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Events

Thursday, April 12 Special Event: Muslim Culture Club Ice Cream Social The Muslim Cultural Club will sponsor the event, which is free and open to the public. It will take place at 2 p.m. in the Berkeley room, located in the Price Center. For more information call (858) 549-9922. Friday, April 13 Performing Arts: Alonso King’s Lines Contemporary Ballet The University Events Office will sponsor an evening of contemporary ballet choreographed by Alonso King. The performance starts at 7 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Auditorium. General admission is $22 and student admission is $16. For more information call (858) 534-4119. Special Event: Spring Job Fair One hundred and fifty companies will be at the event, which is sponsored by the UCSD Career Services Center and Qualcomm. The fair starts at 10:30 a.m. on Library Walk. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4501. Saturday, April 14 Performing Arts: SANGAM 9th Annual Cultural Show The SANGAM Subcontinental Asian Indian Club will sponsor the event, which will feature cultural dances from different parts of South Asia. The event will take place at 6:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public. ...

Hate Incident Under Investigation

The MEChA organization’s awareness display on the Price Center’s grass area was allegedly defaced last Thursday. The display included a poster that documented how many immigrants died trying to cross the border and also included 250 crosses memorializing the dead. Warren freshman Eleazar Loza, a member of the MEChA organization, said that he saw the vandalism on their poster. According to Loza, the words, “”This happens because they are criminals,”” were written in black ink, and were about three inches tall. Loza said that he is very unhappy that someone would write such a comment on the poster. “”It is extremely offensive to the Latino community,”” Loza said. Loza said that MEChA did not take the display down for Admit Day, even after the poster was defaced. “”We decided to leave the display with the graffiti up for Admit Day,”” Loza said. “”But then the poster display and crosses went missing,”” Loza said. According to UCSD police detective Nate Floyd, the case is being investigated as a hate incident. “”If the identity of the perpetrator becomes known, the offender could face disciplinary action under the Student Code of Conduct,”” Floyd said. Floyd said that the difference between what is considered a hate crime and a hate incident is that a hate incident is not considered a criminal offense under the law, however if the perpetrator is identified, legal consequences may arise. According to the Student Office for Human Relations, a hate crime is an act of hostility or violence committed against a person or group or property because of their race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, religion or political beliefs. Hate incidents are things such as nonthreatening name-calling, racist leaflets and hate mail. Floyd said that the scrawled words were noticed Thursday and then the cardboard placard and crosses were noticed missing on or before Admit Day, which began Saturday. “”We are looking into whether the same person who defaced the poster came back and took the crosses and poster display, or whether it is a completely unrelated incident,”” Floyd said. There are conflicting reports by several witnesses — some of whom claim to have seen one, others, two — white males taking the crosses early Saturday. It is still unknown whether a university employee removed the display for Admit Day. Julia Adame, the director of Student Office of Human Relations, a hate and bias prevention and education program, said the language that was written on the poster would be considered as a hate crime because it presented a clear message. “”The defacement is a message that you are not welcome on our campus, that you are criminals and we don’t want you here,”” Adame said. But Adame said that immigrants are necessary on our campus and to our state. “”We do need immigrants because no one else will do the work,”” she said. “”Who is going to work in 110 degree temperature in the Central Valley? No one except the immigrants who are so desperate for any kind of work in order to support themselves and their families.”” Anthony Valladolid, director of student legal services, said the defacement of the poster cannot be viewed as anything but as a message of hate. “”It is a provocative and malicious message,”” Valladolid said. “”It is hateful. It is criminalizing a whole class of people.”” Valladolid said he does not believe that what the vandal alluded to by the graffiti has any basis. “”Because they came illegally into our country out of extreme need, that should result in a justifiable death sentence?”” Valladolid said. “”It is unconscionable to think that.”” Marshall junior Delia Pacheco, the high school conference chair of MEChA, said that the defacement of the poster is a symptom of a lack of diversity at UCSD. “”I think it is a reflection of this university in terms of the energy that is not put toward diversifying our school,”” Pacheco said. Pacheco said that she is hurt and very upset at having the poster not only defaced, but also taken down. “”I am very angry because we put our money, time and effort into making this project to educate the campus,”” Pacheco said. Muir junior Jessica Lopez, chair of MEChA, said that this act is only one example of continued racism and hate that exist in society. “”Though it’s very painful to know how we are viewed, at the same time it’s easier to see that racism does exist because it’s an isolated racial incident,”” Lopez said. “”But we can’t just focus on these, because it happens every day. This hate crime will serve as a reminder that racism still goes on.”” Pacheco said that the MEChA organization would not let the hate stop them from trying to bring awareness to the campus of the current situation of immigrants. “”We will redo the entire project,”” Pacheco said. “”We will have an entire month of Awareness rather than the two weeks we had planned.”” Anyone with any information regarding the graffiti or any hate crime is encouraged to contact UCSD police detective Nate Floyd at (858) 534-4359, or Julia Adame at the Student Office for Human Relations at (858) 534-5661. ...

