Sports

UCSD club Sports

CYCLING TEAM The best riders from a number of southern California colleges competed at Clark Ranch in the first horse show of the season. The top riders from Cal Poly Pomona, USC and USF joined riders from UCSD, bringing together over 60 riders to compete in 80 events. Cal Poly won the Saturday competition and USD was tops during Sunday’s action. UCSD had a number of strong performances from their women riders.. Freshman Heather Thurgood had the most impressive performance for UCSD. This was her first competition at the collegiate level, but she did not act like it was. Thurgood took the High Point Rider Championship by placing second in the intermediate equitation over fences, and first in the intermediate equitation on the flat. This combination made her top point-earner of all the riders. Lisa Calvina placed second and third in the Open over fences on Saturday and Sunday, respectively. Katie Bradly placed second in the novice category over fences and Zoe Jarocki finished just behind her for third. Morgan Messing placed third in the novice flat on Saturday and second on Sunday. Cindy Hung took second in the beginning walk/trot. “”I’m out to do the best I can so I can help the team,”” Hung said. UCSD has a very young team this year, with only five returning riders. “”We have a couple of new members to the team,”” Hung said. “”We have a couple of strong captains.”” Next up for UCSD will be a show in Pomona Nov. 18 to Nov. 19. WEEKEND EVENTS Friday, Nov. 17 * Ice Hockey vs. Sacramento State at UTC, 10:15 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18 * Cycling at Eucalyptus Grove, all day. * Women’s Rugby, Scrum by the Sea Tournament, Warren Field, all day. * Equestrian at Pomona, all day. * Men’s rugby vs. University of Nevada at Nevada. — compiled by Robert Fulton, Sports Editor ...

Up the Mountain They Go

It will not be until the UCSD men’s basketball team steps onto the hardwood for the first time ever as a California Collegiate Athletic Association Division II competitor that coach Greg Lanthier and his squad will fully know what to expect this season. “”This year will be a year of assessment, and we will not really know what we need to do to succeed and make strides until we actually play a few games,”” Lanthier said. “”We will be adjusting to a whole new game, one that is more physical and more athletic, with bigger, faster players. We are going to go out and play and recognize our weaknesses and look to improve on them. But we will not know what they are until we play.”” The CCAA Ranking Committee, composed of league coaches, appears to recognize quite a few weaknesses in the Triton team, ranking them dead last (tied with San Francisco State), for 11th out of the 12 CCAA teams. The Golden Eagles from Cal State Los Angeles, who tied last year for second place in the CCAA, received six first-place votes to garner the No. 1 pre-season seed. Defending CCAA champions, Cal State San Bernadino was ranked second, with traditionally solid Cal State Bakersfield third and six-time NCAA post-season participant UC Davis ranked fourth. The team that went 5-20 last season in Division III play has a chance to outplay that ranking this season, though, and its ability to do so will probably hinge on the play and progression of its key freshman players. The 15-member Triton team is composed of ten freshmen — four true freshmen and six red shirts. Ryan Swed, a true freshman out of Tempe, Ariz., will definitely be looked to by Lanthier to make a contribution, as will Roger Curtis and Ryan Rikansrud. Out of the six red shirts, Cameron Jackson, the 6-foot-1-inch guard out of Tustin High, will be an impact player for the Tritons this year. “”Cameron is the top of the class among the freshman guys, he is an exceptional player, and will start for us and get a lot of playing time,”” Lanthier said. Erik Ramp, the 6-foot-1-inch, 200 pound guard, whom Lanthier describes as a very big, very physical and very athletic player, will also get a lot of looks if he can come back from his recent knee surgery. Mike Roberts and C.J. Duffaut will also challenge for time for the Tritons this year. Of the returning players, the Tritons will once again look to 6-foot-6-inch forward Sam Higgins, the three-year starter, who averaged 15.4 points per game and 4.8 rebounds per game last year, while compiling 61 three-pointers over the duration of the season. Joining him on the floor will be the team’s sole junior, Nick Christenson, a 6-foot-2-inch guard, who averaged 9.2 points and 3.0 assists per game last season, and 5-foot-11-inch senior guard Michael Martin, who averaged 9.9 points and 2.6 assists per game. Sophomore center Clark Goolsby, who at 6 feet 7 inches, 220 pounds is the Tritons’ biggest player, will also be a key element in the Tritons’ success this season. These returning players will be looked to for leadership on and off the court this season by the young Triton team, as leadership will be very important to a team that not only lacks experience, but is also making the jump to Division II play. That is why this season will be a period of adjustment for the blue and gold. “”This season will be a season of development for us, as we know we need to get bigger, faster and stronger, but there will also be many other things that will need to be done for us to be competitive and succeed at the D-II level,”” Lanthier said. “”We will have to adjust to the more physical style of play and make other adjustments as the season goes on.”” The adjustment made by the freshman players will be especially important to the Tritons’ chances on the court. “”We have a lot of freshman players this year, but they are all quality players and have the ability to make big strides this season,”” Lanthier said. “”We call it the ‘freshman factor,’ which is the ability of these guys, who will be given opportunities to mature and play, to make an impact.”” The Tritons open their season with a throwdown versus cross-town rival San Diego State. The Aztecs are one of three Division I teams that UCSD will face this season in light of its jump to Division II. “”Playing the Division I teams will make this advancement all the more easier,”” Lanthier said. “”Out of our five non-CCAA games, three will be against Division I teams, which I think will help us out in our move to Division II,”” he said. “”Playing these very good teams will not only make us better as a team but will also make it easier to face the Division II teams with the added experience of playing some of the top competition around.”” Nor are the benefits of facing off against SDSU lost on Lanthier. “”Playing San Diego State is really a no-lose situation for us,”” he said. “”Even if we don’t win the game, it’s great for the community and for us to be able to get some valuable experience in a nice atmosphere.”” The Tritons will begin their quest for experience Saturday night at 7 p.m. at San Diego State’s Cox Arena. Make your way down Interstate 5 to Interstate 8 and check out UCSD as it looks to put the smack down on those rascally Aztecs and prepare for its inaugural Division II season. ...

