News

Revelle Rape Prompts Concern on Campus

A reported rape on the Revelle College campus has led to an investigation and an effort to educate students on rape and how best to deal with and prevent it. Feb. 20 at 11:10 p.m., a female student reported being raped in the Revelle residence halls. San Diego police detective Nate Floyd said a stranger did not perpetrate the alleged rape. “”The offender was not unknown to the victim,”” Floyd said. San Diego police detective Douglas O’Dell said the rape was not rape in the sense that many people think of it. “”The rape under investigation would fall under 289 of California’s Penal Code – rape with a foreign object,”” O’Dell said. “”It can be anything: fingers or toes, anything. It is rape with something other than a penis.”” O’Dell said a suspect has been identified and charges are currently being reviewed by the district attorney’s office. Kevin Jones, resident dean of Revelle College, said the university is also investigating the incident to possibly take disciplinary action against the suspect. Jones offered students some tips on how to avoid being raped. “”Be careful who you are with,”” Jones said. “”And then be careful to not to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol, so to not allow your faculties to be diminished.”” Renee Barnett-Terry, dean of Revelle College, said that Revelle has many programs that bring awareness on how to prevent rape and to promote the various services offered on campus. “”During orientation and Welcome Week there are activities that deal with the issue of rape,”” Barnett-Terry said. Barnett-Terry said no new measures will be taken in response to this incident. “”We will not do anything new, but we will continue with programs we have,”” Barnett-Terry said. Nancy Wahlig, director of the Student Safety Awareness program, said the majority of rapes are committed by individuals known to the victims. “”Eighty-five percent of reported rapes are committed by someone known to [the victim],”” Wahlig said. “”[The victim] could have a class with the offender, have met at a party, or could be a friend of a friend.”” Wahlig also said that when a female is raped by someone she knows, she cannot automatically count on the support and public outcry that the classic model of rape by a stranger is given. “”Many times, rape cases committed by a stranger are treated as a crime, whereas rape committed by someone known is not seen as bad or not even considered a crime in some cases,”” Wahlig said. “”[Thus] it is hard for the victim to know whom to trust or turn to.”” Referring directly to the alleged rape at Revelle College, Wahlig said it is remarkable that the student reported it, because, she said, rape is the most underreported crime of all. “”The fact that the student was willing to report the rape talks about her drive and courage,”” Wahlig said. Wahlig said that the Student Safety Awareness program serves as an on-campus resource to educate students on how to prevent rape, the many myths associated with rape, and what to do when raped. Victim counseling is also offered. One of the myths Wahlig said her program seeks to dispel is the date rape myth: the idea that because a woman acts a certain way she condones violence by a male. “”In a date rape type of situation, the blame often falls to the woman, but she never asks to be harmed like that,”” Wahlig said. Wahlig offered tips on what students should do if raped. “”First, find a safe place,”” she said. “”Second, tell a trusted friend. Then find out all your options, one of them being calling the 24-hour Rape Crisis hotline at (858)272-1767. Or you can use the Student Safety Awareness program. We are here for the students.”” ...