Suspicious Object Draws UCSD Police

A suspicious package placed on one of the concrete pillars located between the High Bay Physics Laboratory and the Science Engineering Research Facility forced UCSD police to close Matthews Lane on Wednesday afternoon until units of the San Diego Fire Department confirmed that the package was harmless. No buildings were evacuated. According to police, the package consisted of “”a piece of cardboard attached to a silver disk and a sponge, held together with red tape.”” Police also described the object as resembling a “”transistor device”” from a distance, an appearance that ultimately spurred a citizen to notify campus officials at around 12:55 p.m. An employee at the UCSD police said there were reports that the placement of the package was a project by students in a visual arts class. The reports are still unsubstantiated. Police subsequently closed Matthews Lane for about 20 minutes, preventing East and Regents Parking shuttle drivers from dropping passengers off near the Price Center, as they normally would. “”With Matthews Lane closed to vehicular traffic, we began to have the shuttles stop at parking lot P403, near the Canyonview pool, instead,”” said Frank Buono, shuttle operations coordinator for Transportation Services. In addition, the office sent a representative on foot to the Price Center shuttle stop to alert passengers of the change. Normal shuttle service resumed soon after Matthews Lane was reopened by campus police. ...

Nexus Slate Eliminated from Election

All eight Thurgood Marshall College Student Council candidates on the Nexus slate were disqualified Wednesday from the Marshall College Student Council and A.S. elections for violating of posting and solicitation policies. A.S. junior senator candidate Amy Eisel, TMCSC chair candidate Adam Lawrence Sherry, vice chair candidate Brent Nibecker, director of finance candidate Mike Afshar, director of communications candidate Michael Scarpelli, director of public relations candidate Steven Vu, and student at large candidates Jenifer Crawford and Jane Coffee were the students disqualified from this week’s elections. Marshall college director of programming candidate Jennifer Kim had already withdrawn her candidacy when allegations were made. The disqualification leaves all TMCSC position candidates running unopposed. The Thurgood Marshall College Rules/Elections Committee met April 10 to hand down the decision. Five of the seven members of the rules committee eligible to vote on the issue were present. The rules committee found the Nexus slate guilty of 67 posting policy violations. The posting violations, considered to be the first violation, were reported April 4 by Assistant Residence Dean Mitchelle Greenlee, who lives on campus. Members of the slate were found guilty of posting more than 10 fliers, a violation of the Marshall college constitution. They were also found guilty of posting fliers in locations not approved for posting. Additionally, they were found guilty of posting fliers with Residential Life stamps photocopied, another violation of posting policy. The Marshall college constitution states, “”Upon the second violation for a [slate] decided by the rules committee, the candidate is disqualified.”” The second violation was brought to the attention of the rules committee Monday, also by Greenlee. The Nexus slate was also accused of “”dorm storming,”” which is distributing material and campaigning in the residence halls and on-campus apartments. Members of the Nexus slate said they placed printed materials on doorsteps of the Marshall Upper apartments and that they visited the suites of people they knew in the residence halls. “”We didn’t actually go in and talk to anyone we didn’t know,”” Scarpelli said. “”If we had known dorm storming was blatantly illegal, we wouldn’t have done it.”” Sherry also said that the slate members didn’t know that what they were doing was wrong. “”We explained clearly [to the rules committee] that we didn’t know that it was against policy,”” she said. Since the slate was found in violation of these rules, the case was taken to the rules committee by Marshall College Elections Manager Tricia Piers. “”As soon as it was determined that they had committed in excess of two violations, they were disqualified in accordance to the constitution,”” she said. The eight candidates found guilty of the violations were each sentenced to 15 hours of community service and an ethics workshop by Marshall College Dean Ashanti Houston Hands. Members of the Nexus slate said they dispute the decision of the rules committee because two nonvoting members, TMCSC Chair Emiko Burchill and TMCSC Rules Committee Chair Michelle Law, had approached Nibecker April 6 about literature the slate posted legally. These members approached the slate for their own personal reasons, Piers said. “”In [Burchill and Law’s] opinions, some of the material posted on the Nexus fliers was slanderous to current committee members,”” Piers said. Members of the slate felt that their presence at the meeting was a conflict of interest. “”In general, Marshall Council had expressed discontent about our campaign and the way that we called them into question,”” Nibecker said. “”It’s like having the victim of attack be the judge and jury.”” Piers said she disagreed that this was a factor in the decision. “”The meeting we had was 100 percent unbiased, and the decision [the committee] made was strictly based on the constitution,”” she said. In addition, Marshall College Residence Life policies do not fall directly in line with the elections policies of the A.S. Council. The