Sports

Cal Poly Pomona Sours UCSD's Winning Streak

The UCSD men’s soccer team rode into the Cal Poly Pomona match on a hot streak, unbeaten in its last eight matches. The Broncos came into the match with a record of 7-8-3 overall and 4-6-3 in league play. The Tritons were 11-2-2 overall, and 9-2-2 in league play. With the loss of Triton midfielder Ryan Mizumoto, UCSD had to step up on the field and make something happen. This was the match to determine where their weaknesses were, leading into the CCAA championships and hopefully the NCAA Division II championship match. While playing well, the outcome was not good for the Tritons. Pomona prevailed in a close 2-1 game to end league play matches for the 2000 season. Pomona scored early, with two goals within the first 10 minutes of play. John Picco found the net first, and a Pacual Villegas goal was assisted by Theo Hetherington to break things open. The game was 2-0 going into halftime, and UCSD’s Daniel Appel came out and scored an early second-half goal to make things interesting. From then on, no team found the net, and the game ended 2-1. The Tritons only had three shots on goal, compared to eight by the Broncos. “”We were all off,”” said Triton midfielder Sean Summers. “”We couldn’t get anything going early, and the conditions made it tougher. This was the last league match for Pomona, so they sent off all their seniors and played all of them. They were pumped, and we couldn’t play against their enthusiasm.”” UCSD must find their stride in time for playoffs. Hopefully they will be able to look back to their eight game win streak and recapture the feel they had there. The Tritons finished with a league record of 11-3-2. This sets them up as either a No. 2 or No. 3 seed in the CCAA Championships beginning Nov. 2. UCSD will play on Nov. 3 against Sonoma State, a team the Tritons lost to earlier this season. The winner will then go on to face the CCAA favorite, the first-ranked CSU Dominguez Hills. ...

Can Anyone Stay Awake For Baseball?

The World Series came to its less-than-stunning conclusion last week when the New York Yankees unceremoniously disposed of the cross-town rival Mets, four games to one. This was the Bronx Bombers¹ fourth title in five years and their 26th overall. Well, whoop dee freakin¹ doo. There is something wrong with the World Series today, and it does not lie only with the Yankees winning and the buying of another title by a big-market club. No, it is more fundamental than that. The starting and finishing times for the World Series are ridiculous. On the East Coast, the games begin any time between 8 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. and don¹t finish until well after midnight. Over here it is not so bad, with everything three hours earlier, but for the area where the teams are actually located, it is amazingly late. Now, for people like us, college students who are used to late nights and weird time schedules, ending a game after midnight is no biggee. The problem with this game schedule is for the youngsters. What are the children to do? Youngsters can¹t stay up past midnight watching baseball. I mean, elementary school students need their rest and have bedtimes well before the game is over because they must be at school the next day. They can¹t, or at least shouldn¹t, be staying up until the next day. That includes the many watching the games on television. What about those who actually make it to a game? Say a contest ends at 12:30 a.m. After the drive home and everything, it would be 2 a.m. before Junior hits the sack. Yeah, give a 9-year-old five hours of sleep, I¹m sure he¹ll be bright-eyed and bushy-tailed the next day, ready to learn. Baseball is killing itself in this aspect. It isn¹t appealing to youth. It does not affect the children out here so much, but the young Yankees and Mets fans¹ only memories of the game will come from ³Sports Center² the next day. I think that baseball should go back to the way it was and have World Series games start in the afternoon. This is the way it was for many years, well before lighted stadiums made nighttime games possible and fat television contracts dictated which direction the institutions should take. Yes, children had school and adults had work during the games, but certain things would mysteriously take place when the World Series came about. School kids would come down with some sort of cold the day of a game. Parents with jobs would all of a sudden have some family matters to take care of at home just before the time of the first pitch. In other words, children would ditch and working people take the day off from their jobs to head to the ball park or to the television or radio to catch the game. If that was not the case, school kids and workers would sneak in radios to quietly listen to the action transpiring somewhere on a magical diamond. Some schools and work places would go as far as to broadcast the World Series itself over intercoms. This is how big the Series was. It was practically a national holiday. Am I advocating children skipping school and adults leaving work to watch a game? Yes I am. Am I suggesting that the World Series should sit right next to math and history at school and to meetings and clients in the work place? Again, yes. The World Series is tradition. It is as American as apple pie. Why must these traditions be smothered? Baseball needs to look at itself in the mirror and realize what it is doing to itself and its fan base. The Series used to be something so special that the nation would shut down just to watch. Now sleepy-heads with things to do the next day fall off to dreamland, only to witness special memories on the next day¹s highlight show. ...

