Sports

Like a Phoenix, the Tritons' Hopes Arise From the Ashes

UCSD Women’s volleyball travelled up to Los Angeles to play Cal Poly Pomona and Cal State San Bernardino this weekend but came away from their stint up North with nothing but two losses. UCSD met the Broncos of Pomona on Friday night at Darlene May gym in Pomona. The Tritons, as the second place team in the California Collegiate Athletic Association, were heavily favored coming into this match. The first set was not indicative of this, however, as UCSD had a negative hitting percentage at -.161 and lost the game 15-4. UCSD bounced back in the second set with a 15-11 win to even the set score at one each. The match really paralleled this up-and-down roller coaster ride all night long. One team would win a set and look like they were building momentum and then the opposing team would storm right back to take the next set. “”We play a lot of games during the season and we’ve just been in a little bit of a slump lately,”” said UCSD head coach Duncan McFarland. Cal Poly Pomona took the third set with a decisive 15-8 win, but true to form, UCSD came back and took a hard fought fourth set 15-13. UCSD took a 5-4 lead early in the fifth set. Then the Broncos seemed to step up their intensity and reeled off four consecutive points to take a lead at 8-5 that they would not relinquish. The Tritons cut the Broncos’ lead to 10-9 but that was as close as it would get and Cal Poly Pomona pulled it out with a 15-9 win. UCSD was led by Laura Santerre who had 12 kills and six digs. The Tritons also received good performances from Jennie Wilson and Jamie Woods who each had 11 kills. Karla Tate of the Broncos set a school record with 32 kills in the game. She added four digs. The Tritons moved on to CSU San Bernardino the next weekend and looked as if they were still hung over from the previous day’s defeat. They came out and were promptly put behind a set by the score 15-6. The second set proved to be no different as they fell to an identical score. With their backs against the wall the Tritons rallied to take San Bernardino to extra points but that was all she wrote as UCSD was not able to pull it out and lost 16-14. Santerre again stood out for the Tritons with 10 kills and three digs. Wilson had a dig to compliment her 11 kills and Woods led the team in digs with five. The Tritons were plagued by poor hitting the whole weekend as they posted a hitting percentage below .100 in four out of the eight sets they played. With the loss on Friday the Tritons dropped into a three-way tie for second place and with the loss on Friday they slid even further into the pack, all alone in fourth place. CSU Bakersfield and CSU San Bernardino are in a two-way tie for second place. The West region gets six berths in the NCAA tournament and three, possibly four, teams from the CCAA will be selected for these berths. With UCSD’s two losses the picture for the playoffs, which just Thursday was bright and crystal clear, is now clouded with doubt. However, due to Grand Canyon University’s poor performance this weekend, UCSD was granted the sixth spot in the West regional playoffs. Said McFarland, “”We thought we were out of it but due to Grand Canyon’s performance and our own strong showings earlier on in the year, we got the spot.”” UCSD certainly deserves the a berth as all season long the team has had a stranglehold on second place in the CCAA. “”We are excited and the team really deserves this,”” McFarland said. “”With school and midterms and how many games we play, it is hard to keep going all season. But our earlier games really secured us this spot.”” The team will play Cal State Bakersfield Thursday in the 5 p.m. game, at Cal State Los Angeles. “”We are going to take it easy in practice tomorrow and then start preparing a specific game plan for the Bakersfield game,”” McFarland said. “”Amy Waite is their top hitter and they play a game that is similar to ours. She is one of the top hitters in the conference so it will be a challenge.”” The Tritons have their work cut out for them as they have already lost to Bakersfield twice this year. “”We need to work on our ball control and serving and passing,”” McFarland said. “”However, Grand Canyon has beat Bakersfield twice this year and we have beat Grand Canyon twice so I think we should be able to prevail.”” The law of averages is on the Triton’s side, and after this minislump and they should be hungry for a win. If the Tritons win their game against Bakersfield they will then be confronted by Hawaii Pacific, the second ranked team in the conference. The top ranked team in the conference is Cal State Los Angeles. They posted a 22-0 record this year. ...

Playoff Update:

* Women’s volleyball playoff hopes faded as the team lost two straight matches to Cal Poly Pomona and CSU San Bernardino, but they were still granted a playoff spot based upon the strength of their record. * After a jittery first half, women’s soccer settled down to prove it belonged in the upper echelon of teams in Division II by blanking Sonoma State 2-0 to advance to the second round of the NCAA championships. * This week, men’s water polo prepares for the Western Water Polo Association championships in Honolulu on November 17-19, a must-win event for the Tritons to get into the NCAA tournament. ...

