Sports

In Two Directions

It was the best of breaks, it was the worst of breaks. The month of December saw a tale of two different basketball squads for UCSD. The men’s and women’s teams seem to be headed in separate directions. The women’s record now stands at 7-3 while the men now sport a 2-8 record. The highlight for the women was the 21st annual UCSD Doubletree Invitational. The Tritons knocked off Savannah 71-67 to earn a trip to the final. In the final, UCSD outplayed the University of Findlay, narrowly winning the 70-68 overtime tilt. Maya Fok was on fire for UCSD in the final game, scoring 22 points. Ashley Kokjohn contributed with 11 points and 11 rebounds. Fok made the All-Tournament team and was named the tournament’s Most Valuable Player. Kokjohn also was named to the All-Tournament team. The men had a rough month but did have a couple of highlights. The Tritons made mincemeat of San Francisco State 96-77 in the middle of last month for their first win of the season. Nick Christensen led the way with a career-high 26 points. Christensen was hot from downtown, hitting four of five three-pointers. He also had nine rebounds. Cole Miller scored 17 points for UCSD and Ryan Swed chipped in with 12. UCSD was up 44-36 at half-time and cruised from there. A second Triton win came on the road at La Verne, with UCSD winning 77-63. Miller scored 19 points and had eight rebounds. Swed scored 18 and Mike Martin contributed with 10. Both the men and women travel for games against Cal Poly Pomona on Friday. The women play at 5:45 p.m. and the men play at 7:45 p.m. ...

Big Upset Wonderful Parting Gift For UCSD

With an unprecedented 9-8 victory over the University of Southern California in the NCAA men’s water polo semifinals, the Tritons advanced to the championship game at Pepperdine University last month, only to be devastated by seven-time champions UCLA in an 11-2 loss. David Pilz Guardian Despite suffering such a great defeat in the finals, the Tritons can be proud of their underdog overthrow of second-seed USC in the semifinals. Despite being seeded ninth in the nation coming into the tournament, the Tritons defied history to make not only their first appearance in the final game, but the first appearance by any Western Water Polo Association school. Also, they defeated USC for the first time in 32 meetings between the two schools. In doing so, they became the 10th team to join an elite group of schools that have competed in the NCAA title game, entering a group of perennial elites that includes UCLA, Stanford, UC Berkeley and Pepperdine. The game against USC on Dec. 2 proved to be a nail-biter to the end. While the Tritons pulled ahead in the first quarter to lead 2-1 going into the second, USC responded to the Tritons’ third goal with two of their own as the second quarter came to a close, leaving the game tied 3-3 at halftime. UCSD and USC traded goals throughout the third quarter. While USC briefly took the lead 6-5 with 2:09 left in the third on Ivan Babic’s third goal, the Tritons quickly battled back. By the end of the third quarter, the Tritons had tied the game with a goal by Justin Wylie, then taken the lead with a four-meter penalty shot by Jason Boettner. However, USC refused to go down without a fight, and the fourth quarter continued the back-and-forth drama that characterized the match’s first three quarters. USC tied the game 7-7 with a goal early in the fourth, but UCSD took a decisive 9-7 lead with a goal by Brent Allan with about three minutes left to play. Seconds later though, USC’s Steven O’Rourke lobbed a shot into the goal to bring USC within one. The Tritons managed to hold onto the lead through the end of the game, with a breathtaking save by goalie Glenn Busch and by regaining possession of the ball with 11 seconds left, allowing them to run down the clock and capture a berth in the final game. The most notable performance in the USC game, which Triton coach Denny Harper described as “”David slaying Goliath,”” was that of Boettner, who led the team with a total of five goals. Four other Triton players, Allan, Vladimir Djapic, Kellan Hori and Wylie, contributed a goal each, while Triton goalkeeper Busch matched the seven saves of both USC goalies. However, 18-7 UCLA proved to be an insurmountable obstacle to an NCAA title for the Tritons the next day. The top seeded Bruins dominated in both offense and defense, scoring 11 goals and holding the Tritons to two. While the Tritons had marked their first win ever against USC the day before, UCLA proved to continue its streak against the Tritons, who have never defeated the Bruins in the water. While at the end of the first quarter UCLA’s 3-1 lead seemed surpassable, by the end of the third, an unchecked run of seven UCLA goals took the Bruins to a decisive lead, and UCSD’s fourth quarter goal only served to stop play in what proved to be a quarter of formality as UCLA ran down the clock on its way to the national title. Despite being scoreless in the finals however, Boettner was awarded a spot on the All-Tournament first team, the only Triton among six other UCLA and USC players. Djapic, Wylie and Jonathan Samuels were awarded spots on second team as the Tritons finished a phenomenal first season. ...

