Arts & Entertainment

Album Reviews

Bob Sinclar Cerrone Sound of Barclay Who is Bob Sinclar? Sinclar comes from the imagination of Parisian Chris Le Friant — Sinclar is also his alter ego. Sinclar is a world famous DJ, remixer and producer. Sinclar has a specialized groove. The retro-disco sound behind his music is complemented by a sensual house-beat and modern production methods that get you going on the dance floor. Sinclar’s credits are everywhere. His remixes of dozens of songs are on many records and huge singles such as Stardust’s “”The Music Sounds Better With You.”” Sinclar’s recent studio album, “”Champs Elysees,”” captures the sounds of disco and R&B in the ’70s, and creates a soulful blend of very danceable club music. Sinclar returns with arrangements of the work of classic disco producer Jean-Marc Cerrone. Almost everything on “”Cerrone by Bob Sinclar”” is a classic hit from the ’70s, but is reworked to achieve the modern sound of house music. This is French house at its very best. There are classics like “”Love in C Minor”” and “”Supernature.”” There is a spicy Latin sound in “”Revelacion”” and funky disco-guitars scattered throughout the mix. House producers like Modjo (known for “”Lady””) also make an appearance on this album. There are remixes by Spiller (known for the hit single “”Groovejet [If This Ain’t Love]””) and progressive house master Danny Tenaglia. Sinclar also slips in one of his own songs (“”I Feel For You””) to mix beautifully on top of Cerrone’s “”Look For Love,”” which results in nothing short of pure glamor. Soulful vocals dominate “”Standing in the Rain,”” and the horns and funky bass-line of this song — and practically the entire album — can transport you to a mansion in the hills of Hollywood for some swank disco-party, the glittery nightlife in Vegas or the steamy clubs of Paris. This album mixes French disco-house sound with Latin instrumentals and the pace of deep house. “”Cerrone by Bob Sinclar”” is fit for any party or for cruising through the city streets with the top down. Spaceman Spiff The Love EP self-released Spaceman Spiff. Funny name, eh? How many of you recognize this as a Calvin and Hobbes reference? Probably a lot of you. But how many of you know this is probably one of the best hip-hop-infused jazz acts in San Diego? There is a distinct jazz sound in this music, with classic jazz chords that reveal the light sounds of the sax and flute. The funk in the drums and bass gives the sound that extra edge. The smooth vocals of Ivan Garzon will make anyone feel the foot-tapping and body-swaying groove of the music. You could compare Spaceman Spiff to a jazzier Jamiroquai, but almost all of Spiff’s material is original. The talent of this quartet is more than apparent on “”The Love EP.”” As vocalist and bass player, Garzon studied bass guitar at the California Institute for the Arts. The man with the sax and the flute is Clay Elliot, who also does some vocal work and has a degree in jazz performance from San Diego State University. Brilliant guitarist Tommy Collins has his degree in music education, and versatile drummer Mike Cannon teaches drum classes for high school students. “”That Something”” opens up with the flute floating over the funky guitar and groovy bass-line with a great sing-along chorus: “”Girl you have that somethin’ that leaves me wanting you.”” There are songs of admiration with words like “”All I wanna do is love you, tell me you’ll always stay”” in “”Always Stay,”” as well as songs of pure passion in “”You Possess”” with the lyrics, “”You’re hypnotizing, so mesmerizing. My heat is rising, utilizing everything that feels so good.”” This is truly an album of love and is perfect for any late night with candles, a bottle of red wine and someone special. The only criticism is that the album is painfully short and there isn’t very much room to hear the talent that can be completely expressed in a live performance. So for now you’ll have to live with the repeat button until Spaceman Spiff comes out with a full album. With their growing success, that can’t be too far away. Vivid Vivid Flesh in Tension Is there anything truly unique about the sound of San Diego band Vivid? At first, not really. This is a pop-rock group with catchy hooks and great sing-along lyrics. Their self-titled album is the stuff summer anthems are made of — the kind of stuff you will find in MP3 playlists and backyard fraternity barbecues. Vivid has a very polished sound with distorted guitars, riffs and drum fills placed in all the right places. It will fulfill your guilty fun pop music needs. Inevitably, with a band that is trying to break into the notoriously difficult pop-rock market, there will be comparisons. So here I go with mine: Vivid is like Lit but less obnoxious. Third Eye Blind but without that annoying syrupy pop sound. Everclear? Please, Vivid blows them out of the water. Vivid seems to blend all of the good things about American rock and gets rid of most of the annoyances accompanied by pop. Vocalist-guitarist Terran Trousset has almost a Social Distortion vocal quality on “”More Time Alone.”” “”Relentless”” is light, relaxing and has an almost Peter Gabriel-like quality. You can sense influences ranging from The Clash to Stroke 9. “”Renee”” and “”Everlasting La”” have a very energetic, three-chord punk-rock feeling and are sure to create a mosh pit. I see “”Funky Revolution”” prompting fist-pumping and crowd-surfing as the audience yells back, “”I’m talking about a funky revolution/ Just stop all your fuss and get on the bus!”” But fear not, all of the lyrics are not as inane. There is some deeper symbolism about heroes in “”Youth Pilots,”” and the scrutiny of people is addressed in “”All or Nothin’.”” So, is there anything truly unique about the sonic formations of Vivid? They don’t reinvent the sounds of pop-rock, but this stuff sounds better than a lot of other groups on the radio today. So God forbid you walk past all that Limp Bizkit and P.O.D. crap and pick up some Vivid. ...

