News

Violence Victims Take Back the Night

Over 200 women and men gathered in the Price Center Plaza Thursday night for the 2001 Take Back the Night Rally. The rally, sponsored by the A.S. Women’s Commission and the Women’s Center, was followed by a candlelit march around campus. Leo Der Stepanians Guardian The night began with a performance by singer Tara MacClean. Her performance included an a cappella version of her song “”Silence.”” Speaker Steve Allen from the Men’s Leadership Forum and the Center for Community Solutions took the stage next. He discussed men’s roles in assault prevention and mentioned that he was the first male speaker at a Take Back the Night rally at UCSD. Poet Kim Cook was the keynote speaker for the evening. She opened her speech by reading a few of her poems on different topics, including family, assault and recovery. Cook went on to discuss the hardship she has encountered in her life and how she has overcome it. She rallied women about their roles in society and told the audience that women should not have to be afraid of the night. “”We’re women!”” she said. “”I want to be sexy and cute and all that shit, and yeah, we’re gonna take back the night!”” Cook closed her talk with a reading of a poem she wrote for the occasion, titled “”Take Back the Night.”” “”I beg you, brothers and sisters, wake up to the moment of knowing,”” she said. She read the poem twice, once slowly for the audience to comprehend the words, then quickly to establish the meter and power she intended. “”We live in fear no more, but open the door to the future, when we are seeing a dream we had,”” she read. Cook was acknowledged with a standing ovation after the reading. Following Cook’s performance, Catherine Algeri, chair of the A.S. Women’s Commission, introduced an open microphone for audience members to share testimonials. Twenty women and two men took the stage to share their and others’ stories. Many began their stories by expressing that they had not expected to step up to the microphone. First-year cognitive science graduate student Jelena Jovanovic was one of those who did not expect to share her story. The first testimonial was a poem prepared for the event by a student, then a few of the event’s organizers spoke. “”Then there was this big silence,”” Jovanovic said. “”I thought that a regular person should just go up and let [the audience] know that it wasn’t just the organizers who had these experiences.”” Jovanovic took this task upon herself. “”I was already shaken by the things that had gone on,”” she said. “”I was shaking and on the verge of crying, and I went up there completely unrehearsed. I felt really vulnerable and on the spot as I talked.”” In the end, though, she was glad she had spoken. “”I was glad I had gone up and I was worried about how I came across,”” Jovanovic said. “”The thing that made it worth it was that afterward, other people from the audience started going up.”” The audience found the testimonials to be an extremely moving part of the evening. “”I liked the testimonials,”” Newby said. “”I thought they were really powerful, and really needed, because a lot of people don’t realize what happens, even at UCSD.”” A group of women and men from the rally carried candles and signs on a march around campus following the rally. The path went from the Price Center through the Marshall Upper Apartments, down through Warren Apartments, Pepper Canyon Apartments and the Eleanor Roosevelt College residence halls, and back to the Women’s Center in ERC. Algeri felt the event was a success. “”This has been just an amazing experience,”” she said. “”To open up to that dialogue, to get people hearing and understanding, that’s priceless.”” ...

