Arts & Entertainment

Biospheria Tour Reorganizes Reality

There are times when you watch a performance and you find yourself in complete awe of the entire production. Other times you feel like you missed the entire point of the performance — Biospheria falls somewhere in between. Tyler Huff Guardian Biospheria is billed as “”an environmental opera,”” but don’t let the word “”opera”” sway your initial impression. It is nowhere near an opera in the classical sense of the word. The producers of the show, Steven Ausbury and Anthony Burr, worked for over a year on Biospheria before it made its debut on the UCSD campus early in March. There are obvious references to Biosphere 2 in Arizona, which was a project that isolated a team of scientists in the world’s largest enclosed ecosystem. Biosphere 2 was intended to be the prototype for a colony on Mars and was also supposed to explore different holistic theories of ecology. It was subsequently discovered, however, that the founders of Biosphere 2 were not exactly “”real”” scientists. In fact, the founders were actually part of a theater company with alleged cult-like tendencies. Biospheria reflects the utopian themes that Biosphere 2 attempted to create and the isolation that it ultimately created. The entire production blurs the lines between art and science. What makes the production fascinating is that the entire audience is literally involved every step of the way. Dressed in plastic ponchos and armed with headphones, audience members are taken around the UCSD campus to sites that represent some of the historical moments of Biosphere 2. Groups of eight are plugged into the CD player of a group leader, and the listeners’ ears are filled with synthesized noises from nature: The computer-generated sounds incorporate the sounds of birds, frogs and water. “”The idea was to create a simulated nature,”” Burr said, “”and there are also little details according to each environment.”” So imagine yourself in a plastic poncho, wires from your headphones connected to your field leader, wandering around campus and watching Biospherians dressed in a cult-like shade of white acting out the different scenes. At first it’s difficult to digest, but it evolves into a surreal experience. The discomfort brought by being confined with other people is especially noticeable in a particular scene in which the audience is seated around a massive dining table for the Biospherians. The noise playing in the background softens to nothing and, for what seems like an eternity, the entire audience remains quiet — unsure of whether it should talk. Biospheria is the “”subjective experience of being contained and linked to other people,”” Burr said. “”The story itself raises interesting questions about utopian ideas.”” The cult-like tendencies of those in Biosphere 2 is reflected in Biospheria. The actors’ white clothes present a disconcerting image of utopia — or is it conformity? The audience is even led by a shepherd through all the scenes. Throughout the performance, the operatic aspect of Biospheria is transmitted through the headphones, as the noises are often the background music to the Biospherians’ reading of fictional diary entries, which reflect the frustration of being confined in an enclosed environment with other people. Biospheria may prove to be too artsy for many, but enter this realm with an open mind, and you might find yourself completely fascinated. If you allow yourself to be caught up with this interactive experience, you may discover the campus transforming before your very eyes. Performances of Biospheria will run every day from Thursday through Saturday. The performances start at the Center for Research in Computing in the Arts (CRCA) at 3 p.m. Admission is free and reservations can be made online at http://www.-crca.ucsd.edu/biospheria ...

Guardian Album Review

The Places“”The Autopilot Knows You Best””Absolutely Kosher Records A :: Getting away from the generic recipe for famous bands, which rely on bar chords, loud singing and cute asses, The Places, with their debut album “”The Autopilot Knows You Best,”” come up with a fresh new sound that is bound for success. Although largely unknown, this underground band is quickly gaining popularity as its undeniable talent spreads through the college airwaves. From Portland, Ore., the group is comprised of young singer Amy Annelle and her friends, who together give an urban twist to the old folk melody. With a mix of low-fi and electronic sampling, the intricate layers of music hold your attention while the product remains calming and smooth. The folk melody and lyrics are reminiscent of the type of songs your parents would have written in their hippie days. But the new edge, driven by electric guitars and the emotional voice of Annelle, let the youthful sound of these urban kids come through. Probably the best underground album this year, “”The Autopilot Knows You Best”” offers a perfect set of tunes to which you can cuddle up, watch the rain and relax in a tantric escape from suburban college life. Get this album and keep your ears open for more from this up-and-coming band. — Heather Clark ...

