Letters the Editor

Editor:

The article by Matthew Lepori against general education requirements (“”Out with the old rules, in with the new,”” Oct. 22) actually helps to demonstrate the need for such requirements.

Lepori wonders how learning other subjects will make him a better writer. If UCSD were a technical school, such as ITT Tech or one of the many others advertised on daytime television to jobless people, this would be a valid question.

However, UCSD is a university and has a responsibility to educate its students. This educational responsibility is not limited to technical excellence in one field. It includes a broad education in a variety of subjects designed to expand the intellectual capacities of students. Students with a university degree should be expected to have these abilities and to be able to think intelligently about a variety of subjects.

If students do not want this kind of education, I suggest they drop out of UCSD immediately and enroll in one of the many technical schools available. Some of them actually allow one to fulfill all requirements by mail. Just think: In six short weeks, you can be an expert in shoe repair or locksmithing. No general education requirements at all.

On the other hand, if you want a degree from a quality institution, you will be expected to take courses that will make you well-rounded.

The question “”Does knowing how the coastal currents of California work make me a better person?”” seems to be a reference to Earth Sciences 30, a course I am currently enrolled in. In fact, those paying attention in this course (about 50 percent of the students — the remainder talk all period) are learning about a variety of subjects that will allow them to make more informed decisions on environmental issues. The rest will be easy prey for demagogues on the right and the left who rely upon the public’s lack of knowledge to push their agendas on these issues.

One of the reasons the university is striving to offer a quality education is to make its graduates better citizens of our democracy. This is one of the most important jobs of every American citizen — more important, I would argue, than learning technical skills that are valuable in the job market.

The fact that students are retaining little information from these classes is not the fault of the university but is the fault of a student body whose mantra seems to be “”Cram, regurgitate, forget. Repeat until degree is conferred.”” This is an insult to professors, teaching assistants, administrators, students who actually learn the material and to the educational institution itself.

To sum up, if you don’t want to learn, leave. There are plenty of people to take your place who might actually want to get a real education.

— Brinn Belyea

Graduate student

Teacher Education Program

Donate to The UCSD Guardian
$2505
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists at University of California, San Diego. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment, keep printing our papers, and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The UCSD Guardian
$2505
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal