Sports

All-CCAA 2000 Soccer Teams Announced

In their first year at the Division II level and their 14th under the guidance of McManus, the Tritons sported a regular season record of 15-2 and captured the CCAA crown with a 1-0 victory over Sonoma State on Saturday. “”When you have good players, they get you the trophy,”” McManus said. “”If you have good players, you’re not going to get any wins; you’re not going to get anything. It splits up into 25 even parts.”” The Tritons placed two members on the All-CCAA First Team, with senior Cindy Dostalek taking a forward position and junior Julia Cuder at a defensive spot. Junior forward Erika Alfredson made the All-CCAA Second Team. The men’s side was also honored. Junior midfielder Bobby Saadati made the All-CCAA First Team, and senior midfielder Brady Bernard earned an honorable mention. The women’s soccer team will gear up to host Sonoma State in the first round of the NCAA Division II Championship on Saturday at 6 p.m. ...

Sports World To Change With Election

In 1989, George W. Bush became a vested owner in the Texas Rangers. With his run for governor, his interest in the team waned, and in 1998 he sold his part of the club for a $15 million profit. During his time as an owner of the Rangers he had some successes, a few winning seasons and some failures, such as the trade of Sammy Sosa. Given Bush’s long-standing association with the sports world — he played baseball as a freshman at Yale and is an avid runner — I think the question must be posed: What will his probable presidency mean for American sports? In baseball, there will be no salary cap. It seems as if a cap would run against this Republican’s principles of letting the economics dictate what happens. What does a cap do except put teams on equal footing? As Bush’s plans for social security, tax cuts and prescription drugs show, he is not interested in equal footing for anyone. Let us see the rich get richer like the New York Yankees, the Cleveland Indians and the Los Angeles Dodgers, and the poor become poorer, like the Milwaukee Brewers, the Kansas City Royals and the Minnesota Twins. Sounds like a good plan to me! Baseball has had more fights than usual over the last couple of years, and Frank Robinson has been doling out punishments like a madman. With Bush’s record on crime — he has presided over more than 130 executions during his time in office — it looks like Robinson will not only be able to suspend practically the entire Dodgers team for the season as he did last year, but he will have a new weapon at his disposal: death. That’s OK, however; America needs less stuck-up primadonnas like Albert Belle. What about basketball? Players such as Allen Iverson, Shaquille O’Neal and Rick Fox are becoming multidimensional on and off the court. They are reaching across boundary lines to become basketball, movie and rap stars. If Bush and the Republican Congress have anything to say about this kind of faceted approach to life, these guys will be in trouble. This kind of cooperation between different sects of society is just unacceptable. Bipartisan mannerisms can only be given lip service, and not actually followed through. What about the traditionally marginalized sports, those that exist on the fringes of our American sporting conscience: sports like soccer, cross country and diving. These are sports that many people play, but they bring in much less money than baseball and basketball. The majority of Americans rarely think about them. Considering that Bush wants to help only “”real Americans”” — he has published a 16-page pamphlet called “”Real People, Real Americans: The Middle Class”” — and sports like cross country don’t seem like “”real”” American sports, it looks like these marginalized, neglected aspects of the sporting world are going to be in for four more years of being swept under the table. They will be allowed to come out occasionally, for things like the World Cup and for a couple of TV appearances every once in a while, but most of the time they will be locked up in the closet. Football is the only sport that will be safe under a Bush presidency. It is just a bunch of big guys running around and hitting each other. Bush should be comfortable with this. Considering his inability to say what he actually means, and his numerous verbal blunders, Bush will get along just fine with all the concussion-ridden NFL quarterbacks and players. As one USA Today reporter said, “”[Bush’s] verbal gaffes are so numerous they are not even worth reporting any more.”” Just six days ago, he said social security is “”not a government program.”” That is how I see the sports world with Bush as president. A rather interesting place, don’t you think? I can see Papa Bush and Dubya in the governor’s mansion in Austin right now talking about the next four years, and I bet that Papa has just one question for Junior: “”Son, are you going to be pitching or catching?”” Good luck to George Jr. and the sports world in general. ...

