University, Alumni Reveal Price Center Guardian

    The Triton sculpture, cast in bronze and weighing 750 pounds, was included in the originial plans for the Price Center expansion. Funding for the project was derived from class gifts and University Centers. (Erik Jepsen/Guardian)

    University officials, staff and students, along with alumni and members of the surrounding community, unveiled the campus’ new Triton sculpture on Oct. 16. Designed by alumna Manuelita Brown, the 750-pound bronze sculpture was proposed by the senior classes of 1998 and 1999 and sits at the entrance to Price Center East.

    Chancellor Marye Anne Fox and Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Penny Rue welcomed a crowd of 500 at the event and introduced various speakers, including 1999 graduate and former member of the UCSD men’s tennis team Ping Yeh, sculpture designer Brown and A.S. Vice President of Student Life Darryl Nousome.

    Yeh, who currently lives in Minneapolis, spearheaded the Triton statue as a class officer, describing his vision to both former classmates and current students at the unveiling as a “Triton-ization” of the campus.

    “Working [off] the vision presented by Yeh and the classes of 1998 and 1999, collaboration between artist Manuelita Brown and the Triton sculpture committee was formed to create a symbol of unity and campus pride,” Nousome, who served on the committee as a student representative, said at the opening ceremony. “The statue is intended as something students could touch for good luck and pose next to for photographs. It is a landmark that students can come together around, unifying our campus.”

    According to Assistant Vice Chancellor of Student Life Gary R. Ratcliff, the statue was initially funded by the senior-class gifts of 1998 and 1999 and received additional cash from University Centers.

    Brown, who has produced other works in the surrounding La Jolla area — including the dolphin sculptures at Westfield Shoppingtown UTC — also spoke at the ceremony.

    “The statue’s design incorporates UCSD’s interpretation of the mythical god while meeting the university’s expectations of a campus symbol that would produce pride and unification,” Brown said at the ceremony.

    According to Brown, the sculpture needed to be both interesting and timeless.

    The committee responsible for the planning of the statue told the artist that Triton “should look confident, but not too menacing; he should be approachable and still be impressive.”

    The statue, in accordance with Greek mythology, portrays Triton, the official messenger of the deep, clutching a three-pronged trident and a conch shell, with jets of water shooting from its base.

    “In mythology, the shell, when blown loudly, creates a sound so fearsome that the Triton’s rivals imagine it to be the roar of a mighty beast and take flight,” Brown said.

    The unveiling ceremony was also attended by members of the university’s 23 intercollegiate athletic programs and the UCSD pep band, which opened and closed the event with a selection of musical pieces.

    Donate to The UCSD Guardian
    $0
    $2500
    Contributed
    Our Goal

    Your donation will support the student journalists at University of California, San Diego. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment, keep printing our papers, and cover our annual website hosting costs.

    More to Discover
    Donate to The UCSD Guardian
    $0
    $2500
    Contributed
    Our Goal