Arts & Entertainment

Film Review

Someone Like You :: Set in a metropolis with realistic characters who lead troubled, single, professional lives, “”Someone Like You”” is a movie that tries to provide a new twist on a trite story. Ashley Judd portrays the main character, Jane Goodale, who delivers a surprisingly believable performance of a woman hurt by men and determined to make sense of their ambiguous nature. There is another surprise with solid performances by Greg Kinnear and Hugh Jackman as the men in Jane’s life, and by Marisa Tomei as the emotionally distraught best friend. Despite all these credible performances by the cast, “”Someone Like You”” fails to be anything more than another romantic comedy in which a young attractive woman falls for the man who has been right under her nose the whole time. There is, however, an innovative twist of adding unconventional “”scientific theories”” and hysterical farm narratives to give the movie a little individual flair. The occasional dreamy musings of Jane, along with the seemingly serious narration on outlandish and humorous subjects, makes the film better than many recent romantic comedies that exist for no reason except to employ good looking actors and parade them around half-naked. Overall, the hackneyed plot makes this a rather mediocre film, though this can be expected from a film of this genre. However, its occasional humorous and imaginative moments, including the narration and explanation of Jane Goodale’s theories about men through analogous cows, makes the film worthwhile if you are in the mood to see a romantic comedy. — Anne Cong-huyen Yi Yi :: You’d think 170 minutes of subtitled Taiwanese might be a bit of a meal. This film has won a wide array of awards, and it might take as much as 45 minutes to figure out why. It’s a good thing this leaves you about 125 minutes for awe and appreciation, because this film is brimming with beauty as it stitches a quilt where the patches are everyday episodes that might not be as everyday as they at first seem. Birth, love, marriage and death within a family are tangled in a mesh that emphasizes the view of time as circular, a view that is favored by many Asian epistemologies. The casting is superb, and the actors manage to express a huge range of emotions, from Hollywood hysterical sorrow, to dry, situational wit that almost resembles that of British social realist films. The cinematography of this film must be seen. In a detached way that requires more effort from the audience than does your average Hollywood blockbuster, it paints out the intrigues and passions of the portrayed family in broad, soothing brush strokes. The action is often shown as reflections or behind reflective surfaces, and the viewer is allowed to peel away the layers as one would peel a succulent fruit. This parallels the rich texture of the family’s intertwined stories and emotions. The film draws toward an unexpected conclusion: a death. One cannot help being overwhelmed by the elegance and ease with which this film copes with the complexity of its own plot. There’s nothing to do but lay back and be washed away by this tsunami of life’s events. “”Yi Yi”” is directed by Edward Yang, and we can only hope and pray that he’ll send more of this our way. This film is on at the Ken in Hillcrest, and for a very short time only, so schedule in those three hours before it’s too late. — Liss Anda ...

Know Your Herb

In actuality, “”cannabis”” is an umbrella term for two botanical strains of marijuana: cannabis indica and cannabis sativa. Although they both contain the active ingredient THC, their differences are quite substantial to regular and casual smokers alike. Here’s the literature, but the truly curious will go taste the differences. Sativa Indica: Indicas originally come from the hash producing countries. They are short, dense plants with broad leaves and often grow a darker green. After flowering starts they will be mature in six to eight weeks. The buds will be thick and dense, with flavors and aromas ranging from pungent skunk to sweet and fruity. The smoke from an Indica is generally a light body high, relaxing and laid back. Sativa: Sativas are just about the opposite of indicas. They are tall, thin plants with much narrower leaves and grow a lighter green in color. They grow very quickly and can reach heights of 20 feet in a single season. Once flowering has begun, they can take anywhere from 10 to 16 weeks to fully mature. Flavors range from earthy to sweet and fruity. The stone-effect of a Sativa is cerebral and energetic. Cross Strain Cross Strains: Cross strains offer the best Sativa and Indica have to offer. Most cross-strains enjoy the smaller size of Indica plants (ideal for indoor growing), but contain the energetic high of sativas. — David Lee ...

