Arts & Entertainment

Album Reviews

Alien Ant Farm ANThology Dreamworks Is Alien Ant Farm destined to ascend the throne of rock royalty once held by bands like Led Zeppelin, U2 and Radiohead? No. But with that said, their sophomore release, “”ANTthology,”” recorded in North Hollywood and produced by Jay Baumgardner (Papa Roach, Slipknot, Coal Chamber), is not half bad. It’s a good rock record. Good, but not great. If you’re looking for jagged, four-minute fixes of typical themes like relationships and fantasies, you will certainly find them on “”ANThology.”” Singer and lyricist Dryden Mitchell admits that “”many of the songs were written during a breakup. Writing them was better than me chasing someone around who didn’t want to be chased.”” However, some songs, like “”Courage,”” with the lyrics, “”Contrary to the matter/Who you are, you are not/ Come with me, I’ll show you Saturn/ Planets don’t quite align,”” makes me think he should have just chased her anyway. While the lyrics may be far from poignant, there is something about “”ANThology”” that makes it better than your average rock record. “”Movies,”” which compares a bad relationship to a movie, stands out as an especially good track. “”Flesh and Bone”” is another track that moves particularly well. The reason these songs work is that they go back to the tried-and-true formula of sparse verses broken up by heavy melodic choruses that make you want to throw your hands in the air and bang your head. Of course, the one track that can’t be ignored on “”ANThology”” is the rock remix of “”Smooth Criminal”” because stylistically, it sticks out like a sore thumb. Among a collection of songs that are straight-faced, this tongue-in-cheek cover just throws a slice of cheese onto the tail end of the album and disrupts its overall appeal. Those who buy “”ANThology”” because of the popularity of “”Smooth Criminal”” will not be disappointed. However, the throw-back to the 1980s seems like a blemish on an album where all the other songs belong together. But that’s knit-picking. “”ANThology”” really is good. — Lindsay Boyd Dredg Leitmotif Independent With a few good listens to “”Leitmotif,”” I have slowly begun to realize that this is one of the most unusual rock albums I have heard in a very long time. Dredg has created a rock symphony. If I had to force them into a genre, it would be progressive rock. But this is progressive rock without the connotations that title implies these days — an over-produced and hard to follow New Age-like album. “”Leitmotif”” is a concept album that spans five movements. Unique guitar riffs noodle around incredible drumming. Even though the vocals tend to be weak, the musical approach of Dredg more than makes up for it. Dredg breaks away from the traditional verse-chorus-verse-chorus pattern with a constantly evolving sound as hard electric guitars sweep in and out with acoustic guitars. The drums and the guitars work in harmony as they drive the album to its end. The development of different themes creates brilliant songs that melt into each other, and before you know it, you’re at track five. The songs are also cryptic, with titles like “”Traversing Through the Arctic Cold, We Search for the Spirit of Yuta,”” “”Penguins in the Desert”” and “”90 Hour Sleep.”” There is definitely a sense of mysticism behind the songs. The odd atmospherics and the electronic noises found throughout the album are reminiscent of Radiohead and some Queens of the Stone Age. In the liner notes, Dredg proudly states that “”All instruments and sounds are real, no samples.”” With their music, Dredg sends you on an epic journey. Dredg includes an actual story in their sleeve notes, and their tale begins in San Francisco before they head toward the Arctic to the mythical underwater city of Natoma. Throughout the album, they make their way to Northern Asia and Mount Everest in their quest for truth. Ultimately, they find themselves and discover how each piece of culture fits into the puzzle of life. This realization comes after their “”90 Hour Sleep.”” This is an album that you have to play from track one to the very end or you will lose the entire artistic concept of it. You must listen to all of “”Leitmotif”” to see the entire journey unfold before you. — Joseph Lee Remy Zero The Golden Hum Elektra The story of Remy Zero does not start in 1988, when Shelby Tate and his brother Cinjun Tate along with Cedric LeMoyne, Jeffrey Cain and Greg Slay started a band. In fact, the Remy Zero story starts about 50 years ago, with a fellow named Remy Boligee. By 1969, Boligee and friend Sam Bruno committed over 30 hours of tape with music, conversation, ramblings and long periods of silence. Bruno lost track of Boligee and gave the tapes to a 12-year-old, Shelby Tate, whose parents were good friends with the Brunos. That’s where the Remy Zero story begins. The band, as we know now, recreated, rearranged and reinterpreted the works of Boligee. They even recorded sections of the tape into their recordings. They released their self-titled debut album in 1996 and released “”Villa Elaine”” in 1998. Now, nearly three years later, they have released “”Golden Hum.”” Even though the band is from Alabama, their sound seems to be distinctively British. One could even compare them to early Travis with more of an edge and crunch to their guitars. They have also toured extensively with Travis, which may account for the Travis influence in their “”Golden Hum”” album. Remy Zero’s use of sweeping strings on “”Out/In”” give the song a more anthem-esque quality. Comparisons to a less-produced U2 album wouldn’t be too far off. The haunting wail of Cinjun Tate in “”Save Me”” could be mistaken for the wail of Fran Healy from Travis or Thom Yorke from Radiohead. The driving pulse of “”Belong”” is a wonderfully polished pop song with a steady pulse that gets your head nodding in no time. My personal favorite is “”Over The Rails & Hollywood High,”” with its Weezer vocal influences and thick guitar crunches during the chorus. Most may not know about Remy Zero, but the opportunity to check them out is at hand. They will be playing in support of Travis on Oct. 21 at Spreckles Theatre. Tickets are on sale now. — Joseph Lee ...