Triton Weekend A Letdown

The Tritons went 1-3 in last weekend’s NorCal Water Polo Tournament, beating Air Force 12-9 and losing to UC Berkeley 9-6, Pepperdine 10-5 and Long Beach State 5-2. David Pilz/ Guardian In the two-day tournament, which ran from Oct. 21to Oct. 22, UCSD drew Air Force first. Although Air Force has not been nationally ranked this year, it is still a very good team and came out swarming in the first quarter, staking a 2-0 lead when time had expired. UCSD could have clammed up at this point. All season long the Tritons have come out and been able to stick it to people in the first quarter and establish themselves, but for the last couple of games at UCSB and Long Beach State, they have not been able to do this. Falling behind early again could have disheartened the Tritons. However, UCSD did not let the early score affect it and stormed out in the second quarter attacking Air Force up and down the court, scoring four goals. “”We did not let getting down early affect us, even though it is something we have been having problems with,”” said head coach Denny Harper. Perhaps because of letting its guard down a little on the defensive end, UCSD allowed two goals. The second quarter ended tied, 4-4. Not looking to let up the pressure, the Tritons decided to keep attacking the Air Force defense and came out for the third quarter in a feeding frenzy. Air Force was not to be intimidated however, and in a rabid, dog fight-like, offensively charged third quarter, reminiscent of the Rams-Chiefs game, the Tritons scored six goals to Air Force’s five. By the end of the fourth quarter UCSD had slogged its way to two more goals and the defense had held Air Force to a big fat bagel to make the final score 12-9, Tritons. Jonathan Samuels scored four goals for UCSD and Vladimir Djapic and Justin Wylie added two goals apiece. The tournament had 16 teams competing and because of space and time constraints, only two pools were available, UCSD was forced to paly its second game a scant three hours after their first. Unluckily for the Tritons, its second game was against Cal, a team who even at full strength the Tritons would be hard pressed to handle. The game started out slowly and evenly with UCSD hanging tough, and Cal went into the second quarter with only a 3-2 lead. It looked like a re-match of earlier in the season, but then Cal took over, outstripping UCSD to take a 6-2 halftime lead. The Tritons fought valiantly in the second half, narrowing the gap to 7-5, but in the end Cal was too much for them and they fell, 9-6. “”This was our best game of the weekend,”” Harper said. “”We were really happy with the way we played in this game, even though we did not win.”” Samuels posted three more goals for the Tritons. The second day UCSD had a chance to place as high as fifth in the tournament, but an early morning loss to Pepperdine made it impossible for it to place any higher than seventh, and with its mid-day loss to Long Beach State, UCSD ended up placing eighth. Despite its disappointing showing at the tournament, UCSD has something to look forward to, as in the next couple of weeks it will play five home games. This will give the Tritons time to regroup for a season-ending push toward championships. This Sunday the Tritons match face Clairemont College at 12 p.m. ...