ACLU Card

Unfortunately, there are no get-out-of-jail-free cards in life. However, the ACLU does provide this nifty little cut-out of all the major do’s and don’ts when confronted by the police. It might feel silly to carry this in your wallet, but it could mean the difference between a night in holding or a couple years in county jail. ...

NORML: Keeping Stoners Out of Prison Since 1970

“”You’ve got to fight for your right to party.””— Beastie Boys In America today, we wage a very real war on drugs. We spend billions on it, and hundreds of thousands of arrests are made every year. The rate of arrest for marijuana offenses is roughly one person every 45 seconds. Few can credit the drug war as being successful so far, and critics call it futile. With the federal government staving off states’ attempts to change marijuana’s illicit substance status, you should know who is on your side of the fight. One such group is the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, which started in 1970. This is a national organization composed of a head office in Washington, and made up of state and local chapters, though there is no chapter in San Diego. The Web site, http://www.norml.org, serves as both the history of marijuana’s criminalization and the up-to-date state of affairs all across the country. Marijuana’s history in the United States extends over 400 years ago as hemp, when it was used in the Americas as a fiber, all the way through the 20th century. In addition, its presence as medicine and in American medical journals has been around for almost as long. As the 1930s saw the end of alcohol prohibition, the institution that dealt with upholding and enforcing anti-liquor laws found itself with nothing to do. At the same time, the U.S. government was looking for a way to get Mexican workers out of the United States because migrant workers were no longer seen as beneficial. Kris Krane, affiliate coordinator of NORML’s national office, said, “”The government found that many of these workers used marijuana in some form, and that few Americans outside this select group had any exposure to what marijuana is or does,”” with the exception of the African-American Jazz scene. When the Federal Bureau of Narcotics formed in 1930, the new image of “”weed,”” or the “”Devil weed,”” was born, and hemp became widely known as marijuana. In typical U.S. government fashion, the FBN, headed by Commissioner Harry Anslinger, began the misinformation war that brought the ultra-violent and insanity-inducing image of “”reefer smoking”” to the populous via the media. Exaggerated headlines and movies like “”Reefer Madness”” created an image of marijuana as leading to rape, murder and always ultimately to total insanity and death. The result was the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937, which Krane said was a way to circumvent the problem of criminalizing marijuana. “”The problem was that people didn’t think you could make marijuana illegal without an amendment to the constitution, just like they did with liquor,”” Crane said. “”So they taxed marijuana instead.”” “”To have marijuana you would need to get a stamp saying that you had paid the tax, but there was never any intention of allowing anyone to procure marijuana,”” Crane continued. “”The intent was overtly prohibition.”” As for the passing of the Marijuana Tax Act, the hearings lasted only an hour. “”The two main witnesses were Anslinger, who created the Tax Act, and Clinton Hester, assistant general counsel for the Department of the Treasury, who both were in support,”” Crane said. The lone voice of opposition to Congress was the American Medical Association, which was represented by legislative councilmember Dr. William C. Woodward. “”He brought to light that no data other then newspaper reports were offered,”” Krane said. “”Nothing from the Bureau of Prisons or the Children’s Bureau supported the FBN’s position.”” Woodward concluded with remarks on the problems of cutting physicians off from a therapeutic substance. Congress saw this as little more then standing in the way of legislative progress. The House of Representatives’ handling of the bill was very shady. According to NORML’s Web site, less then 90 seconds of “”debate”” took place during which only two questions were asked. First, House Speaker Sam Rayburn was asked to summarize the bill. He replied, “”I don’t know. It has something to do with a thing called marijuana. I think it is a narcotic of some kind.”” The second question was regarding whether the AMA supported the act, to which a member of the Ways and Means Committee said they did. After continuing to sail through both houses with ease, President Franklin Roosevelt promptly signed the legislation into law Aug. 2,1937. The “”Marihuana Tax Act”” took effect Oct. 1 of that year. This is how things have stood at the federal level to this day. The past points to the present — can an individual make a difference? Krane’s response was next to pleading. He insisted we can make a dramatic effect if we are willing to write and call our elected officials. “”What we constantly hear from politicians is that they won’t support an issue when they only hear from constituents who oppose it,”” Krane said. NORML’s Web site includes forms that can be printed