Arts & Entertainment

FIlm Review: Uninspiring 'Zoolander' proves to be cinematic mismatch

en Stiller’s latest offering, “”Zoolander,”” follows the plight of male supermodels who are brainwashed to kill the prime minister of Malaysia. The movie is ultra-brief, poorly played out with visual gags, easily forgettable and contains largely unnecessary cameos. Stiller’s screen presence is awkward, fish-lipped and contrasts with the rest of the cast’s considerably more relaxed attitude. Matilda, the love interest and orgy participant played by Christine Taylor, and several other characters are well-delivered but uninspired. The fashion-oriented plot boasts a very glossy and visually appealing look, but substance of any kind is lacking. Comedically, “”Zoolander”” is a disappointment but is a move away from the painful can’t-get-any-worse approach of “”Meet The Parents.”” Problems stem from the movie’s reliance on dry Stupidity — yes, with a capital S — instead of punch lines. The amusing characters, including Will Ferrell as Jacobim Mugatu, and a few other minor roles, get little attention. What they do receive is homoeroticism or easy, kitschy gags. As Hansel, Owen Wilson rides a scooter and displays pseudo-Hindu spirituality. Zoolander’s roommates, who are also fellow male supermodels, die after they spew each other with gasoline in a car wash-style hose down. Many famous faces show up in this movie — David Bowie and Winona Ryder make appearances — but do little to improve the film. Then again, most of the scenes do very little, so it’s no big loss. The overall effect of “”Zoolander”” is a few chuckles and a lot of time waiting for the laughter to begin. “”Zoolander”” gets worse as the product placements get increasingly blatant. At times, “”Zoolander”” amounts to little more than a string of logo-focused scenes. Certain brightly colored, fruit-named computers got a big segment of time, as did several other less-than-stealthy product placements at the VH1 Fashion Awards, which apparently are now the most important fashion event in the world. This movie is missable at best, deserving little if any praise. At its worst, you will be hiding yawns. The upside is that “”Zoolander”” is not actually bad, it’s just not good. As with most movies, you already know the best scenes from the trailers. Save the $8 and two hours of your life by opting not to support Stiller’s ego — he directed and co-wrote “”Zoolander”” and was one of its eight producers. To sum up, as Jay Sherman said on the TV show “”The Critic””: “”F’eh.”” Starring Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson and Christine Taylor in theaters Sept. 28 Rated PG-13 ...