University Events Office debuts this year's lineup

Each year, the University Events Office at UCSD presents about 20 world music and dance performances. This year, performers from different countries and musical genres will bring UCSD the best of music and dance. The season kicks off with two San Diego premieres: The Sean Curran Dance Company on Oct. 13 and Nov. 4, and Kosong Okwangdae, which performs Korean traditional masked dance. The Sean Curran Company will perform four pieces, including “”Folk Dance for the Future.”” “”Sean Curran began his training with traditional Irish step dancing and progressed into modern dance with the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company,”” said Judi Griffith, an events office representative. “”With his own company, he creates dance infused with his signature virtuosity, complex musicality and powerful emotion.”” General admission tickets are $22. Tickets are $20 for senior citizens and $10 for students. “”Five Clowns Play: Kosong Okwangdae”” premieres Nov. 4. The play, told through dance and song, is the story of the Kosong Village in the South Kysonsan province of Korea. This art form dates back to the 10th century. The play will be performed by an all-male cast from the farming village of Kosong. Kosong Okwangdae will also be in Mandeville Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $17 for general admission, $15 for senior citizens and $10 for students. Jimmy Bosch, who was called “”one of the most devastating forces”” in Latin American music by the Los Angeles Times, will play the Price Center Ballroom on Oct. 19. Irish singer Mary Black will make her long awaited return to San Diego on Nov. 3. Coming Jan. 15, 2002, Frank Sinatra fans will be treated to what The New York Times calls a “”winning tribute to Ol’ Blue Eyes”” with “”Our Sinatra”” performed by an 11-piece band and a trio of singers. Also, look for the San Diego Film Festival at the Price Center in April 2002. Baaba Maal, Lila Downs and Virginia Rodridgues are also scheduled to perform this year. Tickets for all events are available at the UCSD Box Office and at all Ticketmaster locations. For a complete calendar of events, visit the University Events Office or check out their Web site at http://ueo.ucsd.edu. ...

Hiatus Calendar

9/27 Thursday Lyon Liew Guardian Where would the News be without Huey Lewis? Certainly not at The Park in the Viejas Outlet Center. Huey Lewis and the News stormed MTV and the `80s with their 1983 release, ³Sports,² which gave the world four top 10 singles. They will perform at 8 p.m. The bad news? Tickets are $60. Catch some indie-punk at The Casbah with Zen Guerilla. Vocal effects and raw sounds make up the sound of Zen Guerilla. In support are Tori Cobras and Rollerball. The Casbah info line is (619) 232-4355. 9/28 Friday No, ³When Bands Attack² is not another Fox TV special about high school marching bands gone awry. Rather, it is a festival of hard-hitting performers like Ozzy Osbourne, Staind and Godsmack. Osbourne just finished OzzFest 2001 and Staind has been growing to be quite succesful with the help of MTV airplay. Godsmack has recently released ³Awake.² ³When Bands Attack² will be at the Coors Ampitheatre. The event starts at 2 p.m. Al Jarreau has won Grammys in R&B, jazz and pop. He will bring his silky voice and his smooth jazz sound to Humphrey¹s By the Bay. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. and tickets start at $45. Go to http://www.humphreysbythebay.com for more information and to purchase tickets. The Dragons will be at The Casbah to promote the release of their new record, ³Kamikaze.² The supporting bands will be the Nomands, The Demons, and The Fleshtones. The show starts 8:30 p.m. and you¹ll need to call The Casbah at (619) 232-4355 for more details. 9/29 Saturday The 20th Annual Adams Avenue Street Fair starts at 10 a.m. and goes to 10 p.m. it continues on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. There will be everything from carnival rides to over 70 artists performing throughout the weekend. Food, arts, crafts and beer gardens will also be available. The event is free. Look to the front page of hiatus (page 9) for the complete story. Jazz great Wynton Marsalis will be performing with The Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra at the California Center for the Arts in Escondido. Marsalis will perform jazz standards from the likes of Duke Ellington to Charles Mingus as well as original material. The show starts at 8 p.m. and tickets start at $35. 10/1 Monday Basement Jaxx are coming to 4th & B. With hits from their albums ³Remedy² and ³Rooty,² the British duo has been getting asses to shake on dance floors around the world with infectious hits such as ³Rendezvous² and ³Where¹s Your Head At.² The doors open at 8 p.m. and tickets are $18. 10/2 Tuesday Probably best known for his work with the Beastie Boys, Mix Master Mike has been making the rounds on his own. He has performed at UCSD and most recently at Street Scene. This master turntable artist will be at ¹Canes Bar & Grill at 9 p.m. 10/3 Wednesday Anne Murray has recently been found on late-night commercials promoting her latest album of pop covers. But back in 1969 she was one of the best pop singers of the day. She has released almost 30 studio albums of her own in her 30 years in the music business. Murray will kick off the 2001 East County Performing Arts Center season at 2:30 p.m. Tickets start at $30. ...