Oh Where Have You Gone, Tony Gywnn …

Sports legends spending an entire career with one team are very special. It is also increasingly rare. This is why Tony Gwynn should either accept the San Diego Padres’ most recent contract offer, or he should retire from baseball. He should not go to another team. It used to be that sporting legends would spend their whole careers with one organization. A star would stay with a team until he broke down, then retire and be immortalized forever by that team. Now, in this time of free agency and today’s crazy sports economics, players jump around more than a hyperactive child on a pogo stick. Most players chase the big bucks or hopes of a shiny championship ring. Loyalty by both the player and the organization has been shot to hell. There are some cases today of players staying with their teams through thick and thin. Baseball Hall of Famers George Brett and Robin Yount stuck with the Royals and Brewers, respectively, throughout their careers. They should be commended. On the hardwood, Magic, Michael and Larry all stayed with the same club. On the gridiron, Dan Marino played for the Dolphins, and only the Dolphins, and John Elway did the same for the Broncos. Before retiring, Marino could have gone to Minnesota, but instead opted to play golf on Sundays. Players rarely succeed in trying to jump start their careers in another city while their sun is setting on their playing days. This is what Gwynn is trying to do. He still wants to play. You can’t blame him, it’s in his blood. Baseball is a part of his DNA, as is his competitiveness. But Tony, it is time to hang up the uniform. Can he still play? Well, in the field, that is an almost definite “”no.”” His age and his knees won’t let him go chasing after balls in the outfield like he did during his Gold Glove years. The question still exists of whether he can still hit. The answer is yes and no. When he is healthy, he most certainly can. Last season, he beat the ball all around the diamond when he got a chance, but he sat out most of the season with injuries. The Padres are trying the best they can with Tony. They offered the aging right-fielder a $1 million contract with numerous incentives that can jack his pay up even more. Still, it is not enough for Gwynn. It is not the money — he wants an opportunity to play full-time, which he won’t receive from the Padres. So, he is entertaining offers from other clubs. What is happening between the Padres and Gwynn can almost be suicide for both. Gwynn may unfairly be labeled as greedy, when all he really wants to do is play the game he loves. For the Padres, Gwynn is the last thing they have that is appealing to the fans. Him playing for another club would be a public relations nightmare. Tony Gwynn with another club? It could happen. I hope not. It would just not seem right. Tony, please retire and bask in the glory of being one of the best hitters in baseball history. ...

Tritons Want to Put the Ball on the Floor

At the helm for the Triton squad is Judy Malone, who is starting her 25th year as the Tritons’ head coach. She compiled a record of 20 wins and 6 losses last year in Division III, and her overall record is 341-261, a winning percentage of 56.6 percent. This will be her first year as a Division II head coach. “”Our competition level will increase a notch as we move up a division,”” Malone said. “”There was a large disparity of matches in Division III; some teams were tough, while some teams were walk-overs. In Division II, each game will be a battle. There are no more easy games.”” As for the team itself, there are only three seniors on the squad, with five returnees from last year. The team has seven freshmen playing this year, with one junior transfer. With such a young team, the Tritons have some inexperience, but they still hope to make their mark in their first year at Division II. “”We were expecting 11 players back, but that was not the case,”” Malone said. “”We do, however, have four of our five top scorers back. This should keep us in games, and allow the other players to develop as the season rolls along.”” Forward Kimberly Neil led the Tritons last year with 11.6 points per game and 6.4 rebounds per game. Center Renee Hudec held the team lead in total rebounds in the season. Forward Genevieve Ruvalt had the most assists and steals for the Tritons, which maintains this triumvirate in their strong starting lineup. With this talent up front, the freshmen players must step up in their respective positions so that every element is on point. One of the most important parts of a team is how well its different parts fit together. “”We are truly optimistic about the upcoming year,”” Malone said. “”We expect a lot out of players like juniors Maya Fok, who hurt her wrist during the off-season, and Danyiel Wortham, a workhorse in the post. It is also evident that the incoming freshmen will be put into leadership rolls with the lack of seniors on the team, and I think they will respond to the challenge.”” The UCSD women’s basketball team has made the playoffs six out of the last seven years in Division III. Last year, the team lost to Davis, the second-place team in the conference, but defeated Chico State handily, who claimed third place. Pomona buried all competition, piling a record of 19-1 in conference play and an overall record of 26-3. They were the only team to represent the conference in the NCAA championships. The first game for the UCSD women’s basketball team will be at Point Loma Nazarene on Nov. 17. After that, it is on to Christian Heritage College and Vanguard University on Nov. 30 and Dec. 2, respectively. Then, after an arduous week of finals, the Tritons go to Chico State and UC Davis to face their rivals. This will take place on the Saturday and Sunday of finals week, therefore rest and relaxation is going to be delayed for a couple of days. After that it is San Francisco State University on Dec. 15, the home opener for the Tritons. Rounding out the 2000 campaign, Sonoma State University comes to town on Dec. 16 and the UCSD Doubletree Invitational on Dec. 29 to Dec. 30. The Tritons will host the event. As it seems, the UCSD women’s basketball team has a tough mountain to climb to reach the NCAA playoffs, but with the top scorers still remaining, as well as the young talented freshmen and sophomores on the squad, this looks like a promising 2000-2001 season. ...