Dave Matthews Band Shows Their New World

Four years have passed since the Dave Matthews Band released their last studio album. After filling in the time with two live albums, an interview album and a popular acoustic tour with Tim Reynolds, the Dave Matthews Band have finally released, “”Everyday.”” “”Under The Table & Dreaming”” was the first major release that introduced Dave and his band to the rest of the world. “”Crash”” was released in 1996, and by then the entire world was familiar with the eclectic acoustic guitar sound, Matthews’ smooth and sexy vocals and the lively sounds of the rest of the band. In 1998, with “”Before These Crowded Streets,”” the Dave Matthews Band began to explore new ground with their sound by including a gospel choir and experimenting more with their melodies and their sound. But they remained distinctively Dave Matthews songs. Their recent release of “”Everyday”” continues to show the progression of the Dave Matthews Band and the evolution of their sound. The album may be difficult to listen to at first because it doesn’t have the obviously catchy tunes found in previous songs like “”Ants Marching”” and “”Crash.”” The chord progressions are more complex and the melodies are a bit more difficult to find. Much of the pop edge has been wiped away and it reveals a much broader sound that requires a little patience. Carter Beauford’s drums have not changed much; they are one of the most varied and eclectic of any drummer in music today. Bass player Stefan Lessard is the youngest member of the band, but he has developed into quite a talented bass player. There is even a touch of keyboard in many of the tracks Saxophone player Leroi Moore and violinist Boyd Tinsley have been pushed to new musical levels. Moore adds the flute and the contra-bass clarinet to his usual duties on the baritone, alto and tenor sax. Tinsley actually used a wah-wah pedal to push the tones on his violin to new heights. Tinsley even offers his vocal talents on various songs, especially on “”I Did It.”” The most obvious change in the latest evolution of the Dave Matthews Band sound is the use of electric guitars by Matthews. The lush acoustic sound has been slowly replaced by the rough edge of electric guitars and even a baritone guitar on several tracks. Here is a track-by-track listing of the new album by the Dave Matthews Band: Every song on “”EVERYDAY”” “”I Did It”” This song has been getting a lot of radio play and is heavily bass-driven. “”I Did It”” sets the tone for the rest of the album with its thick bass line and guitars. The chorus has a melody that is vaguely reminiscent of Aerosmith, and Tinsley drops a little spoken-word element into the middle of the track. “”When the World Ends”” This track also follows the pattern of a thick bass line. There is definitely a smooth groove to the song, but it seems to follow the same formula and flavor of “”I Did It.”” “”The Space Between”” The electric guitar is very apparent in the first few seconds of this track. It is distinctly different from the acoustic ballads of previous Dave Matthews songs. The chorus has some Toto-esque elements with cascading and atmospheric guitar riffs. “”Dreams of Our Fathers”” With the first three notes you automatically think “”Satellite,”” but with the pace of and vocal complexity of “”Too Much.”” There is also a Police-like feel to the guitar part. “”So Right”” A funky guitar jam opens up this track and it can be the perfect song to cruise down the city streets with the top down. The vocals are strong and soaring, but the lyrics a bit too simplified. “”If I Had It All”” The acoustic guitar makes its first appearance in the early moments of the track, but then returns to the heavy bassline. “”What You Are”” Riverdance comes to mind with the string arrangements in this song. But the song offers a lot of beautiful harmonies and dark undertones in the chorus. “”Angel”” A soft saxophone drives this entire song. “”Angel”” stands as one of the strongest tracks on the album, with a relaxing beat and vintage Dave Matthews singing; the kind that makes you swoon. “”Fool To Think”” There is a blatant “”Message in a Bottle”” vibe to this song. It seems as if the band took the first notes on the guitar riff of the famous Police song. Even the drum beats and the rim shots are straight from the Police school of thought. “”Sleep to Dream Her”” Dave Matthews’ sultry vocals are prominent in this song, which is backed by weeping strings and a soft syncopated, almost ska-like guitar part. Then it gives way to a theatrical string arrangement and showcases the plaintive saxophone of Moore. “”Mother Father”” This song features Carlos Santana and percussionist Karl Perrazo. The lovely Spanish guitar softly picks in the background with Santana’s trademark electric guitar. There is a definitely a Latin flavor to this song that makes for a solid song and a future radio hit. “”Everyday”” The uplifting title track has the support of the gospel choir sound, which was introduced in “”Before These Crowded Streets.”” This is much lighter than the rest of the album and it returns to the classic acoustic guitar sound. It’s a song that makes you glad that you were patient enough to listen to the entire album. Once you’re done, try the album again and you’ll find that these tracks really grow on you. ...