Global Warming Traced to Humans

Scripps Institution of Oceanography researchers Tim Barnett and David Pierce have pinpointed human-induced global warming in the earth’s oceans. Their recent findings have the potential to solidify the belief that global warming over the past 50 years has been a direct result of human activity. Barnett and Pierce ran a series of studies testing ocean temperatures as deep as 3,000 meters. “”The change is profound,”” Pierce said. The pair found an overall change in ocean temperature of 0.1-degree Celsius, and an average 0.4-degree Celsius rise was found at the ocean’s surface “”The temperature increase may not seem like a lot,”” Pierce said. “”However, it takes a tremendous amount of energy to heat the world’s oceans to that extent.”” Barnett also validated the findings by noting the precision of the thermometers used in the study. The thermometers, according to Barnett, can detect 0.2-degree Celsius changes in temperature. Many scientists attribute these changes in temperature to carbon dioxide and sulfur emissions. In the past 50 years, the emission of these products is said to have heated the atmosphere and, as Barnett and Pierce’s study suggests, the ocean temperatures as well. Most studies regarding the issue of global warming have focused on atmospheric temperatures. Barnett and Pierce’s study concentrated on the effects on the ocean. Barnett said he is confident in the recent findings. “”The initial results are certainly compatible at the 95 percent confidence level with the hypothesis that the warming observed in the global oceans has been caused by anthropogenic sources,”” Barnett said. The study was only meant as a preliminary observation of the effects of global warming. The implications of the heating of the environment are, as of now, somewhat of a mystery. “”We don’t have the programs or the government organization to assess what this is going to mean for the average American,”” Barnett said. “”The average Californian doesn’t care about a three-degree rise in the temperature.”” Barnett said he wished people would take action by urging the government to mobilize and create a better understanding of the greenhouse effect. “”Tell people to write their congressman and ask them what the greenhouse effect is going to do to our lives,”” Barnett said. Pierce also noted the U.S. government’s lagging status compared to other developed nations in terms of greenhouse effect research. “”Germany, Britain and Japan all have programs to assess the greenhouse effect,”” Pierce said. “”I would have thought America would be on the forefront of this endeavor but it is not the case.”” The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Association Climate Change Data and Detection program and the U.S. Department of Energy supported the work of Barnett and Pierce. Barnett and Pierce also worked with colleague Reiner Schnur, who was supported by the Max Planck Institute for Meteorolology. Their findings were published in the April 13 edition of the scientific journal Science. ...

Athletes Plea for Fee Funds

Athletic Director Earl Edwards said Wednesday that the continued existence of UCSD’s athletic program as it now exists may depend on the passage of the Campus Life Fee Referendum. The referendum, which would implement an increase of $71.40 per student each quarter, would allot $19 of that additional fee to the NCAA athletic program. Edwards warned the athletes from such teams as basketball, crew, and track and field that should the referendum fail to pass, the athletic program would receive a crippling monetary blow from which it may not fully recover. “”If it passes, we will be able to continue with the athletic program as we know it today,”” Edwards said. Edwards went on to say that without the fee increase, “”half our budget would not be available to us.”” Edwards said this would mean that the administration would have to seriously consider eliminating certain sports teams in the near future. “”We might have to downsize our program if we don’t have the revenue,”” Edwards said. There are currently 23 sports teams at UCSD. However, Edwards also said the athletic program has not begun to seriously consider how many or which teams would be considered for cutting. “”We haven’t set up criteria yet,”” he said. “”How expensive the program obviously would be a factor.”” For teams like women’s crew, which recently spent $12,500 on a new four-oared shell, this is a serious warning. Though this most recent purchase was funded by alumni donations, crew has the potential to spend up to $22,000 on each boat. Assistant women’s crew coach Jack Vallerga, however, did not express much concern about the future of his team. “”I’m not taking what Earl Edwards said as a threat just because crew is a very expensive sport, but [the possibility of cuts] is a reality,”” Vallerga said. Another factor Edwards noted as crucial, should the removal of teams become necessary, is the ratio of male to female teams. “”It would be suicide to drop any female sports because of the Title IV lawsuit,”” Edwards said. This said, Edwards and Matthew DeFord, the representative for the athletic program in the student committee that drafted the referendum, launched a plea for all athletes to encourage students to vote next week. Voting will begin Monday, April 23, and end Friday, April 27. Twelve polling booths stationed throughout campus will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. all week. Four thousand students must vote in the special election for the fee to be eligible to pass. Once the required 4,000-vote minimum is reached, a simple majority is needed for the fee to pass. “”Basically, if 3,000 people vote and 2,900 of those votes are in favor of the referendum, it can’t pass,”” DeFord said. “”We have to have 4,000 people vote.”” DeFord said that the athletic program has already acquired powerful allies in its quest to attain the needed votes. “”We already have on our side the sports clubs, the Greek system and several college counsels,”” he said. However, DeFord said that the people who vote “”no”” are not his main concern. “”It’s the people who don’t vote at all who are our biggest threat,”” DeFord stressed. Because the voting will not be available via StudentLink, Edwards warned athletes that encouraging people to vote was a priority. “”We’ve never had 4,000 students vote for anything at UCSD, either for or against,”” he said. DeFord said that in addition to the 500 to 600 athletes urging students to vote, a subcommittee will be handing out literature about the Campus Life Referendum to educate and inform students. “”It’s not an athletic fee,”” Edwards stressed. “”It involves all students.”” Duncan McFarland, women’s volleyball coach, echoed this sentiment. “”It’s certainly very important for our team as well as other teams,”” he said. “”It will increase fees for everyone but it will benefit everyone as well.”” ...