What to do with Slammin' Sammy

All of Chicago is abuzz these days with talks about the Cubs trading their brightest star, outfielder Sammy Sosa, to the Texas Rangers. Fans are outraged, and Cubs owner Andy MacPhail, trying to maintain some semblance of control, keeps lying through his teeth, saying that no trade will be made. The trade would likely be a five-for-one swap, with the Cubs getting players such as outfielder Gabe Kapler, relief pitcher Jeff Zimmerman Ruben Mateo and possibly additional minor league prospects. From the Cubs’ point of view, I think this would be a steal. They have so many holes that Sosa can’t possibly fill them all by himself. A big trade for their star might have a similar effect on them as the trading of Herschel Walker had on the Dallas Cowboys back in 1989. That trade was directly responsible for bringing Troy Aikman and Emmitt Smith to the team, the duo that caused the Dallas dynasty in the 1990s. This kind of affect was also felt by the Colorado Avalance when they traded Eric Lindros and recieved draft picks that would eventually produce Peter Forsberg. That said, should the Cubs make the deal? Yes. That is, if Sosa wants them to make it. First of all, because Sosa has been in the major leagues for 10 years and spent the last five of them with the same team, he has the power to block any proposed trade. Trying to trade him somewhere he doesn’t want to go would be futile. More importantly, the Cubs owe it to Sosa to send him somewhere that he wants to go. When Sosa hit 66 home runs in 1998, and again the following year when he hit 63, he virtually carried the Cubs and all of baseball on his back. The Major Leagues were still reeling from the strike that wiped out the 1994 World Series, and Sosa, with the help of Mark McGwire, brought baseball back from the brink of utter catastrophe. The way that Sosa and McGwire composed themselves throughout the race to knock down Roger Maris’ immortalized single-season home run record was both an honor to watch and a testament to the character of the two men. So now it is time to pay Sosa back. The only problem is that nobody seems to know what he wants to do. Last season, he basically demanded a trade, and later in the year he said he wanted to end his career, where he started, in Texas. Sammy, it makes it hard for people to honor you by doing your will when you can’t resolve what it is. When Sosa finally decides what he wants, it should be given to him with haste. Baseball and the Cubs owe him at least that much. ...