out and mailed to government officials. Also, there are action alerts for local areas that have impending bills. “”It shouldn’t be limited only to when there is a bill being brought up,”” Krane said. “”Constantly, I would say at least once a month, write your politician. Or call their office. You are their constituents, they are beholden to you. If you live in someone’s district, they have to listen to you, and they will take your phone call. If they aren’t there, their staff will take note of what you say. “”People need to get active and talk to their politicians and tell them how strongly they feel about this issue,”” Krane continued. “”Not many people realize quite how affective this really is. Get in touch with your politicians and tell them how you feel; tell them you want to stop arresting people who smoke marijuana. Tell them you want patients to have access to medicinal marijuana. Tell them that students should not be denied financial aid because of drug convictions.”” Krane emphasized why it is so important for students to get involved in the fight. “”As of two years ago, with the passing of a provision to the Higher Education act, if you have a drug conviction, you are denied financial aid for one year,”” he said. “”Two convictions, two years — more than that, and you are barred for life from receiving financial aid. Now what’s more damaging? Smoking marijuana, or being cut off from a college education? And who does that affect? Not the rich kids who are getting their education paid for. It’s poor and minority kids who get slammed. Students really need to get involved on these issues.”” Krane encourages all marijuana smokers to join NORML to help it lobby for marijuana smokers’ rights. “”If you are a marijuana smoker, you almost have an obligation to join a group like NORML, who’s trying to keep you out of jail. That’s what we do, and our members give the money to lobby, and number power to back up our lobbying.”” Short on cash? Don’t think you can afford a membership? Krane has the answer. “”Buy one less eighth a year and spend that money on helping us keep you out of prison.”” Krane closed with one final word of warning about the most oppressive state in the union toward marijuana: “”Stay out of Oklahoma,”” and if you are a marijuana smoker who lives there, “”get the hell out.”” For more information on marijuana’s history, legal issues, racial breakdowns of arrests and convictions, the status of the legalization process, or to get involved, please go to http://www.norml.org For the ACLU’s “”bustcard,”” with information on what to do in an encounter with police and law enforcement go to: http://www.aclu.org/issues/criminal/bustcardtext.html The page is available in Spanish at: http://www.aclu.org-/issues/criminal/bustcard_spn.html NORML Facts: Notable NORML affiliates include Country singer/guitarist Willie Nelson, who has been a NORML supporter for over 30 years. Among others are George Zimmer, owner of the Men’s Warehouse, and Peter Lewis of Progressive Insurance. * Presently, law enforcement arrests a marijuana smoker every 45 seconds. This represents a 60 percent increase in marijuana arrests since Clinton took office. * Over 10 million Americans have been arrested on marijuana charges since the National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse issued its recommendation to Congress in 1972 to decriminalize marijuana. * Blacks and Hispanics make up 20 percent of the marijuana smokers in the United States but comprise 58 percent of the marijuana offenders sentenced under federal law last year. * Between 1978 and 1996, 34 states passed laws recognizing marijuana’s therapeutic value. * Annual federal government expenditures on the “”war on drugs”” average $15.7 billion annually. In addition, state and local governments also spend $16 billion per year enforcing drug laws. * In 1995, nearly 600,000 of the total 1.5 million drug arrests in America were for marijuana offenses. * The Supreme Court has ruled that law enforcement does not need a search warrant to search your garbage. The rationale is that by discarding refuse, you are relinquishing ownership and privacy over it. Because this makes garbage public property, police can search your garbage for stems and seeds to get a search warrant for your house. * Marijuana prohibition costs American taxpayers between $7.5 and $10 billion annually in enforcement alone. * Marijuana remains the third most popular recreational drug of choice in the United States despite 60 years of criminal prohibition. Only alcohol and tobacco are regularly consumed by a greater percentage of the population. * United States Department of Health and Human Services found that 57 percent of all current illicit drug users report that marijuana is the only illegal drug they have used; this figure rises to 77 percent if hashish (a more concentrated form of marijuana) is included. * Millions of Americans use marijuana; few abuse it. * If you are being pulled over for a routine traffic stop and the cop asks to search your car, you can say no. Without probable cause, law enforcement needs a search warrant to search your car with out your consent. * Marijuana smokers in this country are no different from their nonsmoking peers, except for their marijuana use. ...