Briefly

The National Academy of Sciences has awarded Charles Cox, a Scripps Institution of Oceanography professor emeritus, with the Alexander Agassiz Medal. Cox will receive the medal and his $15,000 prize during the National Academy of Sciences annual meeting April 3 in Washington, D.C. Cox is being awarded for his studies of oceanic waves and their microstructure, mixing and electromagnetic fields. The Agassiz Medal is given every three years for original contributions to the science of oceanography and was established by a gift from John Murray in 1913. Cox’s research has focused on measuring the fine-scale fluctuations in temperature and salinity within ocean water due to turbulence. In addition to this most recent honor, Cox has also been a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1996. Take Back the Night Rally to be Held Thursday Night The A.S. Women’s Commission, the A.S. Council and the Women’s Center will sponsor the Take Back the Night Rally on Thursday evening in an attempt to draw attention to the problem of domestic violence against women. The rally will start at 7 p.m. in the Price Center and will be followed by a march. The rally will feature a musical performer, followed by two smaller speakers and a keynote speaker. Those in attendance will also have an opportunity to give testimonials about their own experiences in survival of domestic abuse. For more information visit http://geocities.com/takebackthenightucsd/ or contact Catherine Algeri at [email protected] or Emelyn dela Pena at [email protected] Muirstock to Descend Upon UCSD Friday, Free to public Muirstock, an all-day festival sponsored by the Muir College Council, is set to begin in the Muir Quad on Friday, at 2 p.m. Bands come on stage at 4:20 p.m. The concert will feature seven bands, a free barbecue, vendors and more. Common Sense, a band embodying the hybridization of rock, reggae, soul, hip-hop, R&B and ska, will headline the concert. Below 34, a rock group that has made the local radio and news station rounds, and Munkafest, a Los Angeles based band that has been featured on Napster and placed under the “”New and Noteworthy”” section of “”Billboard Magazine,”” will also appear. In addition, NZ Rough, Straight No Chaser, Thrice, Taken and Dueling DJ will all perform at the concert. The event is free and open to all UCSD students. For more information contact Laura Biery at [email protected] UCSD Police Department to Offer Self Defense Class The UCSD Police Department and the Student Safety and Awareness Program are offering Rape Aggression Defense Training. The R.A.D. system of self defense provides a practical strategy to protect oneself by combining threat avoidance strategies and real-world assault resistance tactics for women. The course will last three evenings and be taught at the Police Training Room. There is a $10 fee for all three nights. Participants are encouraged to wear comfortable clothing and footwear and to attend all three nights. Reservations are required. To make reservations call SSAP at (858) 534-5793. ...

Events

Thursday, April 19 Holocaust Memorial 24-Hour Name Reading The Union of Jewish Students is sponsoring the event in commemoration of the Holocaust. The reading will begin at midnight in the Price Center Library Lounge. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-6244. Friday, April 20 Performing Arts: UCSD New Play Festival The UCSD Theater and Dance Department is sponsoring the event, which will premiere productions written and produced by master of fine arts playwrights. The event will be at 8 p.m. in the Mandell Weiss Forum Studio. General admission is $10 and student admission is $5. The event is open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4574. Saturday, April 21 Special Event: LGBTA Nonsexist Dance The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Association is sponsoring a dance that welcomes attendees of all ages, orientations and backgrounds. The event will begin at 9 p.m. at The Stage at Porter’s Pub in the Student Center. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4297. Performing Arts: Emerson String Quartet The University Events Office is sponsoring the event, which will start at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Auditorium. General admission is $25 and student admission is $10. The event is open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4119. Film: ‘Teeny-Tiny Orchestra for Silent Films’ The UCSD Music Library is sponsoring the event, which features classic silent films accompanied by the live music of a novelty orchestra of unusual instruments. The event will take place at 11 a.m. in the Seuss Room of Geisel Library. The showing is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-8074. ...