Theater Review: 'Contact' uniquely lights up the stage with passion and flair

We often rely on our vocal capabilities to express our fears, feelings and emotions. In the musical “”Contact,”” however, verbal communication takes a backseat while the artistic form of dance conveys the performers’ thoughts and desires. The self-labeled “”new kind of musical”” offers a fresh kind of theater through innovative choreography and sexy themes. Courtesy of Broadway San Diego In this musical, despair, illusion and renewal are all played out through the common language of dance in three separate, short stories. Although all three acts differ in style, music and choreography, they match in resonance to suit each other thematically. Almost everything, from the dance styles to the soundtrack (yes, I did say soundtrack), is unique in “”Contact.”” There is an eclectic mix of both music and dance that brings a welcome change to the usual musical. Don’t expect an original score because all the music is pre-recorded, but what a wide and interesting range of music it is. The score is perfectly timed with creative and addictive dance steps, resulting in a simple yet effective tone and look. From Tchaikovsky to Dean Martin to Robert Palmer, the music complements the great choreography of Susan Stroman (“”The Music Man,”” “”Crazy For You.””) The first act, “”Swinging,”” is set in 1767 and deals with love between an aristocrat, his lady and a servant. Only three actors dance the entire time and the set itself is minimal. With its simplicity, the first act establishes the tone of “”Contact.”” No words are spoken and only one song is played, leaving the audience free to focus on the light, airy grace of the dancing. The mood is light, but also racy and full of sexual innuendo. In terms of story, “”Swinging”” is too full of fluff, leaving the viewer wanting more. “”Did You Move?”” is the title of the second set, which takes place in a ’50s restaurant in Queens. This act depicts the life of a lonely woman (Meg Howrey) who endures an ill-tempered, abusive husband. Once again, dialogue is minimal because the housewife expresses her comedic desires through dance alone, allowing everyone to become a part of the her romantic and comedic fantasies. The housewife’s airy yet fragile hopes can be seen as her sophomoric, naive leaps and jumps manifest her desire for a new life. The last portion of the play is also the best and most emotional. In this modern-day act, a suicidal advertising agent named Michael Wiley (Alan Campbell) is at a crossroad in his empty life. Wandering through Manhattan, he drifts into a night club where he meets a lady of intrigue and mystery: the woman in the yellow dress (Holly Cruikshank.) A metaphor for the quality of the entire production, the yellow dress is sexy and full of life. What defines the last act is the brilliance and radiance of the enigmatic woman, who elevates the entire cast’s performance. Cruikshank’s dramatic performance is full of an energy, and her devilish charm is embodied in her infamous and mesmerizing yellow dress. The third act provides the most “”meat”” in plot and substance, dealing with such dark subjects as depression and suicide, which are in turn counteracted with hope, renewal and love. As Wiley tries to win the affection of the woman in the yellow dress, swing dances exemplify what “”Contact”” is all about: passion. Even for those not familiar with theater or dance, “”Contact”” is a simplistic yet moving series of performances that should not be missed. In essence, “”Contact”” is more than great dancing: It is the expression of love and hope. ...

