Sports

UCSD: CCAA Champs!

CARSON, Calif., — You cannot stop the UCSD women’s soccer team; You can only hope to contain them. Leo Der Stepanians/ Guardian The Tritons yet again proved their dominance yesterday, winning the California Collegiate Athletic Association championship with a 1-0 victory over Sonoma State University at Toro Field. UCSD took the lead in the 18th minute of the first half. The Tritons’ Julia Cuder booted a corner kick past the Cossacks goalkeeper Kara Stout. “”We knew we were pretty dominant on corner kicks because we have scored a lot from them, so every time we do get one, everybody gets pumped up and excited,”” Cuder said. “”On every kick I just try to drive it in. On that one, Liz [Hughes] made an awesome up-post run and she distracted them and it just went in.”” Stout was a formidable opponent, having been named an NCAA Division II All-American last year. Against the tritons, she was little more than human. “”We came out today wanting to show them we could play up with them, if not above them, and I think we did that,”” Cuder said. The rest of the first half was filled with back-and-forth play, with both squads traveling the length of the field in an attempt to strike blood. The second half saw more of the same until the final 20 minutes. That is when Sonoma unleashed its biggest threat. UCSD goalkeeper Kami Poma came through for the Tritons, making save after save during clutch time, sealing her team’s win and the ensuing conference title “”I thought we went to sleep a little bit in the last 10 or 15 minutes, but that’s going to happen when a team takes chances and throws bodies forward,”” said UCSD head coach Brian McManus. “”Everything just becomes 100 miles an hour. That’s going to happen. You’re going to have to accept that and get on with it. “” Earlier this year, Sonoma and UCSD got together for a rumble at UCSD. The Tritons were outplayed for most of the game but pulled out the win 1-0 in overtime. “”Sonoma is a powerhouse up north,”” Cuder said. “”The first time we played them, we were not scared, but unsure of what was going to happen. The first game they dominated we just weren’t playing our game.”” There were many differences between yesterday’s match and the one earlier this year. “”We decided this time just to play,”” McManus said. “”The last time we played up there they were by far the better team. Today, it was always going to be a tight game. There was no way someone was going to run away and score a barrel of goals, and I thought we did reasonably well.”” The Tritons played in Division III last year, winning the national championship. This year, they moved to Division II. “”The girls worked their backsides off today,”” McManus said. “”It’s been a hard year. They’ve got to keep proving themselves. Everyone wants to beat them. Nobody wants a team coming up from Division II — no scholarships — to win the championships.”” Next up for UCSD is the first round of the NCAA Division II Tournament, to be held this weekend, time and place to be announced. The Tritons hope to continue making waves. “”Our coach is amazing,”” Cuder said. “”That’s all you have to say. He takes whatever team he has and he makes a winning formula out of it and this just shows it. You can’t say enough about him. “”We came back from winning last year in Division III, and we wanted to come this far and we knew could do it. Coming out here and beating teams like Sonoma, [which] is an amazing team, and doing this — I just can’t say enough about him.”” ...

A Tough Weekend Trips up Triton Water Polo

UCSD allowed nine straight goals in the second half to visiting UC Irvine, losing to the third-ranked Anteaters 10-2. Leo Der Stepanians/ Guardian After a defensive gem of a first half, the score was tied 1-1 and it looked like the eighth-ranked Tritons were going to be able to give Irvine a run for its money. “”I don’t think I have ever seen a quarter go 0-0 like the first one did,”” said triton head coach Denny Harper That was absolutely incredible and our guys really did a great job out there.”” Starting the second half, UCSD even managed to take a brief lead on a Justin Wylie goal. That, however, was all she wrote, as the Anteaters took control of the game from that point, and in effect, shut UCSD down at both ends of the pool. “”The wheels just seemed to come off near the end of the third quarter,”” Harper said. “”We were leaning into out-front court offense and Irvine was taking advantage of it.”” The game was really a story of two halves. The first half saw perfect execution by UCSD, at least defensively, as they stymied almost every attempt of Irvine’s to make inroads into their territory. “”We came out more aggressive than we have in the past couple of weeks,”” UCSD goalie Glenn Busch said. “”We were able to hold them in the first half.”” The only goal the Anteaters could manage in the first half came at that 5:24 mark of the second quarter. The Tritons were not down for long, as two minutes later Justin Wylie, who scored both Triton goals on the day, tossed one in to even the score. The second half was a disaster compared to the first two quarters. UCSD seemed to go into a free-fall with nothing to stop them except the final whistle. After scoring the first goal of the half, mental breakdowns plagued UCSD, as they allowed nine straight unanswered goals. “”There were some bad individual mental breakdowns in the game,”” Harper said. “”This is something we will work on right up until we leave for Hawaii.”” While Irvine took its game to another level, UCSD floundered, searching for the form that had it ranked as high as fifth earlier in the year. The Tritons could not seem to get on track offensively in the second half and their offensive ineptitude led to the Anteaters’ counterattack and created opportunities for Irvine that just should not have been there. “”The team played well today and every aspect of the game went well,”” Harper said. “”The only problem we really had was allowing the Irvine counterattack to take over the game in the second half.”” With the loss, UCSD’s record drops to 17-8 and the Anteaters improve to 15-5. The Tritons must look forward to the Western Water Polo Association Championships two weekends from now. To be held in Honolulu, it is of utmost importance that UCSD have an excellent showing there and win in order to gain a berth into the NCAA tournament to be held Dec. 2 through Dec. 3 in Malibu, Calif. UCSD also plays Friday in a warm-up match for championships against the local “”old man’s”” club, Sunset San Diego. Sunset counts many former UCSD players among its ranks and coach Harper thinks they can give the Triton’s a run for their money. The game is at Canyonview Pool on Nov. 10 at 6 p.m. ...

Tritons Strong at Regionals

Last Friday at Prado Park in Chino, Calif., the UCSD cross country teams turned in strong group performances at the NCAA Division II Regionals. The Triton men secured an impressive fourth-place finish out of 13 teams, with an average time of 35:07.2 in the 10,000-meter course. The UC Davis team finished first with an average time of 33:23.4. The UCSD women’s team also placed well, earning eighth place out of 18 teams. Its runners had an average time of 25.20.9 in their 6,000-meter course, while the first place team, Central Washington, averaged a time of 23:47.8 en route to victory. Neither Triton squad had any individual place in the top 20. However several of their young runners ran well. Hosted by Cal Poly Pomona, the event featured teams from UC Davis, Cal State University Chico, Humboldt State, the University of Alaska-Anchorage, Western Washington University, Cal Poly, Hawaii-Pacific University, Central Washington University, St. Martin’s Abbey, Montana State University-Billings, Cal State University Los Angeles and San Francisco State for the men’s division. Men’s squad freshmen Julian Nathan and Neil Kalra had the fastest times with 34:48 and 35:21 to place 21st and 30th, respectively. On the women’s side, sophomore Audrey Sung and freshman Lillian Gardiner turned out the top performances for the Tritons, with their times of 24:17 and 24:58, earning them 24th and 43rd place, respectively. Central Washington, Davis, Cal State Chico, Seattle Pacific, Cal State Los Angeles, Cal State Stanislaus, Humboldt State, Sonoma State, Alaska-Anchorage, Cal State Dominguez Hills, Western Washington, Cal State Bakersfield, San Francisco State, Cal Poly, Cal State San Bernardino, St. Martin’s and Montana State-Billings competed in the women’s division. The men’s race had over 90 runners, while the women’s race featured over 120 runners. The regionals will wrap up on Monday, with the championship being held at 11 a.m. in Chino. ...

Should We Have Pity For Strawberry?