Sir Mix-A-Lot Brings His Act to Ritmo

Approximately 350 students came to see Sir Mix-A-Lot perform at Club Ritmo on Friday night. According to A.S. Programmer -elect Eisha Christian, Sir Mix-A-Lot was booked months ago when the club first started. Christian said that she and co-club creator A.S. Assistant Programmer Anahita Ferasat, wanted to book familiar artists from the past as a good way to introduce Club Ritmo to students. The UCSD DJs and Vinylphiles Club opened, followed by DJ Eli. The Los Angeles-based group the Booty Boys followed DJ Eli and warmed up the crowd before Sir Mix-A-Lot made his entrance. Describing their sound as “”comedy/booty rap,”” the members of the Booty Boys said they were excited to play for their alma mater. “”We just wanted to come back to UCSD and flaunt our rap stardom,”” said Spencer “”sixxxHole”” Yaras, UCSD alumnus and rapper for the group. Sir Mix-A-Lot made his entrance later in the night with a group of fellow rappers. His setlist included songs from his early albums, including 1991’s “”Mack Daddy,”” and his most famous song, “”Baby Got Back,”” which ended the show. After his performance, Sir Mix-A-Lot shared his thoughts about the show. “”It was live,”” Sir Mix-A-Lot said. “”It was crazy.”” “”I like San Diego, it’s all legal,”” Sir Mix-A-Lot joked, referring to how laid back he thinks the police in San Diego are toward drugs. Producing is the next step in his career, according to Sir Mix-A-Lot. “”Fame doesn’t really matter to me right now. If I can produce for others and they succeed, that’s my dream,”” Sir Mix-A-Lot said. “”I want to hand over the mantle, so to speak.”” Christian was optimistic about Club Ritmo’s future. “”I see it definitely expanding because something like this takes time to get better,”” Christian said. Ferasat said that both she and Christian have learned a lot since the club’s opening night. ...

Seniors Make Their Final Contribution

As many seniors prepare to receive their diplomas and move on to life after college, they will have one last opportunity to give back to the UCSD community through their class gift. UCSD’s class of 2001 is in the midst of establishing a scholarship fund as its final contribution to UCSD. It will also donate plaques commemorating gifts given by past classes. “”We felt scholarships were best; they go with the purpose of giving back,”” said Melissa Tsang, chairwoman of the Senior Gift Campaign 2001. Two scholarships will be funded by donations from graduating seniors: Starting next year, the scholarships will be awarded annually: One will be awarded to a transfer student, and the other will go to a graduating senior. The precise financial and logistic criteria for each award are still being worked out. In addition to the scholarships, the class of 2001 will engrave the names of gifts of past graduating classes on their respective Library Walk slabs. This year’s gift is particularly unique, as it celebrates the philanthropy of past classes as well as providing a benefit for future students at UCSD. A.S. President Doc Khaleghi was especially pleased with the choice of gifts. “”I am one of many students that understand the profound effect scholarships have on a student’s life,”” Khaleghi said. “”I think the scholarships represent both giving a student a chance, and, for the outgoing senior, commending the student and supporting their future.”” UCSD Student Foundation President Ping Yeh is partly in charge of organizing the gift. “”These gifts represent an awareness of how lucky we all are to graduate,”” Yeh said. “”Everyone can play a part to make the school better for the future.”” Fund raising for the scholarships will be a joint effort between the UCSD Student Foundation and the A.S. Council. Tsang stressed that the scholarships are “”not a one time deal; working with the Student Foundation will encourage the continuation of the scholarship in the future.”” In the coming weeks, seniors will be asked to contribute to the scholarship and gift funds. The campaign hopes to raise $20,000 as a principal investment to build the scholarship. This year, seniors have the opportunity to donate by phone, by mail and on the Web. Yeh added that the committee is working hard to develop incentives, such as discounts for alumni activities, coupons and freebies for those who donate. Tsang is optimistic about the fund raising. “”The idea of scholarships will hopefully incite people to donate more,”” he said. The two organizations are working hard to better organize the senior gift process. Citing the importance of philanthropy, Khaleghi is determined to broaden involvement in the campaign. “”It gives those leaving a chance to give back to the university and future students,”” Khaleghi said. “”But there exists no institutionalized system. Because of this, there have been classes that have not had the awesome opportunity to participate in a senior gift campaign.”” Khaleghi and Yeh are also working on A.S. legislation to add continuity and structure to the Senior Gift process. “”We can’t reinvent the wheel every year,”” Yeh said regarding the instability of past senior gift campaigns. Although this year’s campaign got off to a delayed start, Khaleghi said he was astonished by the freshman leadership of Tom Chapman and Tsang. “”Campaigns have started late in the past,”” Khaleghi said. “”It would obviously be beneficial if there was a permanent structure in place to have an annual senior gift.”” Yeh hopes to help maximize not only donations but student involvement in the philanthropic process. Recent senior gifts have included recycling barrels on campus and improvements to the nature trails east of RIMAC. The idea of a perpetual scholarships was too much for the campaign to turn down. “”They are the gift that keeps on giving,”” Tsang said. ...