hiatus calendar

10/4 Thursday Rebecca Drexler Guardian Composer-pianist JIM BRICKMAN used to write jingles in his New Age piano style. In 1994 his solo instrumental “”No Words”” hit Billboard’s Top 40 Pop Chart. Now he’s at Humphrey’s Concerts by the Bay. The show starts at 8 p.m. and tickets start at $35. 10/5 Friday JAMES TAYLOR is in town with hits like “”Carolina in My Mind,”” “”You’ve Got a Friend”” and three Grammys under his belt. TAYLOR’S travels led him to a hospital for depression at 17 and rehab for heroin addiction at 20. He ends up at Coors Amphitheater at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $28.50 If you’re into roadhouse rock then check out DELBERT MCCLINTON at 4th & B. He has received praise from the likes of Lyle Lovett and B.B. King. MCCLINTON’S latest release, “”Nothing Personal,”” has also received similar praise. His show starts at 9 p.m. and tickets are $20. L.A. band FISHBONE, is oft underrated but has garnered a strong cult following over the years. They have been compared to the Red Hot Chili Peppers with their hard sound and socially-conscious lyrics. Their show at the Belly Up Tavern starts at 9:15 p.m. and tickets are $12. SKANIC and the PRODIGALS will open. 10/6 Saturday Head to the REGGAE WORLDFEST for a night of great entertainment with BUNNY WAILER, CULTURE, EEK-A-MOUSE and COMMON SENSE. They gather at the San Diego Sports Arena starting at 3 p.m. Tickets are $25. ALL OVER BLUES, led by Luther “”Guitar Junior”” Johnson, will be at the East County Performing Arts Center in El Cajon. This tribute band will be playing the music of the legendary Muddy Waters. Tickets start at $18 and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. San Diego rock, funk and reggae band GOVERNMENT CROWN will be at the Belly Up Tavern at 9:15 p.m. in support of their latest album, “”New Pieces of Clay.”” Call the Belly Up for more information at (858) 481-9022. 10/8 Monday The unstoppable TONY BENNETT will be at the San Diego Civic Center. Need I say more? Tickets start at $33 and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. You know he’ll sing all the hits. 10/9 Tuesday SLAMM magazine presents the 11th Annual SAN DIEGO MUSIC AWARDS, which honor the vibrant but sometimes underrated local music scene. Groups like CONVOY and SOUL CRACKER will play alongside the likes of THE BASTARD SONS OF JOHNNY CASH and THE INCREDIBLE MOSES LEROY. The awards show will be hosted by local radio station DJ Jim McInnes at Humphrey’s by the Bay. The event will start at 7 p.m. Call the SAN DIEGO MUSIC AWARDS hotline at (619) 641-5823 for all the information 24 hours a day. Tickets start at $15 and proceeds will benefit San Diego elementary schools. The BLACK EYED PEAS are one of the greatest groups out there with hip-hop style spiced with some funk and jazz. This talented group from Los Angeles will be at the Belly Up 10/10 Wednesday Tavern in Solana Beach. Tickets are $17.50. Bronx native DJ LOGIC will perform at the Belly Up Tavern at 9 p.m. Tickets will be $9. DJ LOGIC was at the front of the turntable movement in the late ’70s and early ’80s. His latest disc, “”The Anomaly,”” was released in May. ...