Adams Avenue Street Fair

What distinguishes San Diego from many other cities of comparable size is that it feels like a much smaller town. This is due largely to the fact that what we call San Diego is really a patchwork of distinct communities loosely bound together by ordinances and area codes. Every community in the city, from Del Mar to Golden Hill, has its own particular vibe, its own characteristic denizens and its own cultural and community events. Lyon Liew Guardian The crowning example of community togetherness is the street festival, when the legendary weather San Diegans are blessed with leads them to take their parties into the street. Year- round, we host events featuring music, food and vendors catering to every personality. Now, as fall dawns, the greatest of these is upon us once again. The weekend of Sept. 29 and Sept. 30 will find Normal Heights transformed from a quirky but calm pocket of San Diego into a sun-drenched celebration of the best this city has to offer. When the annual Adams Avenue Street Fair rolls into town, music lovers and party-goers should stand up, take notice and make plans. In 1972, Adams Avenue unveiled its new landmark: the neon Normal Heights sign at the corner of Adams and Bancroft. To celebrate, they organized a modest street festival featuring local bands and vendor booths — The Adams Avenue Street Fair was born. Lyon Liew Guardian Among the festival’s offerings this year are over 400 booths and 80 bands on seven stages. Between 50,000 and 60,000 San Diegans attended each day of last year’s fair, and that number is expected to be met again, if not exceeded. On Saturday or Sunday morning, roll out of bed a little earlier than usual — say, 10 a.m. If you have a car, driving to the festival is so easy you could do it in your sleep; the activities on Adams Avenue are nestled between Interstates 805 and the I-15. Parking gets more difficult as the day progresses, of course. Coming in early not only guarantees you’ll enjoy a beautiful beach city morning, it also scores you a spot to stash your wheels. The carless will find the event easily accessible via San Diego Transit bus Routes 2 and 11. Don’t worry if you skipped breakfast: Everything tastes better when you buy it from a brightly colored booth. Among the usual array of barbecue and smoothies, steer toward the hand-squeezed lemonade and fresh-baked cobbler a la mode. A little later in the day — or not, depending on how hardcore you’re feeling this weekend — those aged 21 and up can make a pit stop at one of the three beer gardens along the avenue. Heck, go for all three, but make sure you’ll remember the fun of the festival come Monday. Also, if you show up in your pajamas, it’s no problem — clothing, shoes and accessories are among the most common things peddled at vendor booths. Keep an eye out for the $10 sunglasses store and the Indian clothing booths. You don’t even have to stress if your wallet is still on your bedside table, because the main attractions are free. They don’t call it a fair for nothing: A circus and mimes take charge of the Adams Park Theater Stage while carnival rides hum and spin at 35th Street. Missing out on the Ferris wheel or Scrambler would be a major festival foul. And while the rides are fewer than at, for example, the big-shot Del Mar Fair, no tickets are required. Why go to Student Health for counseling when this childhood regression therapy is much more fun? There’s one big disappointment, though, for all the kids at heart: The pony rides are for the little ones only. But check out the rock climbing right next door on 34th Street. After you’ve hit up the tilt-a-whirl and scaled a polyurethane cliff wall, it’s time to get down to the festival’s bread and butter. All the shopfronts and activities are fun, but the soul of the Adams Avenue Street Fair is the music acts that take to the seven stages strategically scattered along the festival’s six blocks. Each stage is themed to cater to a certain style of music. The Roots Rock Stage showcases San Diego’s best — music they just don’t make anymore. Keep an eye out for the Buddy Blue Band on Saturday night and The Paladins on Sunday evening. The majority of the acts at the World/Jazz Stage are Latin-influenced, like Julian Briano y sus Hermanos, Siete de Corazon and the Orquesta Binacional. Another not-to-miss standout is Theo and the Zydeco Patrol. If you’re unfamiliar with Zydeco, it’s the high-energy sound coming out of Louisiana that evokes crayfish and dimly lit dance halls filled with big-haired, toe-tapping two-steppers. And you thought only Weird Al could make the accordion cool. The Blues Stage is at Hawley and Adams, and its acts range from The Blues Brokers to the Gospel Revelators, Rod and the Pistons to the Sue Palmer Quartet. The last is the best bet for this stage; Sue gets her groove going on Sunday evening. Looking for a more mellow sound? The Acoustic Stage’s songwriters and guitar strummers will soothe you into relaxed contemplation and pleasant digestion. San Diego’s acoustic scene is varied and extremely talented, so any act here is likely to draw you in, but make room in your schedule, especially for Lisa Sanders (Saturday night), as well as Gregory Page and Anya Marina (both Sunday afternoon). Lisa is funky, Gregory is heart-breaking and Anya thought-provoking; each of them puts on a heck of a show. Another great gal guitarist is Mary Dolan, who graces the Lestat’s Coffee House Stage on Saturday afternoon. Her slightly spastic stage presence is a good lead-in to that afternoon’s next act, the National Comedy Theater, for a break from the tunes. But let’s say you show up at the festival and are suddenly struck with a crippling bout of chronic fatigue syndrome, leaving you with no choice but to spend all day at one stage. Although the real essence of the street fair experience is to wander aimlessly and sample the stages with the capriciousness one affords a banquet of free food, if you see only one stage, make it the San Diego Music Awards Stage at DeMille’s. All the acts performing at this stage are nominees for this year’s San Diego Music Awards, and the deservedness of this honor is readily apparent. Pretty much any of the bands performing on this stage either day is a solid bet. Make this stage your Saturday night destination, because Jose Sinatra and the Troy Dante Inferno is not an act to miss. They classify themselves as “”lounge metal,”” but the cumulative effect of mangled covers and medleys of ’60s and ’70s staples, hilarious parodies about sex with celebrities and one very unique lead singer in a tight velvet leisure suit is inexpressible in a cute genre catch-all. The late-night slot at the SDMA stage is filled by the Bastard Sons of Johnny Cash, a slightly less flamboyant group that nonetheless knows how to work the crowd and kick some country butt. They prove that the most amazing thing about the San Diego music scene is that some of these bands stick around as long as they do without being snapped up by major labels and shipped all over the country on tours. Sunday evening also finds great bands at the SDMA stage. The Shambles spout classic SD-style pop, and Pink Froyd transitions smoothly from the bar scene to the fair’s main stage. The Adams Avenue Street Fair doesn’t boast the nationally-known names of Street Scene, the high-brow art of the La Jolla fest or the all-out rowdiness of the PB Block Party. However, its irresistible atmosphere comes straight from the heart of Normal Heights and all of San Diego. It is laid-back SoCal at its best, and it’s the perfect way to spend a weekend. ...

10 Questions

What is your best memory from childhood? “”Probably just spending time with my family and going on family outings.”” What is your greatest regret? “”Not getting really involved in high school until my senior year. I wasn’t bold enough to get involved and make new friends.”” What is your favorite city in the world? “”Santa Cruz, because that is where I grew up.”” How do you handle stress? “”I pray about it.”” Who is your hero? “”My mom, because she supports me and always has time to listen to me.”” What is the most important political issue today? “”Well, after the whole terrorist attack on the World Trade Center, I would have to say national security and world peace.”” How did you choose what you’re studying? “”I am a computer engineering major. I enjoy taking things apart and putting them back together. Computers have always interested me and I enjoy figuring out how they work.”” What improvements do you feel UCSD needs to make? “”Parking — more parking!”” Where do you see yourself in 10 years? “”I would like to be in a professional field and get a master’s degree. I hope to do software development or something in the computer industry.”” How do you want to be remembered? “”That I was a witness of my faith in Jesus Christ through what I did and said, and how I treated other people.”” ...

