Letters to the Editor

    Editor:

    The article published on April 14 by Valerie Ng titled “”Protesting for Peace”” is a one-sided debacle of an article. It attempts to cover the peace rally held on March 14 in front of Geisel. According to her, seven members of the College Republicans were in attendance to counter-protest the supposed 300 war protestors.

    First, I would like to point out that these numbers might be poor estimates, but were more likely fabricated by the protestors whom she questioned. I was among the counter-protesters, and at one point, we had between 15 and 20 people marching with us and numerous others cheering us on. In fact, some spectators asked for signs so they could join in. We find it very unfair that Ng didn’t make the effort to contact any of us, since this would have helped balance out this lopsided piece.

    Ng also states that it was solely members of the College Republicans who were opposed to the rally, as though you have to be Republican to support the war. This is either very poor reporting based only on information from the protestors or a blatant falsification. There were many non-Republican-affiliated people in support of military action and President Bush at the counter-protest.

    The worst part of Ng’s article is when she uses quotes from the war protesters who claim that the counter-protesters “”were very disrespectful.”” This is an absolute joke. Although we were certainly chanting, this is a far cry from “”name-calling”” and spitting, as claimed by the protestors. I can also guarantee that no member of the College Republicans threatened to tear down anti-war propaganda, contrary to what Ng seems to imply. Not only were we orderly, we were downright respectful at the protest. When the protesters had Professor Thomas Cardoza deliver his anti-war propaganda, we made a point of being silent and attentive to him so not to disrespect him or the event. It was a far cry from our Pro-America Rally, which was disrupted by an anti-war leftist.

    By falsifying information in their quotes, the left has stooped to an all new low; in demonizing those who disagree with them, it’s as though they can’t accept the fact that the majority of the country is against them.

    — Adam Richards

    Social Director, College Republicans at UCSD

    President, Marksmanship Club

    Religious orgs in need of campus space

    Editor:

    “”I felt it necessary to veto the legislation to bring rise to the voices at the table that were not heard.”” — Jenn Brown (Guardian, April 7). A noble goal indeed for our A.S. president, however, the execution is questionable. While A.S. Council seemed to be fairly concerned about hearing the voices of its own senators in regards to University Centers expansion, the voices of the students they represent can easily fall between the cracks.

    I was excited to hear of A.S.’s efforts to increase student organization representation on various Price Center expansion committees such as the University Centers Advisory Board and the University Center Expansion Task Force. However, as an active member of a religious organization, I am disappointed and frustrated at the continual lack of religious representation. While the council wisely restructured the task force to include representatives from cultural, greek, and athletic organizations (Guardian, April 10), I find myself without a voice. Where is the religious representation on campus?

    With 36 registered S.O.L.O. religious organizations, we are by no means a minority presence on campus. Furthermore, we are not merely numbers on a page, but active student populations struggling to find space on campus to hold our events. This demonstrates the second discrimination against religious organization: failing to provide appropriate meeting space.

    UCSD has a strong tradition of supporting diversity, however, until now the campus’ definition of diversity has been rather limited. UCSD needs to acknowledge the religious diversity of its student population and the key role it plays in many students’ lives. I applaud the university’s efforts to provide resources for all aspects of student life through their commitment to the Cross Cultural Center, Women’s Center and Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Resource Center. But there is an unfinished agenda. Religious orgs also deserve a dedicated space that would provide for students’ spiritual well-being. However, it is my fear that without invitation to a forum to voice religious organizations’ needs, this dream for religious space will never be realized.

    — Kimberly Mersch

    John Muir College sophomore

    and member of Catholic Student Community

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