Fall Fest 2001

By all accounts, Alien Ant Farm has had one hell of a year. Their major label debut, “”ANThology,”” was released March 6 by DreamWorks/New Noize. That album has since gone platinum and is continuing to climb Billboard’s Top 200 charts. Their single, “”Smooth Criminal,”” has held the No. 1 spot on Billboard’s Modern Rock Charts, and the Marc Klasfeld-directed video has gained heavy rotation on MTV and VH1. They played England’s legendary Reading Festival, performed at the 2001 MTV Video Music Awards and are now embarking on their own headlining tour. Not bad for a band that formed just five years ago in Riverside, California. In 1996, vocalist Dryden Mitchell, guitarist Terry Corso, bassist Tye Zamora and drummer Mike Cosgrove were all bumming around the local Riverside rock scene, playing in various bands, when they eventually decided to play together. “”Individually, we were trying to figure out who were the best players in the area,”” recalls lead singer and lyricist Mitchell. “”We kind of identified with each other and started cheating on the bands we were playing with at the time, getting together after practices. We played our first show in 1996 . . . and have been together ever since.”” However, it was guitarist Corso who came up with the band’s unusual name. “”I was daydreaming at my dull desk job with my feet up and I thought to myself, ‘Wouldn’t it be cool if the human species were placed on earth and cultivated by alien intelligence? Maybe the aliens added us to an atmosphere that was suitable for us and they’ve been watching us develop and colonize, kind of like what a kid does with an ant farm, where the aliens are the kids and humans are the ants.'”” It wasn’t long before Alien Ant Farm was gigging steadily throughout the western United States and Europe, playing to huge festival audiences. Their boldly titled, self-released debut album, “”Greatest Hits,”” earned them a Best Independent Album award at the 1999 L.A. Music Awards. It was then that Alien Ant Farm became the first band signed to Papa Roach’s New Noize label, cementing a professional and personal relationship that started when both bands were slaves to the California club circuit just years before. When Papa Roach gained popularity, they did not leave their old friends behind. Corso explains, “”We always said whoever takes off first would help the other group up, and that’s the way it happened. They’ve been very vocal about us, which is priceless, and we can’t thank them enough.”” Now it is Alien Ant Farm’s turn to reach out to bands such as Dredg and label-mate Pressure 4-5, who will join them as they kick off their headlining tour this October. Onstage, Alien Ant Farm tries to keep things light and fun. “”Music does good things to people — it’s one of those art forms everyone enjoys,”” explains Mitchell. “”It’s magical when we play our stuff for the fans and they light up. We take our music very seriously, but we’re also a very tongue-in-cheek group. We want to keep that enjoyment going.”” But don’t take his word for it — check out Alien Ant Farm for yourself Oct. 5 at FallFest. ...

Top 5 Albums

Here’s another slew of Top 5s that’ll blow your mind. Some will make you think, “”What the hell?”” And others will make you think, “”Why didn’t I think of that?”” Agree? Disagree? Please submit your Top 5 Favorite Albums to: [email protected] Subject: Top Five. — Joseph Lee ANDREW QUADRI Copy Editor 1. “”In Person”” – Vince Guaraldi 2. “”Debut”” – Bjork 3. “”Gordon”” – Barenaked Ladies 4. “”Kind of Blue”” – Miles Davis 5. “”Pet Sounds”” – The Beach Boys JENNIFER SPOSITO Opinion Editor 1. “”Urban Hymns”” – The Verve 2. “”Ray of Light”” – Madonna 3. “”Remedy”” – Basement Jaxx 4. “”Ferment”” – Catherine Wheel 5. “”Nude Dimensions vol. 2 – mixed by Mauricio Aviles”” – various artists CLAIRE J. VANNETTE Features Editor 1. “”Little Earthquakes”” – Tori Amos 2. “”The John Doe Sessions”” – Gregory Page 3. “”Immortal Beloved Soundtrack”” – various artists 4. “”Arkansas Traveler”” – Michelle Shocked 5. “”S&M”” – Metallica ...

