The Matrix: Revolutions

    Despite the replacement of the Oracle from the first two films with a look-alike (the actress who originally played the Oracle passed away between the filming of “”Reloaded”” and “”Revolutions””), the finale of “”Revolutions”” is surprisingly less confusing than that of “”Reloaded.”” “”Revolutions”” does an excellent job of interjecting new characters, ideas and story lines amidst the backdrop of lore the Wachowski brothers create, making a film worthy of praise outside its relationship to the acclaimed predecessors.

    Courtesy of Warner Bros.
    Computers gone wild: Keanu Reeves returns to finish the “”Matrix”” series in this visually stunning film.

    The end of “”Revolutions”” leaves those that have seen the trilogy with a cohesive and provocative look at the state of human life in the modern world. It includes love, religion, fate, choice, war and eventually peace. The “”Matrix”” series has a little bit of something for everyone and is accomplished by taking a fresh look at the philosophical problems that have plagued mankind since inception. In a span of seven hours, the “”Matrix”” trilogy allegorically explains the human condition and does so more effectively than ever in “”Revolutions.”” This fantastic finish to the series places it in film history as one of the best trilogies of all time.

    Keanu Reeves fans, if such people in fact exist, may be disappointed with the lack of screen time received by Neo in this film. “”Revolutions”” deals more with the complex situation facing the city of Zion, where the first two focused on Neo. A number of minor characters from “”Reloaded”” receive considerable screen time as part of the battle for Zion which, despite being visually fascinating, runs long. The film redeems itself by providing one of the most stunning fight scenes ever between Neo and Smith.

    It is difficult to imagine anyone who enjoyed the first two films in the series not relishing the third. “”Revolutions”” may gain even more fans because the audience leaves the theater awestruck rather than bewildered. It would be a pity if anyone that saw the first two films were to miss “”Revolutions.””

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