candidates were given copies of both sets of rules. “”There was a lot of confusion over when you follow A.S.’s rules and when you follow Marshall’s,”” Scarpelli said. Piers said she regrets the timing of the rule discrepancy. “”I don’t know how many years these sets of rules have existed, contradicting each other,”” Piers said. “”It’s unfortunate that this had to come up during election week. We had to make do with two sets of rules.”” Allegations of policy violation were also brought against the Marshall Posse, the other Marshall college slate whose candidates are now all running unopposed. Members of the Nexus slate and another student accused the Marshall Posse of five posting violations, Piers said. Four of the accusations were declared invalid by the rules committee. Another allegation that the Marshall Posse used a photocopied stamp was heard by the committee. The Marshall Posse slate was found innocent of any violation. “”For various reasons, there was not enough evidence linking Marshall Posse to the violation,”” Piers said. The Nexus slate members appealed the decision to A.S. Elections Manager Vince Vasquez and to Piers. Vasquez said he had no jurisdiction over the issue. “”They appealed to me, asking that we look again at the allegations against the Marshall Posse,”” Piers said. “”However, the rules committee’s decision is final.”” The members of the Nexus slate are not happy with this. “”This college is so hyped up on diversity, and they went to great lengths to deny students diversity of choice in this election,”” Sherry said. ...

'One' Wins Complaint Against 'Unity'

The A.S. Elections Board of Inquiry ruled unanimously Friday that Jeff Dodge and the Unity slate were guilty of posting violations in their campaign for the 2001 A.S. Council election. Three members of the One slate filed formal complaints with the elections committee against the 22-member Unity slate for violating this year’s posting policies. Unity was found guilty of posting signs over five feet in length and hanging banners on the Gilman Drive and Veterans Affairs Hospital bridges that were made of paper, rather than cloth as is mandated in A.S. bylaws. Against committee chair Vince Vasquez’s recommendation, the One slate requested a formal hearing. The hearing was held at 10:20 p.m. Thursday in the Student Leadership Chambers. The committee ruled that the Unity slate must write a formal apology to those filing the violations and all other candidates affected by the violations. Also, as reparations for the extra publicity provided by the posting violations, the Unity slate was limited to 13 posters in and on the Price Center from noon. Saturday to 11:59 p.m. Monday. This number includes slate and candidate postings. The conditions surrounding the correction of the violation were in question at the hearing Thursday night. “”Most of the problem I had was that the violations weren’t corrected in a timely manner,”” said One presidential candidate Ali Yazdi, one of the slate members who filed a violation. “”There was over a 30-hour period in which they could have taken down the posters,”” said One vice president internal candidate Shana Thakur. The Unity slate cited busy schedules, trouble locating proper supplies and difficulty mobilizing the 22 members as reasons for the delayed reaction. “”It was just a delayed-time reaction, there was no malicious intent,”” said Dodge, Unity’s presidential candidate. The Unity slate admitted guilt at the hearing to the posting violations. Slate members had received an outdated copy of A.S. posting policies, which they blamed for their violations. Upon notification of the error, Dodge said he was not able to immediately attend to the posters. “”When these violations were brought to my attention, it was 8:30 a.m. on Monday, and I was in bed,”” Dodge said. He said he had classes all day that day, and he met with his slate that night to discuss the poster size problems The bridge posters were fixed Monday afternoon. The Gilman Drive bridge signs were removed and the VA Hospital bridge sign was attached to cloth and tied up with string. The oversized posters in the Price Center were cut down Tuesday by Vasquez. “”The average height of the ones I cut down was six feet or in excess of that,”” Vasquez said at the hearing. The One slate requested the hearing because of the publicity allotted to the Unity slate resulting from their oversized signs. Unity slate members admitted Thursday night that they erred in their delay to correct the violations. “”Their argument rests solely on that there are 22 of us and we should have [taken down signs] faster,”” said Unity slate member Nick Lieberknecht. “”And we should have.”” Dodge agreed. “”It is a violation, and it is a big deal,”” Dodge said. The Board’s decision was well-accepted by both slates. “”I think it was an extremely fair ruling. We had offered to do this and more before the hearing,”” Dodge said. “”Our slate and myself, we’re extremely compliant in trying to get this done.”” Thakur was surprised with the slate’s cooperation in the matter. “”I’m surprised that they decided to have some repercussions,”” Thakur said. “”Since we could not decide in our informal meeting on adequate consequences, I’m happy with the decision.”” The Unity slate corrected the violating posters and continues to follow the current posting policies. “”I think the elections board ruling was fair and it provides everyone with a chance to campaign equally,”” Yazdi said. A.S. elections are being held today through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Students can vote at http://studentlink.ucsd.edu or on Library Walk. ...