Briefly

UC Regents Chairwoman S. Sue Johnson announced Friday that S. Stephen Nakashima would immediately resign from the UC Board of Regents. Nakashima is reportedly stepping down from the post he has served in since 1989 due to the loss of his wife of 52 years, Sally, in July 1999 and the stroke he suffered eight months ago. The 79-year-old Nakashima is an attorney from San Jose. He earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from UC Berkeley and received a law degree from the Boalt School of Law. There are a total of 18 regents on the board, which consists of 26 members. Regents are appointed by the governor of California and serve 12-year terms. Nakashima’s term was not set to expire until 2004. UC Task Force Assesses Campus Cooperation with Act A UC systemwide task force, which was formed in September 2000 to determine how thoroughly and accurately UC campuses were reporting their crime statistics, has reported that while campuses need to make some adjustments to how they report statistics, there was no deliberate under-reporting of crimes. UC Senior Vice President for Business and Finance Joseph Mullinix commissioned the task force to see how well UC campuses were complying with the Clery Act. The legislation sets forth stringent guidelines about how campuses should report their crime statistics and that those statistics be publicized where students, staff and faculty can find them. Several instances of over-reporting were found, however. For example, at UC Davis, DUI offenses were reported when it was found unnecessary to do so. Also released Friday was the University of California’s response to questions put forth by the U.S. Department of Education regarding campus compliance with the Clery Act. The University of California stated that while it had not met every aspect of the act, it was close to being fully compliant. Scripps Researchers Document Tuna Muscle Motion A study currently being conducted at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography is examining the complex muscle system in fish, the muscles credited with giving fish their swimming power and speed. Researchers have long suspected that tuna have the strongest system due to a concentration of the muscle that runs from the middle of their bodies to their tails, giving them a thrust-producing hydrofoil. Stephen Katz, Douglas Syme and Robert Shadwick, the researchers doing the study, have documented the motion of this muscle structure in their results, which they published in the April 12 issue of the journal Nature. Shadwick and his colleagues used ultrasound technology to record the electrical activity of the muscles. Their findings may lead to a greater understanding of comparative physiology and the evolutionary biology of fish. Cesar Chavez Symposium to be Held April 28 “”Si, Se Puede: The Legacy of Cesar Chavez,”” a day-long symposium, will be held April 28 in the Duetz Conference Room of Copley International Conference Center at UCSD as part of the university’s monthlong tribute to the Chicano civil rights leader. UCSD Theater professor Jorge Huerta will moderate the event, which is free and open to the public. There will be two sessions: a morning session that will feature historical and cultural information regarding Chavez’s life and work, and an afternoon session that will offer musical and theatrical presentations. Speakers participating in the morning session include Dionne Espinoza, who will talk about farmworker women activists; Jorge Mariscal, who will discuss Chicano and Chicana experiences of war; and Daniel Rothenberg, who will present a lecture on modern farmworkers. For more information about the symposium, contact Mariscal at (858) 534-3210 or Edwina Welch, director of the UCSD Cross Cultural Center, at (858) 534-9689. ...