Triton Playoff Fever!

Men’s water polo has endured 24 games this year. All its trials and tribulations — from beating then-No. 1-ranked Cal to its disappointing performance at the Northern California Tournament at Stockton — will be for naught if it does not perform well this weekend at the Western Water Polo Association Championships in Honolulu. Lyon Liew/ Guardian The winner of the tournament will get an automatic berth in the NCAA tournament, held Dec. 2 and 3 in Malibu, and a chance to play in the national championship. Coached by Denny Harper, the Tritons started off the season on an incredible tear, winning 15 of their first 18 games and attaining a ranking as high as fifth in the nation. Since then, the team has been in a mini-slump, losing five of its last seven games, but is still ranked eighth in the nation. The Tritons are not losing to just anybody, as all of their losses have come against excellent teams. They have fallen to CSU Long Beach twice, and to Cal, UC Irvine and Pepperdine once. These teams are in the top 10 nationally. What made the Tritons so successful earlier in the season was their ability to jump on teams quickly. By aggressively taking an early lead, the Tritons put other teams on their heels and from there they let their stellar defense take over. In their mini-slump, they have been falling behind early and have been going into the late quarters at a three or four goal deficit. The Tritons then play the teams shot-for-shot, or even outplay them, but their efforts are to no avail, as such a big lead is usually too large to surmount. Why are opposing teams getting out and ahead so early? The Tritons have been making few mental mistakes. They have not been getting back on the counterattack and have been letting their opponents roam freely. These mistakes were not made earlier in the year when they were beating the best teams in the nation. If the Tritons want to compete at the NCAA tournament, they will have to stop making those mistakes now. Many players led the Tritons to the WWPA tournament, Jonathan Samuels first and foremost. He has been an intimidating presence for the Tritons all season long and gives other teams something to worry about. Samuels leads the team with 46 goals and has been solid all year long. If he has a good tournament, the Tritons are likely to follow. Jason Boettner has been a great distributor and defensive presence for UCSD. During the regular season, he dished out 23 assists and recorded 26 steals, tops on the team. Vladimir Djopic has been a great asset for the Tritons, as he has become a versatile utility man. In the pool he is able to go inside or outside with equal effectiveness. Important in the tournament is the performance of goalie Glenn Busch. So far, he has had a very good year, but he will have to be at the top of his game in Honolulu to help the Tritons make it through. Most vital to the Tritons is that they play as a team in the tournament. Harper has repeatedly stressed this point during the season. Each part of the team must work together in order for UCSD play up to its potential. Eight teams from the 12-team WWPA will compete at the Honolulu tournament. The Tritons are the highest-ranked team in the WWPA and are favorites going into the tournament. Nevertheless, competition in Honolulu will be tough. For example, the U.S. Air Force Academy, despite its rank, always fights hard for the win, and may be a tough match for the Tritons. If the Tritons win the tournament, they will then move on to the four-team NCAA tournament. The competition will consist of the winner of the WWPA, the Eastern Conference and the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation. The last spot is an at-large berth, which is likely to go to an MPSF team, as that division fields multiple top 10 teams such as Cal, UC Irvine and USC. ...