San Fran Bummed Out by UCSD

No, those were not overeager witches breaking out their broomsticks for a quick pre-Halloween jaunt that you may have seen Friday night in San Francisco. Those were simply members of the UCSD women’s volleyball team grabbing theirs for a dominating sweep of San Francisco State in SFSU’s own arena, appropriately titled The Swamp. The play of San Francisco State looked like something that belonged submerged in the goopy detritus of some dank bog somewhere, at least in contrast to the superb play of UCSD. The three-game sweep showed the Tritons in solid form; they executed their plays cleanly and made few mistakes after the first game. Early on was a slightly different story, however, as the Tritons were still probably thinking of the late-night, five-game shocker they pulled out against Sonoma State on Friday. The first game went to extra points to squeak past SFSU 16-14. Once the cobwebs cleared, however, it was Tritons, Tritons, and more Tritons for the remainder of the match. The team gathered a collective second wind and went on to take the final two games in a steadfast and decisive fashion, with scores of 15-4 and 15-6 to collect the sweep and the all-important Collegiate Conference Athletic Association win. Leslie Punelli led the way for the Tritons with her 12 kills and 18 digs, while teammates Kathleen Hentz and Dianne Camarillo also stood out among the bolstered UCSD attack, both with at least ten kills apiece. These three players continue to dominate as they have all season, and alongside players like Laura Santerre and Jennie Wilson, they form the core of the Tritons’ winning formula and keep head coach Duncan McFarland smiling. With this win the Tritons improve their glowing record to a stellar 19-4 overall, with 13-2 tally in conference play. The lowly San Francisco squad fell to 3-15 and 1-14 overall. The Tritons have another big weekend ahead of them as they will once again face off in two huge divisional games, this time against Cal State Stanislaus on Friday at 7 p.m. and Cal State Bakersfield on Saturday at 8 p.m. This two-game series marks the return of our beloved Tritons to our very own RIMAC Arena after two consecutive weekends on the road. Come out and support our squad as both of these opponents are fierce Triton rivals and will surely be gunning for them this time around after earlier losses. The white-hot Tritons, though riding high on their winning streak will hopefully continue their victorious ways and you should be there to see it all go down. ...

Women's Soccer Clinches a Playoff Berth With Win

Coming into this year, many questioned whether UCSD athletics would be able to compete with the new Division II competition our teams would be facing. The Triton women’s soccer team has answered that question with a definitive “”yes.”” With two big wins this week against Grand Canyon University and California State University San Bernardino, the Tritons made big strives toward excellency. The women’s soccer team clinched a berth in the California Collegiate Athletic Association Championship Tournament after a 4-0 stomping of the Grand Canyon Antelopes on the road Friday. Erika Alfredson was on a tear again, scoring two goals on six shots. She also had an assist. Cindy Dostalek and Elizabeth Hughes each added a goal and Christy Abizaid contributed with two assists. Triton goalkeeper Kami Poma had one save in 70 minutes of work and Carolyn Cadei had four in the remaining 20 minutes of play. After the playoff-clinching victory, the Tritons headed home for a huge match against San Bernardino. Earlier this season, the two teams had gotten together to rumble in San Bernardino, and UCSD suffered one of its two losses during their first ever CCAA match, losing 4-2. This time around, the Coyotes were no match for UCSD as the Tritons trounced the visitors 3-2. “”I just think we’ve matured since that time with nine first-year players,”” said Triton head coach Brian McManus. “”The first game of the season we weren’t quite ready. I think as the season’s gone on we’ve gotten a lot better and a lot tougher.”” The Triton received their goals from a trifecta of players. Alfredson was up to her old tricks with the team’s first goal off a Hughes assist. Jessica Cordova got in on the fun after a Dostalek assist opened her up for another Triton goal. Julia Cuder rounded out the scoring with a shot off of an Abizaid assist. Poma was rarely tested, needing to make only two saves. Next up for UCSD is a pivotal contest against Cal Poly Pomona, which shares with UCSD a position atop the CCAA Southern Division standings. The Tritons, who downed Cal Poly 1-0 in overtime this year, will win the South with a victory. If Cal Poly wins, they may take the crown. “”We’re just going game to game, taking it as it comes,”” McManus said. “”We’ve got a big game to see who wins the South. We’re a first-year squad. The conference has proved it’s tough. It’s going to be a tight game; a very, very tight game. “” The Tritons, who now stand at 11-2 in CCAA play and 13-2 overall, will head to Pomona on Friday for a match at 4:30 p.m. ...