Film Review: Steve Zahn gets behind the wheel in 'Joyride'

Two estranged brothers driving cross-country in a 1971 Chrysler Newport making prank calls on a CB radio sounds like a surefire comedy hit, doesn’t it? The recipe to turn this comedy into a teenage thriller calls for one psychotic truck driver and one hot college girl. Playing the two estranged brothers are Paul Walker (who most of you will remember as the injured all-state quarterback from “”Varsity Blues””) and the ever-hilarious Steve Zahn (“”Saving Silverman,”” “”That Thing You Do””). The majority of the film is interplay between Walker and Zahn. This creates a bit of a problem, because Walker is about a year of intensive acting lessons away from being able to stumble through a film without annoying whatever part of the audience that isn’t overcome by his dimples. Until those lessons are paid for, he’s stuck with competing against Freddie Prinze Jr. for all of the worthless young-male-actor roles in Hollywood. Leelee Sobieski plays the lead female character, Venna. She describes Venna as “”the girl with the boobs and the butt who does go to college.”” Unfortunately, Venna is that and nothing more. The young actress does the best she can, considering her character’s only purpose is to keep the audience from getting tired of Zahn’s attempts to get Walker into trouble with trite and over-used exclamations such as “”Come on, man!”” and “”Dude, this is awesome.”” Zahn’s comic styling is this film’s only saving grace. He plays the typical, comic-relief smartass, but Zahn makes the character all his with his trademark facial and vocal expressions. His hijinks are refreshing and at the same time oddly misplaced in this teen thriller. Zahn has fewer and fewer opportunities to let his comic genius shine as the movie goes on because this film only gets more and more intense. The fact that the film’s single greatest attribute gets weaned out over time leaves the audience to watch nothing more than blood fly all over the screen. Since this thriller has so few redeeming qualities and is rated R, I imagine you are wondering at this point about the nudity factor. Leelee Sobieski fans (if such a thing exists) will be disappointed to know that there is no female nudity anywhere in this film. Partial male nudity occurs at one point, but the R rating comes mostly as a result of violence. Unfortunately, this joyride is for Steve Zahn fans only. ...

Concert Review: Simon and Felix Jaxx it up

I met Basement Jaxx. Will this taint the objectivity of my concert review? Of course it will. Simon Ratcliffe and Felix Buxton of Basement Jaxx have released two hit albums with a slew of singles from each one. “”Remedy”” in 1999 produced such hits and favorites as “”Rendezvous,”” “”Bingo-Bango”” and “”Red Alert.”” Their most recent effort, “”Rooty,”” has yielded such musical wonders as “”Romeo”” and “”Where’s Your Head At?”” They have remixed the Pet Shop Boys and Roger Sanchez. They were courted by major labels before signing to independent label, XL. And they have to be the nicest chaps in music. After attending their incredible performance at 4th & B on Monday. I waited outside with my buddies in hopes of catching the Jaxx wandering out backstage. I expected them to stumble out with a girl on each arm and expensive cigarettes hanging out of their mouths. Of course, these world famous house producers would be at the lap of luxury, right? Wrong. Felix stumbled out, not with a bottle of Skyy vodka in his hand but a huge bag of equipment. He carried his own stuff! Even after I confused Felix’s name with his cohort’s, he kindly signed autographs and continued to help put equipment into a nearby truck. I slipped him a business card with my e-mail address, my way of saying, “”e-mail me!”” After all, it was Felix from Basement Jaxx. I searched for Simon around their tour bus but couldn’t find him. I asked my newfound friend (Felix, of course) where Simon was and he poked his head into the bus and called for Simon. Simon, also carrying his own bags and equally pleasant, stepped out of the bus and faithfully signed autographs for the few people who stuck around to bid the Jaxx adieu. I was like a 12-year-old on the morning of your gift-receiving winter holiday of choice. Basement Jaxx’s show was simply amazing. Their DJ set was complemented by live singers, dancers and live percussion as well. At one point, Simon stepped out from behind the decks to play the guitar and Felix supplied the vocals for a rousing rendition of “”Where’s Your Head At?”” with Groove Armada (“”I See You Baby””) and BT (“”Never Gonna Come Back Down””). Known to play rousing sets with live guitars and percussion in addition to their turntables, synths and computers, one wonders if this will be the way many electronica producers will start to showcase their music. The massive video screen spit out Vegas-like colors as the Jaxx rocked a relatively small but incredibly enthusiastic crowd who bounced and sweated to every single song. The Jaxx dropped in crowd favorites like “”Red Alert,”” “”Bingo Bango”” and “”Romeo.”” The beats were hard and loud and the attitude was funky and sexy in a way that was distinctively Basement Jaxx. The pace was unforgiving as they pounded through each song with different dancers and vocalists, leaving the audience screaming and breathless by the time their set finished up at a criminally early 11 p.m. Did I mention that I met Basement Jaxx? And they were the nicest guys. As my friend said with her high-pitched-cartoonish-voice, “”they’re so cute! I just want to take them home with me.”” Imagine that. A pair of Jaxx at your very own home. I wish. Overall experience? This has to be one of the best shows that I have ever been to. ...