Kitchen Cooking for UCSD Cross Country Squad

Senior Amy Kitchen runs to race and races to win. Consistently running for the cross country A team, Kitchen has repeatedly placed in the top five spots throughout the season. Running the 5,000-kilometer and 10,000-kilometer races, this ecology, behavior and evolution major also knows what it is like to be out of the race. Kitchen was sidelined for a year and a half with three stress fractures to her leg, which were sustained while running track during her sophomore year. In her returning season of cross country, as she was getting her running legs back, she received a knee injury and had to watch races rather than compete in them. “”She is tough as nails,”” said head coach Ted Van Arsdale. “”This season is a tremendous comeback for her after the year-and-a-half rehabilitation that she went through.”” Kitchen wanted to get back on the track as soon as possible. “”It is really hard to be injured for that long and to not be able to compete,”” Kitchen said. “”I really enjoy the racing aspect of the sport, and not just the running, and I could not wait to get back out there.”” According to Van Arsdale, every runner reaches a point where she questions herself as a runner and her motivation for continuing to run. A runner endures times of reflection and thought about her future in the sport. During Kitchen’s time of questioning, Van Arsdale feels that she realized many things. “”I think that she knew she had it in herself to make a great comeback,”” Van Arsdale said. “”There was more to her career that she had done by then. There was more for her to accomplish before she was satisfied, so she directed her energies into getting back on the track for the team.”” Kitchen learned a lot about herself as an athlete while sidelined with injuries. Although she cares about the UCSD team, running appeals to her because it is such a personal sport. “”I really enjoy running, racing and the competitive aspect of cross country and track,”” she said. “”I know that I rely totally on myself to do well, and it is what you can do out there by yourself. It is just me out there running for the team.”” On the track, however, is not the only time she has been on her own. When her family moved during her sophomore year, the cross country team became an extended family, according to Kitchen. “”The team is very important to me and they mean a lot,”” Kitchen said. “”I try to watch out for the younger runners and take care of them a bit. I enjoy running with them and I hope I help them in some way.”” Freshman Bridgiet Bertino agrees with Kitchen. “”She always has a positive attitude and always is looking out for us in a way,”” Bertino said. “”She sends us little messages when we have a big meet coming up, she organizes us, she watches out for us, and gives advice and help if we ever need it.”” Kitchen has become a kind of team mother, watching over the cross country runners and offering encouragement and amusing stories, according to Bertino. “”I try to set an example for everyone by not complaining,”” Kitchen said. “”I want to stay upbeat for everyone, including myself.”” Kitchen has a strong sense of competition in her also, according to Van Arsdale. “”She is a complex personality that has had to deal with a lot of reality at this level,”” Van Arsdale said. “”When you achieve college running status, there is a fair amount of adversity and you are alone to determine what is important. She has realized that running is important to her.”” Kitchen has taken off with that realization, according to Van Arsdale. Last year she attended nationals in Boston representing UCSD and fared well. She is a quiet-spoken athlete who competes for herself and believes in herself as a competitor. “”[Kitchen] is not a ‘rah-rah’ type person. She is serious and she is tough and she has shown that every step of the way.”” ...

Volleyball Splits Two More

Home is where the heart is; the old adage was again proven true by the UCSD women’s volleyball team last weekend at our very own RIMAC Arena. There has not been a better exhibition of that throbbing, blood-engorged organ in a long, long time. Leo Der Stepanias/ Guardian Cal State Los Angeles blew into town, unbeaten and unbowed, looking to add another convincing win to its already sterling first-place record. The Tritons, however, were more than up for the challenge that these big city ballers were offering and stolidly took the court Friday night primed and ready to face the one team that stood above them in their division of the California Collegiate Athletic Conference. The first set was an even-handed affair, with the teams going back and forth at the net. The ball fell a few more times for CSULA, however, and they took the set 15-11. UCSD used this first set let-down to motivate, and came blasting back with authority to win the second and third sets, 15-6 and 15-4, respectively. Now holding the 2-1 set lead in the match, the Tritons needed just one more game win to seal the victory and break CSULA’s season-long unbeaten streak. The Golden Eagles had other ideas, though, and handily took the fourth set 15-9. The fifth and final set was excruciating for both sides. It was the first time CSULA had been taken to five sets all season and they looked uneasy at the prospect of failure, while the Tritons were tense, not wanting to let their early lead slip away. Points fell for both sides, and the pressure mounted as the set progressed. In the end it was the Eagles, however, who had the little bit of extra effort to put the game away 15-12 and take the match, keeping their unbeaten streak intact. According to senior setter Christine Kueneman, a victory for the Tritons against CSULA is very feasible. “”We played them very well on Friday night, we just needed to do a few more things to get the win,”” Kueneman said. “”We know we can beat them if we just do those few things and play to our potential.”” The Tritons were led by the play of Laura Santerre, who once again had a solid night, compiling 18 kills and 10 digs. Kueneman also had an impressive showing against the tough opposition, picking up 36 assists and 19 digs. Meagan Bergeson led the Golden Eagle attack with 16 kills, while teammates Jamie Griffin, Linda Saucedo and Dana Coffey had each notched 15 kills. Kristy Sain was a huge asset as well, contributing 53 assists on the night. The victory improves the Golden Eagles record to 19-0 in CCAA play and 27-0 overall. Saturday night was designated senior night at RIMAC Arena, and in addition to honoring Leslie Punelli, Kueneman, Kearney Visser and Shannon Hawes, the Tritons celebrated by stomping Cal State Dominguez Hills 3-1 in CCAA play. The Tritons took the first set easily, with 15-4 tally before momentarily losing focus and dropping the second 10-15. From there on out the Tritons kept their eyes on the prize and picked up set three 15-5, and held to take the fourth 17-15 to score the check in the win column. ...