Tritons Want to Put the Ball on the Floor

At the helm for the Triton squad is Judy Malone, who is starting her 25th year as the Tritons’ head coach. She compiled a record of 20 wins and 6 losses last year in Division III, and her overall record is 341-261, a winning percentage of 56.6 percent. This will be her first year as a Division II head coach. “”Our competition level will increase a notch as we move up a division,”” Malone said. “”There was a large disparity of matches in Division III; some teams were tough, while some teams were walk-overs. In Division II, each game will be a battle. There are no more easy games.”” As for the team itself, there are only three seniors on the squad, with five returnees from last year. The team has seven freshmen playing this year, with one junior transfer. With such a young team, the Tritons have some inexperience, but they still hope to make their mark in their first year at Division II. “”We were expecting 11 players back, but that was not the case,”” Malone said. “”We do, however, have four of our five top scorers back. This should keep us in games, and allow the other players to develop as the season rolls along.”” Forward Kimberly Neil led the Tritons last year with 11.6 points per game and 6.4 rebounds per game. Center Renee Hudec held the team lead in total rebounds in the season. Forward Genevieve Ruvalt had the most assists and steals for the Tritons, which maintains this triumvirate in their strong starting lineup. With this talent up front, the freshmen players must step up in their respective positions so that every element is on point. One of the most important parts of a team is how well its different parts fit together. “”We are truly optimistic about the upcoming year,”” Malone said. “”We expect a lot out of players like juniors Maya Fok, who hurt her wrist during the off-season, and Danyiel Wortham, a workhorse in the post. It is also evident that the incoming freshmen will be put into leadership rolls with the lack of seniors on the team, and I think they will respond to the challenge.”” The UCSD women’s basketball team has made the playoffs six out of the last seven years in Division III. Last year, the team lost to Davis, the second-place team in the conference, but defeated Chico State handily, who claimed third place. Pomona buried all competition, piling a record of 19-1 in conference play and an overall record of 26-3. They were the only team to represent the conference in the NCAA championships. The first game for the UCSD women’s basketball team will be at Point Loma Nazarene on Nov. 17. After that, it is on to Christian Heritage College and Vanguard University on Nov. 30 and Dec. 2, respectively. Then, after an arduous week of finals, the Tritons go to Chico State and UC Davis to face their rivals. This will take place on the Saturday and Sunday of finals week, therefore rest and relaxation is going to be delayed for a couple of days. After that it is San Francisco State University on Dec. 15, the home opener for the Tritons. Rounding out the 2000 campaign, Sonoma State University comes to town on Dec. 16 and the UCSD Doubletree Invitational on Dec. 29 to Dec. 30. The Tritons will host the event. As it seems, the UCSD women’s basketball team has a tough mountain to climb to reach the NCAA playoffs, but with the top scorers still remaining, as well as the young talented freshmen and sophomores on the squad, this looks like a promising 2000-2001 season. ...

