Lunafest 2002 provides flavorful food for feminist

    Each year, the minds behind LemonZest and Chai Tea Luna Bars (energy bars vitamin-engineered for women) sponsor the LUNAFEST film festival, in which femme filmmakers from around the world send their cinematic shorts to be considered by the energy bar goddess.

    This fun-fest is a feast for everyone — this is not just a girls’ club. To see something different from the usual movie blockbusters, get tickets to the rockin’ Lunafest.

    The newest edition of LUNAFEST has six features, each an entirely different package from the next.

    “”GrrlyShow,”” directed by Kara Herold, should be shown in every communications class on campus. Herold interviews the bigwigs of the real-world girl ‘zine scene, and juxtaposes these ultra-cool publishing ladies against spoof scenarios of women in the 1950s that want to start their own ‘zine. This feature is an inside look, a how-to and a sweet documentary.

    “”Really, we just make this stuff for us … it’s not a big money-making venture,”” said Debbie Stoller, publisher of Bust ‘zine. “”We have got to stay true to our mission.””

    “”Janey Van Winkle”” is a twist on the classic story — in this case, Janey wakes up to find that life has marched on despite her comatose state.

    Yes, she’s a vegetable for seven years, but her parents still manage to marry her off and get grandchildren.

    “”It’s really a shame,”” Janey’s mother says, to Janey’s horror and disgust. “”Everyone should remember their wedding day.””

    Director Casey Suchan makes this story nightmarishly scary and hilariously funny at the same time. What could be better than a wedding picture in which Janey is propped up and drooling, obviously out cold? Not much.

    Aminah Bakeer Abdul-Jabbar directed “”Personal Touch,”” a naked look at breast cancer. It’s powerful yet difficult to watch; the four-minute running time was a good call.

    “”Psalm 51,”” filmed in black and white, uses an increasingly frenzied soundtrack and improvisational dance to portray themes of sin, despair and hope without words. If director Kris Barberg delivers a message that’s too abstract for you, look for the dancer in the film: She is astounding.

    “”Dear Judge”” buries itself under your skin. In 1992, Dorothy Gains, an Alabama local and mother of three, was sentenced to 20 years in jail on drug charges. Director Laleh Soomekh follows the family in their efforts to cope with the charge, which was made because Dorothy’s husband sold crack cocaine and she allowed him to stay at her home.

    The last feature is five minutes of animated fun. Two words: Boobie Girl.

    Directed by Brooke Keesling, this is the tale of a little girl who hopes and hopes for some curvature on her painfully flat chest. When things start to get out of control (the girl can’t even rollerskate, for breast’s sake), the “”Boo Bees”” come to the rescue.

    Watch out world: “”Boobie Girl”” is the next big thing.

    Lunafest 2002 plays Nov. 7 at the Forum at the University of San Diego.

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