The legendary Darryl Strawberry — he is one of those “”what might have been”” kind of guys. His numbers during his early days with the Mets were outstanding. He was on pace to destroy many career home run marks, including the total career home run mark. On pace, that is. At a young age, he was part of a World Series championship team, the 1986 Mets. He later went on to play for the Los Angeles Dodgers, signing for what was, at the time, an insane amount of money. Strawberry was a future Hall-of-Famer and a perennial All Star. What happened? It is hard to say exactly what happened, but it culminated last week. Strawberry, suffering from a double whammy of colon cancer and cocaine addiction, revealed that he would prefer to be dead. It is a sad thing to read when a baseball hero, a one-time unmistakable figure (for all the right reasons) falls to the point of suicide. The question is whether we should feel sorry for him. It is almost natural to feel sorry for him. It is natural to feel for someone who has fallen to the lowest depths of life. Killing oneself is not a laughing matter. It is something to take seriously, no matter who it is. Then, upon further consideration of Strawberry’s life, why should we feel sorry for him? I look at it this way: He has had everything handed to him, has been given numerous second chances which he has squandered, and has just given up. After being the king of the baseball world, Strawberry fell just as fast as he rose. Tax problems were only one part of it. There was also the cocaine addiction. Cocaine kills a person physically, emotionally and mentally. Despite all of this, the Straw man was given repeated second chances. It’s disgusting. If anyone else were found with coke as much as Strawberry has, that person would have been placed in jail for years, perhaps never to be seen again. Not so if it’s a star baseball player. So some team gives Strawberry a chance, he gets caught with coke, gets a slap on the wrist along with some “”rehab,”” and waits for some other team to pick him up. It has been going back and forth this way for awhile. He has been given every opportunity to bounce back, to get his life together, yet he keeps using drugs. Colon cancer, too, is no joke. Strawberry is suffering from this disease like many others in the world. Straw, unlike the masses who also have this cancer, has had every opportunity to fight it. He has access to the best doctors with the best treatment. He has made progress against the disease, but now he seems to have given up. Strawberry is a tragic character, of which Shakespeare himself would be in awe. While it is easy to feel sorry for his addictions and for his disease, it is also reasonable to be angry at the repeated second chances and the opportunities he has squandered. ...

UCSD club Sports

SKI TEAM The UCSD water skiing team has had some rough water as of late. Earlier this month, the team lost one of its own when Dustin Newell died in an automobile accident in route to an event in Phoenix. This weekend, the team regrouped to participate in the National Collegiate Water Ski Association Championships at Mission Bay. The event was dedicated to their fallen comrade. On the men’s side, UC Davis’ Eric Peterson won the individual competition, narrowly beating out UC Santa Barbara’s Mike Buckle. The Davis men also squeaked past UCLA to capture first place in the trick and jump categories. UCSD finished second overall in the competition, 80 points behind first-place Davis. The UCSD women did better than the men, taking the women’s team overall title. Senior Kikki Kennedy had a stellar day, launching for a school record 81-foot jump to take the jumping category. She also grabbed second in trick and slalom. Kim Blackwell of San Diego State was tops in the trick and slalom categories, edging out Kennedy. As a tribute to Newell, the eight competing schools stopped for a moment of silence and spread flowers across the slalom course. ICE HOCKEY The UCSD ice hockey team hit the ice against Cal State Long Beach Oct. 21 for its first game of the season. UCSD, coming off their Pacific Coast Hockey Association Championship, looks for another big season this year. Long Beach, which has always been a force, also looks to have a good team this season. In its first matchup of the young season, UCSD got the best of their rivals, downing Long Beach 5-2. In the first period, UCSD goalkeeper Scott Friedman was a wall, not allowing a single Long Beach score. On offense, Steven Cohen and Casey Kempner each logged goals for a comfortable early 2-0 lead. Friedman took the rest of the night off, but his contributions in the first period paid dividends. Keith Davis added a goal for UCSD in the second period, giving his team a 3-1 lead that proved too much for their opponents. UCSD’s defense held strong, allowing only one more goal. Davis and Cohen each tacked on another goal, sealing their team’s victory at 5-2. The high from the victory quickly faded the following Friday when UCSD fell to Cal State Fullerton 7-4. Fullerton practically rented out the penalty box during the first period. Despite that, the UCSD offense could not capitalize on the power plays, scoring only two goals. The defense could not shut down Fullerton and the teams ended the first period tied at two. During the second period, Fullerton scored two more goals, but UCSD’s Davis came through with two of his own, knotting the game at four heading into the final period. The third period, on the other hand, was a different story. Fullerton got out of the penalty box and onto the ice, scoring three unanswered goals to win the match 7-4. UCSD’s next game is against Santa Monica College on Friday before facing Cal State Fullerton on Saturday. SURF TEAM The UCSD surf team had its first event of the season, bogging down at Blacks Beach this past weekend. The surfing conditions were poor, with only 1-2 foot waves greeting surfers from 23 teams from all over Southern California. UCSD’s A team finished sixth overall and the B team took 10th. The squad sported many new members and looks to improve with experience. Holly Beck and Loryn Wilson were the top women surfers for UCSD. Beck and Wilson swept the first and second overall finishers, respectively. Ryan Eckoff was the man for UCSD, finishing fourth overall for UCSD. Britt Joyce and Cullen Pagaduan placed third and fourth, respectively, in the body-boarding category. The next contest for the Tritons is a ways off, coming Jan. 28 at Surfers Point in Ventura, Calif. DANCE SPORT The DanceSport team, which was previously known as the Ballroom Dance team, competed in the Pacific DanceSports Championships at Universal Studio’s Hilton Tower in Hollywood on Saturday. The summer team, led by captain Jonathan Marion and coach Peter Edwards, had a great showing. Made up of four hard-working couples, the summer team finished second place overall in the Collegiate/Formation Team Scholarship Competition. The competition featured several of the top teams, including defending national champion Brigham Young University. Various amounts of scholarship money to help support each team was up for grabs at the Pacific DanceSport Championships, depending on the teams’ finish. The four couples for UCSD were Johnny Gutierrez and Janelle Bouey, Marion and Renee Link, Peter Hanrisuk and Cecily Carnahan, and Suvro Goswami and Dana Pugh. UCSD’s team is inexperienced but hopes to improve. Their second-place finish behind BYU earned them $300 in scholarship money. WEEKEND EVENTS Friday, Nov. 3 * Ice Hockey vs. Santa Monica College at the UTC Ice Arena, at 10:15 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 4 * Men’s rugby alumni game at Warren field, 1 p.m. * Ice hockey vs. Cal State Fullerton, 10:15 p.m. * Men’s lacrosse at Loyola Marymount University, all day * Women’s rugby at Stanford’s Rookie Tournament at Stanford, all day. * Cycling at Cal Poly Pomona, all day Saturday and Sunday. –compiled by Robert Fulton, Sports Editor ...

