News

Student Athletes Voice Concerns at Open Forum

UCSD students gathered Thursday evening to express concern over the increasing difficulties of balancing academics and intercollegiate athletics. The open forum, held at the J.K. Wood conference room on the Warren campus, was sponsored by the Warren College Community Development Council. Suzie Asfoor of the Community Development Council organized the forum to begin a dialogue between student athletes, the athletic department and the UCSD administration on how they can come together to better serve the needs of student athletes. UCSD Athletic Director Earl Edwards, Assistant Athletic Director Ken Grosse and Warren College Provost David Jordan were present to respond to the numerous issues and questions brought forth by those in attendance. The fundamental problem is that there is no university-wide policy concerning missed class work due to travel and competition. Professors have full jurisdiction over the academic procedures in their class and this leads to varying standards for different students, resulting in confusion. The forum was an attempt to better understand these problems so they can be corrected. Student athletes spoke of the problems that occur when intercollegiate competitions occur simultaneously with classes and exams. Most of the time, when athletes have to miss an exam due to travel, professors allow them to take exams prior to departure or upon return. The main concern among athletes in attendance was having to choose between taking an exam or participating in a competition. Men’s tennis team captain Everett Schroeter noted that his team has been at less than full strength on numerous occasions because of players needing to take exams for which professors would not allow a compromise. Another problem addressed was compulsory attendance policies in mandatory classes such as Dimensions of Culture and Making of the Modern World. With priority registration, many conflicts have been avoided, but they still occur. Student athletes will often use their allowable absences on game days or travel, hoping they do not actually get sick and need to be absent from class. The general consensus among student athletes at the forum was that academics have and always will take precedence over athletics, but compromise should not be such an uphill battle. Student athletes complained that some professors are under the impression that athletes at UCSD are athletes firsts and scholars second. Jordan, Edwards and Grosse made it clear that the opposite is true. Caroline Kim of the Resident Dean Advisory Board also said that the forum had been beneficial. “”This was a good starting point to educate athletes,”” Kim said. “”This is an issue that can be resolved, but we have to work on it.”” ...

Juvenile Cancels, F.o.N. Fills In at Winterfest Friday

Despite the cold winter weather outside, F.o.N., Sprung Monkey and Lucy Pearl warmed up the stage for all in attendance at Winterfest Friday night. “”With the lineup change, I think the committee did a good job putting it together,”” said A.S. Festival Committee member Mike Hayes. The committee that organized the concert stated that the show was supposed to feature rap group Juvenile, who canceled when its lead singer became ill. “”Juvenile said he had an ear infection and couldn’t fly from Miami on Thursday,”” said A.S Co-Festivals Coordinator Priya Mohan. “”So Thursday morning until Thursday night, we tried to find another band but it didn’t happen.”” Once Juvenile canceled, F.o.N signed on to play the opening set as Lucy Pearl became the lead act. Some of those in attendance deemed it unfortunate that only a small crowd showed up for F.o.N.’s performance. “”It was good, although there weren’t really enough people there yet to give them the credit they deserved,”” said Muir sophomore Puum Sill. “”The drummer kicks ass and I think he’s only like 11.”” Similar sentiments were expressed about Lucy Pearl. The band performed 15 songs, including their Grammy-nominated song, “”I Want to Dance Tonight.”” “”It didn’t seem like there were too many people there at the show,”” said Marshall sophomore Jeff Lee. “”It seemed strange to me since they are pretty well-known and they put on a good show.”” Regardless, the band members themselves said the crowd supported them well, which made it easier to have a good performance. “”I loved the crowd,”” said Joi, the lead singer for Lucy Pearl. “”Everybody was really cool, especially since most did not know me.”” Lucy Pearl’s set did, however, have some technical difficulties. During a part of their performance the front speakers did not work due to California’s current power shortage. Even so, Joi said the crowd was not impacted by such problems. “”I thought the performance was cool,”” she said. “”It was a lot of energy and good. I usually don’t like to play in gymnasiums because the sound is so shitty, but even with the technical difficulties, the crowd was still responsive and they must have heard something they liked.”” In between the sets of Sprung Monkey and Lucy Pearl, each college presented a short skit on stage designed to increase the participation and energy of the audience. Although no college was declared the winner, Mohan said the event, “”Mascot Mayhem,”” accomplished what it was designed to do. “”It was nice to see some creative, crazy people at UCSD who wanted to entertain the students,”” she said. “”[Each college] had a good time with them and the crowd had a good time right along with them.”” As part of the skits, Muir College Council Chair Cristina Villegas performed onstage as cupid to advertise the upcoming A.S. Loveline event featuring Dr. Drew and Adam Corrola March 7. For some, this was one of the highlights of the show. “”I want to see that cupid at Loveline right here at RIMAC in her suit,”” said Revelle junior Tarun Bajaj. However, not everyone was in agreement over the success of this year’s Winterfest. “”The night as a whole was a let down,”” said Muir sophomore Rob Buckley. “”I wish I went to the library.”” The answer to such complaints may be an increased budget for the festivals staff. “”The programming staff really can’t go out and get a big name because they are financially limited as to who they can get,”” said Marshall junior Bryan Fisher. “”It would serve everyone’s needs if the school budgeted them more money and they put on a great show. If they do a good job with the money they get now, imagine what would happen with increased funding.”” ...