5

When you pick up the Guardian, you might wonder who these editors really are. After all, the god-like characters that produce such a politically balanced, high-quality newspaper may seem out of reach to the common student. One might wonder, how can I ever relate to such talent? Or one might ask, is it possible that I have something in common with these journalistic demagogues? The next logical query would be, do these people actually breathe the same air that I do? Well, the editors have provided me with a list of their five favorite albums. With this you may conclude that these people are human after all. You might think, “”Hey, they listen to the same crappy pop music that I do!”” Or, “”Hey, they listen the same great post-industrial-two-chord-rage-chill-out-techno-euro-pop music that I listen to!”” Agree or disagree? Please submit your Top 5 Favorite Albums to: [email protected] They run the Guardian, but do they see eye-to-eye? ALISON NORRIS Editor in Chief 1. “”Blood Sugar Sex Majik”” – Red Hot Chili Peppers 2. “”Nevermind”” – Nirvana 3. “”The Singles Soundtrack”” – various artists 4. “”Use Your Illusion II”” – Guns ‘n’ Roses 5. “”The Ultimate Experience”” – Jimi Hendrix JEFFREY WHITE Editor in Chief 1. “”No Jacket Required”” – Phil Collins 2. “”Blood Sugar Sex Majik”” – Red Hot Chili Peppers 3. “”Achtung Baby”” – U2 4. “”In Utero”” – Nirvana 5. “”Niandra Ladies and Usually Just a T-Shirt”” – John Frusciante LAUREN I. COARTNEY Managing Editor 1. “”Siamese Dream”” – Smashing Pumpkins 2. “”Parachutes”” – Coldplay 3. “”Tidal”” – Fiona Apple 4. “”The Joshua Tree”” – U2 5. “”From the Choirgirl Hotel”” – Tori Amos ...

FallFest lineup announced

It’s that time of year again! Yes, it’s time for FallFest. Our friends over at A.S. are bringing a whole slew of bands for our amusement. You can love them or hate them. But it’s free, so why should you complain? The following is a list of who is coming to FallFest 2001. But there are questions that remain: Alien Ant Farm — Are they better than “”Smooth Criminal?”” Warren G — Will he regulate? How could he not? Toya — Who? Apparently she’s been on MTV a lot. FallFest 2001 will be on Friday, Oct. 5. The show is at RIMAC and admission is free with a student ID. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the concert starts at 8 p.m. Look to the hiatus section next week for complete coverage of the festival and its bands. ...