Hiatus Weekly Calendar

All tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (619) 220-8497 or by going to http://www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. 8 Thursday Orange County punk band Agent Orange will perform at Canes Bar & Grill. Show starts at 8 p.m. and tickets cost $10. The all-star fusion band Jazz Is Dead will breathe life into the music of the Grateful Dead at the Belly Up Tavern. The show starts at 9 p.m. and tickets cost $15. 9 Friday Popular San Diego groove band B-Side Players will perform at Blind Melons tonight and at Winston’s Beach Club on Saturday night. Call (619) 222-6822 for tickets. Ronnie James Dio may be best-known for filling in for Ozzy Osbourne as the Black Sabbath frontman. Dio will perform at 8 p.m. at 4th & B. Tickets cost $22. 10 Saturday Hardcore punk band The Locust will play with Vue and The Pattern at the Che Cafe. The concert starts at 8 p.m. and tickets are $5. Call (858) 534-2311 for more information. Canadian pop-punk band Gob will be at the Mira Mesa Epicentre. With Jason Priestley as their promoter, Gob has been touring in support of their latest release, “”The World According to Gob.”” Showtime is 8 p.m. and tickets are $7. Call (858) 271-4000 for more information. 11 Sunday Cutthroats 09, Tori Cobras and Drunk Horse will be at The Casbah. Call (619) 232-4355 for more information. 13 Tuesday Hootie and The Blowfish are blowing through San Diego. They will be performing at 4th & B at 8 p.m. Tickets are $35. 14 Wednesday Former Pavement frontman Stephen Malkmus will be at Canes Bar & Grill at 8 p.m. His sound is still modeled after the wonderful indie-rock music of Pavement. ...