Dancing in the Streets

San Diego came alive at Street Scene 2001, the last great party of the summer. Thousands of people packed the Gaslamp District to dance, drink and listen. The vibe was simply wonderful. Tyler Huff Guardian Street Scene and the Pacific Beach Block Party are the few times each year when the entire city of San Diego seems to flood the streets to have a good time and listen to great music. Street Scene 2001 included a variety of music to please the attendees of the outdoor festival. Within a few blocks, fans could find reggae and jam bands, jazz and hip-hop groups and DJs making the crowd dance. Still, some may have found the conspicuous corporate sponsorship problematic. Tyler Huff Guardian Bands like Jack Johnson, Cake, Social Distortion and the Counting Crows rocked downtown Sept. 7. All the clubbers headed for the XM Radio Electronica Stage. The Sept. 8 performances showcased 311, the Black Crowes and James Brown. Berlin was even there to take your breath away. Sunday was the chance for the sub-21 crowd to go to Street Scene and revel in the music. Well-known bands like the Offspring, OutKast, and P.O.D. gave performances. People also grooved to G. Love and Special Sauce, and the jazzy sounds of Soulive at the Best Buy Stage. San Diego’s own B-Side Players thrilled the crowd with great Latin jazz jams. Eek-A-Mouse played at the Time Warner Roadrunner Stage. Eek, no stranger to UCSD, was more at home with a larger crowd that seemed to understand its music more than the average UCSD student does. Mix Master Mike dropped the beats in the dance music area and Donald Glaude had the crowd moving along to every pounding beat of his energetic set. Rounding out Street Scene were the overpriced food and drinks: Four dollars for a slice of pizza and how much for a beer? Besdies that and the corporate advertising, Street Scene 2001 proved to be a well-done festival. ...

Hiatus Calendar

Look to the Hiatus Calendar for events in and around UCSD. All tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (619) 220-8497 or by going to http://www.ticketmaster.com, unless otherwise noted. Tuesday, Sept. 18 You only have to travel to The Park at Viejas Outlet Center to watch Chicago perform. The show starts at 8 p.m. The band performs again Wednesday at 8 p.m. at the same location. Tickets are a painful $50 but at least you don’t have to go to Chicago, right? (619) 659-2077 will get you the info you need. Vocalist Lila Brown-Smith with Myron Ross on drums, Dave Milard on sax and flute, Bob Boss on the guitar, Ben Wanicur on bass, and Roy Gonsalez on percussion will be at Dizzy’s from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Cover is $8. Call (858) 279-7467 for more information. Indie-rock group Bahamadia will be at ‘Canes Bar & Grill. The show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15. Call Canes for more information at (858) 488-9690. Wednesday, Sept. 19 Los Angeles-based Buckcherry will perform at ‘Canes Bar & Grill. The group has been playing hard and aggressive rock since 1995 and have a new release titled “”Time Bomb.”” Tickets are $10. For more information dial (858) 488-9690. Punk band Dewey Defeats Truman will headline at The Casbah. Woke Up Falling, The Landslide, and The Dempsey Project will support. The show starts at 8:30 p.m. Call The Casbah for details at (619) 232-4355. Thursday, Sept. 20 Jazz fusion group Spyro Gyra reached its peak in the late 1970s but it’s still hot at Humphrey’s Concerts by the Bay. Tickets start at $33 and the show starts at 7 p.m. You can buy tickets at http://www.humphreysbythebay.com New York City quartet Clem Snide might be the new sound of country. Named after a William S. Burroughs character, the group is here at The Casbah to show off its alt-country sound. The show starts at 8:30 p.m. Call The Casbah for details at (619) 232-4355. Friday Sept. 21 The DJs and Vinylphiles Club present its first event of the year, Hop on Pop, in the Price Center Ballroom. The event is free to UCSD students. DJs will spin house, trance and drum ‘n’ bass. Hop on Pop starts at 8 p.m. and ends at 1 a.m. Log on to http://djclub.ucsd.edu for more information. Crooked Fingers is the project of Archers of Loaf guitarist and vocalist, Eric Bachmann. He plays The Casbah at 8:30 p.m. Lo-fi production and electronic atmospherics color the sound. Jack’s Broken Heart and Jim White will also perform. The Casbah has all the details, (619) 232-4355. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy pushed its way into the music world when swing and rockabilly hit it big. Even though swing isn’t the thing these days, you can still catch them at Humphrey’s Concerts by the Bay. You can buy tickets and get more information at http://www.humphreysbythebay.com Saturday, Sept. 22 The Embrooks from Britain will entertain you with a retro 1960s sound at The Casbah at 9 p.m. Local bands, The Loons and The Lories will play too. DJs will perform all styles of music to round out the evening. Cover is $8. Call The Casbah for more information at (619) 232-4355. Sunday, Sept. 23 After the death of TSOL drummer Todd Barnes in 1999, the band eventually reunited with a new set of band members but the same Orange County punk sound. It has been involved in the O.C. punk scene since the early 1980s. TSOL will play ‘Canes Bar & Grill at 7 p.m. Tickets are $12 and you can call (858) 488-9690 for more information. Monday, Sept. 24 Danilo Perez and the Motherland Project will fill the Neurosciences Institute Auditorium with traditional and Latin jazz. The performance begins at 8 p.m. Tickets are $23. Call (858) 454-5872 for more information. Tuesday, Sept. 25 Would you walk 500 miles for The Proclaimers? Well, you don’t have to. They will perform at ‘Canes Bar & Grill at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15. Call (858) 488-9690 for information. Wednesday, Sept. 26 The incomparable Janet Jackson performs at the San Diego Sports Arena to promote her most recent release, “”All for You.”” The title track is No. 1 on the singles chart. Prepare to get nasty with Janet at 7:30 p.m. There are still tickets on sale, starting at $34.75 ...