Administration Proposes Modified Schedule

The administration is currently looking into a proposal to shorten the 15-minute interval between classes to 10 minutes. This proposal is being considered as part of a solution to improve the efficiency and usage of classrooms and lecture halls on campus. The proposition, along with several others, is being discussed in order to provide a solution to the growing needs of UCSD. In particular, the rising number of students and the subsequent demand for additional classes poses a scheduling problem for the university, as the number of available classrooms and lecture halls will more than likely remain the same. “”Because of a record number of applications to the UC system, UCSD is being asked to raise its target of 3,625 and 1,200 enrolled new freshmen and transfer students, respectively, by 200 to 300 additional students,”” said Joseph Watson, vice chancellor of student affairs. The need for additional classes to accommodate this rapid influx of new students at UCSD has become a conflict, however, since classrooms and lecture halls are already stretched to maximum usage between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. “”We’re just faced with a major problem,”” Watson said. “”Our enrollments have gone up, our classrooms have not kept pace with the enrollment growth and as a result we can’t get classes within the traditional or preferred times of the day, and we’ll have to spread the day out.”” One solution being discussed within the administration is the possibility of shortening the interval between classes on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 15 to 10 minutes. Classes would then start on the hour every hour. If implemented, the first class of the day would start at 8 a.m. and end at 8:50 a.m. Students would have 10 minutes to get to their next class, which would start at 9 a.m. This cycle would repeat throughout the rest of the day, freeing up about 50 minutes, which administrators would use to squeeze in an extra class for every classroom or lecture hall. Other solutions on the table for discussion include scheduling classes in the evenings, starting classes at 7:30 a.m. and even the possibility of holding classes on Saturday. Some administrators claim that the 10-minute proposal, however, would create various scheduling benefits for the university. First, under the 10-minute proposal, additional classes would not have to be scheduled either late at night or early in the morning, a move the administration fears would be unpopular with both students and faculty. Second, the 10-minute proposal can be implemented relatively quickly, responding to the current and increasing demand for classroom and lecture halls needed for additional classes. Third, the 10-minute proposal is cost efficient. While the logical solution is to simply build more classrooms and lecture halls, funding from the state for such projects will not come easily. Therefore, supporters of the 10-minute plan point out that using the existing classrooms and lecture halls more efficiently provides a solution that bypasses any financial obstacles imposed by the state. Several years ago, UCSD operated under a 10-minute interval between classes. The change to 15-minute breaks was thought to provide students with several benefits. “”It was done for a number of reasons,”” Watson said. “”One, it gave students a little more time, so they wouldn’t have to either leave early from a class or come in late to a class. Also, it provided some extra time for students to speak to faculty members outside of class.”” Shortening the breaks between classes has provoked some concern among the administration. The growing size of the campus, for instance, has led many to believe that 10 minutes is simply not enough time to traverse from one end of the campus to the other. Specifically, the walk between York Hall and Warren Lecture Hall raises significant concern. For many students, this walk takes longer than 15 minutes. Students who have a class at York Hall followed by a class at Warren Lecture Hall will inevitably be late for class. The administration is anticipating some opposition from students. “”I think that the administration should look at other options before doing that,”” said Katie Martin, a Roosevelt sophomore. “”It really takes a lot longer than 10 minutes to walk all the way across campus.”” Nonetheless, the university is facing real problems that warrant an immediate solution. The administration acknowledges that reverting back to a 10-minute break may not be popular among students and faculty members, but it may be the best solution in light of the demand for additional classroom and lecture hall space. “”One of the things we must try to do is work this out in a collective fashion,”” Watson said. “”One of our roles is to try to present to the faculty and students what’s needed, what classes need to be taught, how to schedule them and then what’s the best way.”” Discussion and extensive consultation will continue on in the future before any new policies are implemented. The professors and students who comprise the Academic Senate will make the final decision, which may not take place until January of 2002. ...

Missing Student Dies in Car Crash

A crowd gathered in the Muir quad at 9 p.m. Thursday evening to remember the passing of Muir senior Joshua Eber. Eber had been missing since Monday evening. The Thursday night gathering was intended to be a candlelight vigil for the missing student. However, the event turned into a memorial service. Eber was killed in a car accident near Las Pulgas Road, off Interstate 5 at Camp Pendleton. He was 22. Authorities are still unsure why his car crashed. He left his apartment in Mira Mesa at approximately 11 p.m. on Monday night. He was driving home to Calabasas, Calif., to be with his mother as she underwent an angiogram. Eber’s body was found late Thursday afternoon by a railroad worker. He was still seatbelted in his BMW, which had struck a tree. The car was hidden by bushes. Students gathered to comfort one another with words about the deceased student. Eber’s roommate, Robert Bessler, spoke of his friend. Bessler initiated an open microphone session for friends to share words about Eber. Bessler also had the difficult job of letting the gatherers know about the death of Eber. “”Josh was a great person and a great friend,”” Bessler said, after a moment of silence was observed. “”We pray for him and wish his family the best of luck.”” Bessler then asked another friend to say a prayer for the group. Following the prayer, students shared portraits of Eber’s life. “”He was a friend that I could call at 3 in the morning and he would be there,”” Melissa Caputo said. “”Just last week, I was having a hard time. He could always tell. He would ask me, ‘What’s wrong Melissa? What’s wrong?’ He could always tell and he would always do whatever he could to help someone.”” Caputo arrived early to pass out purple ribbons to all those in attendance. Purple is the color of Eber’s fraternity, Sigma Alpha Mu. Muir Dean Chips Dreilinger also spoke fondly of Eber. “”He loved his college and he loved having fun,”” Dreilinger said. “”He was a good kid. This is a bad quarter. This has been the second student death in a month or so.”” Dreilinger was referring to the death of Revelle freshman Gilbert F.D. Nunez on Feb. 10. The series of tragedies, including the deaths of UC Santa Barbara students killed by a driver in Isla Vista, have come as a great shock to many students. Psychological Services was present at the Eber memorial to offer support and options for those who needed to talk. “”I want to let you know that you have support through Psychological Services,”” said Dr. Sam Park. Ellen Kin spoke of the individualized need for grief. “”Our support groups allow students to grieve in different ways,”” Kin said. “”Some need to talk. Others need more time. Some are angry. Others are sad. Especially after recent tragedies, we need to be there for each other.”” The night continued on a somber tone, as students met with each other to discuss the loss of their friend and loved one. Others told stories of things that Eber had done. Chip Hatch, husband of Nancy Hatch of Interdisciplinary Studies, played a Scottish bagpipe piece, “”By the Water’s Edge.”” Hatch saw a particular connection to the piece’s title and Eber’s life. Eber had just returned from Semester at Sea through the Programs Abroad Office. Muir Resident Dean Pat Danylyshyn-Adams remembered Eber expressing great excitement about going abroad. “”I was very excited he got to have a Semester at Sea,”” Adams said. “”It is something he had talked about for a long time. He had to delay going once, but he finally got to go. I am really happy for him.”” Speculation over the reason for the crash yields only more questions. It was raining heavily on Monday evening, which may have played a part in the crash. Eber was an insulin-dependent diabetic who took medication several times a day. Without the insulin, Eber could have lapsed into a diabetic coma, while too much insulin can also send diabetics into insulin shock. KUSI news reporter John Soderman, who was at the scene of the accident earlier on Thursday, noted, “”He died in the act of being a good son.”” Kin, Park and Dr. Reina Juarez of Psychological Services are available for individual appointments for any reason. Their number is (858) 534-3755. The group also holds a grief group Thursdays at 2 p.m. with Nancy Wahlig of the Student Safety Awareness program. ...