Album Reviews

Bob Sinclar Cerrone Sound of Barclay Who is Bob Sinclar? Sinclar comes from the imagination of Parisian Chris Le Friant — Sinclar is also his alter ego. Sinclar is a world famous DJ, remixer and producer. Sinclar has a specialized groove. The retro-disco sound behind his music is complemented by a sensual house-beat and modern production methods that get you going on the dance floor. Sinclar’s credits are everywhere. His remixes of dozens of songs are on many records and huge singles such as Stardust’s “”The Music Sounds Better With You.”” Sinclar’s recent studio album, “”Champs Elysees,”” captures the sounds of disco and R&B in the ’70s, and creates a soulful blend of very danceable club music. Sinclar returns with arrangements of the work of classic disco producer Jean-Marc Cerrone. Almost everything on “”Cerrone by Bob Sinclar”” is a classic hit from the ’70s, but is reworked to achieve the modern sound of house music. This is French house at its very best. There are classics like “”Love in C Minor”” and “”Supernature.”” There is a spicy Latin sound in “”Revelacion”” and funky disco-guitars scattered throughout the mix. House producers like Modjo (known for “”Lady””) also make an appearance on this album. There are remixes by Spiller (known for the hit single “”Groovejet [If This Ain’t Love]””) and progressive house master Danny Tenaglia. Sinclar also slips in one of his own songs (“”I Feel For You””) to mix beautifully on top of Cerrone’s “”Look For Love,”” which results in nothing short of pure glamor. Soulful vocals dominate “”Standing in the Rain,”” and the horns and funky bass-line of this song — and practically the entire album — can transport you to a mansion in the hills of Hollywood for some swank disco-party, the glittery nightlife in Vegas or the steamy clubs of Paris. This album mixes French disco-house sound with Latin instrumentals and the pace of deep house. “”Cerrone by Bob Sinclar”” is fit for any party or for cruising through the city streets with the top down. Spaceman Spiff The Love EP self-released Spaceman Spiff. Funny name, eh? How many of you recognize this as a Calvin and Hobbes reference? Probably a lot of you. But how many of you know this is probably one of the best hip-hop-infused jazz acts in San Diego? There is a distinct jazz sound in this music, with classic jazz chords that reveal the light sounds of the sax and flute. The funk in the drums and bass gives the sound that extra edge. The smooth vocals of Ivan Garzon will make anyone feel the foot-tapping and body-swaying groove of the music. You could compare Spaceman Spiff to a jazzier Jamiroquai, but almost all of Spiff’s material is original. The talent of this quartet is more than apparent on “”The Love EP.”” As vocalist and bass player, Garzon studied bass guitar at the California Institute for the Arts. The man with the sax and the flute is Clay Elliot, who also does some vocal work and has a degree in jazz performance from San Diego State University. Brilliant guitarist Tommy Collins has his degree in music education, and versatile drummer Mike Cannon teaches drum classes for high school students. “”That Something”” opens up with the flute floating over the funky guitar and groovy bass-line with a great sing-along chorus: “”Girl you have that somethin’ that leaves me wanting you.”” There are songs of admiration with words like “”All I wanna do is love you, tell me you’ll always stay”” in “”Always Stay,”” as well as songs of pure passion in “”You Possess”” with the lyrics, “”You’re hypnotizing, so mesmerizing. My heat is rising, utilizing everything that feels so good.”” This is truly an album of love and is perfect for any late night with candles, a bottle of red wine and someone special. The only criticism is that the album is painfully short and there isn’t very much room to hear the talent that can be completely expressed in a live performance. So for now you’ll have to live with the repeat button until Spaceman Spiff comes out with a full album. With their growing success, that can’t be too far away. Vivid Vivid Flesh in Tension Is there anything truly unique about the sound of San Diego band Vivid? At first, not really. This is a pop-rock group with catchy hooks and great sing-along lyrics. Their self-titled album is the stuff summer anthems are made of — the kind of stuff you will find in MP3 playlists and backyard fraternity barbecues. Vivid has a very polished sound with distorted guitars, riffs and drum fills placed in all the right places. It will fulfill your guilty fun pop music needs. Inevitably, with a band that is trying to break into the notoriously difficult pop-rock market, there will be comparisons. So here I go with mine: Vivid is like Lit but less obnoxious. Third Eye Blind but without that annoying syrupy pop sound. Everclear? Please, Vivid blows them out of the water. Vivid seems to blend all of the good things about American rock and gets rid of most of the annoyances accompanied by pop. Vocalist-guitarist Terran Trousset has almost a Social Distortion vocal quality on “”More Time Alone.”” “”Relentless”” is light, relaxing and has an almost Peter Gabriel-like quality. You can sense influences ranging from The Clash to Stroke 9. “”Renee”” and “”Everlasting La”” have a very energetic, three-chord punk-rock feeling and are sure to create a mosh pit. I see “”Funky Revolution”” prompting fist-pumping and crowd-surfing as the audience yells back, “”I’m talking about a funky revolution/ Just stop all your fuss and get on the bus!”” But fear not, all of the lyrics are not as inane. There is some deeper symbolism about heroes in “”Youth Pilots,”” and the scrutiny of people is addressed in “”All or Nothin’.”” So, is there anything truly unique about the sonic formations of Vivid? They don’t reinvent the sounds of pop-rock, but this stuff sounds better than a lot of other groups on the radio today. So God forbid you walk past all that Limp Bizkit and P.O.D. crap and pick up some Vivid. ...