Event Celebrates Black History

Hundreds of people gathered in the Price Center Plaza last Thursday at noon to watch the Black History Celebration. The event was part of a move to increase student awareness of African Americans’ contributions to American history as part of Black History Month. The celebration featured various acts displaying cultural traditions that originated from the African continent, ranging from African stilt walkers and Bomani drummers to a step show put on by the students of the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity and a performance by the UCSD Gospel Choir. The boys and girls of Keiller Middle School were also on hand to perform a montage entitled “”Facing the Rising Sun.”” During this presentation, Mrs. Davis and her sixth grade students took center stage in the Price Center Plaza and electrified the crowd by reading from the works of various African-American poets, writers and leaders, including Harriet Tubman and Langston Hughes. One such student was Deandre Lester, a sixth grader at Keiller Middle School, who passionately read two poems written by Langston Hughes, an African American poet who became popular during the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. “”I think it was a really good presentation,”” Lester said. “”I was [nervous] at first, but then after I said my first part I wasn’t that nervous.”” The children’s performance was well received by the crowd, which consisted of students, parents and university employees. One spectator was Kristin LeAndre, a university employee who admits she came to see the step show, but was impressed by the children’s performance. “”I thought it was great, the kids were wonderful,”” LeAndre said. “”They were very articulate [for] a middle school.”” The Marshall Dean of Student Affairs, Ashanti Houston Hands, who served as the MC for the event, feels that black history is an important part of America’s past. “”Today is the celebration of Black History Month and African American culture,”” Hands said. “”We just wanted to provide the opportunity for our campus to be exposed to all the rich tradition through music, dance and the spoken word.”” For many students, the celebration of black history is truly important. African Americans’ role in American history is often minimized or, in some cases, forgotten. “”We can certainly always do more,”” Hands said. “”I think we do make a nice effort on campus, but I think when we really feel that the level of diversity has been achieved that we would all anticipate, [black history] would be woven into the overall curriculum and not just be a specific department or separate issue.”” Nneka Udoh, a Warren junior, admits being troubled that black history is not always seen as a part of American history. “”Black history is American history, and I don’t understand why we have to take the time to celebrate black history on this token month,”” Udoh said. “”Why can’t we celebrate black history every single day?”” The Black History Celebration was sponsored in part by Marshall college and the Cultural Association Uniting Students through Education, better known as C.A.U.S.E. ...

Events

Thursday, Feb. 22 Special Event: Black History Celebration 2001 Bomoni drummers, unity sleep dancers, the UCSD Gospel Choir and African stilt walkers will perform at the event, which will be sponsored by the Thurgood Marshall Dean of Student Affairs. The celebration will take place at noon in the Price Center. It is open to the public and admission is free. For more information call (858) 534-4390. Friday, Feb. 23 Performing Arts: Winterfest The A.S. Council will sponsor the annual concert, which will feature Sprung Monkey, Lucy Pearl and Juvenile. The event will take place at 8 p.m. at RIMAC Arena. Admission is free to students who bring canned food and is $12 for guests. For more information call (858) 534-4119. Performing Arts: Perla Batalla Mexican-American singer/songwriter Perla Batalla will perform at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Auditorium. Batalla’s music has been described as a hybrid of genres including gypsy, gospel, folk, pop and Latin American. The concert is open to the public. Student admission is $12 and general admission is $17. For more information call (858) 534-4090. Panel: Women in Industry Melissa Ford of Vetrex Electronics, Anne Crossways of CIStern Molecular Corp. and Debrah Schueren of Epummune will participate in a discussion of women in industry. The event is sponsored by Women in Science and Engineering and will take place at noon at the Women’s Center. The event is open to the public and admission is free. For more information call (858) 822-0074. Saturday, Feb. 24 Performing Arts: Faust Fragments Brian Kulick presents an updated version of Goethe’s “”Faust.”” UCSD Theater & Dance will sponsor the event, which will take place at 8 p.m. in the Mandell Weiss Forum. Director Jonathan Silverstein will deliver one of Shakespeare’s most popular comedies. The event is open to the public. Student admission is $6 and general admission is $12. For more information call (858) 534-4574. Tuesday, Feb. 27 Special Event: Unity Celebration for Peace The Baha’i Club will sponsor the Unity Celebration for Peace, which will feature discussions led by Jimmy Collins and Omid G. relating to issues of peace. The event will take place at 7 p.m. in the dining hall of the International Center. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call Sam Shooshtary at (619) 993-3855. ...