Briefly

A study conducted by researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography has revealed that the Orgueil meteorite, which fell to earth in France in 1864, is the first meteorite that can be traced to a comet rather than an asteroid. Asteroids are commonly believed to be the source of all meteorites. The new information about the Orgueil meteorite may lead to an increased understanding of the origin of life on earth. The researchers state in their findings, which were published in the Feb. 27 issue of the “”Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,”” that the meteorite may contain the components necessary to generate life on earth. The amino acids found in the object are the source of what the researchers say may have created life. The meteorite had, however, been studied previously. Jeffrey Bada, a professor of marine chemistry at Scripps, and his colleagues used new technology to study the small amounts of amino acids in the object. The new evidence comes from this more sophisticated approach to looking at the meteorite. UCSD School of Medicine Hosts ‘Mitochondria 2001’ The UCSD School of Medicine, the Mitochondrial Medicine Society, the Mitochondria Research Society and the United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation are currently hosting a conference titled “”Mitochondria 2001,”” a forum intended to draw attention and look for solutions to the problems created by malfunctioning mitochondria in the human cells. The forum started yesterday and will conclude on March 4. Mitochondria are responsible for converting food into energy inside cells, and doctors, researchers and patients are realizing the dangerous repercussions of the malfunctioning mitochondria, which can lead to organ failure and cell injury. At the conference, which is being held at the Hyatt Regency Islandia, researchers and physicians intend to make a plan to bring before the National Center for Health Statistics in Maryland in an attempt to get the disease an international classification of disease code, which would recognize the health problem, since it is an emerging field of discipline. Popular ‘Loveline’ to Visit, Record at UCSD Tuesday MTV’s “”Loveline”” with Dr. Drew and Adam Corolla is coming to UCSD on March 6. The show will be at 7 p.m. at RIMAC Arena and will give UCSD students a chance to address Drew and Corolla with their love and sex concerns. Tickets are $5 for UCSD students with a valid ID and $10 for the general public. The show is intended for those 18 years old and up. Tickets are on sale at all Ticketmaster locations as well as at the UCSD Box Office in the Price Center. Groups purchasing tickets for 10 or more people will receive $1 off each ticket. Author Diane Farr to Appear at UCSD Bookstore Monday Author and former co-host of MTV’s “”Loveline”” Diane Farr will appear at the UCSD Bookstore on March 5 to discuss her new book “”The Girl Code.”” The book uses common female vernacular, including slang and euphemisms, to amuse women in this guide to the single life, which is subtitled “”The Secret Language of Single Women”” and sub-subtitled “”On Dating, Sex, Shopping and Honor Among Girlfriends.”” In addition to authoring the book, Farr has appeared on “”The Drew Carey Show”” and “”Roswell”” and contributed to several magazines. ...