UCSD Conquers SSU

After playing the first 40 minutes tit for tat, the UCSD women’s soccer team dominated the second half to defeat visiting Sonoma State in the first round of the NCAA Division II playoffs 2-0. David Pilz/ Guardian The first half had some great action, but was marked by missed scoring opportunities and nervous play on both sides of the ball. “”We played great in the first half,”” said Sonoma State head coach Luke Oberkirch. “”We missed a couple of chances or half chances, but we still played our hearts out in the first half.”” Sonoma State had two great looks in the first 20 minutes but each time they got near the Triton goal, UCSD was able to repel their attack with some outstanding defense. David Pilz/ Guardian UCSD was not without openings in the first half, as around the 30 minute mark, midfielder Kristen Conahan juked a defender out of her shoes and had a free run at the goal from 35 yards. A great play from the Cossack goalie, however, kept the score tied at 0-0. The Tritons just played Sonoma State on Nov. 5 and according to head coach Brian McManus, this could have affected the way the first half was played. “”We were a little bit tentative in the first half and that has something to do with last week when they threw everything they had at us in the last ten minutes, head-on straight on,”” McManus said. “”There was no good soccer being played and that threw us off a little bit. We started off the same we finished last week: sitting back.”” The second half brought with it a change of pace on the Tritons’ part. McManus had started going to his bench at about the 30 minute mark in the first half, and when the second half started, the Tritons’ fresh legs overwhelmed the Cossack defense. “”This year we have used the bench more than other years, and as the game went on,”” said McManus, “”our bench was a little bit stronger than their bench.”” Throughout the final 40 minutes, UCSD players seemed more eager and more alive than their opponents, and this was finally reflected on the scoreboard when the Tritons scored at the 51:05 mark. Off a corner kick from Julia Cuder, sophomore midfielder Lauren Jacobs took the ball on the bounce from teammate Megan Mendoza, and with what seemed like a nonchalant flip of her foot put it past the Cossack goalie to give the Tritons a 1-0 lead “”It was kind of bouncing around in the box and it just came off of Megan’s thigh and for whatever reason I was there and just took it,”” said Jacobs All season long the Tritons have been strong from the corner, and this goal seemed to be in the making from the very beginning of the second half, when the Tritons came out and appeared to be just half a step quicker than the Cossacks. “”We just had to keep pushing forward and working hard and we knew it was coming,”” Jacobs said. From that point on, the Tritons defense took over. For the rest of the game, SSU had only one look at a goal. Maggie Percell, a Cossack forward, made a nice move down the left sideline and sent a curving shot toward the goal that looked like it was headed for the back of the net. However, Triton goalie Kami Poma, ranging far to her left, made a terrific diving stop to maintain the Tritons’ 1-0 lead. At this point, all the wind seemed to go out of the SSU sails. After outshooting the tritons 7-4 in the first half the UCSD outshot them 12-4 in the second half including three corner kicks to their one. In the 79th minute, UCSD forward Christy Abiziad, on a beautiful pass from Kristin Jones, tacked another goal onto the team’s tally to make the final score a resounding 2-0 shutout. Defense was the name of the game for the Tritons as in three matches agasint SSU they have shut them out three times, and in this match, the Cossaks, despite a few opportunities, never seemed to be able to get anything started. Cuder said, “”We worked on our defense all week with Brian and when you have people like Jess who plays center full and Kara Morris who plays on the outside who come with experience — they stop everything. It makes everyone else’s job easier.”” Its defense, combined with scoring the first goal, really put UCSD over the top. “”We got together before the second half and said, ‘we can do this, we are the best team out here,'”” Cuder said. “”If we get one goal, our defense shuts out, and as soon as we score it is such a lift.”” The Tritons have been the best team in their conference all year long and this game proved it as UCSD came out and beat SSU for the third time this season, all three by shutouts. Sonoma’s head coach agreed. “”They stepped up their level in the second half,”” Oberkirch said. “”They are just a good team and are tough to beat. The better team won today, they are the best team in our region, and they deserved to win.”” This game gives the Tritons some momentum heading into the second round of the playoffs. “”We have 10 first-year players and by now this should be giving them confidence,”” McManus said. “”We have been in three overtime games and knock on wood, won each of them. The longer we are in games, the more chance we have to win, and we know that the longer we are in games the momentum continues to go our way.”” This win improves the Tritons record to 18-2 overall and they maintain their 12-2 league record. UCSD’s next game will be on either Nov. 18 or Nov. 19 against Central Oklahoma. There is a 90 percent chance the game will be played here at home on Sunday at 1 o’clock. If it is, let’s see some UCSD support for our stellar women’s soccer team. ...