Inclement Weather Threatens Many Admit Day Activities

Torrential rain drenched Marshall college’s Cultural Celebration, one of many events on UCSD’s annual Admit Day on Saturday. Crowds were confronted with delays and cancellations due to the weather. Leo der Stepanians Guardian Admit Day activities at all five colleges, in the Price Center and on Library Walk were also affected. Visitors to Marshall college were still able to enjoy diverse culinary works from around the world, featuring Louisiana catfish, Greek falafel and gyros, hot dogs and sushi. The Global Game Room was also open. This area, which was aimed at children, featured classic board games such as chess and checkers, as well as Africa’s mankala and the ancient tile game mah-jongg. The Children’s Village lost its larger attractions due to the rain. Llama rides were canceled to keep the animals dry. The Astrojump was also gone by 12:30 p.m. The agaobitin, or Filipino-style pinatas, were waiting inside, so those in attendance did have some entertainment. Grammy winner Quino and three other bands, Almeta Speaks, The Revelations and B-Side Players cancelled performances. A troupe of Aztec dancers, whose costumes would have been spoiled by the rain, also canceled. A lone bagpiper arrived in the morning to play Scottish songs. One of the main attractions that remained untouched by the weather was the Cesar Chavez exhibit. Planners transformed the Thurgood Marshall Dean’s Conference Room into a pictorial display of Chavez’s work with migrant farm workers in the 1960s. Several other objects were displayed, including a quilt modeled after the United Farm Workers flag and a video presentation of “”Fight in the Fields.”” The exhibit opened with the history of Chavez and the National Farm Workers Association he founded in 1962. This union was formed to protect the rights of agricultural workers who were allegedly manipulated and underpaid while the U.S. and Mexico engaged in a “”Bracero program,”” whereby labor was imported from Mexico to keep prices low. From there the display moved to illuminate some of the specifics of the labor rights movement that was growing in the San Joaquin Valley and elsewhere. ...