Events

Thursday, March 1 Information: Eating Disorder Awareness The Student Health Advocates will hold an information booth in the Price Center Gallery B. The Student Health Advocates are sponsoring the event, which will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 587-3621. Friday, March 1 Concert: Miss Jane Musical Group Miss Jane will perform at Club Ritmo. The A.S. Council is sponsoring the event, which will take place at 8:30 p.m. at the Stage in Porter’s Pub. Admission is $5 for UCSD students with a valid ID and general admission is $15. Pre-sale tickets are available at Ticketmaster outlets and at the Price Center Box Office. For more information call (858) 534-5259. Monday, March 5 Performing Arts: Indian Music Concert The UCSD Music Department is sponsoring the event, which will take place at 8 p.m. in the Mandeville Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4830. Conference: Tax Workshop The International Student and Scholar Office is sponsoring the workshop, which will introduce foreign students to the U.S. tax system. The event is free and open to the public and will take place at 2 p.m. in the International Center. For more information call (858) 534-0603. Tuesday, March 6 Lecture: ‘From the Barrio to the ‘Burbs’ Enrico Marcelli, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Massachusetts, will discuss immigration and urban sprawl. The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies is sponsoring the event, which will take place at noon in the Institutes of the Americas building. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 822-4447. Wednesday, March 7 Performing Arts: Taraf de Haidouks Taraf de Haidouks, a band of gypsies from the small Romanian village of Clejani, will perform at Mandeville Center. The University Events Office is sponsoring the event, which will take place at 7:30 p.m. The event is open to the public. Student admission is $12 and general admission is $17. For more information call (858) 534-4119. Performing Arts: Poetry Slamm The University Centers and Porter’s Pub are sponsoring the event, which will take place at 7 p.m. at the Stage in Porter’s Pub. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 822-2068. ...

UCSD to Remember Cesar Chavez

March 30 has been declared a state holiday in California in honor of Cesar Estrada Chavez. Chavez was the founder and leader of America’s first successful farm workers’ union and was a prominent figure in the Chicano civil rights movement until his death in 1993. The UCSD Commemoration Committee is sponsoring a variety of events throughout March in celebration of Chavez’s life, including a candlelight vigil, a “”Remembering Cesar”” panel discussion and the Cesar E. Chavez Humanitarian Awards, to be given out at the Barrio Station Annual Dinner. According to American Indian Academic Outreach Coordinator Mark Chavez, UCSD is sponsoring many of its own events to commemorate the civic leader. Beginning April 2 with a showing of “”Fight in the Fields”” at the Price Center Theater, UCSD will show a movie on Chavez and his cause every Monday. Also, members of the UCSD community will be participating in a Cesar Chavez commemorative walk from the corner of Euclid and Logan streets to Cesar Chavez Elementary School. The walk will take place March 31 at 9 a.m. Mark Chavez said he was proud that “”UCSD is taking the initiative to have the essay contest.”” Still, he urged further involvement of the university in the celebration of the political leader’s life and struggle. “”We need to make more of an attempt to be a leader in community activities of this type,”” Mark Chavez said. “”We want to set a precedent for the future and develop a commitment from the university as a whole. We initiated it this year, and hopefully we’ll be even more involved next year.”” As part of the holiday celebration, UCSD, in partnership with the San Diego Cesar Chavez Committee, is sponsoring an essay contest dedicated to celebrating the life and achievements of Chavez. The contest is open to students from grades seven through 12 and challenges contestants to comment on the influence Chavez and his work have had, or might have, on their lives and futures. Members of the San Diego Cesar E. Chavez Commemoration Committee, as well as representatives from the UCSD faculty, staff and student body, will judge the essays on their originality, historic content and expression of personal viewpoints. Of the contestants, three grand-prize winners will win a new computer. Second-, third- and fourth-place winners will each receive $750, $500 and $250 savings bonds, respectively, to be put toward paying for college. Certificates of honorable mention will be awarded to participants in each of the five regions serviced by UCSD’s Early Academic Outreach Program. Winning authors will be invited to read their essays at the Third Annual Cesar E. Chavez Breakfast March 30 at the San Diego Convention Center. Winners of the essay contest will also be featured April 7 at the Marshall College Cultural Celebration at UCSD, as well as at other community events commemorating the life of Chavez. ...