Warrior Spirit

Shannon Kawika Phelps, better known as Kawika (Ka-vee-ka) Sensei to his ninjitsu students, is someone you cannot help writing about in the first person. His presence affects you, causes you to look back at yourself, which is eerily disturbing, to say the least. David Pilz Guardian The course of the interview was a mental Rubix Cube for me as I tried to decipher and pinpoint what this man was all about. Journalists like to go with their first instincts; a product of their insight and stubbornness. The trouble was, there was no initial “”feeling,”” no urge to think “”car salesman”” or “”professional badass.”” Yet there was something there, something being offered. I felt as though I was either getting suckered by a mastermind grifter or I was in store for an extremely rare and surreal moment. As the photographer and I entered his dojo, anonymously located in the midst of an industrial park, we were greeted by his wife, Theodora, kindly smiling and waving us over. We sat on a small wooden bench, facing what appeared to be a shrine. It was decorated with a Tibetan rug that was blessed by two Dali Lamas, a ceremonial Tengu mask and a brass gong hundreds of years old. I did a quick scan of his biography and remembered there was no such thing as a “”quick”” look into such a nefarious life, to use his own word. Phelps was orphaned at birth and spent his childhood bouncing from foster home to foster home. He eventually settled in Hawaii and was taken in as a ward by a village of assorted Chinese, Japanese and native Hawaiians. They became his surrogate parents and helped him survive childhood polio at the age of 4. David Pilz Guardian “”The Hawaiians would massage me with their Lomi Lomi massage,”” Phelps said. “”Uncle David would show me some of his private arts, and the Japanese would massage me with their martial arts, and then the Chinese taught me Tai Chi and Qi Gong practices.”” It was here that Phelps began his journey with the martial arts. “”Back then, all the kids in the village wanted to be American and eat French fries, and ran away from their culture,”” Phelps said. “”But I was a strange kid, and I was a captive audience. So I listened to the elders. I didn’t have any friends my own age. They began to teach me what they couldn’t teach their own grandchildren.”” And by default, the orphaned Phelps had become a martial artist. Not only did such training condition his body, he began to think in the traditional sense of his elders. This caused greater alienation between Phelps and the world at hand, as he bore the face of a “”howa”” (Caucasian), but brandished an Eastern soul. “”I looked like them, but I didn’t think like them,”” he said. Phelps developed his martial arts training in its most practical form in the Vietnam War as a special forces operative. He then spent the next seven years both as an enlisted soldier and an officer in the elite Navy SEALs. Phelps then became an officer for the UN peacekeeping forces in the Golan Heights, Syria and Southern Lebanon, later working as a case officer for the CIA’s counter-terrorist task force. Not only did his training mentally discipline him to handle the general rigors of military life, it prepared him for actual life-and-death scenarios. “”There were times when you’d be alone and all you knew was that you were surrounded by enemies,”” Phelps said. “”My martial arts training gave me that edge — to feel my enemies without seeing them.”” Along with combat, the arts had given him the meditative resources to calm himself, or to be as calm as the target of bullets and brimstone could possibly be. Like other Vietnam veterans, Phelps was not treated to a warm homecoming. “”They weren’t very nice when we arrived,”” Phelps said, “”calling us names while all we could think of was, ‘Where were you while our buddies’ heads were getting blown off?’ So I said, ‘The heck with that,’ and went back to where I was happier: in Asia. Specifically, I went to Hong Kong to find a gung fu master.”” While in Hong Kong, Phelps was introduced to Dr. Chin, who knew of a Buddhist monastery in the Northern territories of China that was open to teaching Westerners. A letter of recommendation was written and Phelps waited outside the monastery for six days, until he was invited in on the seventh day. “”They took me in and lead me to this small altar,”” he said. “”After some chatting [Phelps became fluent in Mandarin Chinese while in China], they offered me a cup of tea. I was told earlier that I should offer the first cup to the altar. If they offered me a second cup, it would mean my acceptance into the monastery. “”If another cup wasn’t offered, the person was expected to make up an excuse and leave the monastery — that way, no face was lost,”” he said. Phelps was offered a second cup and was allowed into the monastery as a student, where he became a pupil under Wen Shih, master of the “”Dai Lao Hu Gung Fu,”” or “”Grand Tiger System.”” The Grand Tiger is the symbol of the West in ancient Chinese cosmology. Feared and revered by Buddhists and Taoists alike, the Grand Tiger is a sentinel, protecting innocent beings from “”Evil’s winds.”” His time in the monastery not only taught him the physical forms of the art, but the intrinsic, esoteric value as well, something that has been lost with Western commercialization. Phelps returned to the United States, where he decided to pursue his academic interests, receiving a bachelor’s degree in Chinese philosophy from Stanford University. He received his master’s degree in comparative religion from Harvard University, where his theological studies were under renowned professors Richard Reinhold and John Carmen. Phelps also studied at the Harvard Yenching Institute of East Asian Studies with Chinese philosopher Tu Weiming. He concluded his academic endeavors with a master’s of divinity from Yale Divinity School and was ordained as an Episcopal priest in 1993, serving in the Episcopal Diocese of San Diego. Yes — he’s also a priest. “”People have a hard time relating why someone devoted to martial arts would pursue religion in such a manner,”” Phelps said. “”I have a hard time understanding why they can’t see the similarities.”” During his stay at Stanford, Phelps continued his martial arts training under Mark Saito. Shorinjin Ryu Saito Ninjitsu is a Japanese family martial art that emphasizes discipline and anonymity. He is one of only three people who hold the rank of 10th-degree black belt in Saito Ninjitsu. He is the only non-Saito through the martial art’s illustrious 1,000-year history to be granted the rank of Saito Ninjitsu Master. Along with his mastery of Saito Ninjitsu, Phelps became an authorized instructor of the Fu family Wudang arts in China. Privately tutored under Bo Sim Mark, founder of the Chinese Wushu Research Center, Phelps is the only person authorized to teach the art in the United States. What resulted after a lifetime of training and searching for the martial way, whatever that may be, Phelps integrated his training into his own unique martial style. Wu Shan Fa, or “”Five Mountains,”” is a system that utilizes elements from Dai Lao Hu Gung Fu, Wu Dang Ssu, Shorinjin Ryu Saito Ninjitsu and Hawaiian Lua. Each one of these arts is taught on its own in style and discipline, yet each is infused with one another in such a way as to make a greater comprehensive system. Master Phelps subsequently named his dojo the Temple of the Full Autumn Moon after the same monastery in which learned the Dai Lao Hu Gung Fu. After five years, his first crop of black belts is finally emerging. Of course, in the martial arts community, receiving a black belt is just the beginning. Part two of this feature will include the actual interview, as well as the master’s personal thoughts on defining the martial arts and their role in the future. For more information on the Temple of the Full Autumn Moon, visit http://tfam.com ...