Tyson-Golota Fight A Mere Joke

I don’t know how many of you decided to fork out the exorbitant sum that it took to purchase a viewing of the Mike Tyson vs. Andrew Golota fight on Friday night, but my roommates and I were unfortunately among your ranks. What we saw was the poorest excuse for a heavyweight fight since Tyson decided to give Evander Holyfield some free plastic surgery almost three-and-a-half years ago. For those of you who haven’t heard, here’s what happened. Tyson tagged Golota in the first round and knocked him down. The second round was pretty much a waste. Before the third round could even begin, Golota quit and walked out of the ring. The most entertaining part of the match was seeing Golota walking down the path to the locker room, all the while being pelted by beers from disgusted fans. In my house there were about 30 angry people yelling obscenities at the television, my girlfriend and me included. We were all thoroughly pissed about the outcome, and we pretty much assumed that we had been duped into tuning into a fight that was fixed from the beginning. But later we heard some information that made us all feel like we belonged in Satan’s constituency. It turns out that Golota not only suffered a concussion from his two-round brawl with Tyson, but he also received a broken cheekbone. Feeling bad, I began to think about whether we, as fans, have the right to expect people to fight to the brutal end against animals like Tyson. First of all, I considered whether our assessment that the fight was rigged was accurate. After doing quite a bit of thinking, I came to the conclusion that Golota didn’t go into the fight looking to take a dive. My evidence is twofold. First of all, in the interview after the fight, Golota looked greatly distraught about the occurrences during the six minutes of fighting. It was clearly not the look of a man who had come to Michigan looking for a quick payday. Second of all, and more importantly, I figured if Golota wanted a quick score, he could have had it much faster. Tyson absolutely demolished him with a knockout blow at the end of the first round. Golota staggered and then hit the mat. If this man wanted to take the money and run, there is no way he would have got up from this shot. He would have meekly stayed sitting on the canvas, counting his millions as the referee quickly counted him out. But Golota didn’t do that. He got up and stood in with Tyson for another round before quitting, taking unbelievable punishment that he could have easily avoided if he wasn’t looking to win. Although I had solved to my satisfaction the controversy of whether this fight was prearranged, at least in Golota’s mind, my real question was whether this fight should have taken place at all. My conclusion was a resounding no! These men are completely unstable, and their track records prove it. Golota has a history of mental health problems and also has a problem keeping his punches away from his opponents’ genitals. Tyson’s problems have been well-documented and range from something as simple as asocial behavior to something as serious as rape. Clearly, these people are not in the right physical and mental state of well-being to put themselves in the middle of a ring punching the tar out of each other. But who in his right mind would do that anyway? Heavyweight boxing has become an absolute circus. This fight encompassed everything bad about the sport. Tyson received $10 million, while Golota received $2 million for six minutes of work. Like many of the marquee heavyweight boxing matches of recent years, this one ended by some completely unexpected freak occurrence. It gypped the people who paid for the fight out of their hard-earned money, and the sport of boxing out of its integrity. In the last five years, we have seen fights end because of people biting off others’ ears, random head-butts, boxers having nervous breakdowns in the middle of the ring and, in the case of Golota, simply quitting in the middle of the fight and delivering blows to his opponent’s groin one too many times (which he did on two occasions, both times against Riddick Bowe). And who gets screwed when this kind of garbage goes on in the ring? People like you and me. We tune in and hope to see a real classic, like the first battle between Holyfield and Tyson, but for every one of those there are 10 Tyson vs. Golota matches. I have seen enough of these episodes that I will never again pay one red cent to watch this crap. I can do many things with $50 that would be much more fulfilling than watching two social deviants dance around and beat on each other for five minutes before one of them gets sick of it and does something that ends up getting him disqualified. There is also a much better way to use my time than to watch an entire undercard of fighters that I have never heard of waiting for the big match-up to arrive, only to be thoroughly disappointed once it does. So, for those of you who are loyal Reality Check readers, add heavyweight boxing to NBA basketball on the list of garbage sports that this writer will never again become interest in. ...