Dodge Next A.S. President

The Unity slate accomplished its goal Friday as its candidates swept the A.S. Council election by winning all 22 races that they ran in. David Pilz Guardian “”Honestly, I wasn’t expecting all 22 of our slate members to all win,”” said A.S. President-elect Jeff Dodge. “”That is kind of unheard of, but I think it just shows that we are a good group of people and that we are going to do good things for the A.S.”” The Unity slate, led by Dodge, Vice President Internal-elect Jenn Brown and Vice President Finance-elect Sam Shoostary, has been campaigning for almost two months. The members say the work they put into their campaign was their ultimate key to victory. “”And I really felt it was just a matter of who could put the most energy and time out there,”” said Dodge. Dodge, who is currently the vice president internal for this year’s A.S. Council, said that although he did not expect to win, he is honored to become the new president. Dodge received a total of 1,311 votes, while Ali Yazdi, presidential candidate for the One slate, received 665 votes, John Bwarie received 587, Jennifer Christine Villanueva Ganata received 437 and Noah Levin received 349 votes. Dodge said this election has been a valuable learning experience. “”The one thing I learned is that you have to go out and present yourself as who you are,”” he said. “”If you go out and put on a plastic fake smile and shake a bunch of hands, it is not going to work. But if you go and be yourself and talk about things that students care about, it will all work out in the end.”” The vice president internal race was considerably closer. Brown received a total of 1,470 votes, while One slate member Shana Thakur received 1,205 votes. The outcome of the election came as a surprise to Brown as well. “”We worked so hard that I knew we had a chance and that I personally had a chance,”” she said. “”But especially after the Guardian endorsement and everything, I really wasn’t expecting it at all.”” Brown said Thakur ran a very successful campaign in the race, considering the absence of certain necessary factors on her slate. “”Shana is awesome and I think she would have done just as good a job as I would,”” Brown said. “”She put up a tough fight. She ran a really good election.”” Regardless, Thakur said she was surprised over the final outcome of the election. “”I expected more of a mix between individuals,”” she said. “”I thought certain members of my slate would have won.”” In addition, Thakur criticized having slates on campus citing that they give an unfair advantage for those who are a part of them. “”From the beginning I didn’t like slates because qualified candidates actually don’t have a chance to win,”” she said. “”Now that the election is over, I would like to see at least smaller slates.”” Thakur said she is undecided as to her level of participation with the A.S.- council next year. Due to the lack of competition for the vice president finance position, Sam Shooshtary won with 2,213 votes, the most of anyone in the election. “”I feel really great,”” Shoostary said. “”I am so happy that Jeff and Jenn won.”” The vice president external position was very close election as well. Although the One slate did not have a representative, independent candidate Ernesto Martinez came within 300 votes of Unity candidate Dylan deKervor. DeKervor said the win was a justified and gratifying experience for her and her slate. “”I feel like a lot of hard work paid off on behalf of myself and my entire slate,”” she said. “”Having worked with everybody, I just know how hard everyone worked. Coming into this, I knew that everybody deserved to win and so I feel like the entire UCSD community did themselves a service.”” Although both slates had commissioner of programming candidates, current co-Assistant Programming Chair Eisha Christian won by almost 750 votes. “”Honestly, I was not expecting this,”” she said. “”I was hoping for it, but then I wasn’t completely sure. You never know how elections turn out. I have never heard of a slate winning the whole thing like this.”” She said her slate’s ability to work together this last week proved to be the determining factor of such success. “”This week has been nuts, exhausting and fun,”” she said. “”I thought elections were going to be a lot worse, but I think we had a lot of awesome people supporting each other. I couldn’t have made it, through, without all 21 of them.”” Four other commissioners from the Unity slate won their respective positions. Jennifer DeCamp won for commissioner of academic affairs, Catherine Algeri won for commissioner of communications, Colin Parent won for commissioner of services and enterprises and Kyle Biebesheimer won for commissioner of student advocacy. In addition, voter turnout was up over five percent from last year, bringing the number of students who voted up to approximately 3,700. “”I found out here that we hit 3,600 or so,”” Biebesheimer said. “”It was more than four percent more than what they were hoping for so it really pays that people went out, took it seriously and went and voted.”” The 24 percent of students who voted also passed both fee referendums and both constitutional referendums. By passing fee referendum No. 1, students voted to increase tuition by $2 per quarter to use toward membership in the United States Student Association and the University of California Student Association. This will free up over $22,000 from the A.S. Council budget devoted to membership. Fee referendum No. 2 calls for a $1 increase in student tuition per quarter to give more funding to the Academic Success Program, which specializes in peer tutoring, peer mentorship and a book-borrowing service. ...