Winterfest 2001

Winterfest is the biggest festival at UCSD that isn’t named “”Sun God,”” and it has gradually grown to invite bands that tend to have small but very strong fan bases. Courtesy of Hollywood Records UCSD’s first Winterfest in 1998 capitalized on the ska and swing revival, bringing the Dance Hall Crashers, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy and Goldfish to town. The lineup for the following year was successful with the popularity of one-hit wonders Digital Underground, and the past-their-prime Violent Femmes and Southern-California-act World Tribe. They were able to carry the show with the anticipation of Digital Underground’s “”The Humpty Dance”” and the enduring quality of “”Blister in the Sun”” by the Femmes. Buck-o-Nine, Ozomatli and Coolio came to last year’s Winterfest with the power of a small but strong following that fueled the energy of the show. Courtesy of Hollywood Records Sprung: Sprung Monkey will open Winterfest 2001 with their punk rock styles dealt straight from San Diego. Even with all the skepticism about the show and the lineup, Winterfest has traditionally been able to fill RIMAC arena up to capacity and Winterfest 2001 is not expected to be any different. Following the tradition of having a balanced lineup, Winterfest will feature Juvenile, Lucy Pearl and San Diego band Sprung Monkey. We will have to wait and see this Friday if the selection of bands will bring out the masses. As for now, your friendly hiatus editor will happily give you some background on the bands that will grace our lovely campus. The Bands Juvenile Bio: Juvenile was born Terius Gray and for the past 15 years he has he has been honing his style. He came on to the music scene about a year ago with a hit song called, “”Ha.”” His last full length album, “”400 Degreez”” is expected to be quadruple platinum. “”Tha G-Code”” has also been met with positive reviews. The New Orleans native started out working at a local gas plant to support his family and rapped on the side. He was able to successfully blend hip-hop and “”bounce”” music. The success of his tune, “”Bounce For the Juvenile”” led him to a deal with a small New York record label. The deal eventually soured and turned Juvenile away from the music industry. Juvenile eventually came back into the music scene after he realized that he could emerge as a rapper that did not adhere to the West coast or East coast rap formula. “”We didn’t have a New Orleans rapper that straight up used our language and rapped for our people,”” Juvenile stated. “”Everybody wanted to be either East coast or West coast. That’s where I came in.”” Juvenile eventually caught the attention of Cash Money Records and in 1997 released “”Solja Rags,”” which was an underground hit. Eventually, “”Solja Rags”” reached a half-million sales and with that recognition, Cash Money Records was able to reach a distribution deal with Universal Records. Juvenile’s second album with Cash Money and Universal earned the Billboard award for “”R&B Album of the Year”” in 1999 and the single, “”Ha”” won “”Single of the Year”” from the Source Awards. Juvenile is expected to release his new album, “”Project English,”” March 27. What to Expect: The fact that Juvenile doesn’t conform too much to the West coast and East coast formula is refreshing. He may not have the hit of the year in 2001 but he definitely knows how to entertain. Lucy Pearl Bio: Take jazz-funk singer Joi, Raphael Saadiq from Tony! Toni! Tone!, mix them with Ali Shaheed Muhammed from A Tribe Called Quest, and you get the talented group known as Lucy Pearl. Originally formed in the summer of 1999 with Saadiq, Muhammed and former En Vogue vocalist Dawn Robinson, Lucy Pearl immediately worked on its May, 2000 self-titled album. Lucy Pearl seemed to be a new supergroup on their way to the top until Robinson left the group early in November. Robinson went on to sign a solo recording contract with Q Records. Lucy Pearl did not falter, and recruited the talents of Joi, who has released three solo albums of her own. Her last album was released in 1996 and since then she has worked with Fishbone, Organized Noise, Dallas Austin and the Goodie Mob. Saadiq was the bassist, singer and songwriter of the popular group Tony! Toni! Tone!. After Saadiq left the group in 1998 he went on to work with John Mellencamp, the Bee Gees and D’Angelo. Muhammed picked up the sax at age 13 but turned his musical energy to the turntables. During high school he met up with rapper and writer Q-Tip and with another rapper, Phife, A Tribe Called Quest was born. Muhammed was able to seamlessly fuse R&B and jazz with hip-hop. Muhammed was also part of the team that helped put together D’Angelo’s 1995 album, “”Brown Sugar.”” Joi is officially on tour with Lucy Pearl and she will also be featured on next Lucy Pearl album. What to Expect: In spite of former En Vogue vocalist Robinson leaving the group last November, you can expect Lucy Pearl to put on an amazing show. Lucy Pearl offers a smooth combination of hip-hop and R&B along with seductive vocals and funky grooves. The songwriting, singing and musical talent of Saadiq, Muhammed and Joi cannot be ignored. Sprung Monkey Bio: San Diego punk band Sprung Monkey debuted in 1995 with their album “”Swirl.”” They eventually signed to Hollywood Records and released another album in 1998 called “”Mr. Funny Face.”” Their hit song was “”Get ‘Em Outta Here,”” a summer anthem in 1998 with their tales of San Diego girls and the trouble that they get in to. After their hit in 1998 they did not release another album but they toured extensively in the United States, Australia and in New Zealand. Sprung Monkey also made a trip to Japan with Kottonmouth Kings and traveled extensively in Europe with The Offspring. Monkey have also made numerous television appearances and contributed to soundtracks and radio shows. Sprung Monkeys did find their way into the studio to work on a new album. Their new album produced by Jim Wirt should be released in late October and it is tentatively titled “”Get a Taste.”” What to Expect: Sprung Monkey adds the guitar-rock element into Winterfest 2001, making it a well-balanced show. Their extensive touring schedule has led to a polished live act that should energize the crowd. ...