Briefly

Tim Barnett and David Pierce, researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, have recently pinpointed global warming in the upper 3,000 meters of the ocean to human beings rather than natural causes. The researchers found that observed global ocean temperature rose along with climate model taken from the U.S. developed Parallel Climate Model, indicating that global warming could be attributed to man-made causes. This finding applies to all of the world’s oceans and will be published in the April 13 issue of the journal Science. The study results will also help measure the accuracy of computer climate computer models. The study was funded by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Association Climate Change Data and Detection Program and the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Research. Regents Appoint David Russ as UCSD’s New Treasurer The UC Regents appointed David H. Russ as their new treasurer and vice president for investments last week. Russ formerly served as the public markets managing director for the University of Texas Investment Management Company and replaces Patricia A. Small, who resigned in August after serving on the post for five years. Russ will begin his new position June 1, 2001. At the University of Texas Investment Management Company, where he has worked since 1997, Russ was responsible for all global publicly traded investments and alternative marketable assets, among other things. Russ’ other experiences include his tenure both as director of investment management and portfolio manager for Pacific Telesis Group and as a portfolio manager for Stanford Management Company, which is in charge of all of Stanford University’s investments. UCSD Physicists Verify Snell Law Reversing Material Physicists at UCSD have verified the first of a set of composite materials that they believe would reverse the behavioral characteristics of fundamental electromagnetic properties. The scientists discovered that electromagnetic radiation travels through the new material in a manner never witnessed before. The new material could be instrumental in creating new kinds of antennas and also a “”perfect lens”” that could focus light and other radiation in a way that no other lens can. The researchers findings were published in the April 6 issue of Science. The composite material differs from ordinary materials in that it bends electromagnetic radiation in the opposite direction while ordinary materials deflect light in the same direction; it possesses a negative index of refraction. The researchers have filed for a patent for their new material. Their study was supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the Air Force Office for Science Research, which are investigating potential applications. Bingham Scholarships to Help Students Working on Campus The Darcy and Robert Bingham Endowed Scholarships, “”Helping Students who are Helping Themselves,”” are now open for application and are being offered to students who hold jobs on campus. Six scholarships of $1,500 each will be awarded to students in the 2001-2002 academic year. The Darcy Bingham Recreation Student Employee Scholarship will be awarded to an undergraduate student employed by UCSD Student Recreation. The Bingham Student Affairs Student Employee Scholarships will be awarded to two undergraduate students employed by Student Affairs. The Bingham UCSD Student Employee Scholarships will be awarded to three UCSD students employee by any campus department. Applications for the scholarships can be printed from the UCSD Financial Services Web site at http://www.ucsd.edu/finaid. A hard copy of the applications can also be obtained from the Student Financial Services lobby. Questions about the scholarships can be directed to the Scholarship Office at (858) 534-3263. ...

UCSD Admits More Underrepresented Students

UCSD, often criticized for a lack of diversity, increased its admittance of underrepresented students by 16.6 percent this year, as the total number of applicants reached an all-time high. As a result of Proposition 209, students of ethnic backgrounds are not given advantages in getting into UCSD. Proposition 209 ends all affirmative action practices in hiring, firing, admissions and contract awards have been illegal in California state-funded organizations for over two years. Assistant Vice Chancellor Richard Backer said that the higher number of underrepresented students is an indication of the higher caliber of applicants overall. “”For both African-Americans and Mexican-Americans, the response is the same,”” he said about why he thinks there was an increase in African-American admissions. He also attributed the higher numbers to the increasing popularity of the campus. Backer also said that students are becoming better prepared for a UCSD education. Admittance of African-Americans increased to 239, up 16.6 percent from last year. Latino admittance is up to 379, which is an increase of 17 percent. Admittance of Native Americans decreased by 8.5 percent to 55. Backer said this is nothing to be alarmed about, as the decrease in statistics is not an accurate representation of a change in the number of Native Americans at this school. Because the number of Native American applicants is already low, any small increase or decrease has a large effect on percentages. “”Native Americans do not have the college-going tradition of other groups,”” Backer said. “”We have been more aggressive in the last two years to change that by visiting reservations more frequently.”” However, the increased percentage of underrepresented students is only a small part of what the admissions data suggests about UCSD’s changing ways. UCSD received 38,161 applications, the second highest in the UC system this year. More than 16,300 students were admitted this year, breaking last year’s record by more than 2,600 students. “”We get so many applications because we are a great university in a great location that provides a first-rate education and social experience,”” Backer said. “”Students want to be here.”” The school expects a lower percentage of those admitted to register this year, and is planning on a freshman class of 3,850 students. There were 2,600 more students admitted this year than last year, with only 650 additional spots. In addition, the 4.04 average GPA of those admitted is an indication that UCSD has reached the academic level of other prestigious and academically celebrated schools. “”We are attracting a higher caliber of student who also consider UCLA, Cal, the Ivies, Stanford, etc.,”” Backer said. Unlike the other schools in this category, UCSD offers the five-college system, which has lured many students. “”Students are recognizing what a great school UCSD is,”” Backer said. “”We are becoming well-known in California and nationally. The college system is also one of our greatest assets.”” The number of applications has slowly risen over the last five years, thanks in part to UCSD’s public relations department, which has been successful in making prospective students aware of what UCSD has to offer. “”A lot of people aggressively publicize and market the best-kept secret in Southern California,”” Backer said. In addition, Backer feels that the work of the Student Affairs Office has been an asset in the school’s attempt to recruit new students. “”[It has been helped by] the very assertive and aggressive role by Student Affairs to make the quality of campus life as strong and fulfilling as possible,”” he said. “”The best recruiters we have are you, the students.”” ...