Like a Phoenix, the Tritons' Hopes Arise From the Ashes

UCSD Women’s volleyball travelled up to Los Angeles to play Cal Poly Pomona and Cal State San Bernardino this weekend but came away from their stint up North with nothing but two losses. UCSD met the Broncos of Pomona on Friday night at Darlene May gym in Pomona. The Tritons, as the second place team in the California Collegiate Athletic Association, were heavily favored coming into this match. The first set was not indicative of this, however, as UCSD had a negative hitting percentage at -.161 and lost the game 15-4. UCSD bounced back in the second set with a 15-11 win to even the set score at one each. The match really paralleled this up-and-down roller coaster ride all night long. One team would win a set and look like they were building momentum and then the opposing team would storm right back to take the next set. “”We play a lot of games during the season and we’ve just been in a little bit of a slump lately,”” said UCSD head coach Duncan McFarland. Cal Poly Pomona took the third set with a decisive 15-8 win, but true to form, UCSD came back and took a hard fought fourth set 15-13. UCSD took a 5-4 lead early in the fifth set. Then the Broncos seemed to step up their intensity and reeled off four consecutive points to take a lead at 8-5 that they would not relinquish. The Tritons cut the Broncos’ lead to 10-9 but that was as close as it would get and Cal Poly Pomona pulled it out with a 15-9 win. UCSD was led by Laura Santerre who had 12 kills and six digs. The Tritons also received good performances from Jennie Wilson and Jamie Woods who each had 11 kills. Karla Tate of the Broncos set a school record with 32 kills in the game. She added four digs. The Tritons moved on to CSU San Bernardino the next weekend and looked as if they were still hung over from the previous day’s defeat. They came out and were promptly put behind a set by the score 15-6. The second set proved to be no different as they fell to an identical score. With their backs against the wall the Tritons rallied to take San Bernardino to extra points but that was all she wrote as UCSD was not able to pull it out and lost 16-14. Santerre again stood out for the Tritons with 10 kills and three digs. Wilson had a dig to compliment her 11 kills and Woods led the team in digs with five. The Tritons were plagued by poor hitting the whole weekend as they posted a hitting percentage below .100 in four out of the eight sets they played. With the loss on Friday the Tritons dropped into a three-way tie for second place and with the loss on Friday they slid even further into the pack, all alone in fourth place. CSU Bakersfield and CSU San Bernardino are in a two-way tie for second place. The West region gets six berths in the NCAA tournament and three, possibly four, teams from the CCAA will be selected for these berths. With UCSD’s two losses the picture for the playoffs, which just Thursday was bright and crystal clear, is now clouded with doubt. However, due to Grand Canyon University’s poor performance this weekend, UCSD was granted the sixth spot in the West regional playoffs. Said McFarland, “”We thought we were out of it but due to Grand Canyon’s performance and our own strong showings earlier on in the year, we got the spot.”” UCSD certainly deserves the a berth as all season long the team has had a stranglehold on second place in the CCAA. “”We are excited and the team really deserves this,”” McFarland said. “”With school and midterms and how many games we play, it is hard to keep going all season. But our earlier games really secured us this spot.”” The team will play Cal State Bakersfield Thursday in the 5 p.m. game, at Cal State Los Angeles. “”We are going to take it easy in practice tomorrow and then start preparing a specific game plan for the Bakersfield game,”” McFarland said. “”Amy Waite is their top hitter and they play a game that is similar to ours. She is one of the top hitters in the conference so it will be a challenge.”” The Tritons have their work cut out for them as they have already lost to Bakersfield twice this year. “”We need to work on our ball control and serving and passing,”” McFarland said. “”However, Grand Canyon has beat Bakersfield twice this year and we have beat Grand Canyon twice so I think we should be able to prevail.”” The law of averages is on the Triton’s side, and after this minislump and they should be hungry for a win. If the Tritons win their game against Bakersfield they will then be confronted by Hawaii Pacific, the second ranked team in the conference. The top ranked team in the conference is Cal State Los Angeles. They posted a 22-0 record this year. ...

Playoff Update:

* Women’s volleyball playoff hopes faded as the team lost two straight matches to Cal Poly Pomona and CSU San Bernardino, but they were still granted a playoff spot based upon the strength of their record. * After a jittery first half, women’s soccer settled down to prove it belonged in the upper echelon of teams in Division II by blanking Sonoma State 2-0 to advance to the second round of the NCAA championships. * This week, men’s water polo prepares for the Western Water Polo Association championships in Honolulu on November 17-19, a must-win event for the Tritons to get into the NCAA tournament. ...