Album Reviews

Rod Stewart “”Human”” Atlantic C :: Rod Stewart has always successfully adapted his music to fit current music trends for more than two decades. Once again, Stewart tries to update his vocal talents with his latest release, a pedestrian album “”Human,”” which blends rock ballads with a mix of R&B, soul and Motown. With his name fading, Stewart has nothing to lose by changing his music once again. He made the change from rock to pop, but this time his attempt is not as successful. From the first track, it becomes clear that the album is rough. Rob Dickins, an R&B and pop producer, worked with Stewart on his latest attempt to change his style. Dickins is best remembered for Cher’s “”Believe.”” It may have worked for Cher, but Stewart is not as good at combining his rock ballads and new music. Unlike Stewart’s previous albums, “”Human”” does not achieve this blend successfully and has a hard time matching his raspy voice to the R&B sound. It’s not an awful album; it’s decent, but there are no memorable songs. The last track, “”I Can’t Deny It,”” has a pleasant and mellow tone that makes it the most commercial and upbeat song on the album, but it cannot compare to “”Maggie May”” or any of his earlier works. On the other hand, Stewart’s music is smooth, warm and polished, showing that his style has aged gracefully. As a result, the slower ballads are much better than the other R&B-tinged songs. Stewart has shown that he is a versatile singer who is able to keep up with the current trends, but he is starting to show his age. — Charlie Tran Idlewild “”100 Broken Windows”” Odeon/Capitol B :: Idlewild are the best band you have never heard of. Idlewild are the quiet place in the novel “”Anne of Green Gables,”” but they are anything but quiet. These lads from Edinburgh made the mistake of putting together a punk rock group at the height of Britpop in 1995. While groups such as Oasis and Suede were making a splash in the British and American music scenes, Idlewild were left on the side. But now the wail of their Nirvana-esque guitars and their Pavement-like wit have finally made heads turn. Although they say they are influenced most by American indie-rock bands, they are able to retain a distinctively British sound within their songs. This is due in part to the production efforts of Dave Eringa, who has also produced the music of the Manic Street Preachers. Lead singer Roddy Woomble reaches for beautiful harmonies that edge into an angst-filled scream powerful enough to shake a bottle of Evian off your desk. Woomble’s favorite singer is Morrissey. The two singers’ emotional depth is comparable, but Woomble makes sure you know that he is the front man of a punk band. However, beautiful ballads such as “”The Bronze Medal”” make you wonder if they are edging toward a R.E.M.-esque sound. Their first single was released in March 1997 on the same label responsible for early Eugenius and Chicane singles. Successful airplay on Steve Lamacq’s BBC Radio 1 Evening Session gave them more exposure, which led to working with the Fierce Panda label, which has released singles from Mansun, Placebo and Embrace. Idlewild’s most recent effort, “”100 Broken Windows,”” is a powerful album that experiments with emotive drum beats and smooth harmonies. This isn’t just three-chord punk rock, but an intelligent, hard-hitting style of punk that is new and intense. “”Little Discourage”” is their first single and was an instant hit in the United Kingdom. Other tracks such as “”Actually It’s Darkness”” and “”Idea Track”” round out the solid album. If you believe Blink 182 is punk rock, then you need to let Idlewild take you on a sonic ride into honest punk rock, recalling the quality sound of punk rock in the late ’70s and ’80s. “”100 Broken Windows”” will be released March 13. Idlewild will be peforming at the Knitting Factory in Los Angeles on March 14. — Joseph Lee ...

