Film Review: 'Waking Life' literally a work of art

Director Richard Linklater of “”Slacker”” and “”Dazed and Confused”” takes an innovative approach to filmmaking with his latest movie “”Waking Life.”” Not technically an animated or live-action production, Linklater originally shot the film with real actors and then went back and painted each cell to give the movie a unique, dream-like look, making the atmosphere of the film become as surreal as the story.

However, when the entire background of the film is floating and the faces of the characters morph continuously, it becomes dizzying and difficult to concentrate on the complex matter of the film.

Starring Wiley Wiggins (“”Dazed and Confused””), “”Waking Life”” chronicles the journey of a young man who cannot wake up from his dreams and spends most of them listening to many seemingly random people discuss intangible theories.

Appearances from other actors such as Ethan Hawke and Adam Goldberg seem to be random and sporadic with no real ties made to the main character and plot of the film, which makes it occasionally confusing.

Although the film was visually remarkable, its presentation contrasted with the subject of the film. In addition, much of the dialogue between the random characters is very complex and thought-provoking, yet the cartoonish feel of the movie takes away from the seriousness of the conversations.

In short, it’s hard to concentrate on characters who talk about abstract metaphysical concepts when objects in the background start floating or random objects sprout legs and start dancing around the speaker.

An innovative spin on filmmaking, “”Waking Life”” sometimes looks like an impressionist painting vibrating with life but at other times seems to be cartoony and completely incoherent. For many college students, this would not be considered a must-see simply because it makes you think so much. If you decide to go see this movie, though, make sure you are completely awake, because this film is quite soporific.

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