Cannabis Study Proposals Approved

The UCSD-based Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research announced the approval of its first proposals for the study of cannabis as a treatment for specific medical conditions. The studies selected include an inpatient study on the effects of smoking marijuana to alleviate peripheral nerve pain associated with HIV infection; an outpatient study of the effects and safety of smoked marijuana versus a placebo for the treatment of muscle spasms, loss of function, and related pain in patients with multiple sclerosis; and an outpatient study on the acute and long-term effects of repeated administration of medical cannabis on driving ability. CMCR Director Igor Grant described the process by which 13 proposals were narrowed to four. “”We have followed a careful process of protocol review, engaging senior scientists from around the country on our scientific review board to evaluate proposals and recommend funding for those that meet our high scientific standards, within the strict procedures established by Health and Human Services, the DEA and the FDA,”” Grant said. The CMCR is a state-funded collaboration between UCSD and UCSF. It was established last year as a result of a bill sponsored by state Sen. John Vasconcellos, D-Santa Clara, and signed into law by Gov. Gray Davis in October 1999. The law provided for $3 million in state funds for the center. Additional federal funding may come later. California voters approved the use of medical marijuana in 1996, but the guidelines for administering cannabis are ambiguous. Vasconcellos’ legislation called for a three-year program of high-quality medical research. “”These approved studies will begin to gather evidence to determine whether or not marijuana is effective as a medical treatment for certain conditions,”” Vasconcellos said. It is anticipated that additional studies will be reviewed and approved to begin in late spring 2001. ...

Week Draws Attention to Eating Disorders

UCSD’s Student Health Services and Advocates operated a table at RIMAC from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.on Monday to mark the beginning of Eating Disorder Awareness Week, which continues through Friday. Pamphlets regarding this year’s themes, “”Every BODY is Beautiful”” and “”Celebrating Every BODY,”” were offered to students, along with the opportunity to talk to trained professionals about body image, fitness and nutrition issues. The goal of the programs this week are “”to bring awareness that there are eating disorders on campus,”” according to Heather Kurata, a dietitian with Student Health Services. Today from 10 a.m. to noon, there will be an information booth in Price Center Gallery B. Students will be able to view videos about body image and talk with professional physicians, psychologists and dietitians. Other students in recovery will also be present to talk with students about issues regarding body image. There will also be a booth on Library Walk from noon to 2 p.m. today. Videos, information and give-aways will be available, along with the opportunity to talk with peers and professionals. This year’s themes are intended to encourage people across the country to celebrate the diversity of body shapes and sizes. They come in response to current trends in eating disorders, which can result from body image issues. “”We’re trying to shift the focus more toward body acceptance,”” Kurata said. Eating Disorder Awareness Week is a nationally recognized program. “”Most universities do something during this week,”” Kurata said. The pamphlets available contain a large range of information on various aspects of eating disorders. One pamphlet is called “”Eating Disorders: What Everyone Should Know,”” and contains information about the symptoms and signs of eating disorders, how to help a friend, what causes eating disorders, tips for athletes and strategies for combating unsafe eating habits. Another pamphlet contains information about the focus of this year’s Eating Disorder Awareness Week: body image. “”Help on the Way: Female Athlete Triad”” is another pamphlet available. The “”Female Athlete Triad”” is a combination of three disorders: disordered eating, lack of menstrual periods and bone weakening. Active women, including college athletes, are at risk for this. The pamphlet includes information about the signs and risks of Female Athlete Triad, as well as prevention tips. College students are often at high risk for eating disorders because of all the changes they experience. Kurata named some of the factors, such as being away from home for the first time, having to select their own meals in the dining halls, and the weight limits that some sports teams impose. Students being treated for eating disorders at Student Health Services see a combination of three people to aid their recovery: a dietitian, a psychologist and a physician. “”We do a multi-disciplinary approach,”” Kurata said. ...