Men's Soccer Downs San Bernardino 2-0

With the playoffs weeks away, The UCSD men’s soccer team helped its cause by defeating rival California State University San Bernardino 2-0. The victory improved the Tritons’ season record to 11-2-2, 9-2-2 in conference play. Junior Daniel Appel scored an early goal and freshman Jonathan Costabile scored later on to seal the win for the Tritons, who improved their unbeaten streak to eight games. “”We got a quick goal early on that helped to set the pace of the game,”” said freshman goalkeeper Jeremy Cookson. “”This time they came out very tough and it took us a while to start stringing things together. In all, though, I think that San Bernardino played a better game this time, and we did well to beat them.”” The victory, however, was marred by the knee injury of Ryan Mizumoto, one of the top midfielders the Tritons have in their lineup. He will miss the remainder of the season. “”Ryan’s injury is a major one and a major blow to the team,”” said head coach Derek Armstrong. “”He was the unity that kept everything going, and we will sorely miss him.”” Freshman Sean Summers also commented that with Mizumoto out of the lineup, someone will have to step up and play well in the midfield. “”When Ryan was taken out of the game we struggled to find our rhythm,”” Summers said. “”After halftime we came out hard and put the game away early. After that, they were done and we were able to experiment a little.”” As for the rest of the season, the men’s soccer team has an away game with Cal Poly Pomona on Oct. 27. The last match against Pomona ended in a thrilling overtime goal by Tyler Girimonte to lift the Tritons to victory. After that comes a UCSD alumni match; the time has yet to be announced. United States International University comes to town for a final nonconference showdown with UCSD on Monday, just before the California Collegiate Athletic Association championships begin. When asked how the Tritons would approach facing teams as CSU Dominguez Hills and Sonoma State — the only teams to defeat the Tritons this year — the response was clear: revenge. “”Revenge would definitely be nice against Dominguez Hills and Sonoma,”” Cookson said. “”Who doesn’t want another shot at Dominguez Hills? They’re definitely a great team and I’d really like a chance to play them again. From here on out all that matters is the next game. We can’t get ahead of ourselves.”” A similar response was given to the question of teamwork. The amount of unity this team has is quite evident. “”I think we have had success in the past month because we play for each other,”” Summers said. “”There are no players on the team who think only of themselves. Our team is very close and we have learned to play well with each other.”” The next two matches will be a test to see how the Tritons fill the void Mizumoto filled up so well. The team has bounced back from two major injuries this year, so adversity is its oyster. “”We look forward to going against the best the conference has to offer this next week,”” Armstrong said. “”We, however, have two games to find out what we can do to fill the shoes of Ryan.”” ...

Swim Team Opens Strong at USC Invitational

Last weekend the UCSD men’s and women’s swim teams held their own against very tough competition at the USC Invitational at McDonald’s Swim Stadium at the University of Southern California. “”[Our team’s performance] was very good,”” said head swim coach Scott McGihon. “”Especially considering how broken down and tired we are.”” The invitational, which began on Friday and ended Saturday, included teams from UC Berkeley, UC Santa Barbara, UC Irvine, California State University Northridge and Cal State Bakersfield. Also competing were club teams from Mission Viejo, Industry Hills, Irvine and Pasadena. “”All the teams were very good,”” McGihon said. “”There wasn’t a single team that was a doormat everyone could step on.”” While the men and women had no individual winners, the women had several finishers in the top five. Jennifer Watanabe, who was named NCAA Swimmer of the Year last year as a freshman, led the Tritons with top five finishes in three events. She placed fifth out of 38 in the 400-yard individual medley with a time of 4:36.41, fifth out of 91 in the 200-yard freestyle in 1:55.22, and fifth out of 41 in the 200-yard backstroke in 2:07.34. Junior Sandra Lopez also swam well for UCSD, netting a fourth-place finish in the 100-yard breaststroke with a time of 1:06.63, and a second-place finish in the 200-yard breaststroke in a blazing 2:21.59. Along with Watanabe and Lopez, junior Lindsey Meeks also swam well enough to qualify for the NCAA championships. The UCSD women had a strong showing in the 100-yard freestyle competition, with Samantha Wong coming in eighth out of 93 entrants, and Carolyn and Evelyn Kwok placing seventh and ninth, respectively. The women’s 200-yard medley relay teams also had a strong effort with a fourth-place finish and a time of 1:51.50. The USC relay team won the event with a time of 1:47.09. On the men’s side, sophomore Luke Seed stood out for the Tritons, earning a ninth-place finish out of 47 in the 100-yard butterfly with a 52.36 and seventh-place out of 37 in the 100-yard breaststroke with a time of 58.67. McGihon also praised the efforts of senior and team captain Rusty Jones, who came in 18th in the 100-yard backstroke event and senior Ryan Wong, who earned 13th place in the 200-yard backstroke. “”There were some surprising efforts,”” McGihon said. “”Especially considering the fact that not all swimmers were swimming in their best events.”” The young men and women Triton swim teams, each boasting only three seniors, are looking for strong efforts from their swimmers this year. “”Our team goal is for everyone to achieve a lifetime best this season,”” McGihon said. The women’s team is especially youthful this year, as it lost seven seniors to graduation. McGihon also expects the teams to do as well as they can in the NCAA championship with several top five finishes. While pleased with his teams’ efforts so far, McGihon cites relay starts and turns, as well as overall speed, as the main areas in need of improvement for the Tritons. “”However I’m very happy with how things are progressing,”” he said. “”These things just come with time.”” Both the men and women will have to demonstrate their skills next Friday in the UCSD Alumni meet. ...