UCSD Conquers SSU

After playing the first 40 minutes tit for tat, the UCSD women’s soccer team dominated the second half to defeat visiting Sonoma State in the first round of the NCAA Division II playoffs 2-0. David Pilz/ Guardian The first half had some great action, but was marked by missed scoring opportunities and nervous play on both sides of the ball. “”We played great in the first half,”” said Sonoma State head coach Luke Oberkirch. “”We missed a couple of chances or half chances, but we still played our hearts out in the first half.”” Sonoma State had two great looks in the first 20 minutes but each time they got near the Triton goal, UCSD was able to repel their attack with some outstanding defense. David Pilz/ Guardian UCSD was not without openings in the first half, as around the 30 minute mark, midfielder Kristen Conahan juked a defender out of her shoes and had a free run at the goal from 35 yards. A great play from the Cossack goalie, however, kept the score tied at 0-0. The Tritons just played Sonoma State on Nov. 5 and according to head coach Brian McManus, this could have affected the way the first half was played. “”We were a little bit tentative in the first half and that has something to do with last week when they threw everything they had at us in the last ten minutes, head-on straight on,”” McManus said. “”There was no good soccer being played and that threw us off a little bit. We started off the same we finished last week: sitting back.”” The second half brought with it a change of pace on the Tritons’ part. McManus had started going to his bench at about the 30 minute mark in the first half, and when the second half started, the Tritons’ fresh legs overwhelmed the Cossack defense. “”This year we have used the bench more than other years, and as the game went on,”” said McManus, “”our bench was a little bit stronger than their bench.”” Throughout the final 40 minutes, UCSD players seemed more eager and more alive than their opponents, and this was finally reflected on the scoreboard when the Tritons scored at the 51:05 mark. Off a corner kick from Julia Cuder, sophomore midfielder Lauren Jacobs took the ball on the bounce from teammate Megan Mendoza, and with what seemed like a nonchalant flip of her foot put it past the Cossack goalie to give the Tritons a 1-0 lead “”It was kind of bouncing around in the box and it just came off of Megan’s thigh and for whatever reason I was there and just took it,”” said Jacobs All season long the Tritons have been strong from the corner, and this goal seemed to be in the making from the very beginning of the second half, when the Tritons came out and appeared to be just half a step quicker than the Cossacks. “”We just had to keep pushing forward and working hard and we knew it was coming,”” Jacobs said. From that point on, the Tritons defense took over. For the rest of the game, SSU had only one look at a goal. Maggie Percell, a Cossack forward, made a nice move down the left sideline and sent a curving shot toward the goal that looked like it was headed for the back of the net. However, Triton goalie Kami Poma, ranging far to her left, made a terrific diving stop to maintain the Tritons’ 1-0 lead. At this point, all the wind seemed to go out of the SSU sails. After outshooting the tritons 7-4 in the first half the UCSD outshot them 12-4 in the second half including three corner kicks to their one. In the 79th minute, UCSD forward Christy Abiziad, on a beautiful pass from Kristin Jones, tacked another goal onto the team’s tally to make the final score a resounding 2-0 shutout. Defense was the name of the game for the Tritons as in three matches agasint SSU they have shut them out three times, and in this match, the Cossaks, despite a few opportunities, never seemed to be able to get anything started. Cuder said, “”We worked on our defense all week with Brian and when you have people like Jess who plays center full and Kara Morris who plays on the outside who come with experience — they stop everything. It makes everyone else’s job easier.”” Its defense, combined with scoring the first goal, really put UCSD over the top. “”We got together before the second half and said, ‘we can do this, we are the best team out here,'”” Cuder said. “”If we get one goal, our defense shuts out, and as soon as we score it is such a lift.”” The Tritons have been the best team in their conference all year long and this game proved it as UCSD came out and beat SSU for the third time this season, all three by shutouts. Sonoma’s head coach agreed. “”They stepped up their level in the second half,”” Oberkirch said. “”They are just a good team and are tough to beat. The better team won today, they are the best team in our region, and they deserved to win.”” This game gives the Tritons some momentum heading into the second round of the playoffs. “”We have 10 first-year players and by now this should be giving them confidence,”” McManus said. “”We have been in three overtime games and knock on wood, won each of them. The longer we are in games, the more chance we have to win, and we know that the longer we are in games the momentum continues to go our way.”” This win improves the Tritons record to 18-2 overall and they maintain their 12-2 league record. UCSD’s next game will be on either Nov. 18 or Nov. 19 against Central Oklahoma. There is a 90 percent chance the game will be played here at home on Sunday at 1 o’clock. If it is, let’s see some UCSD support for our stellar women’s soccer team. ...