The Blunt Facts

Over the past 30 years, High Times magazine has spearheaded the spread of stoner culture, covering everything from political referendums to regional market values of retail and wholesale pot. Courtesy of High Times Its mission statement has grown beyond its green confines, not only celebrating the counterculture, but documenting pot’s place in history. High Times was there for Burning Man, but it was also there for Waco and Columbine. Of the magazine’s most prolific effects was the wildfire spread by the term 420, which later became a worldwide stoners’ mantra for smoking weed. Although High Times was not the originator of the infamous codeword, it was the first to investigate what started out as a Deadhead community phenomenon. After one article, and thousands of subscribers later, 420 was beginning to pop up from coast to coast in America. If anything, this proved one crucial fact for the staff of the magazine. The counterculture not only accepted them, but was taking the lead from them. The following contains two interviews with Steven Hager, editor in chief of High Times, and Peter Gorman, the magazine’s current photo editor and former editor in chief. The people who wrote the stories of the counterculture now share a little of their own. Steven Hager What is the purpose of your magazine? To celebrate the counterculture. How have you seen pot culture change over the years? We’re concentrated on getting medical access for sick people through the initiative process. Do you drug test your employees? Certainly not. Drug testing is illegal search and seizure as far as we’re concerned. Most interesting article/ interview? Well, that changes all the time. I just wrote an article on Waco in the May issue that’s pretty interesting. How did the magazine start out? Particularly, how was it funded? It was started by Tom Forcade, a counterculture journalist, activist, and pilot who smuggled marijuana from South America to get his nest egg. Any significant problems with the government? Well, they’ve tried to shut us down three times over the past 25 years. What the hell is the pot 40 page? People write in and vote for their favorite things and we list the most popular ones. Do you think legalization is possible? What would the magazine do if it was legalized? We will be far more successful and popular after legalization than we are now. Legalization would allow the counterculture to come up from the underground and become a legitimate culture. It’s hard to do that when your sacraments and ceremonies are against the law. Should the “”420″” holiday be replaced with a different date, given other “”incidents”” that happened on the day. (i.e. Columbine) No, the holiday should stay were it is. There are lessons to be learned with Columbine, like the overprescription of legal mind-altering substances such as Luvox, which can cause violent reactions in a small minority of users. Dylan K. was on Luvox. Favorite five bud strains? Don’t really have an answer. I like sativa-dominant, organic, outdoor-grown at a high elevation, preferably close to the equator. Best American city for a stoner to live in? The world? The West Coast is the best for the counterculture. Anywhere from Carmel to Vancouver. Peter Gorman How many pot photos do you get from readers in a day? High Times receives 20-30 photos daily from readers. Where was your most “”interesting”” shoot? Our shoots are done by a number of different photographers, so the most interesting would depend on their choice. My most interesting was done in Morocco, up in the hash highlands. The owner of the several hundred pounds of hash left the room for an hour or so to make a deal and during that time a quart of hash oil I was placing in just the right position fell over. I had to eat some of it to hide the mess and that made the trip back out of the highlands — being chased by hash dealers the whole way — quite interesting. How many photos of marijuana do you have archived? “”High Times”” has tens of thousands of archived photos. Still, the bulk of the photos we print belong to the photographers and not us. How many plants are represented by the combination of the two? Hundreds of thousands, in all likelihood. Top three sickest buds you’ve seen. The best bud in the world is almost always the one I’m rolling. ...