Annual San Diego Music Awards announces nominees

If you are like most UCSD students — that is, from somewhere other than America’s Finest City — your knowledge of San Diego music is pretty much limited to Blink-182 and Jewel. Never mind that Blink comes from that distant, red-headed stepchild of a suburb: Poway. And never mind that the Coffee House Queen is an Alaskan masquerading as a SoCaler. Our local music scene has much more to it than that. Pick up a copy of Slamm or the San Diego Reader, available on campus, and dive into the myriad musical events and CD reviews. There’s plenty of homegrown talent around, in all musical genres — and yes, many are purveyors of poppy punk or are soulful singer-songwriters. The best of the varied and dizzyingly talented pool of music acts in San Diego are honored every year at the aptly named San Diego Music Awards. This year’s ceremony is Tuesday, Oct. 9 at Humphrey’s by the Bay. Its performers include The Incredible Moses Leroy, whose obnoxiously upbeat “”Fuzzy”” swamped alternative radio last spring, as well as Convoy, Bastard Sons of Johnny Cash, NovaMenco, Switchfoot and Soulcracker. Tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster or at the Humphrey’s box office if you’d prefer to avoid the service charge. Local music fans can get involved with the awards before the show date, though. Voting for many of the top honors is now underway at http://www.sandiegomusicawards.com. Anyone with a few spare minutes can shape San Diego music history. To steal a line from better-known awards shows, “”And the nominees are…”” FOR PUBLIC VOTING: Best Bar Band 80s All Stars Liquid Blue Pink Froyd Private Domain Rockola Siers Brothers Best Mainstream Jazz Charles McPherson Chris Klich Quartet Dave Patrone Gilbert Castellanos Peter Sprague Tim Maglione Best Pop-Jazz Fattburger Hollis Gentry Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe Reggie Smith and Pressed for Time Robert Walter’s 20th Congress Spaceman Spiff Best Latin Jazz Agua Dulce B-Side Players Jack Costanzo Jaime Valle & Equinox Kokopelli Latin Jazz Ensemble Orchestra Primo Best Big Band Benny Holman Orchestra Big Daddy Orchestra Big Time Operator Ira B. Liss Big Band Ray Barrie Big Band San Diego Youth Jazz Band Best Acoustic Anya Marina Berkley Hart Gregory Page Joe Rathburn Lisa Sanders Steve Poltz Best Blues Bill Magee Candye Kane Len Rainey & the Midnight Players Michele Lundeen Robin Henkel Scottie Blinn & the Tiki Torchers Best World Music Common Sense Crucial Earth Ride NovaMenco Psydecar The Revelations Best Roots, Rockabilly or Swing Billy Bacon & the Forbidden Pigs Billy Midnight Cowboy Nation Hot Rod Lincoln The Paladins Scotch Greens Best Dance or Funk Clyde’s Ride d*fRost Fat Beat Squad Honey Bucket Mix Mob Wise Monkey Orchestra Best R & B, Hip Hop or Rap Downlow Father & Son Icons MainFlow Roundtable MC’s Tony da Skitzo & Mr. Brady Best Country Bastard Sons of Johnny Cash The Dorados Frank Sullivan and Texas Sky Hill Country Honkytonk Kings Nickel Creek Best Adult Alternative 34 Below Eve Selis The Good China The Hatchet Brothers Jolly Lamas Swerve Best Pop Dave Howard Incredible Moses Leroy The Shambles Switchfoot Teacher’s Pet Vertibird Best Rock Convoy Powerthud Soulcracker Sprung Monkey Ten Pound Brown The Dragons Best Hard Rock or Metal Cage Ghoulspoon Life Hates Me Mower Stretcher Teabag Best Alternative a.m. Vibe Black Heart Procession GoGoGo Airheart Jack’s Broken Heart The Album Leaf Tristeza Best Punk Agent 51 The Classified Dogwood Furious IV The Locust Lucky 7 Best Electronic DJ Jon Bishop DJ Greyboy Nortec Collective Rotator Scooter & Lavelle Square Circle ACADEMY-ONLY VOTING Artist of the Year Billy Bacon (The Forbidden Pigs) Jimmy