UCSD Club Sports

WOMENS DISC The cream of the women’s ultimate disc Southern California crop gathered last weekend for a warm-up tournament. The tough UCSD players are rarely tested. The team was divided into two separate squads, X and Y. Both teams went undefeated, embarrassing the other schools by showing even the second-best UCSD players are better than their top competitors. Claremont finished second in the tournament, UC Santa Barbara came in third, UCLA fourth and Occidental finished fifth. Lauren Clancey was the star for UCSD. Other standouts were Cherie Lim, Jamie Kinard and Kristina Ow. CYCLING TEAM Last weekend, the UCSD cycling team trekked to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo to compete in the Parkfield Mountain Bike Race. Although it was its first race this season, UCSD still had a good showing. In the men’s A cross country category, Jesse Beck finished with an impressive second place. Teammate Pete Knudsen also had a strong day, despite some mechanical problems that kept him from finishing in the top 10 along with Becj The men’s B cross country team dominated the cycling event, with captain Jason Goldberg finishing in first and teammate Brian Flock close behind after capturing third place. Mike Guan, K.K. Mozumdera and Carlos Rocha also tested their grit for UCSD. Johnny Yin competed in the Dual Slalom, and Ivan Wong and Brendan O’Brian competed in the downhill event. The women’s team had a few competitors, with Heather McTighe leading the way. ICE HOCKEY The UCSD ice hockey team held revenge in a rematch with CSU Fullerton. Earlier this year, Fullerton was the victor in a dominating way. However, it was different this time, with UCSD using a strong defense to shut down Fullerton’s good players and downing it, 10-5. UCSD had a number of players with goals. Will Thomas led the way with three goals, and Andrew Jacobsen had two goals and two assists. Will Cohen had a pair of goals, and Bhavin Mehta and Chris Davis each had one. UCSD hosts Sacramento State at 10:15 p.m., Friday, Nov. 17 at University Towne Centre ice rink. MENS DISC The men’s ultimate disc team faced some tough competitors in a Southern California warm-up tournament. The team, 60 members strong, had to split up into three different squads. The first, second and third teams made it to the quarterfinals, semifinals and finals, respectively. The third team only lost against UC Santa Barbara after making it to the final game. WEEKEND EVENTS Saturday Nov. 11 * Men’s rugby, round robin at Warren Field, 9 a.m. * Equestrian show at Clark’s Ranch, all day * Sailing North/South Inter-sectionals at UC Santa Barbara, all day — Compiled by Robert Fulton Sports Editor ...

All-CCAA 2000 Soccer Teams Announced

In their first year at the Division II level and their 14th under the guidance of McManus, the Tritons sported a regular season record of 15-2 and captured the CCAA crown with a 1-0 victory over Sonoma State on Saturday. “”When you have good players, they get you the trophy,”” McManus said. “”If you have good players, you’re not going to get any wins; you’re not going to get anything. It splits up into 25 even parts.”” The Tritons placed two members on the All-CCAA First Team, with senior Cindy Dostalek taking a forward position and junior Julia Cuder at a defensive spot. Junior forward Erika Alfredson made the All-CCAA Second Team. The men’s side was also honored. Junior midfielder Bobby Saadati made the All-CCAA First Team, and senior midfielder Brady Bernard earned an honorable mention. The women’s soccer team will gear up to host Sonoma State in the first round of the NCAA Division II Championship on Saturday at 6 p.m. ...