Soccer Gearing up for Playoffs

Division II competition is much tougher than Division III competition. Don’t tell that to the UCSD soccer teams. Both squads, storming through impressive regular seasons, are stepping into their first ever California Collegiate Athletic Association Championship tournament this weekend. The women’s team captured the CCAA Southern Division after sporting a 12-2 CCAA record, 14-2 overall. The regular season title earned the women a first-place seed in the tournament. They face Cal Poly Pomona on Thursday at 1:30 p.m. in the first round. If victorious, the women will head to the CCAA finals on Sunday at 11 a.m. The men rumbled through the regular season, garnering a record of 9-3-2 in the CCAA and 11-4-2 overall. Now they must face Sonoma State in the first round of the playoffs on Friday. If they pass that test, Cal State Dominguez Hills lies ahead on Sunday at 1:30 p.m. Cal State Dominguez Hills is hosting the event. ...

Sports in Our Area in Bad Shape

Southern California sports have seen better days. The dearth of any sporting franchises that could even be labeled as competitive have the SoCal sports fans in search of a winner, or at least a team that is not excruciatingly painful to watch. Our baseball teams, the Padres, Dodgers and Angels, are all toiling away in mediocrity. The Pad squad is simply biding their time until they can cash in on their new stadium and start making some real dough. The Dodgers, with their preposterously high payroll, paid a lot for what they got, which was garbage, and the poor Angels will always be a second-tier organization. Our sole football franchise, the Chargers, can barely get to the line of scrimmage without tripping over their own feet or embarrassing themselves in some other pathetic fashion. Of course, while this tomfoolery is going on, our two old football teams, the defending Superbowl-champion St. Louis Rams, and the Oakland Raiders with their knife-wielding misfit fans, have compiled stellar records this season. Our two hockey teams, well um, eh whatever. Since Gretzky left the Kings I’ve pretty much lost interest. There is no way I am supporting some big, multinational, corporate conglomerate entity’s team, especially if said team is named after one of the conglomerations that owns the rights to awful films like “”The Mighty Ducks.”” That is why every SoCal sports fan worth his salt is eagerly anticipating the upcoming NBA season. I, for one, am looking forward to seeing Donald Sterling’s Clippers, voted last year as the worst franchise in sporting history, come into their own, with a fresh crop of young players whose starting five may possess less collective years than our UCSD men’s basketball squad. Of course there is that other team that plays in the Staples Center, who are not only competent, but pretty much tops in the class as their league championship last season can attest. This season, the Lakers look to be even better with some key new personnel, the departures of a whiny chump or two, and another season of experience in regular and postseason play. Isaiah Rider is a welcome addition to the purple and gold, as he adds some thug mentality and scoring ability. Horace Grant, acquired in the three-team deal that sent the token white boy Travis Knight and outside shooter Glen Rice (and his wife) to the Knickerbockers, adds 13 years of experience and some good ol’ fashioned whoopass to the Laker team. Mark Madsen, the fresh-faced rookie who was the Lakers’ first round draft pick (29th overall) in the latest draft will also be given the chance to contribute. The Lake Show kicked off its 2000-2001 campaign Tuesday night against their fierce old Western rival, the Portland Trailblazers and showed that their success will be more than short-lived. Shaq-daddy knocked down 36 points, and the Kobemeister had 14, while Rider, the new kid on the block, chipped in with 13. One important thing, however, to keep in mind is that if you were not down with the Lakers before, it would be morally and philosophically wrong to hop onto the old bandwagon at this juncture. You should be able to remember the post-ShowTime, pre-Lake Show days when the only real reason to tune into Laker broadcasts was to hear the sweet schtick of Laker announcer Chick Hearn and watch poor Del Harris squirm in the harsh big city spotlight. Recently, it seems as if everyone is a die-hard Laker fan, yet hasn’t a clue as to who Nick Van Exel is, or, in some extreme cases, what the Great Western Forum was. But take heart all you true fans out there. One of these days, perhaps six to 10 years from now, the Lake Show will end, and the team will once again sink into mediocrity, as all Southern Californian teams do. Then it will be all yours once again. ...