Subway Series Not All That Grand

Hey, I have an idea. Let’s take the greatest event in American sports and name it after a run-down, crime-infested, smelly underground train. Wait, someone already beat me to it. What I am talking about, of course, is the World Series, which has, unfortunately, turned into a Subway Series, pitting the New York Mets against the New York Yankees. As far as the two teams being from the same city, who really cares? Back in the heyday of baseball, this sort of thing used to happen all the time. Either the New York Giants or the Brooklyn Dodgers would face the Yankees for the title. A Subway Series was nothing special then, and it is nothing special now. This is the last thing baseball needed. It is common knowledge that it is nearly impossible for a small-market team to make it to the Series. It is like catching lightninhin a bottle every time a team such as the Oakland Athletics or the San Francisco Giants makes it. The people with money are the people with players, and they are the people with titles. This Subway Series just reinforces that notion, with the two teams from the largest television market duking it out for supremacy. Another thing I cannot stand about this beloved Subway Series is that it just reinforces the egos of those from the East Coast, and New York especially. Everything in this country seems to revolve around the East Coast and particularly New York. Sports, politics, news — you name it, the right half of the country gets first billing. A city that is full of itself already is just getting more full of itself. This Series isn’t about the world, North America or even just the United States. It is all about two burroughs in New York City: Queens and the Bronx. Baseball desperately needed the Seattle Mariners or the A’s or the Giants to make this Series for two reasons: First, it needed a small-market team to make it to the Series, one the average Joe could get behind. That is what the A’s are all about — a bunch of guys busting their asses off. Their payroll is something like $80 million less than that of the Yankees. The Giants have a solid team but are led by their coach, Dusty Baker, who can will a team to victory. Also, a team from another part of the country could have some regional significance. The A’s, Giants or Mariners would have excited the West Coast. The St. Louis Cardinals and the Chicago White Sox would have done the same for the Midwest, and the Atlanta Braves could have stirred the South. Alas, it was not meant to be. Instead of a World Series, we have a New York Series. There are some out there who say the Subway Series will turn off many a fan. This is true for the casual fan, because most people outside of New York cannot relate to either team. To the pure baseball fan, on the other hand, a Subway Series does not matter one bit. I love baseball. I will watch the World Series as much as my schedule will allow. The fact that it is a Subway Series does not get me more excited. In fact, it turns me off a little, but not to the point that I will not watch. Baseball is baseball. Period. I’m rooting for the Mets. The Yankees have had their time, with three rings in the last four years. I’m tired of seeing them celebrate every fall. Plus, I hope the Mets will win. The Yankees are the highest paid, or maybe the highest overpaid, team in baseball. It’s time for someone else to win. It looks grim right now with the Yanks up 2-0, but there is still hope that the Amazin’ Mets can work some magic at Shea Stadium. So, here’s to baseball at its best, Subway Series or not. ...