Lavelle (Tristeza/The Album Leaf) John Reis (Rocket From The Crypt) Jon Forman (Switchfoot) Karl Denson (Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe) Pall Jenkins (Black Heart Procession) Ron Fountenberry (Incredible Moses Leroy) Song of the Year Blink-182 — The Rock Show Convoy — Caught Up In You Incredible Moses Leroy — Fuzzy FenixTX — Threesome Nickel Creek — Reasons Why POD — Alive Sprung Monkey — What’s That You Say Album of the Year Blink-182 — “”Take Off Your Pants And Jacket”” Convoy — “”Black Licorice”” Incredible Moses Leroy — “”Electric Pocket Radio”” Karl Denson — “”Dance Lesson #2″” Nickel Creek — “”Nickel Creek”” Sprung Monkey — “”Get A Taste”” Switchfoot — “”Learning to Breathe”” Best Pop Album Dani Carroll — self titled Cheryl Bliss — Angels Running After Incredible Moses Leroy — Electric Pocket Radio Scorch — Pop with a Twist Switchfoot — Learning to Breathe The Joey Bowen Band — In This World The Shambles — What You’re Missing Best Adult Alternative Album Bastard Sons of Johnny Cash — Walk Alone Chris Torres Band — Signs of Hope Comanche Moon — Old Dogs Gregory Page — And I Look Up Jeff Clark — Nashville, CA The Hatchet Brothers — Tools of the Trade The Paladins — Palvoline No. 7 Best Rock Album Convoy — Black Licorice Government Grown — New Pieces of Clay Mike Keneally & Beer for Dolphins — Dancing Rocket From The Crypt — Group Sounds Rochelle, Rochelle — self-titled Sprung Monkey — Get A Taste Soulcracker — At Last For You Best Hard Rock or Metal Album Acid Nine — Mess With The Bull Brothers From Another Planet — Resistance Is Futile G-13 — Just Another Day Life Hates Me — Imperfections Mindsize — Gravity Mower — Mower Stretcher — Annomundi Best Alternative Album Black Heart Procession — 3 Buckfast Superbee — You Know How The Song Goes Jack’s Broken Heart — Against Forgetting Counterfit — From Finish to Starting Line The And / Ors — Will Self Destruct The Album Leaf — One Day I’ll Be On Time Tristeza — Dream Signals in Full Circles Best Punk Album Agent 51 — Just Keep Running A Little Punk, Slightly Drunk — San Diego 2001 (compilation) Blink-182 — Take Your Pants Off and Jacket FenixTX — Lechuza One Track Mind — Can I Have Your Number? Spazboy — Alright Tokyo The Locust — Flight of the Wounded Locust Best Dance or Funk Album Cult of Soul — Walkin’ My Planet d.fRost — Digital Dustbowl Fat Beat Squad — Delicious Honey Bucket — Boombox Hero Psydecar — On a Wing Wise Monkey Orchestra — They Live Square Circle — Say Hello to Square Circle Best Rap or Hip Hop Album Downlow — Vegetables for your Noodle Icons — Capture The Flag Kastle Vania — Str8 From the Dungeon Mission Infinite — WordSoundPower Mr L’il On — Tha 13th Skorn Rekless — self titled Best Jazz Album Agent 22 — First Witness Holly Hofmann — Live at Birdland Jack Costanzo — Back From Havana Karl Denson — Dance Lesson #2 Mike Woffard — Time Cafe Robert Walter’s 20th Congress — Money Shot Spaceman Spiff — The Love EP Best Blues Album Billy Watson — Little Snick meets Junior Mint Blue Largo — What A Day Buddy Blue — Pretend It’s Okay Hoodoo Blues — Running for the Light Martha’s Kitchen — Women Trouble Sue Palmer & Her Motel Swing Orchestra — Soundtrack to a B Movie The Blues Invaders — The Invasion begins Best Local Recording Chuck Perrin — Swallow Life Earth Ride — Tree of Life F.O.N. — Cease & Desist Jeff Clark — Nashville, CA Lizzy Wann — A Wing and a Prayer Slightly Stoopid — Live & Direct Acoustic Roots Via Satellite — Wake Up Heavy ACADEMY Best New Artist The Deere Johns Jason Mraz Rochelle Rochelle Square Circle Lovelight Shine The And / Ors Via Satellite Group of the Year Black Heart Procession Blink-182 Convoy Nickel Creek P.O.D Rocket From The Crypt Sprung Monkey ...