Briefly

The new California Spatial Reference Center, which uses Global Positioning System technology to monitor California’s environment, was dedicated Monday at its headquarters at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. There are more than 40 organizations that will use the center, including the Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Scripps, Caltrans, the California Land Surveyor’s Association, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, the U.S. Geological Survey, and Orange County’s Public Facilities and Resources Department. UCSD Professor Looks Into High Altitude Effects Frank Powell, UCSD professor of physiology and director of the University of California’s White Mountain Research Station, has organized a program to study the effects of high altitude on humans and the environment. Mountain research has significant implications for heart and lung diseases. Powell and his colleagues presented their findings at the annual meeting of the Association for the Advancement of Science Feb. 18. Powell and his fellow researchers study hypoxia, a factor that limits humans’ oxygen intake at high altitudes, and their findings may lead to treatment for people who suffer from hypoxia at sea level as a result of heart or lung disease. UCSD School of Medicine to Offer Classes for Seniors The Scripps Institution of Oceanography held its annual Surf Bowl Feb. 10. Each year, local high schools compete in the competition to demonstrate their mastery of the fields of biology, chemistry, geology, technology, the social sciences and geography, by answering questions. La Jolla High School’s first team placed first in the event and will continue on to the National Ocean Sciences Bowl. Dana Hills High School came in second, and La Jolla High School’s second team came in third. Poway High School received the Best Sportsmanship Award, which was decided by all the participating high schools. The National competition will be held in Miami Beach, Fla., in April. In that competition, La Jolla will compete against 18 other teams that won their own regional competitions. Scripps Institution of Oceanography Holds Surf Bowl The UCSD School of Medicine is offering a course on healthy aging for seniors in the San Diego community. The course will cover a wide variety of topics pertaining to aging and will focus on disease prevention and personal health enhancement. The individual classes will address the biological processes that affect aging as well as various diseases and disorders common among the elderly. The course will be offered on a first-come, first-served basis. There is a $25 enrollment fee to help offset the cost of instructional materials. Sessions will be held for eight consecutive Saturdays on the UCSD campus beginning April 28. For more information call (858) 822-2437. ...

Navidad Virus Sent Out by UCSD Visual Arts Server

Earlier this week the “”Navidad”” virus was unintentionally sent via e-mail to hundreds of students on a visual arts mailing list. The e-mail’s subject line read “”Grad Show!”” and contained the attached file navidad.exe, which is a virus that distributes itself through address books in Microsoft Outlook Express. According to ResNet Coordinator Erik Strahm, when downloaded, the virus prevents any application from running. “”When the user tries to open an application, a screen pops up with a smiley face,”” Strahm said. “”Fortunately, computers infected with the virus are 100 percent repairable.”” Nich Ziesmer, senior residential computing consultant, explained that the outbreak was completely random. “”It is pure chance that the UCSD sender got the virus,”” Ziesmer said. Strahm said that the Navidad virus that was sent to people on the visual arts list did not originate on campus. “”Usually someone creates the virus somewhere else and almost all viruses are from other countries,”” Strahm said. He added that the UCSD sender did not intentionally propagate the virus. “”Microsoft Outlook Express is very susceptible to viruses because the viruses can piggy-back themselves on the files the system uses,”” Ziesmer said. He also said that computer viruses spread like viruses in humans and can be designed to do almost anything. He said the Navidad virus is very well-designed. “”It’s practically ingenious,”” he said. “”It readily distributes itself to millions of computers. It is unfortunate how effective the virus is.”” The Navidad virus is one of many viruses that have been spreading around campus. The “”Snow White”” and “”Romeo and Juliet”” viruses are some of the others. Ziesmer said the best way for people to protect their computers from viruses is to buy an anti-virus program such as Norton AntiVirus. He said another problem is that people do not keep their anti-virus programs updated. Ziesmer added that students who read their e-mail though popmail.ucsd.edu or telnet are at less risk, because file attachments will not be opened automatically, as they sometimes are in older versions of Microsoft Outlook Express. “”Look twice before opening files,”” Ziesmer said. He explained that students should be cautious about opening files from senders they do not know. According to Strahm, the problem with viruses is that they grow exponentially when they are distributed through mailing lists. Strahm said that although viruses are already commonly found on campus residential computers, there has been an increase in the last few weeks. Two years ago, the “”Melissa”” virus infected computers and was the most devastating virus on campus, Strahm said. There have been no reported actual costs or damage to computers infected with the Navidad virus on campus yet, other than the time spent removing the virus because people were temporarily unable to use their computers. Students whose computers have a virus or have problems should call the ResNet office at (858) 822-2800. The office is open Sunday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Information about computer viruses, those that present the top threats, removal procedures and anti-virus software can be found at http://www.norton.com/avcenter/ ...