Presidential Hopefuls Debate

The candidates for A.S. president met Thursday night for the A.S. Council Presidential Candidates’ Debate, co-sponsored by the Toastmasters and the UCSD Speech and Debate Team. Earlier in the week, the A.S. Council conducted its own presidential debates during the day at Price Center. According to the UCSD Speech and Debate Team President Brandy Brickey, each organization wanted a separate presidential debate as an alternative to the annual debate that the A.S. Council conducts. “”We tried to focus [the questions] more from a student org. perspective,”” Brickey said. “”All the candidates were willing to participate and were very responsive.”” After being introduced by Brickey, each candidate presented an opening statement. Marshall senior and member of the UCSD Speech and Debate Team, Santosh Narayan, served as the moderator. Narayan asked each candidate a total of 15 questions. Each candidate was given one minute to answer each question. Topics ranged from general, such as what candidates believe they can offer to the UCSD community, to specific, like their personal thoughts on the proposed campus life fee referendum. The five candidates were Jennifer Christine Villanueva Ganata, John Bwarie, Ali Yazdi, Jeff Dodge and Noah Levin. During the debate, all the candidates had an opportunities to introduce themselves and express their stances on issues. Ganata, a Marshall sophomore who is running without a slate, said her campaign does not make big promises, but instead focuses on individual student needs. She went on to say that even though she lacks A.S. Council experience, she has been involved with other organizations such as the Student Affirmative Action Coalition, the Asian and Pacific-Islander Student Alliance, the Movimiento Estudiantil Chicana/o de Aztlan and the African American Student Union. Ganata described how she distinguishes herself from the other candidates. “”I’m a woman of color, which I think makes a big statement,”” Ganata said. “”Even though there have been past female presidents, I hope to represent those students who are underrepresented.”” Bwarie, a Marshall junior is also running without a slate. He served on Marshall College Council his freshman year and is an outreach coordinator this year at the Preuss School. Bwarie said he is running as a true leader and is a candidate for the people. Being a commuter has made Bwarie willing to get more involved on campus, he said. “”I’m very energetic with people and I’m always trying to find out what’s going on on campus,”” Bwarie said. “”I want to be visible and represent people and communicate with the administration on a mature level.”” Yazdi, a Revelle senior and candidate on the One slate, said he wants to listen to students. According to Yazdi, one of his main goals is to improve the quality of student life on campus. For two years, Yazdi served as ex-officio on the A.S. Council and is currently a senior senator for Revelle. Yazdi said he has tangible goals such as increasing campus safety by adding more call-boxes on campus, supporting bigger and better student events, and supplementing support for UCSD athletics with a Triton Pride Booster Club. “”Last year I ran for A.S. President,”” Yazdi said. “”I don’t think A.S. is something you can get involved [with] any time. You need to know a lot about the campus.”” Dodge is a Marshall junior running as a member of the Unity slate. He has served on over 10 all-campus committees including the Academic Senate and Student Affairs and Business Relations. This year he serves as A.S. vice president internal. Dodge said he hopes to increase access to the A.S. Council for all UCSD students and to end the “”bureaucratic shadiness”” of the A.S. Council. He said his extended experience with the council distinguishes him from the other candidates. “”Ideas are only good if you have experience and know-how to follow through with them,”” Dodge said. “”I have a firm commitment to do things and am extremely passionate about representing student interests at all times.”” Levin, a Muir junior running independently, said he wants students to be interested in UCSD and show what it has to offer. According to Levin, he would like the over 300 organizations on campus to actively recruit more students. This year, Levin has served on the Muir College Council. “”I see a lot of students and I make an effort to talk to them,”” Levin said. ...