Sports World To Change With Election

In 1989, George W. Bush became a vested owner in the Texas Rangers. With his run for governor, his interest in the team waned, and in 1998 he sold his part of the club for a $15 million profit. During his time as an owner of the Rangers he had some successes, a few winning seasons and some failures, such as the trade of Sammy Sosa. Given Bush’s long-standing association with the sports world — he played baseball as a freshman at Yale and is an avid runner — I think the question must be posed: What will his probable presidency mean for American sports? In baseball, there will be no salary cap. It seems as if a cap would run against this Republican’s principles of letting the economics dictate what happens. What does a cap do except put teams on equal footing? As Bush’s plans for social security, tax cuts and prescription drugs show, he is not interested in equal footing for anyone. Let us see the rich get richer like the New York Yankees, the Cleveland Indians and the Los Angeles Dodgers, and the poor become poorer, like the Milwaukee Brewers, the Kansas City Royals and the Minnesota Twins. Sounds like a good plan to me! Baseball has had more fights than usual over the last couple of years, and Frank Robinson has been doling out punishments like a madman. With Bush’s record on crime — he has presided over more than 130 executions during his time in office — it looks like Robinson will not only be able to suspend practically the entire Dodgers team for the season as he did last year, but he will have a new weapon at his disposal: death. That’s OK, however; America needs less stuck-up primadonnas like Albert Belle. What about basketball? Players such as Allen Iverson, Shaquille O’Neal and Rick Fox are becoming multidimensional on and off the court. They are reaching across boundary lines to become basketball, movie and rap stars. If Bush and the Republican Congress have anything to say about this kind of faceted approach to life, these guys will be in trouble. This kind of cooperation between different sects of society is just unacceptable. Bipartisan mannerisms can only be given lip service, and not actually followed through. What about the traditionally marginalized sports, those that exist on the fringes of our American sporting conscience: sports like soccer, cross country and diving. These are sports that many people play, but they bring in much less money than baseball and basketball. The majority of Americans rarely think about them. Considering that Bush wants to help only “”real Americans”” — he has published a 16-page pamphlet called “”Real People, Real Americans: The Middle Class”” — and sports like cross country don’t seem like “”real”” American sports, it looks like these marginalized, neglected aspects of the sporting world are going to be in for four more years of being swept under the table. They will be allowed to come out occasionally, for things like the World Cup and for a couple of TV appearances every once in a while, but most of the time they will be locked up in the closet. Football is the only sport that will be safe under a Bush presidency. It is just a bunch of big guys running around and hitting each other. Bush should be comfortable with this. Considering his inability to say what he actually means, and his numerous verbal blunders, Bush will get along just fine with all the concussion-ridden NFL quarterbacks and players. As one USA Today reporter said, “”[Bush’s] verbal gaffes are so numerous they are not even worth reporting any more.”” Just six days ago, he said social security is “”not a government program.”” That is how I see the sports world with Bush as president. A rather interesting place, don’t you think? I can see Papa Bush and Dubya in the governor’s mansion in Austin right now talking about the next four years, and I bet that Papa has just one question for Junior: “”Son, are you going to be pitching or catching?”” Good luck to George Jr. and the sports world in general. ...

