Proposed integrity policy rejected

    The proposed changes to the academic integrity policy, which stirred conflict between concerned students and members of the faculty and administration, was sent back to the Committee on Educational Policy for revision at the Representative Assembly meeting on Oct. 29.

    The proposed changes would have centralized the process in which academic integrity cases are handled. Currently handled by college deans, the proposed process would have given control of the proceedings to the student conduct coordinator, which is an administrative position.

    Concerned students raised questions about the legitimacy of allowing the SCC to handle all aspects of integrity cases, including selecting a hearing board, prosecuting the accused and deciding upon what disciplinary actions should be taken.

    Ten students, the majority of whom are members of the A.S. Council, attended the assembly meeting to show their concern for the proposed process. The students were pleased with the decision to send the policy back into committee, which is what David Goodwin, an Eleanor Roosevelt College Student Council member-at-large, said students “”wanted the whole time.””

    However, CEP Chair Stephen Cox was not pleased with the outcome of the meeting. Cox was in favor of passing the changes, and said that the purpose of the revisions was to centralize the process to make it more fair.

    “”The CEP policy would simplify the process so that faculty have one place to go to report,”” Cox said.

    While in favor of a more centralized process, students argued that giving the SCC complete control of integrity cases raised multiple conflicts of interest. It was because of this main concern that students lobbied professors and pushed for the assembly to send the proposal back to the CEP.

    Cox said that he believed the methods used by students to mobilize support for their agenda included propaganda.

    “”This is a deplorable strategy of scare tactics to convince students that there is a plot against students,”” Cox said.

    A strong majority of the assembly voted to have the proposal reassessed in committee.

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