Hiatus Weekly Calendar

All tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (619) 220-8497 or by going to http://www.ticketmaster.com, unless otherwise noted. Courtesy of http://www.flecktones.com Fleck: Bela Fleck and the Flecktones will perform at Spreckels Theatre this Friday. 12 Thursday Venice has been compared to the likes of Fleetwood Mac and the Eagles. You can catch this harmony-laden group at the Belly Up Tavern at 8 p.m. Tickets are $12. Go to Dizzy’s and check out some “”adventuresome”” jazz from Return to One. Shows start at 8 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. The cost is $6. For more information call (858) 270-7467. 13 Friday One of the most talented jazz-funk-bluegrass groups you’ll ever see is Bela Fleck and The Flecktones. Bela Fleck and her nontraditional style of banjo playing leads the group. Fleck is backed by Roy Wooten, who plays a hybrid drum machine and synth module that is shaped like a guitar, as well as bassist Victor Wooten and avant-garde saxophonist Jeff Coffin. They will be performing at Spreckels Theatre in downtown San Diego. The show starts at 8 p.m. and tickets start at $28.50. The Melvins are arguably the band that started the grunge phase before bands like Nirvana and Soundgarden made it accessible to the masses. The Melvins all but disappeared along with grunge, but they are touring again behind their recent release, “”Crybaby.”” Watch them perform at the Brick By Brick. The show starts at 8:30 p.m. and tickets are $12. Joe Walsh, ex-guitarist from the Eagles, will be performing at the Belly Up Tavern. After the Eagles self-destructed in 1980, Walsh went on to have a successful solo career. His show starts at 9 p.m. and tickets are $40. 14 Saturday This Computer Kills and Durga will perform at the Che Cafe at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $5. For more information call (858) 534-2311. The Gilbert Castellanos Quartet will perform at Dizzy’s at 8:45 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. with an $8 cover. Call (858) 270-7467 for more information. 15 Sunday Joe Jackson offers a darker form of pop music and may be best known for his 1982 hit “”Steppin’ Out.”” Jackson will perform at 8:30 p.m. at 4th & B. 17 Tuesday Tonight you can envy your friends when they go to the U2 revival at 7:30 p.m. at the San Diego Sports Arena. 19 Thursday After spending a lot of time in the Dallas club scene, the Toadies will perform at Canes Bar & Grill. They have opened for acts such as the Red Hot Chili Peppers, the Butthole Surfers and the Supersuckers. The Toadies’ new CD is titled “”Hell Below/Stars Above.”” The show starts at 8 p.m. ...

Night of Fusion

Fusion 2001 was a large success, packing RIMAC Arena on Sunday night. This event, put on by the Multi Asian Student Alliance and the dance group 220, was a dance competition involving a plethora of dance styles. Many hip-hop dance groups performed at the show, as did several traditional ethnic dance groups. Below are some photos depicting the high-energy feel of the night. — David Pilz ...