Blue-Ribbon, Red-Let'-

Whether this is your first year of navigating a campus or you’re a fifth-year thinking of adding yet another major, UCSD’s enormity and complexity can sometimes seem too much to bear. During these daunting moments, students have many resources that can provide assistance or plain old entertainment. However, there are a handful of campus businesses, organizations and nearby getaway spots that stand above the rest. These, which are reviewed below, together represent the best of UCSD. Lyon Liew Guardian Best Student Organization: [email protected] The lackluster party scene at UCSD takes a lot of heat from students seeking that famed college experience they first saw in “”Animal House.”” There is, however, one oasis of craziness among the libraries and lecture halls: [email protected] This student organization truly is a meeting of the minds — the surfing, skateboarding, and snowboarding minds, that is. Lyon Liew Guardian Before thinking “”I don’t surf, skate or snowboard. Forget it,”” know that [email protected] is responsible for more than just snowboarding trips to Big Bear and Mammoth Mountain resorts. Even if you aren’t graceful on a board, make sure to hang out with those who are — attending their crowded, crazy meetings and parties might earn you a free snowboard or free T-shirts, or you could find that kegstand insanity you’ve been dreaming of. Contact the craziness directly at [email protected] Best Place to Study: CLICS It’s ninth week, and unless you find a quiet spot where you can absorb the genius that your professor insists is within the pages of your reader for Dimensions Of Culture – or Making of the Modern World, Warren Writing, Revelle Humanities, Muir Writing, whatever – you’ll fail the final. The Center for Learning and Instructional Computing Services in Revelle college should be of help. CLICS rocks for many reasons. For one, it boasts the latest hours and the most free-use computers of any UCSD library. Macs and PCs rest atop almost all of the super-sized desks, meaning you’re free to check your e-mail or browse the Internet during study breaks. Furthermore, the soft humming of computers and low-level chatting contribute to a perfect balance of background noise. Finally, caffeine addicts are treated well here — a Peabody’s Coffee cart sits outside the entrance. During finals week, show up in person — and early — to reserve one of the private study rooms designed for study groups. For more information regarding the UCSD libraries, visit http://libraries.ucsd.edu. Best Workout Facility: Main Gym Besides the colossal RIMAC weight room shown to every campus tour group, UCSD has other on-campus workout facilities for students. The Main Gym’s weight room stands apart from the others. Admittedly, RIMAC has the greatest variety of weights and machines, and it has the most floor space, but the Main Gym boasts the newest workout equipment. What it lacks in floor space and variety is made up for with its central location and its snazzy, well-maintained equipment. We all know that bigger isn’t necessarily better, so sweat your stuff at Main Gym instead of RIMAC and fight the freshman 15. For more information, visit http://recreation.ucsd.edu. Best Eatery: Porter’s Pub Hands down, Porter’s Pub has the best food on campus. No day-old cafeteria cuisine can compare to this menu of drippy submarine sandwiches, frothy and frosty beers, and grease-laden, perfectly spiced curly fries. However, there are a few rules of engagement one should know before stopping by the Student Center to indulge. First, never attempt to use a fake I.D. at the pub. The employees are like hawks when they check your legality, and not even the slickest fakie will do you any good — it’ll only get taken away. Second, call in your order 10 minutes ahead so you only have to wait in line to pay — instead of waiting to pay, then waiting for your food to be made. Finally, it is a given that the employees here will not greet you, ask you how you’re doing, or check that your food is up to par. Leave them a tip and leave them alone. Rumor has it that the Price Center is getting a Rubio’s, however, so keep your eye out for that too. Porter’s Pub can be reached at (858) 587-4828. Best Annual Event: Sun God Every spring, UCSD hosts the Sun God Festival. For the hard-core Sun God loyalists, this is a day on which UCSD students imbibe alcoholic beverages or other intoxicating substances, attend class wasted, visit the student organization booths set up near Sun God field, and then party even more at the concert that takes place on RIMAC Field that evening. For less-than-hardcore Sun God enthusiasts, be warned that this pattern of activity is unavoidable, so prepare yourselves. After all, without the uncharacteristic prevailing attitude of peace, love and drunkenness, it would not be the best annual event. For more information on the festival, call (858) 534-4450 or visit http://as.ucsd.edu. Best Date Restaurant: Forever Fondue Forever Fondue, located on the second floor at 1295 Prospect Ave. in downtown La Jolla, offers a menu and an atmosphere that are unique enough to break even the most awkward silences. For appetizers, visitors can dip fluffy chunks of dark and light breads into rich, melty cheeses that cook at each party’s table. For the main course, waiters bring a boiling broth to your table, into which you can plunge salmon, filet mignon and shrimp. For dessert, sink sweet morsels of fresh fruit into a smoothly melted chocolate of your choice. If you haven’t experienced fondue, keep the mood light by letting your date teach you how to perfectly dunk these goodies. If you’re a fondue freak, take on the role of teacher and dole out a few lessons of your own. If neither you nor your date have a clue about the world of fondue, even better – learning together is a great way to keep those awkward first-date silences at bay. For reservations, call (858) 551-4509. Best Local Beach: La Jolla Shores La Jolla Shores, though crowded during peak season, gives sun seekers a package that can’t be found at any other beach near campus. Surfers may want to stick to the Scripps Pier or Blacks Beach areas, but those looking for a relaxing spot to spread out their