A Tough Weekend Trips up Triton Water Polo

UCSD allowed nine straight goals in the second half to visiting UC Irvine, losing to the third-ranked Anteaters 10-2. Leo Der Stepanians/ Guardian After a defensive gem of a first half, the score was tied 1-1 and it looked like the eighth-ranked Tritons were going to be able to give Irvine a run for its money. “”I don’t think I have ever seen a quarter go 0-0 like the first one did,”” said triton head coach Denny Harper That was absolutely incredible and our guys really did a great job out there.”” Starting the second half, UCSD even managed to take a brief lead on a Justin Wylie goal. That, however, was all she wrote, as the Anteaters took control of the game from that point, and in effect, shut UCSD down at both ends of the pool. “”The wheels just seemed to come off near the end of the third quarter,”” Harper said. “”We were leaning into out-front court offense and Irvine was taking advantage of it.”” The game was really a story of two halves. The first half saw perfect execution by UCSD, at least defensively, as they stymied almost every attempt of Irvine’s to make inroads into their territory. “”We came out more aggressive than we have in the past couple of weeks,”” UCSD goalie Glenn Busch said. “”We were able to hold them in the first half.”” The only goal the Anteaters could manage in the first half came at that 5:24 mark of the second quarter. The Tritons were not down for long, as two minutes later Justin Wylie, who scored both Triton goals on the day, tossed one in to even the score. The second half was a disaster compared to the first two quarters. UCSD seemed to go into a free-fall with nothing to stop them except the final whistle. After scoring the first goal of the half, mental breakdowns plagued UCSD, as they allowed nine straight unanswered goals. “”There were some bad individual mental breakdowns in the game,”” Harper said. “”This is something we will work on right up until we leave for Hawaii.”” While Irvine took its game to another level, UCSD floundered, searching for the form that had it ranked as high as fifth earlier in the year. The Tritons could not seem to get on track offensively in the second half and their offensive ineptitude led to the Anteaters’ counterattack and created opportunities for Irvine that just should not have been there. “”The team played well today and every aspect of the game went well,”” Harper said. “”The only problem we really had was allowing the Irvine counterattack to take over the game in the second half.”” With the loss, UCSD’s record drops to 17-8 and the Anteaters improve to 15-5. The Tritons must look forward to the Western Water Polo Association Championships two weekends from now. To be held in Honolulu, it is of utmost importance that UCSD have an excellent showing there and win in order to gain a berth into the NCAA tournament to be held Dec. 2 through Dec. 3 in Malibu, Calif. UCSD also plays Friday in a warm-up match for championships against the local “”old man’s”” club, Sunset San Diego. Sunset counts many former UCSD players among its ranks and coach Harper thinks they can give the Triton’s a run for their money. The game is at Canyonview Pool on Nov. 10 at 6 p.m. ...

Tritons Strong at Regionals

Last Friday at Prado Park in Chino, Calif., the UCSD cross country teams turned in strong group performances at the NCAA Division II Regionals. The Triton men secured an impressive fourth-place finish out of 13 teams, with an average time of 35:07.2 in the 10,000-meter course. The UC Davis team finished first with an average time of 33:23.4. The UCSD women’s team also placed well, earning eighth place out of 18 teams. Its runners had an average time of 25.20.9 in their 6,000-meter course, while the first place team, Central Washington, averaged a time of 23:47.8 en route to victory. Neither Triton squad had any individual place in the top 20. However several of their young runners ran well. Hosted by Cal Poly Pomona, the event featured teams from UC Davis, Cal State University Chico, Humboldt State, the University of Alaska-Anchorage, Western Washington University, Cal Poly, Hawaii-Pacific University, Central Washington University, St. Martin’s Abbey, Montana State University-Billings, Cal State University Los Angeles and San Francisco State for the men’s division. Men’s squad freshmen Julian Nathan and Neil Kalra had the fastest times with 34:48 and 35:21 to place 21st and 30th, respectively. On the women’s side, sophomore Audrey Sung and freshman Lillian Gardiner turned out the top performances for the Tritons, with their times of 24:17 and 24:58, earning them 24th and 43rd place, respectively. Central Washington, Davis, Cal State Chico, Seattle Pacific, Cal State Los Angeles, Cal State Stanislaus, Humboldt State, Sonoma State, Alaska-Anchorage, Cal State Dominguez Hills, Western Washington, Cal State Bakersfield, San Francisco State, Cal Poly, Cal State San Bernardino, St. Martin’s and Montana State-Billings competed in the women’s division. The men’s race had over 90 runners, while the women’s race featured over 120 runners. The regionals will wrap up on Monday, with the championship being held at 11 a.m. in Chino. ...

