. But they will also have a hard time not sympathizing with her, even growing to love her in her struggle, since she is attractive, intelligent, funny and — like any human being — in search of the ultimate orgasm, or the “”mental orgasm,”” as she calls it, which is none other than love.

    The format and subject matter of the film are very much like that of “”Sex and the City.”” Davis (star/writer/director/producer/editor) takes a candid look at a modern woman’s most intimate moments and thoughts — so candid, sometimes, that one might feel slightly embarrassed. After only three films (“”I Love You, Don’t Touch Me!”” and “”All Over the Guy””), Davis has received great acclaim, being deemed “”the female Woody Allen,”” and for good reason, too. Perhaps the only drawback would be that between Amy’s neurotic on-screen dialogue and off-screen narration, there is sometimes little time for moments to sink in. This is essential to the character’s rhythm, but can become tedious.

    Amy’s Orgasm

    ****

    Starring Julie Davis, Nick Chinlund and Caroline Aaron

    In theaters Nov. 8

    Rated R

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