towels will appreciate the regularly combed, soft, deep sand here, and the impressive view of downtown La Jolla. Shores has a handful of fire pits and barbecues, and the adjacent residential neighborhood site hosts plenty of eye-catching architecture. Sounds touristy, yes, but if you’re new to San Diego, so what? Hop in your car and you’re there in five minutes. Overall, compared to the rowdiness of beaches farther south and Del Mar’s lack of anything but a family scene, La Jolla Shores stands alone as the best beach of the area. For more information, visit http://www.sannet.gov/lifeguards/beaches/shores.html. Best Place to Get Experience: The Academic Internship Program The Academic Internship Program, located on the second floor of Warren college’s Literature Building, collects information on hundreds of local and non-local organizations and helps UCSD students to secure internships at those organizations. The office’s computer database of opportunities is free to UCSD students who complete a brief application, and its listings are diverse enough to ensure a match with almost any student’s interests. AIP is well-established, the staff is personally connected to many people involved with the offered internships, and earning academic credit for your internship hours is simplified by the AIP’s policies. For more information, visit http://aip.ucsd.edu. Best Bookstore on Campus: The UCSD Bookstore Groundwork Books doesn’t accept credit cards. Revelle Bargain Books maintains only a minimum-sized selection. The General Store Co-Op’s long lines are intolerable, and it sells only the most commonly used texts. Ordering your books from online vendors can result in huge delays if your books are back-ordered, plus there’s the cost of shipping. The UCSD Bookstore, on the other hand, accepts cash, checks, credit and ATM cards, has a plethora of readily available books for almost every course, and it maintains enough staff to keep the lines a little less daunting. Early morning is the best time to avoid crowds. Visit the UCSD Bookstore in the Price Center, or find more information at http://www-bookstore.ucsd.edu. Best Class: Contemporary Issues 22, Human Sexuality Take it. We promise that you’ll learn something. Best Intercollegiate Sport To Watch: Women’s Soccer Ah, women’s soccer. It’s a great sport to watch to begin with, and at UCSD, it is especially exciting. Led by head coach Brian McManus, UCSD’s team is now feared by schools nationwide, and hasn’t lost a match in 17 games. With five national titles in the past six years, these athletes are top-notch. They even took the title last year — their first in Division II — compiling an astonishing 21-2 record. Besides its winning record, the team has some of the most loyal, enthusiastic fans. Home games at misty RIMAC Field are well-attended, and there’s nothing like watching the Triton women dismantle their foes under the lights at night. Get there. With nine returning starters, it should be a show. For more information on Triton sports visit the UCSD Athletics Web site: http://athletics.ucsd.edu. Best Place To Get A Job: Monstertrak.com You like buying things. But your parents don’t realize the importance of that enormous bean-bag chair from Ikea you want, and are no longer cooperating by making those deposits into your account. Well, it had to happen sometime. Get a job — it’s easier than you think. Log onto http://career.ucsd.edu/ studentsalumni/relogin.htm to sign up for Monstertrak.- com through UCSD’s Career Services Center Web site and you’re set. UCSD students can post their resumes on the site, look through hundreds of job listings and even check out online job fairs. Just enter what type of job you’re looking for — whether you’re looking for a job on or off campus, part or full-time, or a summer internship — you can filter the results with a few mouse clicks. You can even send your resume and cover letter electronically to employers. Earn some money, get some experience and build up that pathetic excuse for a resume. Monstertrak.com is as close to a sure thing as you will get, even in a tight job market. Best Coffee Cart: Art of Espresso It seems as if every quarter a new coffee cart laden with little boxes of tea, muffins and other quaint confections springs up somewhere on campus. Though the vast majority of them feature mediocre food and coffee, there is one that doesn’t. Located outside the entrance to Mandeville Auditorium, The Art of Espresso truly lives up to its name. This cart sells the best coffee on campus. The organic Sumatra is to die for. The best thing about the cart is its impeccable service. The people who work there are friendly and helpful to the point where you actually notice — even at 8 a.m. So, caffeine fiends, head over to The Art of Espresso and sate your joe addiction. Best Nearby Grocery Store: Trader Joe’s It’s no Ralphs or Albertsons in terms of size, but Trader Joe’s is the best place to pick up healthy, inexpensive food. Located just a few blocks from campus in La Jolla Village Square at Nobel Drive and Villa La Jolla Drive, TJ’s prides itself in stocking the shelves with premium food without the premium price. For the health-conscious shopper, this place is heaven. With almost half an aisle devoted to nutrition bars, half-dozen kinds of granola and every kind of dried fruit you can imagine, it’s easy to go home with food that won’t leave you malnourished or overweight. Its freezer section is stocked with college essentials such as frozen pizzas and rolled tacos, and they carry all the staples, such as milk, cheese, produce and fresh meat. You can even get fresh-cut flowers for your boyfriend or girlfriend for surprisingly cheap. Beware: If you crave your boxes of Lucky Charms and cases of Coca-Cola, you will be disappointed. Those with stubborn brand loyalties and no sense of adventure need not apply. Luckily, Ralphs is right next door. And no, beaver pelts are not a valid form of payment at Trader Joe’s, though cash, check, credit and ATM cards are gladly accepted. Check out http://www.traderjoes.com for cool stuff. Best Intramural Sports Teams Coed: Innertube Water Polo It’s easy to see why this is the best coed intramural sport on campus: Men and women in