University Events Office debuts this year's lineup

Each year, the University Events Office at UCSD presents about 20 world music and dance performances. This year, performers from different countries and musical genres will bring UCSD the best of music and dance. The season kicks off with two San Diego premieres: The Sean Curran Dance Company on Oct. 13 and Nov. 4, and Kosong Okwangdae, which performs Korean traditional masked dance. The Sean Curran Company will perform four pieces, including “”Folk Dance for the Future.”” “”Sean Curran began his training with traditional Irish step dancing and progressed into modern dance with the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company,”” said Judi Griffith, an events office representative. “”With his own company, he creates dance infused with his signature virtuosity, complex musicality and powerful emotion.”” General admission tickets are $22. Tickets are $20 for senior citizens and $10 for students. “”Five Clowns Play: Kosong Okwangdae”” premieres Nov. 4. The play, told through dance and song, is the story of the Kosong Village in the South Kysonsan province of Korea. This art form dates back to the 10th century. The play will be performed by an all-male cast from the farming village of Kosong. Kosong Okwangdae will also be in Mandeville Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $17 for general admission, $15 for senior citizens and $10 for students. Jimmy Bosch, who was called “”one of the most devastating forces”” in Latin American music by the Los Angeles Times, will play the Price Center Ballroom on Oct. 19. Irish singer Mary Black will make her long awaited return to San Diego on Nov. 3. Coming Jan. 15, 2002, Frank Sinatra fans will be treated to what The New York Times calls a “”winning tribute to Ol’ Blue Eyes”” with “”Our Sinatra”” performed by an 11-piece band and a trio of singers. Also, look for the San Diego Film Festival at the Price Center in April 2002. Baaba Maal, Lila Downs and Virginia Rodridgues are also scheduled to perform this year. Tickets for all events are available at the UCSD Box Office and at all Ticketmaster locations. For a complete calendar of events, visit the University Events Office or check out their Web site at http://ueo.ucsd.edu. ...

Hiatus Calendar

9/27 Thursday Lyon Liew Guardian Where would the News be without Huey Lewis? Certainly not at The Park in the Viejas Outlet Center. Huey Lewis and the News stormed MTV and the `80s with their 1983 release, ³Sports,² which gave the world four top 10 singles. They will perform at 8 p.m. The bad news? Tickets are $60. Catch some indie-punk at The Casbah with Zen Guerilla. Vocal effects and raw sounds make up the sound of Zen Guerilla. In support are Tori Cobras and Rollerball. The Casbah info line is (619) 232-4355. 9/28 Friday No, ³When Bands Attack² is not another Fox TV special about high school marching bands gone awry. Rather, it is a festival of hard-hitting performers like Ozzy Osbourne, Staind and Godsmack. Osbourne just finished OzzFest 2001 and Staind has been growing to be quite succesful with the help of MTV airplay. Godsmack has recently released ³Awake.² ³When Bands Attack² will be at the Coors Ampitheatre. The event starts at 2 p.m. Al Jarreau has won Grammys in R&B, jazz and pop. He will bring his silky voice and his smooth jazz sound to Humphrey¹s By the Bay. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. and tickets start at $45. Go to http://www.humphreysbythebay.com for more information and to purchase tickets. The Dragons will be at The Casbah to promote the release of their new record, ³Kamikaze.² The supporting bands will be the Nomands, The Demons, and The Fleshtones. The show starts 8:30 p.m. and you¹ll need to call The Casbah at (619) 232-4355 for more details. 9/29 Saturday The 20th Annual Adams Avenue Street Fair starts at 10 a.m. and goes to 10 p.m. it continues on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. There will be everything from carnival rides to over 70 artists performing throughout the weekend. Food, arts, crafts and beer gardens will also be available. The event is free. Look to the front page of hiatus (page 9) for the complete story. Jazz great Wynton Marsalis will be performing with The Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra at the California Center for the Arts in Escondido. Marsalis will perform jazz standards from the likes of Duke Ellington to Charles Mingus as well as original material. The show starts at 8 p.m. and tickets start at $35. 10/1 Monday Basement Jaxx are coming to 4th & B. With hits from their albums ³Remedy² and ³Rooty,² the British duo has been getting asses to shake on dance floors around the world with infectious hits such as ³Rendezvous² and ³Where¹s Your Head At.² The doors open at 8 p.m. and tickets are $18. 10/2 Tuesday Probably best known for his work with the Beastie Boys, Mix Master Mike has been making the rounds on his own. He has performed at UCSD and most recently at Street Scene. This master turntable artist will be at ¹Canes Bar & Grill at 9 p.m. 10/3 Wednesday Anne Murray has recently been found on late-night commercials promoting her latest album of pop covers. But back in 1969 she was one of the best pop singers of the day. She has released almost 30 studio albums of her own in her 30 years in the music business. Murray will kick off the 2001 East County Performing Arts Center season at 2:30 p.m. Tickets start at $30. ...