Hiatus Weekly Calendar

All tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (619) 220-8497 or by going to http://www.ticketmaster.com, unless noted. 22 Thursday Flamenco Vivo presents Noches Flamenco. This passionate San Diego dance troupe will heat things up at Dizzy’s. There will be a performance at 8:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. The cover is $10. Call (858) 270-7467 for ticket information. Eve Selis, who is often compared to Bonnie Raitt and Sheryl Crow, blends different styles of American roadhouse rock to create her own distinctive style. Selis will perform at the Belly Up Tavern at 8:30 p.m. Tickets cost $5. David J, who is one of the founding members of legendary Goth band Bauhaus, is now behind the turntables spinning an eclectic musical concoction ranging from electronic to Billie Holiday. He will perform at The Casbah at 8:30 p.m. Tickets cost $8. 23 Friday Enjoy the Kenny Dorham Tribute featuring an evening of music by this underrated bop trumpet player. The show will feature Gilbert Castellanos, Gary Lefebvre, Rob Thorsen, Paul Keeling and Brett Sanders. There will be shows at 8:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. The cover charge is $8. For more information call (858) 270-7467. Greg Hetson from Bad Religion, Eric Melvin from NoFX, Derrick O’Brien from Social Distortion and Mike Watt from The Minutemen and Firehose will be your band for about two minutes at The Casbah’s Punk Rock Karaoke. Tickets are $10. Sign up before the show to get the chance to be on stage. Check http://www.emperorsnewfoes. com/songlist.html for the complete songlist and lyric sheets. 24 Saturday Cindy Lee Berryhill along with Joy Eden Harrison will perform at Dizzy’s, each showcasing her own acoustic-folk style. The show starts at 8 p.m. Call (858) 270-7467 for details. Texas band The Gourds are already successful in Europe and are looking to break into the American scene. This five-piece band recently released an album titled, “”Bolsa de Aqua.”” Fans of Phish might enjoy this group. Tickets cost $8. The show is at the Brick by Brick and starts at 8 p.m. 25 Sunday The eclectic hip-hop stylings of Jurassic 5 will be at 4th & B. This Los Angeles-based group has been together for the past six years and it has definitely given a very vibrant and positive spin to hip-hop. The show starts at 8 p.m. and tickets are $22.50. 27 Tuesday George Winston is a solo piano artist whose style comes from 1950s pop instrumentalists. His most recognizable works are probably the soundtracks for the “”Charlie Brown”” cartoons and “”The Velveteen Rabbit.”” Winston will be performing at the California Center for the Arts in Escondido. The show begins at 8 p.m. and tickets cost $30. 28 Wednesday Girls Against Boys opened for Garbage at RIMAC Arena about a year ago, and to put it simply, they were very good. This Washington, D.C. group bases its music on thick, crunchy guitar and driving drum beats. It will be supported by Autolux and Drop Science at The Casbah. The show begins at 8:30 p.m. and tickets cost $8. Henry Rollins, former frontman of the Rollins Band and Black Flag, will be at 4th & B talking about his life on the road and his humorous reflections on politics and touring around the world. Tickets are $15 and the event starts at 8:30 p.m. ...