Dynes Convenes Diversity Town Hall Meeting

Students, staff and faculty gathered Tuesday afternoon in the Price Center Ballroom for the second annual Diversity Council Town Hall Meeting. The council’s theme was “”Embracing Diversity: A Campus-wide Responsibility.”” The meeting opened with a welcome and introduction by Diversity Council Chair Deborah Wingard, with opening remarks by Chancellor Robert Dynes. Dynes opened the discourse on embracing diversity. “”We don’t pursue cultural diversity because it is a noble concept, but because it really does strengthen the community,”” Dynes said. Following Dynes’ remarks, Catherine Joseph, vice chair of the Diversity Council, introduced the keynote speaker, Daryl G. Smith. Smith is a professor of education and psychology at The Claremont Graduate University. Smith said the road to cultural diversity in higher education, although difficult, is possible. “”We’re living in the consequences of Proposition 209, and on the other hand, people are beginning to realize the importance of cultural diversity,”” Smith said. Smith talked about Proposition 209, which passed as California state law in 1996 and ended affirmative action, making it illegal to hire on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin. Smith spoke of the need for immediate changes in higher education to bring about diversity. She rebuked the common argument that kindergarten is the place to start. On the contrary, Smith proposed that the greatest need exists for graduate schooling. “”If graduate education is not engaged, we will go very short distances,”” Smith said. Smith also spoke about placing value on the multiple identities of individuals and on steering clear of classifying individuals solely on the basis of color. Smith closed her discussion rhetorically, asking “”If not now, when?”” Smith’s words were followed by short speeches from each of the panelists from the council on diversity. The panelists addressed issues of admissions and outreach and discussed already functioning programs to counteract the trend of the increasingly homogenous campus. Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Joseph Watson remarked on the continuing need to press toward the goal of cultural diversity. “”I don’t think UCSD has found all the solutions to cultural diversity,”” he said. Watson also alluded to recent talk of eliminating of the SATs as a criterion for admission to the university. Laura Barroclough, an ethnic studies graduate, spoke on the weakness of the SAT. “”The SAT is culturally biased toward students with greater amounts of money,”” Barroclough said. Smith concurred, remarking that recent studies have shown that high SAT scores do not equal success in later life. Following the speeches from Smith and the panel members, there was a question-and-answer period. The audience was allowed to address questions to the panel and to Dynes. One group called for a repeal of SP-1 and SP-2 and gave Dynes a petition to sign that would call for such a repeal. SP-1 and SP-2 were legislative documents passed by the UC Regents in response to the passing of Proposition 209. SP-1 and SP-2 state the university’s policy on affirmative action, which is aligned with the dictates of Proposition 209. Dynes said that he was opposed to the legislation, as he was opposed to the passing of Proposition 209. However, he said that repealing SP-1 and SP-2 would not change the law that stands under Proposition 209 in California. Dynes also remarked that the present outreach programs are more important than the repeal of SP-1 and SP-2. “”I do not want to put to compromise the outreach programs for the sake of a repeal to SP-1 and SP-2,”” Dynes said. “”I will not sign this because I don’t sign these sort of things. That does not mean I will not fight the regents aggressively against SP-1 and SP-2.”” Students found this response unsatisfactory. Alexis Montevirgen, a biology major, expressed worry. “”My biggest concern was the reasons the chancellor gave for not signing the petition,”” Montevirgen said. “”I don’t see it as a choice between outreach programs we have now and the repeal of SP-1 and SP-2. The repeal should not affect the programs we have.”” Other audience questions involved the status of diversity at UCSD and the means for getting to where the university needs to be. Undergraduate student Joseph Sherman-Villafane rebutted a claim Smith made in her speech regarding the widespread participation among students fighting for diversity. Smith said that the trend seen at most universities is that students of color are active in seeking diversity. Sherman-Villafane claimed that the students fighting for diversity are often the underrepresented themselves. Overall, the meeting expressed optimism for the Preuss School and for programs such as C.R.E.A.T.E., while demonstrating a need to press on for a larger amount of diversity on campus. The council meeting will be aired on UCSD-TV on May 21 at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. ...