bathing suits splashing around in a pool. As nice as this sounds, the game of innertube water polo is actually a fierce, competitive sport. Because of the use of innertubes as floatation devices, not as much action can occur underwater. This, however, does not prevent aquatic treachery, as tube-flipping and plenty of arm wrestling occurs outside the referee’s sightlines. If you’re looking to get some exercise or just love water polo, give this one a try in the fall and spring quarters, when it’s in season. The cost is $35 per seven-person team. Men: Flag Football Flag football conjures up fond memories of childhood, calling out “”alligators”” before rushing the quarterback who is invariably looking at least 20 yards downfield for the long bomb. Forget it. IM flag football at UCSD can be more brutal than an XFL playoff game, and the level of play can be extremely high. If you’ve played casually in the past, join a single or even a double-A team. If you think you can hang, join a triple-A team, but plan on practicing your multiple defensive sets and pre-designed plays that you’ll need to have a chance. One last word of advice: Buy a mouthpiece. There are seven men per team and the entry fee is $35 per squad. Women: Soccer Picture yourself shirtless, on your knees in the middle of a field beating your fists in the air in pure euphoria. All you Brandi Chastain wannabes can fulfill this worthwhile fantasy by joining an intramural soccer team. Those who love the game but just missed the cut to the UCSD women’s Division II national championship team can feed their competitive hunger, or just get out there and get some exercise. If you’re really good, you can go for the triple-A league, which is very competitive. Double-A is intermediate and single-A is for beginners. So strap on your shin guards, wash your sports bras and go for the goal. For more information on intramural sports at UCSD visit http://recreationucsd.edu/im.htm or pick up a UCSD Recreation Guide from one of several locations around campus. Best Club Sport: Ultimate Disc This one is very close. Though men’s lacrosse and ice hockey club teams were league champions, men’s and women’s crew are always solid and rugby is, well, very psychotic, ultimate disc gets the nod as best club sport. The Squids and the Psychos — the men’s and women’s teams, respectively — are extremely popular, and the game is fast-paced and exciting. And if you’re looking for some “”extracurricular activities”” to go with your extracurricular activities, it is rumored that the team knows how to put on a decent shindig after a long game. If you’re not too confident on your disc-wielding skills, they even have teams for beginners and intermediate players to cut their teeth on. Best Recreation Class: Intro to Indoor Rock Climbing UCSD’s indoor rock-climbing facility, the Outback Climbing Center, is located at the Canyonview Athletic Complex, and this class gives beginners a crash course in how to climb large, man-made rocks. Rock climbing can be a great form of stress relief, and you even get to wear funny shoes. Indoor rock climbing builds strength and coordination in a fun and safe environment. With Outback employees staffing the climbing facilities, there’s little risk of becoming a pancake. The two-hour class costs $15 for students, and consists of one hour of instruction, and one hour of free climbing. For more information on Outback Adventures visit http://recreation.ucsd.edu/outback.html For information on all of UCSD’s myriad recreation classes visit http://recreation.ucsd.edu. Best Commuter Lounge: Revelle College Commuter Lounge Libraries are great if you’re looking for a quiet place to do your chem homework, but they’re not the most relaxing place to just chill out, and sleeping is frowned upon. If you have a couple of hours between classes and don’t live on campus, a great place to relax is at one of the commuter lounges. The best is on the bottom floor of Blake Hall in Revelle Plaza right next to CLICS. It has plenty of comfortable chairs and a television, so you can check the latest CNN reports and just unwind. They also have lockers so you can stash all that stuff you don’t want to carry around with you. You can also check your e-mail from one of the computers. And best of all, they don’t care if you snooze. For a complete listing of all on-campus commuter lounges and their hours, visit the University Centers Web site at http://theuniversitycenters.ucsd.edu/commuter_lounge.html. Best Dining Hall: OceanView Terrace Thurgood Marshall college’s OceanView Terrace isn’t usually considered one the top places to eat on campus, but after its recent renovation, it is UCSD’s best. It now has a coffee house lounge a la “”Friends”” and even Internet-capable computers. The place is actually worth frequenting by more than starving Marshall dormrats. As its name suggests, there is an ocean view — which can be enjoyed from the patio that is now partially enclosed with plenty of windows. The new decor is pleasing to the eye, and the food is much improved. Of the new food options, the open-hearth fired pizza is the best. They cook these delicious, cheese-smothered pies right before your eyes. OVT serves the classic dining hall fodder such as salads, sandwiches and food off the grill as well. If you have meal points, you should check out the new OVT at least once, even if you’re not a Marshall student. For more information including locations and hours of all on-campus dining facilities, visit the UCSD Housing & Dining Services Web site at http://hdsu.ucsd.edu. Best On-Campus Restrooms: AP&M, Price Center Let’s be honest: The best place to do your business is at home, but unfortunately, sometimes that’s just not feasible. Every so often, you have to drop anchor at school. The best men’s bathroom is located on the second floor of the Applied Physics and Mathematics building in Muir college. Always well-stocked with ample paper supplies, this fine facility also features a full-length mirror. Enjoy! The best women’s bathroom is located on the second floor of the Price Center. Average in most respects, what sets this one apart is its dispenser of free feminine products0. So if you’re in a bind, you know where to go. ...