'Sweet November' Evokes Sour Taste

It is difficult to describe “”Sweet November”” without comparing it to a “”Love Story”” redone for the millennium. That’s exactly what it is, and I don’t mean that as a compliment. It is a remake of a 1968 film called “”Sweet November.”” Only now, everything is awfully cute and politically correct. Cue entrance of token gay neighbor/drag queen with amazing job — because gay people can have important positions, you know. Of course, we would all love to be vegan animal lovers living out our dreams in the most expensive city in the world, mysteriously affording a lush apartment without actually working. Of course we should all live as if money doesn’t matter. Soft-focus lenses and colored light would be a plus, too. I fundamentally disagree with the treatment of the majority of the underlying issues in this film. Additionally, it is boring. I don’t like chick flicks, and “”Sweet November”” reminds me why. Boy-meets-girl-and-almost-loses-girl ad infinitum. But I won’t give away the ending in case you like Keanu Reeves and want to see it, just for the pleasure of seeing him as the rat-race-loving ad man, Nelson. Reeves can’t act. Sorry, but he just can’t. Charlize Theron saves the day as the woman whose task in life is to “”save”” men. I’m sure a lot of women will identify with this aspect of the film. The film should come with a warning label that says, “”This is a film, not a representation of real life.”” Cue hundreds of females rushing out to save the first and best traumatized male in their immediate environment. Gals, don’t go there. It doesn’t work that way in real life. ...

Jonny Is All Grown Up Now

As I walked into the intimate Dreamcatcher Lounge at Viejas Casino, I decided to take a seat and subtly listen to comments made about the blues performer of the evening. Praise for him reached me in the form of a one-shot-too-many older man who bluntly said, “”This guy fuckin’ rocks! You excited?”” Courtesy of Paul Calis Blues: Over the past four years, Jonny Lang has played with Aerosmith, The Rolling Stones and blues legend B.B. King. Now, at 20, he has continued to mature and develop his style. Um, yeah, but I did not need a random man to inform me of Jonny Lang’s talent; I had heard and believed all the hype from day one. Four years ago, “”child prodigy”” was the best description of Lang. He kept his listeners in awe with his amazing blues singing and guitar playing. Lang was a huge 50-year-old black man from Mississippi hiding inside the body of a lanky 16-year-old white boy from Minnesota. The music industry took notice. Since his debut album “”Lie To Me,”” Lang has been invited to tour with B.B. King, Aerosmith, The Rolling Stones and Blues Traveler. He has also headlined a world tour. Four years after his debut, Lang has left the heading of “”child prodigy”” and taken his place among the blues elite. He has also released his second album, “”Wander This World.”” Straying from purely blues to include a touch of R&B and rock, this album received more acclaim than the first. Yet, in trying to distance himself from other flashy musicians who tend to focus on high drama, Lang stayed true to his musical influences like bluesmen King and the late Luther Allison. He describes his music style as the “”simple kind of full and dirty sound.”” One might assume Lang’s fan base would be limited to twentysomethings, but he has fans of all ages. At Viejas Friday night, the average fan was a middle-aged male. With no opening act or grand entrance, Lang and the rest of his band nonchalantly walked onto the stage. As the fans screamed and clapped, Lang smiled and waved casually to the crowd and began to effortlessly strum his guitar. The performance lasted about an hour-and-a-half, and Lang had the crowd in the palm of his hand the entire time. The audience followed Lang’s emotions throughout; it listened intently to Lang’s self-written ballad “”Walking Away.”” People danced in the aisles to Lang’s upbeat “”Lie To Me.”” Lang also introduced fans to a couple of new songs from his latest album. The show was incredible. Fans, including me, walked in with the intention of seeing a great show and left knowing we had witnessed one of the most incredible musicians of our time. ...