Briefly

    Professor speaks on history of scientific consensus

    UCSD history professor Naomi Oreskes will discuss whether present scientific methods are correct in a free lecture on Feb. 26. The lecture, called “Consensus in science: How do we know we’re not wrong?” will also feature professor Richard Somerville of the climate research division at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Oreskes and Somerville will discuss how past historians, philosophers and scientists have tried to find answers to the questions surrounding current consensus. The lecture will also focus on cases in the history of science where prior consensus had been wrong. Oreskes cites the notion of continental drift and how it was not accepted in the beginning of the century because of a model during the time that made the theory impossible. The event, which is free and open to the public, will be held at Peterson Hall 110 at 7:30 p.m.

    Oreskes previously gave a similar talk for the George Sarton Award Lecture at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting on Feb. 13. She spoke about possible alternate scientific methods and whether they should be considered.

    UCSD to offer SAT prep class, admissions workshop

    UCSD will offer the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test to high school students on March 13 and free workshops on college admissions for parents. High school students will be able to take the PSAT at Center Hall from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. In addition, parents will be able to attend free workshops to learn more about admission requirements for UC and California State University systems, as well as other factors that will affect high school students entering college in 2006. Financial aid and scholarship information will also be available. The workshop will be held concurrently with the PSAT.

    The event is sponsored by UCSD’s Early Academic Outreach Program and the Princeton Review.

    Study finds HIV rates higher than previously recorded

    A study by UCSD researchers found that HIV infection among pregnant women at Tijuana General Hospital is 14 times higher than previous reports. According to the study conducted by physicians from UCSD School of Medicine, there was a 1.26 percent HIV infection rate among 947 women in labor tested in the past year. Previous studies had found infection among only .09 percent of pregnant women.

    The study found that 96.7 percent of women in labor were willing to undergo HIV counseling and rapid-result testing. If a woman was found to be HIV positive, the research team helped provide her with the drug zidovudine and advised her against breast feeding. Children were then given the drug for six weeks and given follow-up tests during their first four months.

    Researchers also found that HIV infection in women and children in Mexico has effects on the San Diego community. The Tijuana/San Diego border sees more than 131,000 legal crossings daily, and many of those who cross the border frequently seek medical care in the United States, according to the researchers. The UCSD Mother, Child and Adolescent HIV Program has provided medical care to pregnant women, children and teens for the past 15 years. The program has also provided prenatal counseling, care and testing at Tijuana General Hospital. HIV specialists also provide patient and community education through the program.

    Nikkei sponsors Day of Remembrance on Feb. 19

    Nikkei Student Union at UCSD will hold an event called Day of Remembrance in memory of the Japanese American internment in World War II on Feb. 19. The event commemorates the signing of Executive Order 9066 on Feb. 19, 1941, resulting in approximately 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry being forced into camps. The event will feature speakers in addition to pictures, artifacts and personal accounts from the camps. Political science professor Peter Irons will be present as a guest speaker.

    Irons is a practicing civil rights and liberties attorney and was the lead counsel in the 1980s in cases to reverse criminal convictions of Japanese Americans who challenged relocation orders during World War II. George Wakji, president of the Ventura County chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League, will also share his experience as an activist and former internee at the Gila River Relocation Center in Arizona.

    The event will take place at Price Center Plaza from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

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