Adams Avenue Street Fair

What distinguishes San Diego from many other cities of comparable size is that it feels like a much smaller town. This is due largely to the fact that what we call San Diego is really a patchwork of distinct communities loosely bound together by ordinances and area codes. Every community in the city, from Del Mar to Golden Hill, has its own particular vibe, its own characteristic denizens and its own cultural and community events. Lyon Liew Guardian The crowning example of community togetherness is the street festival, when the legendary weather San Diegans are blessed with leads them to take their parties into the street. Year- round, we host events featuring music, food and vendors catering to every personality. Now, as fall dawns, the greatest of these is upon us once again. The weekend of Sept. 29 and Sept. 30 will find Normal Heights transformed from a quirky but calm pocket of San Diego into a sun-drenched celebration of the best this city has to offer. When the annual Adams Avenue Street Fair rolls into town, music lovers and party-goers should stand up, take notice and make plans. In 1972, Adams Avenue unveiled its new landmark: the neon Normal Heights sign at the corner of Adams and Bancroft. To celebrate, they organized a modest street festival featuring local bands and vendor booths — The Adams Avenue Street Fair was born. Lyon Liew Guardian Among the festival’s offerings this year are over 400 booths and 80 bands on seven stages. Between 50,000 and 60,000 San Diegans attended each day of last year’s fair, and that number is expected to be met again, if not exceeded. On Saturday or Sunday morning, roll out of bed a little earlier than usual — say, 10 a.m. If you have a car, driving to the festival is so easy you could do it in your sleep; the activities on Adams Avenue are nestled between Interstates 805 and the I-15. Parking gets more difficult as the day progresses, of course. Coming in early not only guarantees you’ll enjoy a beautiful beach city morning, it also scores you a spot to stash your wheels. The carless will find the event easily accessible via San Diego Transit bus Routes 2 and 11. Don’t worry if you skipped breakfast: Everything tastes better when you buy it from a brightly colored booth. Among the usual array of barbecue and smoothies, steer toward the hand-squeezed lemonade and fresh-baked cobbler a la mode. A little later in the day — or not, depending on how hardcore you’re feeling this weekend — those aged 21 and up can make a pit stop at one of the three beer gardens along the avenue. Heck, go for all three, but make sure you’ll remember the fun of the festival come Monday. Also, if you show up in your pajamas, it’s no problem — clothing, shoes and accessories are among the most common things peddled at vendor booths. Keep an eye out for the $10 sunglasses store and the Indian clothing booths. You don’t even have to stress if your wallet is still on your bedside table, because the main attractions are free. They don’t call it a fair for nothing: A circus and mimes take charge of the Adams Park Theater Stage while carnival rides hum and spin at 35th Street. Missing out on the Ferris wheel or Scrambler would be a major festival foul. And while the rides are fewer than at, for example, the big-shot Del Mar Fair, no tickets are required. Why go to Student Health for counseling when this childhood regression therapy is much more fun? There’s one big disappointment, though, for all the kids at heart: The pony rides are for the little ones only. But check out the rock climbing right next door on 34th Street. After you’ve hit up the tilt-a-whirl and scaled a polyurethane cliff wall, it’s time to get down to the festival’s bread and butter. All the shopfronts and activities are fun, but the soul of the Adams Avenue Street Fair is the music acts that take to the seven stages strategically scattered along the festival’s six blocks. Each stage is themed to cater to a certain style of music. The Roots Rock Stage showcases San Diego’s best — music they just don’t make anymore. Keep an eye out for the Buddy Blue Band on Saturday night and The Paladins on Sunday evening. The majority of the acts at the World/Jazz Stage are Latin-influenced, like Julian Briano y sus Hermanos, Siete de Corazon and the Orquesta Binacional. Another not-to-miss standout is Theo and the Zydeco Patrol. If you’re unfamiliar with Zydeco, it’s the high-energy sound coming out of Louisiana that evokes crayfish and dimly lit dance halls filled with big-haired, toe-tapping two-steppers. And you thought only Weird Al could make the accordion cool. The Blues Stage is at Hawley and Adams, and its acts range from The Blues Brokers to the Gospel Revelators, Rod and the Pistons to the Sue Palmer Quartet. The last is the best bet for this stage; Sue gets her groove going on Sunday evening. Looking for a more mellow sound? The Acoustic Stage’s songwriters and guitar strummers will soothe you into relaxed contemplation and pleasant digestion. San Diego’s acoustic scene is varied and extremely talented, so any act here is likely to draw you in, but make room in your schedule, especially for Lisa Sanders (Saturday night), as well as Gregory Page and Anya Marina (both Sunday afternoon). Lisa is funky, Gregory is heart-breaking and Anya thought-provoking; each of them puts on a heck of a show. Another great gal guitarist is Mary Dolan, who graces the Lestat’s Coffee House Stage on Saturday afternoon. Her slightly spastic stage presence is a good lead-in to that afternoon’s next act, the National Comedy Theater, for a break from the tunes. But let’s say you show up at the festival and are suddenly struck with a crippling bout of chronic fatigue syndrome, leaving you with no choice but to spend all day at one stage. Although the real essence of the street fair experience is to wander aimlessly and sample the stages with the capriciousness one affords a banquet of free food, if you see only one stage, make it the San Diego Music Awards Stage at DeMille’s. All the acts performing at this stage are nominees for this year’s San Diego Music Awards, and the deservedness of this honor is readily apparent. Pretty much any of the bands performing on this stage either day is a solid bet. Make this stage your Saturday night destination, because Jose Sinatra and the Troy Dante Inferno is not an act to miss. They classify themselves as “”lounge metal,”” but the cumulative effect of mangled covers and medleys of ’60s and ’70s staples, hilarious parodies about sex with celebrities and one very unique lead singer in a tight velvet leisure suit is inexpressible in a cute genre catch-all. The late-night slot at the SDMA stage is filled by the Bastard Sons of Johnny Cash, a slightly less flamboyant group that nonetheless knows how to work the crowd and kick some country butt. They prove that the most amazing thing about the San Diego music scene is that some of these bands stick around as long as they do without being snapped up by major labels and shipped all over the country on tours. Sunday evening also finds great bands at the SDMA stage. The Shambles spout classic SD-style pop, and Pink Froyd transitions smoothly from the bar scene to the fair’s main stage. The Adams Avenue Street Fair doesn’t boast the nationally-known names of Street Scene, the high-brow art of the La Jolla fest or the all-out rowdiness of the PB Block Party. However, its irresistible atmosphere comes straight from the heart of Normal Heights and all of San Diego. It is laid-back SoCal at its best, and it’s the perfect way to spend a weekend. ...