Album Reviews

Aerosmith“”Just Push Play””Sony/Columbia A- :: It is rare when a rock ‘n’ roll band can maintain fame throughout generations. But every time my dad and I listen to the radio, Aerosmith always keeps us on the same station. Emerging over 25 years ago, Aerosmith has defined the rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle. Along with immortal songs like “”Walk This Way”” came the fame, the power and the women. Subsequently, internal conflicts and battles with substance addiction were also present. Yet through the ups and downs, frontman Steven Tyler and his bandmates forged through long enough to be inducted into the Rock ‘N’ Roll Hall of Fame on March 19, 2001. “”Just Push Play”” is the thirteenth studio album released by Aerosmith, and it is just what the fans have been waiting for: vintage Aerosmith mixed with more contemporary tunes. From beginning to end, “”Just Push Play”” rocks. The first single off the new album, “”Jaded,”” is already climbing the charts faster than anything off their previous album, “”Nine Lives.”” Again, “”Jaded”” rings true to the contemporary style Aerosmith is mixing with their rock ‘n’ roll flair. “”Light Inside”” is one of the power ballads on the album, resonating with guitar-driven solos. When will Aerosmith stop releasing super kick-ass, yet classic, albums? My dad and I are keeping our fingers crossed that it won’t be any time soon. — Tara Jones Rocket from the Crypt“”Group Sounds””TVT/Vagrant Records A :: Three long years after their last studio release, San Diego rock band Rocket From the Crypt have thrown their fans a high-energy, intense album that gets inside your mind and doesn’t let go until you bite the head off a small furry creature (take it from me!). Rocket From the Crypt are a six-piece rock band, complete with a saxophone and trumpet. Their guitar riffs are very powerful and extremely catchy, and the horns serve to build up emotion in the songs. They are one of the hardest bands out there and have a very strong underground following. In fact, their Web site has pictures of about a dozen people’s Rocket tattoos. The new album is much more reminiscent of their 1995 release, “”The State of Art is on Fire,”” than of their most recent album, “”RFTC.”” It is a lot louder and contains more simple, crunching guitar riffs than “”RFTC.”” The names of their songs describe the vibe of the band, which include tracks such as “”Heart of a Rat,”” “”Return of the Liar”” and “”Ghost Shark.”” Songs that stand out on this album include “”White Belt,”” “”Out of Control”” and “”Savoire Faire.”” The album doesn’t experiment at all; instead, it is simply a reiteration of the group’s old style. It is done very well, however, and has been considered by many die-hard fans to be their best album yet. Overall, it is an awesome follow up to a somewhat disappointing previous release. — David Pilz Run-DMC“”Crown Royal””BMG/Artista B :: Before listening to Run-DMC’s new release, “”Crown Royal,”” my opinion of the trio was that they were old. These guys began when most of us were “”terrible”” (i.e. 2-year-olds). I thought their style was the kind the Beastie Boys capitalized off of: one rapper finishes another’s rhyme and the last word of the rhyme is shouted. That opinion changed at the sound of the opening song, titled “”It’s Over,”” which is probably the best track on the album. Jermaine Dupri talks over a haunting choral piece, “”Marcia Religioso,”” which was first used in “”The Godfather III.”” Run does the rapping, and it’s the fast-flowing rap characteristic of modern day. A few songs later, I realized that the album actually features a conglomeration of styles and talents, perhaps the sign of a group laced with success — Run-DMC was the first rap group to appear on MTV, “”Saturday Night Live”” and the cover of Rolling Stone. They’ve sold over 20 million albums. “”Queens Day,”” featuring Nas, has an easy, relaxed pace to it, as does “”Ahhh,”” featuring Chris Davis. “”Crown Royal,”” the title song, though not having the most catchy chorus, still features great lyrics, attesting the group’s right to the throne of rock. “”Them Girls,”” sung partly by Limp Bizkit’s Fred Durst, is a fun, comical song, though hearing the phrase “”them girls”” over and over may destroy your libido. The album contains several songs with more of a rock guitar sound than a rap song beat. “”The School of Old,”” performed with Kid Rock, is the best of these because the tempo doesn’t shift and Kid Rock’s screams add to the entertainment. “”Take the Money and Run,”” with Everlast, is done well but it’s not as good as the Steve Miller original. Another remake is “”Let’s Stay Together,”” a romantic song taken from Al Green. It’s the same as the “”Let’s Get Married”” song, if you’ve heard it. The beat is good, but how many times can a song be remade before it sounds like Michael Jackson? Both “”Rock Show”” with Stephan Jenkins from Third Eye Blind and “”Here We Go”” are songs similar to the old-school style I expected of the group. “”Ay Papi,”” featuring Fat Joe, adds a spicy Latin flavor and the flow is more modern and more pleasing to the ear. The song with the best beat is the last: “”Simmons Incorporated,”” featuring Method Man. Sonically the song is very electronic and definitely intriguing. Though some songs don’t come together as well as others, Run-DMC’s latest release proves that the group can still produce great music. — Eric Dean Halfbreed“”Kontamination””Siccmade Muzicc A :: Halfbreed Eminem and Kid Rock are by far the most popular hip-hop artists to come out of Detroit, but they are in no way representative of what’s really going on there. The real Detroit sound is in its underground rap scene. Many undiscovered artists are awaiting an opportunity to be heard, especially Halfbreed. Halfbreed, formerly known as House of Krazees, is comprised of rappers Sol and Skrapz, and their newest album, “”Kontamination,”” is their best collaboration to date. Throughout the 21 tracks, Sol and Skrapz show off their versatility as artists and also their evolution as writers. “”Don’t Get Caught Up,”” and “”Welcome To …”” represent your basic head-bobbing, smooth-style rap. Halfbreed embody a well-established base that allows them to branch out creatively. That creativity is shown in “”Kaoz,”” which spews intensity and has a heavy-metal feel to it that instantly gets you hyped. “”Unstoppable”” features raw, aggressive lyrics such as Skrapz’s intro verse: “”Run away, I’m chasing for your fears, and almost got ’em in my possession, my sweat is your tears. Smoke clears, repentance in the west side of bounds, disciplining wack MCs for all 10 rounds.”” “”What’s Wrong With Me,”” “”Porn Star”” and the self-titled song “”Halfbreed”” contain hypnotic beats, and mix in many intriguing sound effects. Prevalent are futuristic, robotic noises, people screaming, and howling whistles. It’s important to stress that this genre of music is not mainstream “”TRL,”” Jay-Z or P-Diddy. It’s a style all its own. It’s hardcore, intense and wicked, and it reflects Sol’s and Skrapz’s views of society. It is horror-core rap at its finest. Also, like many of Detroit’s underground artists such as Natas, Esham and Project Born, Halfbreed say they make music for their fans, not for money. They’re interested in quality and content rather than flashiness and notoriety. Halfbreed’s “”Kontamination”” is unique and is a must-have for any underground collector. — Mike Barker ...