Should We Have Pity For Strawberry?

The legendary Darryl Strawberry — he is one of those “”what might have been”” kind of guys. His numbers during his early days with the Mets were outstanding. He was on pace to destroy many career home run marks, including the total career home run mark. On pace, that is. At a young age, he was part of a World Series championship team, the 1986 Mets. He later went on to play for the Los Angeles Dodgers, signing for what was, at the time, an insane amount of money. Strawberry was a future Hall-of-Famer and a perennial All Star. What happened? It is hard to say exactly what happened, but it culminated last week. Strawberry, suffering from a double whammy of colon cancer and cocaine addiction, revealed that he would prefer to be dead. It is a sad thing to read when a baseball hero, a one-time unmistakable figure (for all the right reasons) falls to the point of suicide. The question is whether we should feel sorry for him. It is almost natural to feel sorry for him. It is natural to feel for someone who has fallen to the lowest depths of life. Killing oneself is not a laughing matter. It is something to take seriously, no matter who it is. Then, upon further consideration of Strawberry’s life, why should we feel sorry for him? I look at it this way: He has had everything handed to him, has been given numerous second chances which he has squandered, and has just given up. After being the king of the baseball world, Strawberry fell just as fast as he rose. Tax problems were only one part of it. There was also the cocaine addiction. Cocaine kills a person physically, emotionally and mentally. Despite all of this, the Straw man was given repeated second chances. It’s disgusting. If anyone else were found with coke as much as Strawberry has, that person would have been placed in jail for years, perhaps never to be seen again. Not so if it’s a star baseball player. So some team gives Strawberry a chance, he gets caught with coke, gets a slap on the wrist along with some “”rehab,”” and waits for some other team to pick him up. It has been going back and forth this way for awhile. He has been given every opportunity to bounce back, to get his life together, yet he keeps using drugs. Colon cancer, too, is no joke. Strawberry is suffering from this disease like many others in the world. Straw, unlike the masses who also have this cancer, has had every opportunity to fight it. He has access to the best doctors with the best treatment. He has made progress against the disease, but now he seems to have given up. Strawberry is a tragic character, of which Shakespeare himself would be in awe. While it is easy to feel sorry for his addictions and for his disease, it is also reasonable to be angry at the repeated second chances and the opportunities he has squandered. ...