Fall films provide plenty of entertainment

Summer movies are similar to buttered popcorn: They tend to give you a savory taste but not much substance. Summer 2001 had few high-quality movies and few bright spots. That’s why fall films, which tend to take more chances, are more worthy Oscar contenders. The fall 2001 lineup is remarkably diverse and includes comedies, period pieces and fantasy escapes. Here is a look at the no-popcorn-necessary films that are coming out this fall. “”Training Day”” Sept. 21 Who’s in it: Denzel Washington and Ethan Hawke. What it’s about: Jake Hoyt (Hawke), a young and ambitious undercover investigator, is assigned to an anti-drug squad led by decorated veteran Sgt. Alonzo Harris (Washington). Harris is a corrupt official who is as terrible as the criminals he is chasing. Hoyt is faced with a problem as his morality is challenged by the decadent ways of his boss. Outlook: Two great actors are paired well in this drama. The plot is overdone by Hollywood, but whenever you get Washington in a good role, he usually steals the show. “”Zoolander”” Sept. 28 Starring: Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson, Will Ferrell, Christine Taylor, Jerry Stiller and Milla Jovovich. What it’s about: Derek Zoolander (Stiller) is the world’s most famous supermodel. Trouble ensues when male models are being brainwashed by an organization to assassinate world leaders. Derek must work with his archrival, Hansel (Wilson), to stop the plan and save the world. Outlook: Stiller has been on a roll since his charming performance in “”Meet the Parents.”” “”Zoolander”” looks like another movie that will make it big the theaters. Although silly and childish, expect much laughter not only from Stiller but also from the promising Wilson. Also look for Stiller’s dad, Jerry, who plays a modeling agent. “”Serendipity”” Oct. 5 Who’s in it: John Cusack and Kate Beckinsale. What it’s about: Fate seems to be shining down upon Cusack’s and Beckinsale’s characters as a chance encounter leads to a wonderful night on the town. They like each other, but Beckinsale decides to let destiny decide the future of their affection and leaves a possible second meeting to chance. They next meet a decade later when Beckinsale’s character is about to be married. Outlook: “”Sleepless In Seattle”” redux? This is a nice date movie or chick flick, but unfortunately the far-fetched plot lacks both the charisma and charm of “”Sleepless In Seattle.”” Cusack is an excellent actor with great range, but this looks like another “”America’s Sweethearts”” fiasco. “”Corky Romano”” Oct. 12 Who’s in it: Chris Kattan, Peter Berg, Chris Penn and Peter Falk. What it’s about: Kattan plays a vegetarian obsessed with 1980s music. When his mobster family gets into trouble with the law, they ask him to infiltrate the FBI to destroy any incriminating evidence. Outlook: Some films were born to be funny and witty. This lackluster movie should have been stillborn. Kattan’s annoying comedy is unfortunately the main attraction. Like most “”Saturday Night Live”” skits that are transferred to the big screen, this movie’s minimal appeal will cause it to die out faster than you can drop an o-chem course. “”From Hell”” Oct. 19 Who’s in it: Johnny Depp, Heather Graham and Robbie Coltrane. What it’s about: In Victorian London, the streets are ominous as Jack the Ripper goes on a killing rampage. Psychic inspector Abberline (Depp) suspects a conspiracy and is determined to solve the mystery and identify the serial killer. In his hunt, he falls for a Cockney prostitute (Graham) who is in imminent danger. Outlook: The Hughes brothers, who have directed many urban street dramas, are an awkward fit for this period drama, but it will be interesting to see if their expertise can make it something gripping. This is not another “”Sleepy Hollow,”” but expect a great performance from Depp. Unfortunately, this cannot be extended to Graham, whose acting abilities, like Jack’s identity, are unknown and missing. “”K-PAX”” Oct. 26 Who’s in it: Kevin Spacey, Jeff Bridges, Mary McCormack and Alfred Woodard. What it’s about: In a mental hospital, Prot (Spacey), a mysterious patient, claims to come from the planet K-PAX. A doctor (Bridges) who monitors Prot tries to convince him otherwise, but the further he delves into Prot’s mind, the more he starts believing that Prot may be an alien after all. Outlook: Remember “”Don Juan Demarco?”” If not, you’re missing out on a film with a similar plot to “”K-PAX.”” Spacey has played quirky characters in “”American Beauty”” and “”The Usual Suspects,”” and it looks like he’s displaying his excellent acting abilities once again. The movie seems like an Oscar-contender with a cast that also includes the venerable Bridges. But be warned: Although the movie looks promising, it may be a dud (remember “”Pay it Forward?””). “”Novocaine”” Oct. 26 Who’s in it: Steve Martin, Laura Dern and Helena Bonham Carter. What it’s about: Martin plays a fairly normal doctor with a thriving practice. He lives a predictable life with his obsessive-compulsive fiancee (Dern). After meeting a drug-addicted patient (Carter), his once-normal life is turned upside down and he is accused of several crimes involving bizarre murders. Outlook: This is a different step for Martin as this film is much more awkward and darker than his previous films. However, there is no one better than Martin to bring life to awkward screwball-comedy. If you’re willing to step outside the norm, this eccentric film should be a joy to watch. “”Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”” Nov. 16 Who’s in it: Maggie Smith, Alan Rickman, Daniel Radcliffe, Richard Harris, Rupert Grint and Emma Watson. What it’s about: Based on the first book of J.K. Rowling’s series, 11-year-old Harry (Radcliffe) begins his travels in a magical world of fantasy and delight. An explanation of his mysterious childhood and his training as a sorcerer are guided by his mentor, Professor Dumbledore (Harris). While at his new school, Hogwarts, mysterious occurences trouble him. Outlook: This is one of fall’s most anticipated films. A variety of viewers, even college students, will be delighted. With spectacular special computer and graphic effects, Harry’s world is now visualized. Read the books, then see the movie. You’ve been warned. ...

Ben Harper Lights Up RIMAC Field

San Diego showed its pretty side Monday as gray clouds gave way to blue skies for Ben Harper and the Innocent Criminals, Jurassic 5 and Jack Johnson at RIMAC Field. David Pilz Guardian A laid-back crowd accompanied the pleasant weather. I might be pushing it, but there was a 1960s Woodstock vibe to the entire concert. People were relaxing on blankets and enjoying the company of the thousands who showed up for the concert. As some concertgoers put it, there was a “”communal”” feeling surrounding everyone. The golden sun of Memorial Day cast the perfect lighting for the acoustic groove of Jack Johnson. Smooth bass riffs and acoustic guitar rounded out a sound that was reminiscent of headliner Ben Harper. As dusk settled, Jurassic 5 took the stage and played an incredible set. For those in the audience unfamiliar with Jurassic 5, this set was the perfect crash course to their eclectic sound. Jurassic 5’s improvised rhymes and clean harmonies were fabulous, and their beats kept everyone on their feet with their hands up in the air. J-5 effectively charged the audience for the triumphant appearance of Ben Harper and the Innocent Criminals. Night fell and the bright lights on the stage glowed like jewels. Harper and the rest of the band took the stage to a crowd that simply went mad for them. Harper and the rest, who have performed at UCSD twice before, did not waste any time going through a set that ranged from lighter acoustic material to hard-edged jams with Harper’s solo work paying tribute to Jimi Hendrix. Harper’s wide range of musical styles match the wide range of guitars that he brought onstage. Slide guitar is his signature instrument, but the way he handled his acoustic guitar and the rest of his electric guitars made many a jaw drop with amazement. He played a passable cover of Stevie Wonder’s “”Superstition,”” but the highlight of the show came when he played “”Burn One Down.”” With the first few chords of the song, a curious plume of thick, fragrant smoke drifted over the crowd. What else could you expect? Harper finished his set with a rousing rendition of his recent hit, “”Steal My Kisses,”” but he later reappeared for the encore. He started with a couple of intimate acoustic songs by himself and was later joined by the vocal group Blind Boys of Alabama, who added a soulful gospel sound to the last songs of Harper’s encore. This mellow part of the evening kept much of the audience quiet as they listened in awe. This was by far one of the best concerts that UCSD has hosted recently. Jack Johnson and Jurassic 5 were both incredible, but if Ben Harper and the Innocent Criminals played any better, they would be guilty as charged. I know you saw that line coming. ...