5

When you pick up the Guardian, you might wonder who these editors really are. After all, the god-like characters that produce such a politically balanced, high-quality newspaper may seem out of reach to the common student. One might wonder, how can I ever relate to such talent? Or one might ask, is it possible that I have something in common with these journalistic demagogues? The next logical query would be, do these people actually breathe the same air that I do? Well, the editors have provided me with a list of their five favorite albums. With this you may conclude that these people are human after all. You might think, “”Hey, they listen to the same crappy pop music that I do!”” Or, “”Hey, they listen the same great post-industrial-two-chord-rage-chill-out-techno-euro-pop music that I listen to!”” Agree or disagree? Please submit your Top 5 Favorite Albums to: [email protected] They run the Guardian, but do they see eye-to-eye? ALISON NORRIS Editor in Chief 1. “”Blood Sugar Sex Majik”” – Red Hot Chili Peppers 2. “”Nevermind”” – Nirvana 3. “”The Singles Soundtrack”” – various artists 4. “”Use Your Illusion II”” – Guns ‘n’ Roses 5. “”The Ultimate Experience”” – Jimi Hendrix JEFFREY WHITE Editor in Chief 1. “”No Jacket Required”” – Phil Collins 2. “”Blood Sugar Sex Majik”” – Red Hot Chili Peppers 3. “”Achtung Baby”” – U2 4. “”In Utero”” – Nirvana 5. “”Niandra Ladies and Usually Just a T-Shirt”” – John Frusciante LAUREN I. COARTNEY Managing Editor 1. “”Siamese Dream”” – Smashing Pumpkins 2. “”Parachutes”” – Coldplay 3. “”Tidal”” – Fiona Apple 4. “”The Joshua Tree”” – U2 5. “”From the Choirgirl Hotel”” – Tori Amos ...