Men's Soccer Falls in Conference Semis

In its first year of competition at the Division II level, the UCSD men’s soccer team could not pull off an upset against Sonoma State University to advance in the 2000 California Collegiate Athletic Association Championship Tournament. Leo Der Stepanians/ Guardian The teams faced off on Friday, Nov. 3, at the campus of CSU Dominguez Hills, the host of the event. The previous meeting between these two squads resulted in a 2-1 loss for the Tritons, as freshman Jonathan Costabile scored the only goal for UCSD. Ryan Blair and Brady Bernard returned after suffering injuries during the regular season, which gave the Tritons better artillery against Sonoma State. The game was scoreless in the first half, which could be accredited to the time both teams took to figure out their game plan in such a crucial match. Unfortunately, Sonoma State struck first, just after four minutes into the second half. Ivan Alvarado threw the ball to Tony Bussard, who placed it out of the reach of Triton goalkeeper Jeremy Cookson. Somona then increased the margin just two minutes later, as Dustin Boone passed a loose ball, deflected by Cookson to Brian Cox, who found the right side of the net. “”The first two goals were avoidable and it made a different kind of game after that,”” said head coach Derek Armstrong. “”All the credit goes to Sonoma State. They are a tactically sound team and [its coach] does a good job of preparing his club.”” In the 68th minute, the Tritons got on the scoreboard with a 30-yard curving shot from Brady Bernard. With new signs of life, the Tritons looked to even the score and shift the momentum on their side. This nearly occurred when a jump ball took place near the Sonoma State goal line, but Ivan Alvarado cleared it for Sonoma State to maintain their advantage. The dagger came at the 84th minute, as Sonoma’s Ryan Smith raced down the left sideline to set up Bussard for his second goal of the game. Five minutes later, Joel Heffren, the leading scorer for the Cossacks, assisted Dustin Boone for an open net goal. This put away the match and the season for the Tritons. “”This season was very successful on the most part,”” junior defenseman Daniel Appel said. “”We had a young team with nine freshman, so it was a learning process. Overall, with all the injuries as well as it being our first season at the Division II level, I think this season has been bright.”” Daniel went on to predict that CSU Dominguez Hills will win the CCAA Championship and represent the league in the NCAA Division II tournament. Two seniors — Tyler Korman and Brady Bernard — will be sorely missed in the midfield. Tyler finished the season with an assist in eight games played. Brady Bernard was second on the team with 9 points, consisting of 2 goals and 5 assists, in 14 games played. UCSD will have to look to young, upcoming players such as Sean Summers and Ryan Mizumoto to hold up the middle of the field and be the catalyst for those around them. With this experience under its belt, it is easy to think that UCSD will be in the running for not only a CCAA Tournament Championship, but perhaps a NCAA Division II Championship. The Tritons’ final record in their inaugural season in Division II was 11 wins, 5 losses and 2 ties, and 9 wins, 3 losses and 2 ties in league play. ...

UCSD: CCAA Champs!

CARSON, Calif., — You cannot stop the UCSD women’s soccer team; You can only hope to contain them. Leo Der Stepanians/ Guardian The Tritons yet again proved their dominance yesterday, winning the California Collegiate Athletic Association championship with a 1-0 victory over Sonoma State University at Toro Field. UCSD took the lead in the 18th minute of the first half. The Tritons’ Julia Cuder booted a corner kick past the Cossacks goalkeeper Kara Stout. “”We knew we were pretty dominant on corner kicks because we have scored a lot from them, so every time we do get one, everybody gets pumped up and excited,”” Cuder said. “”On every kick I just try to drive it in. On that one, Liz [Hughes] made an awesome up-post run and she distracted them and it just went in.”” Stout was a formidable opponent, having been named an NCAA Division II All-American last year. Against the tritons, she was little more than human. “”We came out today wanting to show them we could play up with them, if not above them, and I think we did that,”” Cuder said. The rest of the first half was filled with back-and-forth play, with both squads traveling the length of the field in an attempt to strike blood. The second half saw more of the same until the final 20 minutes. That is when Sonoma unleashed its biggest threat. UCSD goalkeeper Kami Poma came through for the Tritons, making save after save during clutch time, sealing her team’s win and the ensuing conference title “”I thought we went to sleep a little bit in the last 10 or 15 minutes, but that’s going to happen when a team takes chances and throws bodies forward,”” said UCSD head coach Brian McManus. “”Everything just becomes 100 miles an hour. That’s going to happen. You’re going to have to accept that and get on with it. “” Earlier this year, Sonoma and UCSD got together for a rumble at UCSD. The Tritons were outplayed for most of the game but pulled out the win 1-0 in overtime. “”Sonoma is a powerhouse up north,”” Cuder said. “”The first time we played them, we were not scared, but unsure of what was going to happen. The first game they dominated we just weren’t playing our game.”” There were many differences between yesterday’s match and the one earlier this year. “”We decided this time just to play,”” McManus said. “”The last time we played up there they were by far the better team. Today, it was always going to be a tight game. There was no way someone was going to run away and score a barrel of goals, and I thought we did reasonably well.”” The Tritons played in Division III last year, winning the national championship. This year, they moved to Division II. “”The girls worked their backsides off today,”” McManus said. “”It’s been a hard year. They’ve got to keep proving themselves. Everyone wants to beat them. Nobody wants a team coming up from Division II — no scholarships — to win the championships.”” Next up for UCSD is the first round of the NCAA Division II Tournament, to be held this weekend, time and place to be announced. The Tritons hope to continue making waves. “”Our coach is amazing,”” Cuder said. “”That’s all you have to say. He takes whatever team he has and he makes a winning formula out of it and this just shows it. You can’t say enough about him. “”We came back from winning last year in Division III, and we wanted to come this far and we knew could do it. Coming out here and beating teams like Sonoma, [which] is an amazing team, and doing this — I just can’t say enough about him.”” ...