Oh Where Have You Gone, Tony Gywnn …

Sports legends spending an entire career with one team are very special. It is also increasingly rare. This is why Tony Gwynn should either accept the San Diego Padres’ most recent contract offer, or he should retire from baseball. He should not go to another team. It used to be that sporting legends would spend their whole careers with one organization. A star would stay with a team until he broke down, then retire and be immortalized forever by that team. Now, in this time of free agency and today’s crazy sports economics, players jump around more than a hyperactive child on a pogo stick. Most players chase the big bucks or hopes of a shiny championship ring. Loyalty by both the player and the organization has been shot to hell. There are some cases today of players staying with their teams through thick and thin. Baseball Hall of Famers George Brett and Robin Yount stuck with the Royals and Brewers, respectively, throughout their careers. They should be commended. On the hardwood, Magic, Michael and Larry all stayed with the same club. On the gridiron, Dan Marino played for the Dolphins, and only the Dolphins, and John Elway did the same for the Broncos. Before retiring, Marino could have gone to Minnesota, but instead opted to play golf on Sundays. Players rarely succeed in trying to jump start their careers in another city while their sun is setting on their playing days. This is what Gwynn is trying to do. He still wants to play. You can’t blame him, it’s in his blood. Baseball is a part of his DNA, as is his competitiveness. But Tony, it is time to hang up the uniform. Can he still play? Well, in the field, that is an almost definite “”no.”” His age and his knees won’t let him go chasing after balls in the outfield like he did during his Gold Glove years. The question still exists of whether he can still hit. The answer is yes and no. When he is healthy, he most certainly can. Last season, he beat the ball all around the diamond when he got a chance, but he sat out most of the season with injuries. The Padres are trying the best they can with Tony. They offered the aging right-fielder a $1 million contract with numerous incentives that can jack his pay up even more. Still, it is not enough for Gwynn. It is not the money — he wants an opportunity to play full-time, which he won’t receive from the Padres. So, he is entertaining offers from other clubs. What is happening between the Padres and Gwynn can almost be suicide for both. Gwynn may unfairly be labeled as greedy, when all he really wants to do is play the game he loves. For the Padres, Gwynn is the last thing they have that is appealing to the fans. Him playing for another club would be a public relations nightmare. Tony Gwynn with another club? It could happen. I hope not. It would just not seem right. Tony, please retire and bask in the glory of being one of the best hitters in baseball history. ...

UCSD Club Sports

WOMENS DISC The cream of the women’s ultimate disc Southern California crop gathered last weekend for a warm-up tournament. The tough UCSD players are rarely tested. The team was divided into two separate squads, X and Y. Both teams went undefeated, embarrassing the other schools by showing even the second-best UCSD players are better than their top competitors. Claremont finished second in the tournament, UC Santa Barbara came in third, UCLA fourth and Occidental finished fifth. Lauren Clancey was the star for UCSD. Other standouts were Cherie Lim, Jamie Kinard and Kristina Ow. CYCLING TEAM Last weekend, the UCSD cycling team trekked to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo to compete in the Parkfield Mountain Bike Race. Although it was its first race this season, UCSD still had a good showing. In the men’s A cross country category, Jesse Beck finished with an impressive second place. Teammate Pete Knudsen also had a strong day, despite some mechanical problems that kept him from finishing in the top 10 along with Becj The men’s B cross country team dominated the cycling event, with captain Jason Goldberg finishing in first and teammate Brian Flock close behind after capturing third place. Mike Guan, K.K. Mozumdera and Carlos Rocha also tested their grit for UCSD. Johnny Yin competed in the Dual Slalom, and Ivan Wong and Brendan O’Brian competed in the downhill event. The women’s team had a few competitors, with Heather McTighe leading the way. ICE HOCKEY The UCSD ice hockey team held revenge in a rematch with CSU Fullerton. Earlier this year, Fullerton was the victor in a dominating way. However, it was different this time, with UCSD using a strong defense to shut down Fullerton’s good players and downing it, 10-5. UCSD had a number of players with goals. Will Thomas led the way with three goals, and Andrew Jacobsen had two goals and two assists. Will Cohen had a pair of goals, and Bhavin Mehta and Chris Davis each had one. UCSD hosts Sacramento State at 10:15 p.m., Friday, Nov. 17 at University Towne Centre ice rink. MENS DISC The men’s ultimate disc team faced some tough competitors in a Southern California warm-up tournament. The team, 60 members strong, had to split up into three different squads. The first, second and third teams made it to the quarterfinals, semifinals and finals, respectively. The third team only lost against UC Santa Barbara after making it to the final game. WEEKEND EVENTS Saturday Nov. 11 * Men’s rugby, round robin at Warren Field, 9 a.m. * Equestrian show at Clark’s Ranch, all day * Sailing North/South Inter-sectionals at UC Santa Barbara, all day — Compiled by Robert Fulton Sports Editor ...