Event Celebrates Black History

Hundreds of people gathered in the Price Center Plaza last Thursday at noon to watch the Black History Celebration. The event was part of a move to increase student awareness of African Americans’ contributions to American history as part of Black History Month. The celebration featured various acts displaying cultural traditions that originated from the African continent, ranging from African stilt walkers and Bomani drummers to a step show put on by the students of the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity and a performance by the UCSD Gospel Choir. The boys and girls of Keiller Middle School were also on hand to perform a montage entitled “”Facing the Rising Sun.”” During this presentation, Mrs. Davis and her sixth grade students took center stage in the Price Center Plaza and electrified the crowd by reading from the works of various African-American poets, writers and leaders, including Harriet Tubman and Langston Hughes. One such student was Deandre Lester, a sixth grader at Keiller Middle School, who passionately read two poems written by Langston Hughes, an African American poet who became popular during the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. “”I think it was a really good presentation,”” Lester said. “”I was [nervous] at first, but then after I said my first part I wasn’t that nervous.”” The children’s performance was well received by the crowd, which consisted of students, parents and university employees. One spectator was Kristin LeAndre, a university employee who admits she came to see the step show, but was impressed by the children’s performance. “”I thought it was great, the kids were wonderful,”” LeAndre said. “”They were very articulate [for] a middle school.”” The Marshall Dean of Student Affairs, Ashanti Houston Hands, who served as the MC for the event, feels that black history is an important part of America’s past. “”Today is the celebration of Black History Month and African American culture,”” Hands said. “”We just wanted to provide the opportunity for our campus to be exposed to all the rich tradition through music, dance and the spoken word.”” For many students, the celebration of black history is truly important. African Americans’ role in American history is often minimized or, in some cases, forgotten. “”We can certainly always do more,”” Hands said. “”I think we do make a nice effort on campus, but I think when we really feel that the level of diversity has been achieved that we would all anticipate, [black history] would be woven into the overall curriculum and not just be a specific department or separate issue.”” Nneka Udoh, a Warren junior, admits being troubled that black history is not always seen as a part of American history. “”Black history is American history, and I don’t understand why we have to take the time to celebrate black history on this token month,”” Udoh said. “”Why can’t we celebrate black history every single day?”” The Black History Celebration was sponsored in part by Marshall college and the Cultural Association Uniting Students through Education, better known as C.A.U.S.E. ...

Briefly

UCSD Chancellor Robert C. Dynes announced last Wednesday that, come Feb. 23, Sid Karin, the founding director of the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the National Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure, would become the new senior strategic advisor to the director of the center. Additional changes include Francine Berman signing on as new director of SDSC and NPACI. Karin has served as the director of the center for 16 years and has made the center an internationally respected laboratory for computational science and technology. He was also instrumental in the successful proposal that lead to UCSD’s hosting of NPACI. After Karin’s significant contributions, he desired to return to hands-on research, and the new position will allow him to do so. Berman has worked with UCSD since 1984 and was the founder of UCSD’s Parallel Computation and Grid Computing Laboratories. Power Conservation Saves UCSD More Than $8,000 a Day The Office of the Vice Chancellor announced Friday that through campuswide efforts to conserve power by shutting off lights and appliances, UCSD saved 10 percent in energy. This helped all Californians keep their lights on and has led to a savings of over $8,000 per day for the university, which is the third-largest consumer of electricity in San Diego Gas & Electric’s territory. The state electric system operator has replaced the Stage 3 emergency, which lasted for 29 consecutive days, with a less critical Stage 1 emergency. Jack Hug of the Office of the Vice Chancellor emphasized that the crisis is not over and that continued cooperation by the campus will be necessary to further the progress during the remainder of California’s energy crisis. UCSD Helps Parents Prepare Their Children for College “”Enhancing Student Preparation for College,”” a conference offered to San Diego parents to help them prepare their children for college, will take place on Saturday, March 31 at Woodland Park Middle School at 8:30 a.m. The Early Academic Outreach Program at UCSD will sponsor the conference, which is aimed at familiarizing local parents about the college application process, admission requirements and other education options in California besides the University of California. Parents are encouraged to attend with their children. For reservations or more information, contact Jackson at (858) 822-4252 or [email protected] by Monday, March 19. Atkinson Urges Students to Take Advantage of CalGrants UC President Richard C. Atkinson urged students Friday to take advantage of the state’s CalGrant program, which provides million of dollars in financial aid to California college students every year, before the March 2 application deadline. Atkinson stressed that students meeting the requirements could possibly have their total tuition needs met and that unlike loans, grants do not need to be repaid. The CalGrant program pays up to $9,700 toward tuition and fees to students attending private institutions and up to $1,550 for those attending California community colleges. Some basic requirements for the program include being a legal California resident, attending a qualifying California post-secondary institution, being enrolled at least half-time and not being in default on a student loan. The programs offer both “”A”” and “”B”” grants, given depending on a student’s education status and grade point average. ...