Claremont Spanked by the Tritons 13-1

UCSD water polo jumped back in the saddle in a big way on Sunday when it shellacked visiting Claremont College, 13-1. Lyon Liew/ Guardian After a dry spell in the win column, which included a disappointing, befuddled showing at the NorCal Tournament in Stockton, the Tritons were primed and ready to resume their winning ways. The first quarter saw UCSD attack relentlessly with pressure on both sides of the ball, confounding and confusing Claremont goalies in a 2-1 deficit when the quarter ended. “”We were looking to reverse a trend,”” said Kellan Hori, driver for the Tritons. “”In the last six or seven games we have been slow out of the blocks, and we wanted to change that in this game.”” Despite Claremont scoring the first goal, UCSD was aggressive, as it reeled off 13 consecutive points after Claremont’s initial score. During the second quarter it looked like the Tritons’ early pressure began to affect Claremont, as UCSD notched three goals to its opponents’ zero. UCSD went into halftime with a commanding 5-1 lead, which it would not relinquish for the rest of the game. After being so thoroughly dominated in the first half, Claremont came out for the second half looking a little disheartened and flummoxed. The Tritons, on the other hand, came out ready to rumble, and that they did. Taking advantage of Claremont’s demeanor, UCSD tacked on four more goals in the third quarter. Just for good measure, it added another four in the fourth quarter to make the final score a demoralizing 13-1 — demoralizing from Claremont’s point of view. UCSD shared the wealth in this contest. Eleven different players scored goals. Some of the proliferation of scoring might have had to do with the Tritons’ new rotation. After every goal, the Tritons are throwing a fresh bunch of players into the pool. “”We want to keep the other team on their heels and really hammer them up and down the court,”” utility man Matthew Ellis said. “”We think we can do that with this rotation.”” Byron Spicer, Paul Motschall, Ken Woodruff and Dave Swinehart threw in a goal each. Jon Samuels continued his explosive standout year with three goals. Samuels leads the Tritons with 63 goals for the year, a ratio of almost one goal per quarter played. Jason Boettner and Hori had outstanding contributions to the win. Boettner, though he did not score a goal, had two assists. Hori scored a goal and had three assists. At goalie, UCSD once again saw two different men between the bars. This was similar to earlier in the season, when it had employed a platoon system for the position, rotating between Glenn Busch and Lance Onken. Later the job went to Busch. Busch and Onken played against Claremont, and each had very good games. Busch had five saves and one goal against, and Onken had four saves and no goals against. The Tritons must now begin to look forward to next Saturday’s match against UC Irvine. In the not-so-distant future comes the Western Water Polo Association Championships, which fall on Nov. 17 to Nov. 19. If UCSD does well and wins, the victory will assure it of a chance to compete at the NCAA Championships in Malibu between Dec. 2 and Dec. 3. With Irvine a top-three team, this match is a definite tattle tape for the Tritons. With a win or a good showing, the Tritons can reaffirm their place in the top echelon of teams. With a bad loss, UCSD will have much work to do to prepare for the season-ending championships. The Irvine game will take place Saturday at Canyonview Pool. Start time is noon. ...