FallFest lineup announced

It’s that time of year again! Yes, it’s time for FallFest. Our friends over at A.S. are bringing a whole slew of bands for our amusement. You can love them or hate them. But it’s free, so why should you complain? The following is a list of who is coming to FallFest 2001. But there are questions that remain: Alien Ant Farm — Are they better than “”Smooth Criminal?”” Warren G — Will he regulate? How could he not? Toya — Who? Apparently she’s been on MTV a lot. FallFest 2001 will be on Friday, Oct. 5. The show is at RIMAC and admission is free with a student ID. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the concert starts at 8 p.m. Look to the hiatus section next week for complete coverage of the festival and its bands. ...

10 Questions

What is your best memory from childhood? “”Probably just spending time with my family and going on family outings.”” What is your greatest regret? “”Not getting really involved in high school until my senior year. I wasn’t bold enough to get involved and make new friends.”” What is your favorite city in the world? “”Santa Cruz, because that is where I grew up.”” How do you handle stress? “”I pray about it.”” Who is your hero? “”My mom, because she supports me and always has time to listen to me.”” What is the most important political issue today? “”Well, after the whole terrorist attack on the World Trade Center, I would have to say national security and world peace.”” How did you choose what you’re studying? “”I am a computer engineering major. I enjoy taking things apart and putting them back together. Computers have always interested me and I enjoy figuring out how they work.”” What improvements do you feel UCSD needs to make? “”Parking — more parking!”” Where do you see yourself in 10 years? “”I would like to be in a professional field and get a master’s degree. I hope to do software development or something in the computer industry.”” How do you want to be remembered? “”That I was a witness of my faith in Jesus Christ through what I did and said, and how I treated other people.”” ...

Dancing in the Streets

San Diego came alive at Street Scene 2001, the last great party of the summer. Thousands of people packed the Gaslamp District to dance, drink and listen. The vibe was simply wonderful. Tyler Huff Guardian Street Scene and the Pacific Beach Block Party are the few times each year when the entire city of San Diego seems to flood the streets to have a good time and listen to great music. Street Scene 2001 included a variety of music to please the attendees of the outdoor festival. Within a few blocks, fans could find reggae and jam bands, jazz and hip-hop groups and DJs making the crowd dance. Still, some may have found the conspicuous corporate sponsorship problematic. Tyler Huff Guardian Bands like Jack Johnson, Cake, Social Distortion and the Counting Crows rocked downtown Sept. 7. All the clubbers headed for the XM Radio Electronica Stage. The Sept. 8 performances showcased 311, the Black Crowes and James Brown. Berlin was even there to take your breath away. Sunday was the chance for the sub-21 crowd to go to Street Scene and revel in the music. Well-known bands like the Offspring, OutKast, and P.O.D. gave performances. People also grooved to G. Love and Special Sauce, and the jazzy sounds of Soulive at the Best Buy Stage. San Diego’s own B-Side Players thrilled the crowd with great Latin jazz jams. Eek-A-Mouse played at the Time Warner Roadrunner Stage. Eek, no stranger to UCSD, was more at home with a larger crowd that seemed to understand its music more than the average UCSD student does. Mix Master Mike dropped the beats in the dance music area and Donald Glaude had the crowd moving along to every pounding beat of his energetic set. Rounding out Street Scene were the overpriced food and drinks: Four dollars for a slice of pizza and how much for a beer? Besdies that and the corporate advertising, Street Scene 2001 proved to be a well-done festival. ...