Atkinson Moves to Eliminate SAT

UC President Richard C. Atkinson proposed dropping the SAT I as a criterion for applying to UC schools, citing the test as an unfair assessment of the abilities of students. “”The SAT I is problematic because it does not cover what is learned in a high school curriculum,”” said UC spokesman Brad Hayward. “”The SAT measures the student’s test taking abilities.”” As a result of such criticism regarding the SAT, Atkinson has proposed to restructure the application process so that students will no longer submit their SAT I scores. Instead, high school grade point averages in UC-approved classes and SAT II scores would be the two major parts of the application and would determine a student’s acceptance. Atkinson suggested that a new, fairer standardized test be developed, but recommended that the SAT II be used until such a test has been made. In his Feb. 18 speech at the Annual Meeting of the American Council Education, Atkinson said that the SAT I is no longer a valid indicator of success in college. “”We know that high school grades are by far the best indicator of first-year college performance,”” he said. “”We have also found that the SAT II is a better predictor of performance than the SAT I.”” A 1996 study, on the other hand, showed that 82 percent of students who had over a 1,300 on their SAT I graduated college within five years, while only 74 percent of the students who scored between 1200 and 1299 graduated within the same time frame. UCSD’s Assistant Vice Chancellor Richard Backer said that this proposed policy would not impact UCSD to a large degree, as the importance of standardized tests in admissions decisions has already been decreasing for the last two years. For the last two years, admission to UCSD has been based 60 percent on high school GPA and 40 percent on standardized tests. This is a change from three years ago when the percentages were equal at 50 percent each. In recent years, the test has fallen under close scrutiny, and many believe it is culturally, sexually and economically unfair. Statistics from the 1998 test show that males on average perform 42 points better on the exam than females, despite females’ general better performance in high school and higher graduation rate than males. The SAT is also under scrutiny because many believe it is unfair to students from low-income families that cannot afford private tutoring. Atkinson said last year that about 150,000 students paid over $100 million to companies such as IVY West and Kaplan that charge as much as $750 per student for services. “”These changes will help all students — especially low-income and minority students — determine their own educational destinies,”” Atkinson said. If passed by the UC Regents, the proposal will go into effect during the 2003 school year. Backer said there is a strong possibility that this will happen. ...