Kitchen Cooking for UCSD Cross Country Squad

Senior Amy Kitchen runs to race and races to win. Consistently running for the cross country A team, Kitchen has repeatedly placed in the top five spots throughout the season. Running the 5,000-kilometer and 10,000-kilometer races, this ecology, behavior and evolution major also knows what it is like to be out of the race. Kitchen was sidelined for a year and a half with three stress fractures to her leg, which were sustained while running track during her sophomore year. In her returning season of cross country, as she was getting her running legs back, she received a knee injury and had to watch races rather than compete in them. “”She is tough as nails,”” said head coach Ted Van Arsdale. “”This season is a tremendous comeback for her after the year-and-a-half rehabilitation that she went through.”” Kitchen wanted to get back on the track as soon as possible. “”It is really hard to be injured for that long and to not be able to compete,”” Kitchen said. “”I really enjoy the racing aspect of the sport, and not just the running, and I could not wait to get back out there.”” According to Van Arsdale, every runner reaches a point where she questions herself as a runner and her motivation for continuing to run. A runner endures times of reflection and thought about her future in the sport. During Kitchen’s time of questioning, Van Arsdale feels that she realized many things. “”I think that she knew she had it in herself to make a great comeback,”” Van Arsdale said. “”There was more to her career that she had done by then. There was more for her to accomplish before she was satisfied, so she directed her energies into getting back on the track for the team.”” Kitchen learned a lot about herself as an athlete while sidelined with injuries. Although she cares about the UCSD team, running appeals to her because it is such a personal sport. “”I really enjoy running, racing and the competitive aspect of cross country and track,”” she said. “”I know that I rely totally on myself to do well, and it is what you can do out there by yourself. It is just me out there running for the team.”” On the track, however, is not the only time she has been on her own. When her family moved during her sophomore year, the cross country team became an extended family, according to Kitchen. “”The team is very important to me and they mean a lot,”” Kitchen said. “”I try to watch out for the younger runners and take care of them a bit. I enjoy running with them and I hope I help them in some way.”” Freshman Bridgiet Bertino agrees with Kitchen. “”She always has a positive attitude and always is looking out for us in a way,”” Bertino said. “”She sends us little messages when we have a big meet coming up, she organizes us, she watches out for us, and gives advice and help if we ever need it.”” Kitchen has become a kind of team mother, watching over the cross country runners and offering encouragement and amusing stories, according to Bertino. “”I try to set an example for everyone by not complaining,”” Kitchen said. “”I want to stay upbeat for everyone, including myself.”” Kitchen has a strong sense of competition in her also, according to Van Arsdale. “”She is a complex personality that has had to deal with a lot of reality at this level,”” Van Arsdale said. “”When you achieve college running status, there is a fair amount of adversity and you are alone to determine what is important. She has realized that running is important to her.”” Kitchen has taken off with that realization, according to Van Arsdale. Last year she attended nationals in Boston representing UCSD and fared well. She is a quiet-spoken athlete who competes for herself and believes in herself as a competitor. “”[Kitchen] is not a ‘rah-rah’ type person. She is serious and she is tough and she has shown that every step of the way.”” ...

Volleyball Splits Two More

Home is where the heart is; the old adage was again proven true by the UCSD women’s volleyball team last weekend at our very own RIMAC Arena. There has not been a better exhibition of that throbbing, blood-engorged organ in a long, long time. Leo Der Stepanias/ Guardian Cal State Los Angeles blew into town, unbeaten and unbowed, looking to add another convincing win to its already sterling first-place record. The Tritons, however, were more than up for the challenge that these big city ballers were offering and stolidly took the court Friday night primed and ready to face the one team that stood above them in their division of the California Collegiate Athletic Conference. The first set was an even-handed affair, with the teams going back and forth at the net. The ball fell a few more times for CSULA, however, and they took the set 15-11. UCSD used this first set let-down to motivate, and came blasting back with authority to win the second and third sets, 15-6 and 15-4, respectively. Now holding the 2-1 set lead in the match, the Tritons needed just one more game win to seal the victory and break CSULA’s season-long unbeaten streak. The Golden Eagles had other ideas, though, and handily took the fourth set 15-9. The fifth and final set was excruciating for both sides. It was the first time CSULA had been taken to five sets all season and they looked uneasy at the prospect of failure, while the Tritons were tense, not wanting to let their early lead slip away. Points fell for both sides, and the pressure mounted as the set progressed. In the end it was the Eagles, however, who had the little bit of extra effort to put the game away 15-12 and take the match, keeping their unbeaten streak intact. According to senior setter Christine Kueneman, a victory for the Tritons against CSULA is very feasible. “”We played them very well on Friday night, we just needed to do a few more things to get the win,”” Kueneman said. “”We know we can beat them if we just do those few things and play to our potential.”” The Tritons were led by the play of Laura Santerre, who once again had a solid night, compiling 18 kills and 10 digs. Kueneman also had an impressive showing against the tough opposition, picking up 36 assists and 19 digs. Meagan Bergeson led the Golden Eagle attack with 16 kills, while teammates Jamie Griffin, Linda Saucedo and Dana Coffey had each notched 15 kills. Kristy Sain was a huge asset as well, contributing 53 assists on the night. The victory improves the Golden Eagles record to 19-0 in CCAA play and 27-0 overall. Saturday night was designated senior night at RIMAC Arena, and in addition to honoring Leslie Punelli, Kueneman, Kearney Visser and Shannon Hawes, the Tritons celebrated by stomping Cal State Dominguez Hills 3-1 in CCAA play. The Tritons took the first set easily, with 15-4 tally before momentarily losing focus and dropping the second 10-15. From there on out the Tritons kept their eyes on the prize and picked up set three 15-5, and held to take the fourth 17-15 to score the check in the win column. ...