Hiatus Calendar

Look to the Hiatus Calendar for events in and around UCSD. All tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (619) 220-8497 or by going to http://www.ticketmaster.com, unless otherwise noted. Tuesday, Sept. 18 You only have to travel to The Park at Viejas Outlet Center to watch Chicago perform. The show starts at 8 p.m. The band performs again Wednesday at 8 p.m. at the same location. Tickets are a painful $50 but at least you don’t have to go to Chicago, right? (619) 659-2077 will get you the info you need. Vocalist Lila Brown-Smith with Myron Ross on drums, Dave Milard on sax and flute, Bob Boss on the guitar, Ben Wanicur on bass, and Roy Gonsalez on percussion will be at Dizzy’s from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Cover is $8. Call (858) 279-7467 for more information. Indie-rock group Bahamadia will be at ‘Canes Bar & Grill. The show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15. Call Canes for more information at (858) 488-9690. Wednesday, Sept. 19 Los Angeles-based Buckcherry will perform at ‘Canes Bar & Grill. The group has been playing hard and aggressive rock since 1995 and have a new release titled “”Time Bomb.”” Tickets are $10. For more information dial (858) 488-9690. Punk band Dewey Defeats Truman will headline at The Casbah. Woke Up Falling, The Landslide, and The Dempsey Project will support. The show starts at 8:30 p.m. Call The Casbah for details at (619) 232-4355. Thursday, Sept. 20 Jazz fusion group Spyro Gyra reached its peak in the late 1970s but it’s still hot at Humphrey’s Concerts by the Bay. Tickets start at $33 and the show starts at 7 p.m. You can buy tickets at http://www.humphreysbythebay.com New York City quartet Clem Snide might be the new sound of country. Named after a William S. Burroughs character, the group is here at The Casbah to show off its alt-country sound. The show starts at 8:30 p.m. Call The Casbah for details at (619) 232-4355. Friday Sept. 21 The DJs and Vinylphiles Club present its first event of the year, Hop on Pop, in the Price Center Ballroom. The event is free to UCSD students. DJs will spin house, trance and drum ‘n’ bass. Hop on Pop starts at 8 p.m. and ends at 1 a.m. Log on to http://djclub.ucsd.edu for more information. Crooked Fingers is the project of Archers of Loaf guitarist and vocalist, Eric Bachmann. He plays The Casbah at 8:30 p.m. Lo-fi production and electronic atmospherics color the sound. Jack’s Broken Heart and Jim White will also perform. The Casbah has all the details, (619) 232-4355. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy pushed its way into the music world when swing and rockabilly hit it big. Even though swing isn’t the thing these days, you can still catch them at Humphrey’s Concerts by the Bay. You can buy tickets and get more information at http://www.humphreysbythebay.com Saturday, Sept. 22 The Embrooks from Britain will entertain you with a retro 1960s sound at The Casbah at 9 p.m. Local bands, The Loons and The Lories will play too. DJs will perform all styles of music to round out the evening. Cover is $8. Call The Casbah for more information at (619) 232-4355. Sunday, Sept. 23 After the death of TSOL drummer Todd Barnes in 1999, the band eventually reunited with a new set of band members but the same Orange County punk sound. It has been involved in the O.C. punk scene since the early 1980s. TSOL will play ‘Canes Bar & Grill at 7 p.m. Tickets are $12 and you can call (858) 488-9690 for more information. Monday, Sept. 24 Danilo Perez and the Motherland Project will fill the Neurosciences Institute Auditorium with traditional and Latin jazz. The performance begins at 8 p.m. Tickets are $23. Call (858) 454-5872 for more information. Tuesday, Sept. 25 Would you walk 500 miles for The Proclaimers? Well, you don’t have to. They will perform at ‘Canes Bar & Grill at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15. Call (858) 488-9690 for information. Wednesday, Sept. 26 The incomparable Janet Jackson performs at the San Diego Sports Arena to promote her most recent release, “”All for You.”” The title track is No. 1 on the singles chart. Prepare to get nasty with Janet at 7:30 p.m. There are still tickets on sale, starting at $34.75 ...