Police to enforce 'zero tolerance' at Sun God

    According to campus police, authorities will enforce a zero-tolerance policy during the annual Sun God festival Friday. The event is often characterized by an increase in student drinking on campus.

    Due to the history of Sun God and its relationship with the possession and consumption of alcohol, police officers say they will be looking for signs of public intoxication on their patrols.

    Community service officers, residential service officers and San Diego Police Department deputies will provide additional aid.

    “”From what I’ve heard,”” said Earl Warren College freshman Richard Hagar, “”Sun God festival is an excuse to party and get hammered. I’m sure there will be a lot of people drunk on Friday.””

    Many students seem to share Hagar’s view, and this is the primary reason campus police are on alert during the festivities.

    “”There are usually several factors that we look for in situations of public intoxication,”” said officer John Smart. “”It’s a combination of signs that include being passed out, vomiting in the bushes or making a scene.””

    Students detained for public intoxication will be transported to detox for detention, according to Smart. Depending on their cooperation, students sent there will be under supervised care for a minimum of four hours. Uncooperative suspects will be arrested and detained for a minimum of six hours.

    After being released, the individual is allowed to call for someone to pick them up from detox.

    Campus police will also look for minors possessing alcohol. Students cited for being minors in possession and who have a valid campus ID will be given a citation and then released. The citation will include a court date, and the accused student must appear in a San Diego courtroom.

    Penalties usually include fines and community service hours, according to police. Those without a valid campus ID will be arrested and detained.

    “”Minor in possession is considered a misdemeanor,”” Smart said. “”It will go down as a misdemeanor on your record.””

    Eleven to 13 CSOs will also be available Friday evening to escort students upon request. They will also roam the campus throughout the day to provide additional help with security for the festival.

    “”The CSOs will provide help and aid for students,”” said CSO coordinator Peter Kim. “”And because the CSOs are usually the first on the scene, they can also lead police and ambulances to areas that need attention.””

    RSOs will also be more vigilant than usual during their patrols of each college’s residential complexes Friday night, according to Kim.

    “”All of this is precautionary,”” Kim said.

    The past few Sun God festivals have been relatively tame with just a handful of incidents, and campus police say they would like to keep it that way.

    Smart stresses the need for attendees to be mindful of each other.

    “”The biggest thing is to be responsible and look out for each other,”” Smart said. “”We’re not here to squash the fun. We’re here for the safety of the students.””

    For more information on the consequences of public intoxication and minor in possession citations, contact (858) 534-HELP. CSO escorts can be reached at (858) 534-WALK.

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