Mission: Food

Tucked away, just off the beaten path of downtown La Jolla, is the Mission Coffee Cup. Located on Wall Street, it is removed enough to be at odds with what one expects to find in La Jolla’s bustling yuppie atmosphere. The restaurant is delightfully small, with an intimate but casual setting. When it is not busy, seating tends to be immediate and service prompt. A good number of locals eats there regularly, so peak times can be backed up. You’ll find a mix of business types and locals who find their way here for a very different kind of attitude about healthy food. During good weather, a small outdoor seating area makes for a lovely change in scenery. Amenities are kept very simple — paper napkins, paper menus and metal tabletops are as fancy as it gets. The highlight of the Mission Coffee Cup, sparsely decorated with a funky but retro ’50s flare, is the food. All menu items are very affordable, the high-end being around seven or eight dollars for a “”large lunch plate.”” The lunch menu is quite extensive, with many vegetarian options. Besides sandwiches, main dishes described as “”health-Mex”” and “”health-Chinese”” are available. Ignore the connotations of the word “”health;”” these items are still very good. Everything is very hearty and fills you up. You really get your money’s worth. The breakfast selection, though limited, has been the focus of my experiences there. The cinnamon French toast is especially good — light fluffy inside with toasted edges. The mission potatoes, which come with eggs and squaw bread, are also good. In addition, there is a power breakfast menu that has very light energy foods. The Mission Coffee Cup also offers a wide array of coffee drinks that have as much flare as the food. Cuisine here has a simple elegance that can be traced to owner Marla Reif’s attitudes about healthy eating. The slogan on the back of her sweater says “”Conscientious Cuisine,”” which is an accurate summary of her restaurant. Her intent is to sell food that is interesting to eat and see, and that is made with a health-conscious attitude. There is little dairy usage; perhaps two items I noticed actually had sour cream. There is little cheese used in the majority of dishes, and there is no butter at your table, though you can order it. The Mission Coffee Cup in La Jolla is the second restaurant with that name. The original Mission Coffee Cup sits on Mission Boulevard in Mission Valley. Both were started by Reif, but she has little to do with the original now. Reif’s unique and eclectic take on cuisine has been at the La Jolla location for almost five years. As of now, the Mission is open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., but Reif has plans to extend its hours of operation to include dinner. This will mean an entire new menu of similar items. Mission Coffee Cup1109 Wall St.(858) 454-2819 ...

