Marching to a Drum Beat of Her Own

This Mother’s Day, I did not go home to see my mother. I was too busy preparing for International House’s Asian and Pacific Culture Night, which was held that Sunday evening. So, instead of going home bearing gifts for my mom like a good daughter, I invited my parents to attend Asian and Pacific Culture Night. That way, I got to see my mom, and she got to see me make a fool of myself onstage.

My mother is my role model. Raising two children is a daunting task for anyone, but to do so in an unfamiliar country makes the task doubly difficult. Transplanting oneself from one’s own country and immigrating to another with two young children is a true test of courage and strength. Yet my mother persevered, and … are you still reading? Have I lost you yet? Were you just about to turn the page to see if there were any good coupons in today’s issue?

Lately I have been asked why my articles have taken on such a negative tone (to put it tactfully). “”Don’t you have anything positive to say?”” Why, yes, I have many positive things to say. The question is, do you care enough to read them?

My mother is a very loving and admirable person, but do you really want to hear me wax poetic about her? My reasons for loving my mom are probably the same you have for loving your mom, so would I be imparting any new and interesting knowledge to you, or provoking you to come to any new and interesting thoughts? Probably not.

How about an article titled “”Ethnic Diversity Increasing in Hollywood””? I could talk about how, lately, there’s been an increase in non-Caucasian actors in television programs. I could praise the networks for being more sensitive to the need for ethnic diversity in the media and give suggestions on how to further portray race and gender relations in a positive light. This may interest a few people, but how many of you are affected by this in your day-to-day lives?

While it is true that a good article does not have to be one that addresses topics of everyday life, if it were my aim to discuss global, national or social issues, I would write the pro and con articles.

The fact of the matter is, this is my column and I’ll write about whatever I damn well please, within reason. But since I am being paid to write articles for the UCSD publics, it makes sense that I choose topics that I think will be of interest to others, instead of using this space as my own personal diary. Therefore, I will spare you the ode to my mother and instead write about what I believe to be more interesting.

That point brings me to the controversy. The last time I was in the Guardian office, I was told that two very angry people had to bite my head off. The guy probably had a goatee and the girl probably dyes her hair. Yes, I make controversial statements. Would you be reading this if I didn’t? Nobody reads the Guardian cover to cover, with the exception of the editor in chief and those whose lives must be so mundane that they have nothing better to do. People flip through the Guardian between classes and read only those articles that catch their attention. Answer me truly, which is more attention grabbing: “”Ethnic Diversity Increasing in Hollywood”” or “”Why Female Friends Suck””?

Admit it. Most of you read my column because you either get a kick out of hearing me call it as I see it, or because I piss you off and you’re curious how much of a rise I can get out of you. I knew when I took on this job that I would offend people. That’s generally what happens when one voices one’s opinion. There’s always going to be someone who disagrees.

What I don’t understand is why some people get so upset when they see my opinions in print. You know that somewhere out there, someone thinks the exact opposite of what you think. If that someone happens to be me, why does it upset you so? Do you believe that because twice a month I get my opinion published that somehow my opinion is more valid than yours? Perhaps you resent me for having the opportunity to voice my beliefs. If that’s the case, then get off your ass and submit an application to the Guardian office to become an opinion writer.

So yes, I sometimes write about topics that are unconventional and my opinions are often controversial. I find these subjects interesting and I think others do as well. If you don’t like my subject matter or my opinions, then stop reading my articles, quit your whining and get your own damn column. Until someone replaces me, I’m going to keep writing as I have been. Change my tune? Not a chance.

Donate to The UCSD Guardian
$2505
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists at University of California, San Diego. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment, keep printing our papers, and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The UCSD Guardian
$2505
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal