Sports

UCSD club Sports

SKI TEAM The UCSD water skiing team has had some rough water as of late. Earlier this month, the team lost one of its own when Dustin Newell died in an automobile accident in route to an event in Phoenix. This weekend, the team regrouped to participate in the National Collegiate Water Ski Association Championships at Mission Bay. The event was dedicated to their fallen comrade. On the men’s side, UC Davis’ Eric Peterson won the individual competition, narrowly beating out UC Santa Barbara’s Mike Buckle. The Davis men also squeaked past UCLA to capture first place in the trick and jump categories. UCSD finished second overall in the competition, 80 points behind first-place Davis. The UCSD women did better than the men, taking the women’s team overall title. Senior Kikki Kennedy had a stellar day, launching for a school record 81-foot jump to take the jumping category. She also grabbed second in trick and slalom. Kim Blackwell of San Diego State was tops in the trick and slalom categories, edging out Kennedy. As a tribute to Newell, the eight competing schools stopped for a moment of silence and spread flowers across the slalom course. ICE HOCKEY The UCSD ice hockey team hit the ice against Cal State Long Beach Oct. 21 for its first game of the season. UCSD, coming off their Pacific Coast Hockey Association Championship, looks for another big season this year. Long Beach, which has always been a force, also looks to have a good team this season. In its first matchup of the young season, UCSD got the best of their rivals, downing Long Beach 5-2. In the first period, UCSD goalkeeper Scott Friedman was a wall, not allowing a single Long Beach score. On offense, Steven Cohen and Casey Kempner each logged goals for a comfortable early 2-0 lead. Friedman took the rest of the night off, but his contributions in the first period paid dividends. Keith Davis added a goal for UCSD in the second period, giving his team a 3-1 lead that proved too much for their opponents. UCSD’s defense held strong, allowing only one more goal. Davis and Cohen each tacked on another goal, sealing their team’s victory at 5-2. The high from the victory quickly faded the following Friday when UCSD fell to Cal State Fullerton 7-4. Fullerton practically rented out the penalty box during the first period. Despite that, the UCSD offense could not capitalize on the power plays, scoring only two goals. The defense could not shut down Fullerton and the teams ended the first period tied at two. During the second period, Fullerton scored two more goals, but UCSD’s Davis came through with two of his own, knotting the game at four heading into the final period. The third period, on the other hand, was a different story. Fullerton got out of the penalty box and onto the ice, scoring three unanswered goals to win the match 7-4. UCSD’s next game is against Santa Monica College on Friday before facing Cal State Fullerton on Saturday. SURF TEAM The UCSD surf team had its first event of the season, bogging down at Blacks Beach this past weekend. The surfing conditions were poor, with only 1-2 foot waves greeting surfers from 23 teams from all over Southern California. UCSD’s A team finished sixth overall and the B team took 10th. The squad sported many new members and looks to improve with experience. Holly Beck and Loryn Wilson were the top women surfers for UCSD. Beck and Wilson swept the first and second overall finishers, respectively. Ryan Eckoff was the man for UCSD, finishing fourth overall for UCSD. Britt Joyce and Cullen Pagaduan placed third and fourth, respectively, in the body-boarding category. The next contest for the Tritons is a ways off, coming Jan. 28 at Surfers Point in Ventura, Calif. DANCE SPORT The DanceSport team, which was previously known as the Ballroom Dance team, competed in the Pacific DanceSports Championships at Universal Studio’s Hilton Tower in Hollywood on Saturday. The summer team, led by captain Jonathan Marion and coach Peter Edwards, had a great showing. Made up of four hard-working couples, the summer team finished second place overall in the Collegiate/Formation Team Scholarship Competition. The competition featured several of the top teams, including defending national champion Brigham Young University. Various amounts of scholarship money to help support each team was up for grabs at the Pacific DanceSport Championships, depending on the teams’ finish. The four couples for UCSD were Johnny Gutierrez and Janelle Bouey, Marion and Renee Link, Peter Hanrisuk and Cecily Carnahan, and Suvro Goswami and Dana Pugh. UCSD’s team is inexperienced but hopes to improve. Their second-place finish behind BYU earned them $300 in scholarship money. WEEKEND EVENTS Friday, Nov. 3 * Ice Hockey vs. Santa Monica College at the UTC Ice Arena, at 10:15 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 4 * Men’s rugby alumni game at Warren field, 1 p.m. * Ice hockey vs. Cal State Fullerton, 10:15 p.m. * Men’s lacrosse at Loyola Marymount University, all day * Women’s rugby at Stanford’s Rookie Tournament at Stanford, all day. * Cycling at Cal Poly Pomona, all day Saturday and Sunday. –compiled by Robert Fulton, Sports Editor ...

Soccer Gearing up for Playoffs

Division II competition is much tougher than Division III competition. Don’t tell that to the UCSD soccer teams. Both squads, storming through impressive regular seasons, are stepping into their first ever California Collegiate Athletic Association Championship tournament this weekend. The women’s team captured the CCAA Southern Division after sporting a 12-2 CCAA record, 14-2 overall. The regular season title earned the women a first-place seed in the tournament. They face Cal Poly Pomona on Thursday at 1:30 p.m. in the first round. If victorious, the women will head to the CCAA finals on Sunday at 11 a.m. The men rumbled through the regular season, garnering a record of 9-3-2 in the CCAA and 11-4-2 overall. Now they must face Sonoma State in the first round of the playoffs on Friday. If they pass that test, Cal State Dominguez Hills lies ahead on Sunday at 1:30 p.m. Cal State Dominguez Hills is hosting the event. ...

Sports in Our Area in Bad Shape

Southern California sports have seen better days. The dearth of any sporting franchises that could even be labeled as competitive have the SoCal sports fans in search of a winner, or at least a team that is not excruciatingly painful to watch. Our baseball teams, the Padres, Dodgers and Angels, are all toiling away in mediocrity. The Pad squad is simply biding their time until they can cash in on their new stadium and start making some real dough. The Dodgers, with their preposterously high payroll, paid a lot for what they got, which was garbage, and the poor Angels will always be a second-tier organization. Our sole football franchise, the Chargers, can barely get to the line of scrimmage without tripping over their own feet or embarrassing themselves in some other pathetic fashion. Of course, while this tomfoolery is going on, our two old football teams, the defending Superbowl-champion St. Louis Rams, and the Oakland Raiders with their knife-wielding misfit fans, have compiled stellar records this season. Our two hockey teams, well um, eh whatever. Since Gretzky left the Kings I’ve pretty much lost interest. There is no way I am supporting some big, multinational, corporate conglomerate entity’s team, especially if said team is named after one of the conglomerations that owns the rights to awful films like “”The Mighty Ducks.”” That is why every SoCal sports fan worth his salt is eagerly anticipating the upcoming NBA season. I, for one, am looking forward to seeing Donald Sterling’s Clippers, voted last year as the worst franchise in sporting history, come into their own, with a fresh crop of young players whose starting five may possess less collective years than our UCSD men’s basketball squad. Of course there is that other team that plays in the Staples Center, who are not only competent, but pretty much tops in the class as their league championship last season can attest. This season, the Lakers look to be even better with some key new personnel, the departures of a whiny chump or two, and another season of experience in regular and postseason play. Isaiah Rider is a welcome addition to the purple and gold, as he adds some thug mentality and scoring ability. Horace Grant, acquired in the three-team deal that sent the token white boy Travis Knight and outside shooter Glen Rice (and his wife) to the Knickerbockers, adds 13 years of experience and some good ol’ fashioned whoopass to the Laker team. Mark Madsen, the fresh-faced rookie who was the Lakers’ first round draft pick (29th overall) in the latest draft will also be given the chance to contribute. The Lake Show kicked off its 2000-2001 campaign Tuesday night against their fierce old Western rival, the Portland Trailblazers and showed that their success will be more than short-lived. Shaq-daddy knocked down 36 points, and the Kobemeister had 14, while Rider, the new kid on the block, chipped in with 13. One important thing, however, to keep in mind is that if you were not down with the Lakers before, it would be morally and philosophically wrong to hop onto the old bandwagon at this juncture. You should be able to remember the post-ShowTime, pre-Lake Show days when the only real reason to tune into Laker broadcasts was to hear the sweet schtick of Laker announcer Chick Hearn and watch poor Del Harris squirm in the harsh big city spotlight. Recently, it seems as if everyone is a die-hard Laker fan, yet hasn’t a clue as to who Nick Van Exel is, or, in some extreme cases, what the Great Western Forum was. But take heart all you true fans out there. One of these days, perhaps six to 10 years from now, the Lake Show will end, and the team will once again sink into mediocrity, as all Southern Californian teams do. Then it will be all yours once again. ...

Claremont Spanked by the Tritons 13-1

UCSD water polo jumped back in the saddle in a big way on Sunday when it shellacked visiting Claremont College, 13-1. Lyon Liew/ Guardian After a dry spell in the win column, which included a disappointing, befuddled showing at the NorCal Tournament in Stockton, the Tritons were primed and ready to resume their winning ways. The first quarter saw UCSD attack relentlessly with pressure on both sides of the ball, confounding and confusing Claremont goalies in a 2-1 deficit when the quarter ended. “”We were looking to reverse a trend,”” said Kellan Hori, driver for the Tritons. “”In the last six or seven games we have been slow out of the blocks, and we wanted to change that in this game.”” Despite Claremont scoring the first goal, UCSD was aggressive, as it reeled off 13 consecutive points after Claremont’s initial score. During the second quarter it looked like the Tritons’ early pressure began to affect Claremont, as UCSD notched three goals to its opponents’ zero. UCSD went into halftime with a commanding 5-1 lead, which it would not relinquish for the rest of the game. After being so thoroughly dominated in the first half, Claremont came out for the second half looking a little disheartened and flummoxed. The Tritons, on the other hand, came out ready to rumble, and that they did. Taking advantage of Claremont’s demeanor, UCSD tacked on four more goals in the third quarter. Just for good measure, it added another four in the fourth quarter to make the final score a demoralizing 13-1 — demoralizing from Claremont’s point of view. UCSD shared the wealth in this contest. Eleven different players scored goals. Some of the proliferation of scoring might have had to do with the Tritons’ new rotation. After every goal, the Tritons are throwing a fresh bunch of players into the pool. “”We want to keep the other team on their heels and really hammer them up and down the court,”” utility man Matthew Ellis said. “”We think we can do that with this rotation.”” Byron Spicer, Paul Motschall, Ken Woodruff and Dave Swinehart threw in a goal each. Jon Samuels continued his explosive standout year with three goals. Samuels leads the Tritons with 63 goals for the year, a ratio of almost one goal per quarter played. Jason Boettner and Hori had outstanding contributions to the win. Boettner, though he did not score a goal, had two assists. Hori scored a goal and had three assists. At goalie, UCSD once again saw two different men between the bars. This was similar to earlier in the season, when it had employed a platoon system for the position, rotating between Glenn Busch and Lance Onken. Later the job went to Busch. Busch and Onken played against Claremont, and each had very good games. Busch had five saves and one goal against, and Onken had four saves and no goals against. The Tritons must now begin to look forward to next Saturday’s match against UC Irvine. In the not-so-distant future comes the Western Water Polo Association Championships, which fall on Nov. 17 to Nov. 19. If UCSD does well and wins, the victory will assure it of a chance to compete at the NCAA Championships in Malibu between Dec. 2 and Dec. 3. With Irvine a top-three team, this match is a definite tattle tape for the Tritons. With a win or a good showing, the Tritons can reaffirm their place in the top echelon of teams. With a bad loss, UCSD will have much work to do to prepare for the season-ending championships. The Irvine game will take place Saturday at Canyonview Pool. Start time is noon. ...

Regular Season Ends On a Low

After every loss, the UCSD men’s soccer team seems to rebound with no problem at all. Leo Der Stepanians/ Guardian After losing to California State University Dominguez Hills and Sonoma State University, the No. 1 and No. 2 seeds respectively in the California Collegiate Athletic Association, in back to back matches, UCSD went on an eight-game streak without a loss, compiling a record of 6-0-2. The great streak came to a halt, however, when they traveled to Cal Poly Pomona to face a talented Buffalo team. Their loss in Pomona displayed their injury woes, as Brady Bernard and Ryan Mizumoto were among those missing. Before the final stretch toward the playoffs, the UCSD men’s soccer team partook in an alumni match on Oct. 28 featuring UCSD soccer players from years past. The older team received a surprise: one of the previous UCSD players, Robert Cramplit, flew all the way from Japan with his wife to play in this game. The game was a great one, ending in a 4-4 tie. “”It was a wonderful event to partake in,”” said head coach Derek Armstrong. “”Seeing previous players from older days mixing with the new talent we have was nice.”” After the Alumni match came United States International University on Oct. 30, the last match for the Tritons before they play rival Sonoma State University on Friday. This game was no easy task. USIU is a Division I school that has won 14 games this year, beating teams with great winning records. The game was a struggle from start to finish. USIU was hot, and its strength and quickness hurt the wounded Tritons. The game ended in a 3-0 victory for USIU, as its dominance could be accredited to their Division I stature. “”They were very good, being more physical and pounding the ball around the field,”” Armstrong said. “”With Brady [Bernard] and both Ryans [Blair and Mizumoto] out, we couldn’t handle them.”” It is obvious to see that the UCSD men’s soccer team is ailing, struggling to find offense and a consistent rhythm. “”We must regroup our team for the championship run,”” Armstrong said. “”We will have Brady Bernard and Ryan Blair back, so we should have all the elements to win.”” While commenting on the Somona State match, Armstrong said he expects a “”good match from both sides and a tight match throughout.”” “”We don’t know if they know about our injuries or not, and I have yet to hear of any major news concerning them,”” Armstrong said. “”If they take us lightly, we have the capability to win the match.”” As for the CCAA championship games the UCSD women’s soccer team plays on Thursday, starting off the postseason. Then on Friday, at a time to be announced, UCSD will face Sonoma State University for a chance to play the No. 1 seed, CSU Dominguez, in the CCAA Championship match. “”Who doesn’t want another shot at Dominguez Hills?”” asked freshman Jeremy Cookson. “”They’re definitely a great team and I’d really like a chance to play them again. But we’ll see. From here out all that matters is the next game. We can’t get ahead of ourselves.”” At the end of it all, Bobby Saadati was the leader in points for the Tritons, amassing 22 points with nine goals and four assists. Though injured, Bernard placed second with nine points on two goals and five assists. UCSD accumulated an overall record of 11-4-2, going 9-3-2 in league play. ...

Women's Volleyball Splits Homestand

The Tritons’ eagerly anticipated homestand fell slightly short of expectations this weekend as they split a pair of California Collegiate Athletic Association matches. Leo Der Stepanians/ Guardian RIMAC Arena hosted the two fierce conference showdowns, which pitted UCSD against Cal State University Stanislaus on Friday night, and Cal State University Bakersfield on Saturday. Friday night, the Tritons thoroughly dominated the visiting Warriors of Stanislaus, sweeping them in three games. The most difficult set was the first, as the two teams went all the way down to the wire before the Tritons could finish Stanislaus off 15-13 and avoid extra points. The next set saw a more composed UCSD meticulously dismantle the Warriors, taking the game 15-9. From there on out, it was easy sailing as the Stanislaus squad folded like a Tyson opponent, essentially packing it in and allowing the Tritons to waltz away with a 15-4 third-game victory and the match as well. Dianne Camarillo led the way for the Blue and Gold, compiling a match-high 10 kills. Leslie Punnelli also had a strong showing Friday night, notching 16 digs in the effort. Jennie Wilson added to the barrage, chipping in with eight kills, while teammates Shannon Hawes and Kathleen Kentz had seven kills apiece. The vanquished Warriors were led by the play of Angie Tribble, who picked up eight kills and 12 digs in the loss. The Tritons came out Saturday night looking for more of the same polished play that had netted them the sweep the night before. It was not in the cards, however, as CSU Bakersfield overpowered UCSD, taking the match in four sets. Perhaps it was fatigue, or maybe the players were looking forward to donning their outfits for some trick-or-treating Tuesday night, but for one reason or another the Tritons could not get it together in this match. They faltered early on, losing the first set 15-12 before giving their most heartfelt performance of the night in the second game. Down 12-4, they rallied back and then fell behind again 14-12. The Tritons would not back down, though, and took it to extra points to win the set 16-14. The inspired play that UCSD exhibited in the second set soon ran out, however, and it went on to drop the final two sets 15-9 and 15-8. Saturday night it just was not there for the Blue and Gold, as it was out-hit by visiting Bakersfield at a 0.213 to 0.035 clip. This defeat marked the first loss of the season at RIMAC Arena for the Tritons. Standout efforts for the Tritons came courtesy of Laura Sinter, who had 16 kills and 16 digs on the night. Punnelli also had a solid night with eight kills and 14 digs, while Jessica Barter was hooking up her teammates all night, picking up 34 assists. With the split over the weekend, the Tritons’ record stands at 14-3 in CCAA play and 20-5 overall. UCSD next heads out to Phoenix where it will lock horns with Grand Canyon University in an important CCAA showdown on Wednesday night that may have postseason ramifications. It will then return home for a two-game headstand, where it will attempt to topple CSU Dominguez Hills and CSU Los Angeles. ...

Tritons Triumph, Win CCAA

The Tritons’ women’s soccer team walked all over Cal Poly Pomona on Friday night 3-1, then came home to defeat Point Loma Nazarene 1-0 in a real squeaker on Saturday. Leo Der Stepanians/ Guardian The Cal Poly game was to decide the California Collegiate Athletic Association championship. Both teams were already assured of meeting in the first round of the playoffs, and this game was for bragging rights. With a win, Cal Poly could claim a share of the CCAA championships. With a Triton loss, UCSD could be in jeopardy of losing its No. 1 ranking in the upcoming CCAA tournament. UCSD came into the game firing on all cylinders with no intention of letting Pomona share its title, and within 50 seconds of the whistle blowing, the Tritons already had a 1-0 lead over the Broncos. Leo Der Stepanians/ Guardian UCSD’s Laura Dooly scored the first goal off a corner kick from teammate Julia Cuder. A scant two minutes later, UCSD increased its lead to 2-0 on a beautiful 22-yard kick from Cuder. At this point in time the Tritons, up 2-0, and only three minutes into the match, hit a bit of a slow spot, at least offensively. For the next 40 minutes of the game, UCSD and the Broncos traded stabs and jabs into each other’s territories to no avail. However, at the 42-minute mark, Cal Poly finally got on the board with a goal by Michelle McConnel. UCSD, like the fifth-ranked team it is, did not let the goal affect it, and 10 minutes later Cindy Dostalek scored on an assist from Cuder to extend the lead back to two, going up 3-1, to cap scoring for the rest of the game. “”The game against Cal Poly was 100 miles per hour the whole game,”” said head coach Brian McManus. Cuder had a great game for the Tritons and was involved in all three Triton scores with two assists and one goal. Pomona’s loss dropped its record to 14-4 overall and 10-4 in league play. The win for UCSD bumped its record to 14-2 overall and 12-2 in league play. The Broncos and the Tritons will meet again on Nov. 2 in the semifinal round of the four-team tournament to decide the CCAA championship. The Tritons returned home on Saturday to face the Crusaders of Point Loma Nazarene. A partisan crowd of just over 1,000 people showed up to watch UCSD wrap up its regular season, and even though the game was not a league game it still had playoff implications, and there was some good action on the field as the Tritons defeated the Crusaders 1-0. “”It was a great atmosphere out there, and it was a tough game also with the rain and everything,”” McManus said. “”Our girls might have been a little tired from the night before.”” It was a tight match from the start and a defensive gem for both sides. The Tritons finally broke through, however, on a goal from Dostalek, who took a through-ball from Jessica Cordova and drove it into the back of the net. The lone goal was all the Tritons needed, as goalie Carolyn Cadei played her first complete game of the season and had two saves for her first collegiate shutout. The two wins this weekend give UCSD a stellar 15-2 regular season record, and a 12-2 record in league. “”These last two games really give us a head of steam going into the playoffs,”” said McManus. By winning their last games the Tritons assure that they will be ranked first in the CCAA tournament and have had a superb season in their freshman year in Division II. ...

Greed and Avarice Rule Our Sports World With an Open Pocketbook

I have a confession to make. I have become disillusioned with professional sports. An avid baseball fan, I didn’t watch one game of the World Series. I haven’t watched a whole pro football game this year. Heck, I barely watch “”Sports Center”” anymore. It’s not because I see football players in the news more than I see them on the field, not because I couldn’t stand to see those damn Yankees win their thousandth championship, and certainly not because I’m busy doing interesting things and don’t have the time. It’s because I can’t make myself watch two characterless teams stumble against each other to win more money. Back in the day, the extra cash the players earned from winning a championship used to mean something. The athletes all wanted that money in order buy a house, a car or to invest it. Nowadays the players can find championship-caliber cash buried in their couches. When the average baseball player makes around $1 million a year, an extra couple thousand is nothing. After being fined for the Piazza fiasco, Roger Clemens probably lost money in the World Series. Yet the players still strive for it, which reveals the greed and avarice of professional sports. The Yankees aren’t a team; they’re a collection of mercenaries hired by the manager to win at all costs. The money cycle perpetuates itself, so the richest team in baseball wins more money to wallow in, while the small-market teams fall even further behind. An examination of individual players does not present much hope. The players, especially the superstars, are important because they represent the team. It’s almost as if the media has realized that the terms “”Yankee,”” “”Padre,”” “”Charger,”” or “”Laker”” have lost all meaning. Sure, there’s the history of each franchise, but with athletes hopping from one team to another each year, it’s practically impossible for a team to establish an identity. I mean, look at the NBA — practically half the league got traded this year. Overnight, the Orlando Magic became a force to be reckoned with by acquiring Grant Hill and Tracy McGrady, while the mediocre teams got even worse. These athletes, instead of differentiating themselves from the owners, have subscribed to their system. With a few notable exceptions, most pros have sold their pride for pieces of green paper. Instead of focusing on the sports they play, pro athletes today are concerned with more than just the game. The most blatant example of this is the commercials athletes make. Turn on the TV and they’re in ads for soup, dot-com companies, even real estate. These commercials have absolutely no point other than to garner humor by showcasing the athlete’s terrible acting skills. I could understand if the athletes needed money, but when the league minimum salary is a couple hundred thousand, I’m pretty sure the athletes aren’t strapped for cash. Some pros have even dabbled in the fields of music and acting, which I can’t understand. I’ll admit, some of them have real talent (some have no talent), but if they are good enough to be bored with their sport, then they shouldn’t be among the privileged few allowed to play a professional sport for a career. So where do you go to see athletes chasing dreams and glory, instead of dollar bills? Why, you have to look no further than college teams. While big colleges have begun to focus on individuals as well, they still remain more team oriented than the professional leagues. These athletes aren’t concerned with big contracts, nor trying to fulfill incentives — in fact, quite the opposite. They use sports as an outlet to retreat from the pressures of class and social life, while the pros have no such concept. Whether you believe it, college athletes have more of an incentive than pros to play hard. Multi-millionaire superstars know they will not be benched no matter how badly they play, since it will be equivalent to the franchise admitting they had made a multi-milliondollar mistake. No — first the coaches will be fired, and then the manager, and then maybe the superstar will be traded for a couple hundred thousand less than what he was earning. College athletes, on the other hand, are quite aware of the fact that they can be replaced any time. They are reminded every day that someone is sitting on the bench behind them, waiting for the opportunity to prove they can start. The starters in college play their hearts out every day in order to ensure they’ll be playing tomorrow. I encourage all the readers to go out and watch some college athletic events, where you’ll find pain, sweat, emotion, blood, tears and most importantly, heart. ...

Cal Poly Pomona Sours UCSD's Winning Streak

The UCSD men’s soccer team rode into the Cal Poly Pomona match on a hot streak, unbeaten in its last eight matches. The Broncos came into the match with a record of 7-8-3 overall and 4-6-3 in league play. The Tritons were 11-2-2 overall, and 9-2-2 in league play. With the loss of Triton midfielder Ryan Mizumoto, UCSD had to step up on the field and make something happen. This was the match to determine where their weaknesses were, leading into the CCAA championships and hopefully the NCAA Division II championship match. While playing well, the outcome was not good for the Tritons. Pomona prevailed in a close 2-1 game to end league play matches for the 2000 season. Pomona scored early, with two goals within the first 10 minutes of play. John Picco found the net first, and a Pacual Villegas goal was assisted by Theo Hetherington to break things open. The game was 2-0 going into halftime, and UCSD’s Daniel Appel came out and scored an early second-half goal to make things interesting. From then on, no team found the net, and the game ended 2-1. The Tritons only had three shots on goal, compared to eight by the Broncos. “”We were all off,”” said Triton midfielder Sean Summers. “”We couldn’t get anything going early, and the conditions made it tougher. This was the last league match for Pomona, so they sent off all their seniors and played all of them. They were pumped, and we couldn’t play against their enthusiasm.”” UCSD must find their stride in time for playoffs. Hopefully they will be able to look back to their eight game win streak and recapture the feel they had there. The Tritons finished with a league record of 11-3-2. This sets them up as either a No. 2 or No. 3 seed in the CCAA Championships beginning Nov. 2. UCSD will play on Nov. 3 against Sonoma State, a team the Tritons lost to earlier this season. The winner will then go on to face the CCAA favorite, the first-ranked CSU Dominguez Hills. ...