Briefly

Physicians at the UCSD School of Medicine implanted genetically modified brain tissue into the brain of an Alzheimer’s patient on April 5. The study that will ensue marks the first in a series of studies physicians at the university will be doing with the disease. The procedure took 11 hours and was done on a 60-year-old Caucasian women who had entered the beginning stages of the disease, which can include memory loss. The surgery is led by UCSD neurosurgeon Hoi Sang U. The study was led by UCSD neurologist Mark H. Tuszynski and is unique because it is the first of its kind to use human gene therapy to treat a disease of the nervous system. The treatment attempts to deliver a nerve growth factor to dying brain cells. Improvement may be seen in the patient within a few months, but the long-term efficacy of the treatment may not be gauged for several years because of the need to test it in a variety of subjects. The study will be conducted in several phases, the first being intended to test whether the procedure is safe. This study is known as the “”safety/toxicity”” study and is based on previous work done by Tuszynski. Scripps Student Receives Fellowship, Writing Award Luc Rainville, a graduate student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, has recently been honored with two prestigious awards. He has been given a $20,000 fellowship from the Link Foundation Ocean Engineering and Instrumentation Fellowship Program and an Outstanding Student Paper Award from the American Geophysical Union. Rainville is currently working under the guidance of Scripps oceanography professor Rob Pinkel. His research focuses on internal waves and instrumentation. With the fellowship, Rainville is creating a “”wirewalker,”” an instrument that will have the ability to profile the ocean. The device uses the surface waves to examine the water column. The design of the instrument is innovative because of its simplicity and low cost. The Outstanding Paper Award was given to Rainville for a paper he wrote based on his research on internal waves in the East China Sea, which was part of the Asian Sea Acoustics Experiment. The title of the paper was “”Vertical Shear Structure of the Kuroshio near the Shelf Break.”” UCSD Programs Helped City’s High-Tech Growth, Economy In a report recently published by Harvard Business School professor Michael Porter, several UCSD programs were noted as contributors to San Diego’s success in the area of technological innovation, namely the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. The results were published as a part of the new San Diego Clusters of Innovation Initiative, a study designed to examine specific regions as part of the Council on Competitiveness’ national Clusters of Innovation Project. Porter noted the high level of state support that UCSD receives, UCSD Connect, and collaborations between the university and corporate partners as specific reasons for economic growth in the area. Porter also noted numerous challenges the region faces, including a disparity between the living wage and the cost of living. Arena Pharmaceuticals Becomes SDSC Partner The San Diego Supercomputer Center announced last Thursday that Arena Pharmaceuticals of San Diego had become a new member of SDSC’s Science and Technology Outreach program. Arena and SDSC are interested in pursuing research in “”rational drug design.”” Arena, a San Diego-based company incorporated in 1997, has made pioneering advances in two areas of biotechnology. The first has been the creation of an Internet accessible database cataloging both failures and successes in the research of gene therapy drugs. The second advancement is a process they dub “”CART,”” standing for Constitutively Activated Receptor Technology, a research process that greatly increases the speed and decreases the cost of empirical research on the unidentified uses of known proteins that lie on the cell surfaces in the human body. ...