Briefly

William B. Armstrong, whose resume boasts 12 years of directing research activities for the San Diego Community College District, had joined UCSD as the new director of Student Research and Information. Armstrong takes over the position, which was formerly held by the now-retired Darlene Morell, on March 12. In addition to the book and numerous papers, Armstrong has authored concerning institutional research at the university and post-secondary education level, he has also worked as the project director for two nationally funded endeavors on the development of national standards for adult literacy. Author Ruth Morgan-Jones to Appear at UCSD Bookstore Ruth Morgan-Jones will make an appearance at the UCSD Bookstore on Feb. 28 at 5 p.m. to discuss her book, titled “”Hearing Differently: An Investigation into the Impact of Hearing Loss on Family Life.”” The book covers the results of 150 interviews with hearing-impaired people and looks at how their disability has altered their relationships. Morgan-Jones is hearing-impaired herself and used her experience on the subject as inspiration to write the book. The book finds a positive outlook on the topic by drawing from various fields of study, including social psychology, family sociology and linguistics to discover means hearing-impaired people use consciously and unconsciously in every day interaction such as conflict management and communication. For more information about the event, call (858)534-3149. Brain Impairment Discovered in Female Alcoholics Researchers at the UCSD School of Medicine and the Veteran’s Affairs Health Care System have used fMRI studies to confirm that alcoholism negatively affects memory in young, female alcoholics. Previously, only thinking and memory tests were used to test the theory. The researchers published their findings in the February issue of “”Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.”” Susan F. Tapert, who works as an assistant adjunct professor of psychiatry at UCSD and as a clinical psychologist at the Veteran’s Affairs Health Care System, headed the research, which employed functional magnetic reasoning for the first time to study the brains of female alcoholics. Women 18 to 25 years old were tested in order to discover the importance of studying the impaired brain parts individually to see how early alcoholism leads to brain damage. The researchers are planning to do more studies with men and women to determine whether memory loss can improve with abstinence from alcohol or whether it is permanent. Waste Minimization Committee Announces Recycling Awards The Waste Minimization Advisory Commitee announced the 2001 Recycling Heroics Awards last week. The Recycling Heroics Awards were created to cut down on waste and to encourage recycling in all departments at UCSD. Recipients of the award will receive a pin and a certificate for their conservation efforts. Nominations for the awards are accepted all year long with the actual awards being given out some time near Earth Day, which is April 22. March 30 will be the cutoff date to submit nominations for this year’s awards. The ceremony will be held April 27. Award recipients are chosen based on several factors, including fostering recycling in their own department, encouraging others to recycle, and making sure that the recycling continues. ...

Student Regent Visits UCSD, Discusses Admissions

Student Regent-designate Tracy Davis visited UCSD Thursday to talk to potential student regent candidates at a luncheon concerning the application process. The luncheon took place in the Faculty Club Thursday morning. Davis spoke to six applicants and a few other spectators about the difficulties of the application process and the responsibilities of student regent. Applications for the position are due in the chancellor’s office Feb. 23 by 5 p.m. These applications are for the position of student regent-designate for 2001-2002 and student regent for 2002-2003. Davis is the student regent-designate for 2000-2001 and will be student regent next year. Students from all UC campuses are eligible to apply. Student regents in the past have been undergraduate and graduate students alike. Davis is a graduate student at UCLA. She received her bachelor’s degree in 1995 from UCLA. She moved to New York City and worked for CNN in the investigative documentary department before moving back and becoming an undergraduate adviser at UCLA. She then began her graduate studies and ran for the student regent position. Davis is the first student regent to be elected to a two-year term. Previously, the term was only one year. The year as designate was added to allow student regents to become more involved and versed in the issues. “”Even though you only have two years, you have things to learn, networking,”” Davis said. “”Those don’t take hours, they take months.”” The students present at the luncheon asked questions regarding the position and the application process. Davis informed them of different steps of the process. The first interview for the position is with the UC Student Association. Her advice for this step of the process is to go to the UCSA Web site and find out where the association stands on issues. “”A lot of it is figuring out what you can accomplish and what you can’t accomplish and talking to a lot of people to find out what they think a student regent should be doing,”” Davis said. Davis will not be able to vote until her second year. “”[Next year] I do all the same things as a regular regent does,”” she said. The year as student regent-designate is a nonvoting year. The last interview for the position is with the regents themselves. Only three candidates in the UC system make it to this step. Davis again told applicants to prepare by knowing their audience. She talked about how she prepared by talking things out and realizing where she stood on issues. “”The regents want someone they can spend hours and hours on buses and planes and in meetings with, as well as someone they can work with,”” she said. Davis said she found the second interview intimidating because it was with 24 interviewers and just her as the interviewee. “”[The luncheon] broadened my mind as to the specifics of the job and what role I could have in it and the advantages I would bring to the position,”” said student regent applicant and Warren junior Fady Mikhael. The position of student regent takes up a lot of time, Davis emphasized. She said she is used to working 12 to 14 hours in a day and up to 30 hours a week in addition to her graduate work. “”I’m in my office doing ‘regental’ things between 10 and 20 hours a week,”” she said. She has an assistant who works 10 hours a week, but she does more research, according to Davis. Davis summed up her job by simply saying “”It is to direct people to correct information.”” Revelle junior Seth Silvernail attended the luncheon to obtain more information about the position. “”I’m looking at all the implications of it,”” he said. During the luncheon, Silver-nail asked Davis about the personal impact of her job. “”I think you need to love what you’re doing,”” she said. “”You need to be willing and prepared that your friends and the things you’re doing will be a part of this.”” The duties of a student regent include keeping well-informed of issues affecting education in California, being prepared to represent all students in the system and understanding how the system actually operates. Applications for the position of student regent can be obtained at the A.S. offices on the third floor of the Price Center. Davis urged students to apply for the position. “”It’s learning an amazing internship,”” she said. “”You learn so much about the way things really work.”” ...