5-k Run to Raise Funds

The fifth annual Chancellor’s Challenge 5k run will commence this Friday at 12:15 p.m. Over 1,000 participants are expected. In the past, the Challenge has been run exclusively on the cross country course, but this year things are going to change. The new route begins by RIMAC and takes runners down through Marshall college, along Library Walk, then back up to the start/finish line with only part of the race going through the eucalyptus grove, the traditional cross country haunt. The Chancellor’s Challenge is much more than just a 5k run however, and last year it raised over $158,000. “”Right now, it looks like we are definitely going to beat last year’s total of $158,000 and much of that is due to Charlie Robbins,”” said Brian Daly, who is in charge of donations and scholarships for this year’s race. Robbins, a former UCSD trustee, will match up to $15,000 in donations and has done the leg work behind many of the corporate sponsorships at this year’s Challenge, including sponsorships such as a $15,000 donation from Fisher Scientific and $10,000 apiece from Audrey Geisel and the Doctor Seuss Foundation, and John Moores and the San Diego Padres. “”Charlie has just been terrific and we really owe him a big thank you,”” Daly said. All the money that Robbins and others have raised goes to two scholarships. The first is a research scholarship and the second is a community service scholarship. The research scholarship is for students who mentor with a teacher and is competitive, meaning it is applied for individually. The community service scholarship is for incoming freshmen. The freshmen are nominated by their high schools for what the schools perceive to be outstanding service to the community. The winners are then picked by UCSD. Dynes is providing another $40,000 dollars in matching funds, which comes from unrestricted funds that, as chancellor, Dynes has control over and can spend toward the university as he sees fit. This makes a total of $55,000 in matching funds to be provided by Dynes and Robbins, and assures that this year’s Challenge will bring in at least $110,000 in added need. Beyond matching up to $40,000 dollars, Dynes will provide $25 out of his own pocket for every person that beats him. However, this is not as easy as it may sound, for the Chancellor is one tough competitor Last year the Chancellor finished 170th with a time of 23:42, a donation of $4,250, but that still leaves over 800 people who did not have enough in them to beat him. Ken Grosse, assistant athletic director at UCSD, and coordinator of the athletic side of the race, says even some of the athletes who are competing in the event should be worried about Dynes beating them. “”Chancellor Dynes is out there every day running the course and getting ready for the event,”” Grosse said. “”He is serious about this. I know that the coaches and athletes that are competing are always saying, ‘we’ve got to beat the chancellor,’ but they need to be careful.”” Dynes also has a standing bet running with the A.S. president such that if the chancellor beats him, Doc Khaleghi must wash Dynes’ car. On the other hand, if Khaleghi happens to pull out the victory over Dynes, the chancellor has to donate funds for an A.S. barbecue. In addition to the Chancellor’s Challenge of $25 for every person that beats him, professor Frances Dynes Hellman is donating $25 for every woman who beats her, and Vice Chancellor of Health Sciences Ed Holmes will pay $25 to every person from Health Sciences who beats him in the race. For those who want to participate in the race, there are many ways to apply. The application is available with Adobe Acrobat Reader directly off the Chancellor’s Challenge Web site, http://www.ucsd.edu/5k, and there are application forms handy at RIMAC, Geisel, Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Faculty Club. All mailed applications are due by Oct. 25 and walk-in applications are being accepted at RIMAC on the 26 from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. “”This is really a great deal for students,”” Grosse said. “”You get a free t-shirt and food, plus you get to be a part of something that has really turned into a campus signature event.”” Registration is $5 for students and $10 for anyone else. “”Day-of”” registration is available and will be $10 for students and $15 for others. “”Every year the event gets bigger and better, and this year is going to be no exception,”” Daly said. For more information about the Chancellor’s Challenge or to sign up and see how you rate aginst the chancellorand others, go to the Web site or contact Brian Daly at (858) 822-8236 or Kyra Randle, who is charge of entrants and volunteers, at (858) 822-1537. ...