Hiatus Weekly Calendar

All tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (619) 220-8497 or by going to http://www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. 5 Thursday STEVE WHITE with percussionist STEVE TOMAI will play the blues at Dizzy’s. Perfomances start at 8 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Cover charge is $5. Call (858) 270-7467 for more information. UGLY DUCKLING brings together old-school hip-hop with a funky jazz flavor. With beats that are reminiscent of Jurassic 5 and Dilated Peoples, UGLY DUCKLING will be at `Canes Bar & Grill. Tickets are $10. Local San Diego group BUCKFAST SUPERBEE will be at The Casbah for their CD release party. Just think, lots of guitars and high levels of energy. Tickets cost $7. Call (619) 232-4355 for more information. 6 Friday Groove to Latin jazz at Dizzy’s with KOKOPELLI featuring Turiya Mareya and Dave Millard. The sets are at 8:45 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. The cover is $8 and the phone number for more information is (858) 270-7467. ATERCIOPELADOS means “”The Velvety Ones”” and this Coloumbian group has brought together the fire of Latin American music with a trip-hop-like groove. This velvety group has been nominated for a Grammy in 1997 and 1998. They will be at `Canes Bar & Grill at 8 p.m. Tickets for the show are $20 apiece. 7 Saturday The MIKAN ZLATKOVICH QUARTET with special guest Joe Marillo will be at Dizzy’s. The shows start at 8:45 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. with a $8 cover charge. For more information call (858) 270-2467. With their Brit-pop sensibilities, the American quintet, GUIDED BY VOICES, hits you with great pop sound guaranteed to get your feet moving. They will perform at the Brick By Brick and tickets are $14. The show starts at 8:30 p.m. If you’re in a ’70s-funk-dance-soul kind of mood, GOLDFISH will provide you with that and more. They will perform in the Belly Up Tavern at 9:15 p.m. Tickets are $7. Led by the unmistakable voice of Richard Butler, the PSYCHEDELIC FURS will perform at the Cannibal Bar on Mission Blvd. This London group made a huge splash in the ’80s with their unique sound in the New Wave movement. Their best songs are classics on the ’80s radio stations. Tickets cost $35 and for more information call (619) 220-TIXS. 8 Sunday Jazz it up at Dizzy’s before you get ready for the week with saxophonist DICK McGUANE, trumpet player PHIL TAUBER, piano player LYNN WILLARD with BILL ANDREWS on bass and MIKE HOLGUIN on the drums. The show start at 7 p.m. and the cover charge is $5. For more information call (858) 270-2467. 11 Wednesday AT THE DRIVE-IN has cancelled their show at `Canes Bar & Grill. Explore “”Feminine”” bodies at Price Center Ballroom B at 4:30 p.m. The event will feature Judith Halberstam, Daphne Brooks, Kathy Jones, George Lipsitz and Lisa Yoneyama. Event is free to the general public. 12 Thursday VENICE will be at the Belly Up Tavern. The concert starts at 8 p.m. and tickets are $12. ...