Students of Color Convene

A record 300 students participated this weekend in the 12th annual “”Students of Color Conference: Politics of Silence Establishing a Voice at the Crossroads of the New Millennium,”” which was hosted by the A.S. Council in cooperation with the UC Student Association. Students from various schools were in attendance during the three-day event, including members from all of the UC campuses, some California State University campuses and some high schools. Among the UC campuses, Davis and Riverside had the highest number of attendees. UC Santa Cruz junior David Harbaugh explained his motivation for making the long commute to attend the conference. “”My motivation as a white ally was to learn my role as one,”” Harbaugh said. “”I wanted to be more familiar with the struggle and I think the people [in the conference] have been really open in trying to educate themselves and learn their role, as well.”” Co-Chair of the SOCC Committee Nneka Udoh said she heard only good things about the conference. “”It was extremely organized,”” Udoh said. “”I think this conference in San Diego totally set a precedent — not to say the ones in the past weren’t successful, because they were. It’s just that this year we had so many people.”” Jesse Coward, a member of the SOCC Committee, agreed. “”It ran very smoothly,”” Coward said. “”The amount of work and energy put into it really paid off.”” Udoh said the high turnout rate was a surprise for everyone involved. According to her, this year’s student participation is a significant increase from last year’s number of approximately 60 students. Before the conference, Co-Chair of the SOCC Committee Alicia Schwartz talked about her goals for the three-day event. “”My big hope is that people will get something from this when they leave,”” Schwartz said. “”After a conference like this, it makes you think of what you really have — you realize just how privileged you are.”” The conference’s first major event on Friday was “”The Arena,”” a concert/dance/art exhibit featuring L.A. Symphony and Medusa. Events sponsored by the conference on Saturday included an opening speech from Hughes Suffren of Claremont-McKenna College, workshops on issues including rally organization, various caucuses including multiple identities and a rally and march with the coalition of Justice for Janitors and Bus Riders’ Union. The evening’s activities included a banquet featuring professor George Lipsitz of the UCSD department of ethnic studies as keynote speaker, and the play “”The Vagina Monologues.”” “”He touched me deeply,”” said Kevin Du, a UC Davis junior, about Lipsitz’s speech. “”He talked so passionately that it made me passionate.”” Sunday, the final day of the conference, wrapped up with more workshops, caucuses addressing women and queers of color, a panel discussion entitled “”The Changing Face of Activism”” and finally, a large group session. Arash Kolahi, a Marshall senior, said he liked how the conference ended. “”It ends on a positive note,”” Kolahi said. “”Speakers talk about solutions and success stories.”” A.S. Vice President External Eugene Mahmoud praised the conference and its participants but wondered why more people did not attend, particularly more members of the administration. “”It’s interesting when something is student-initiated like this conference, Chancellor Dynes, who has deemed himself chief executive officer of diversity, or something to that effect, is not here,”” Mahmoud said. Udoh shared his sentiment. “”Honestly, I wish more people from UCSD could be here,”” Udoh said. “”I wish Joseph Watson and Chancellor Dynes were here. They should totally use this as a resource.”” UC Riverside senior and External Vice President Ryann Nieves mentioned how she thought this year’s conference was better than the ones before. “”This is my third year at the conference, and this year has three times as many students who are just more willing to listen and dialogue,”” Nieves said. “”Touchy subjects usually bring negative connotations, but I’ve seen people [this year] really be open to make it a positive situation.”” Nieves went on to commend the San Diego staff for hosting the event so smoothly. UCLA junior Greg Hom said one of the goals of participants was to network. “”A lot of connections were made that were really important,”” Hom said. “”I definitely met a lot of people, which is sort of the theme of this conference — unity of struggle.”” Mahmoud said most of the credit should be given to Co-Chairs Udoh and Schwartz. Udoh expressed her thanks to all the SOCC staff, including a special thanks to Tom Colley, UCSD operations manager of the University Centers. ...