The Various Faces of Football

The world of football has two distinct branches: one is that of the NFL and the other is of its little brother, college football. The state of each is on vastly different sides of the scale. The NFL seems to being doing a lot right. It has diversity amongst the teams. This year’s playoffs feature a number of clubs that, had their names been considered for the playoffs before the season started, the ones making the predictions would have been labeled insane or on heavy amounts of drugs. The Saints and the Eagles both miraculously turned things around and made it to the postseason. Amazing. Even better yet, the Saints did it without their starting quarterback and running back for a large portion of the year. They had a couple of unknowns lead their team on offense, winning the Western Division. Who would have thought that either of those teams would make it to the respectability, let alone make it to the postseason? The same goes for the AFC. Baltimore, of all teams, is in the postseason. It didn’t even have a team a couple of years ago. Trent Dilfer has seemingly come back from the dead, playing just enough to let the Baltimore defense win games. The other surprise is the Oakland Raiders. The dreaded silver and black were preparing to explode, but their run this year is still impressive. The college game is a little different. The college football bowl season came to a stunning halt last week when Oklahoma University defeated Florida State University 13-2 to win the Orange Bowl and the Bowl Championship Series National Championship. College football lucked out. If the Seminoles had won that game, all hell would have broken out. Miami defeated Florida handily in the Sugar Bowl the day before. It would have had one loss, just like FSU. The only difference is that Florida State’s loss came against Miami. Even more, the University of Washington also had one loss, and its victory list included a conquest of Miami. The question of which was the best team in the country would have been anyone’s guess. Luckily, the Sooners won and all was well. Oklahoma was clearly the best team of the year, going 13-0. But should it have been Florida State in the title game instead of either Miami or Washington? That is still up for argument. The system still stinks, though, and needs to be changed. The pro game seems to have accomplished what it has been trying to do: Give every team, every city and every fan a chance at glory. The college game, on the other hand, is wallowing in confusion, running the risk of not having a clear champion. ...

Twice as Sweet

Division II? Piece of cake as far as the UCSD women’s soccer team is concerned. David Pilz Guardian Last month, the Tritons captured the 2000 Division II championship by defeating Northern Kentucky University 2-1 at Barry University in Miami Shores. With the score tied at 1-1, Triton senior Christy Abizaid passed the ball to teammate and fellow senior Cindy Dostalek. Dostalek took the ball and scored the winning goal with only 15 seconds remaining in regulation for the title. “”I saw Kristin (Jones) coming down the line and I said ‘this is it’,”” Dostalek said. “”The ball came across from Christy, and I just followed it through. After the goal, I looked up at the clock and it said 15 seconds and I could not believe it.”” The Tritons dominated the second half, attempting six corner kicks in five minutes. UCSD almost gave up the winning goal as the Norse’s Becky Schnieder launched a shot with 43 seconds left. Triton goalkeeper Kami Poma came up big with her second save of the day and set off the events that led to the winning goal. The first half was scoreless but not without championship-caliber excitement. UCSD almost took a 1-0 lead, but Laura Dooly’s header came just short, striking the crossbar. Northern Kentucky goalkeeper Lauren Piening was busy all day, making six saves. The second half looked frightening as the Norse took a 1-0 advantage at the 51:31 mark. Northern Kentucky’s Betsy Moore dribbled the ball up the field and passed the ball to teammate Tricia Ruark. Ruark passed it to Denise Kunz, who introduced the ball to the net. “”I felt we needed a goal against us to wake us up,”” said Triton head coach Brian McManus. “”I think today we deserved it. We’ve had games at times that we thought we may have stolen, but we deserved this one. We outplayed them.”” The Tritons quickly answered Northern Kentucky’s goal. At 66:15, Christine Wensel launched a corner kick to the far post. Dooly was there to greet the ball and rocked it into the net, tying the game at 1-1. Northern Kentucky was very impressed with UCSD. “”UC San Diego has a great team,”” said Northern Kentucky head coach Bob Sheehan. “”We were pleased with our effort, but a little disappointed with how we played. When you give up 16 corner kicks it’s tough to win. They just kept serving the ball into the box and taking their shots.”” The Tritons are no strangers to championships, having captured five trophies at the Division III level. This title was even more impressive, considering that this was the first year for UCSD at the Division II level. Accolades went all around for the Tritons. Dostalek earned the tournament’s Outstanding Offensive Player award and Kara Morris was named the Outstanding Defensive Player. Also making the all-tournament team were Elizabeth Hughes, Julia Cuder and Erika Alfredson. The road to the final was not an easy path. UCSD had to get by defending national champion Franklin Pierce of New Hampshire. The Tritons did just that, winning in overtime 2-1. Northern Kentucky knocked off host school and previously undefeated Barry University to reach the final. The Tritons finish the year with a 21-2 record. They have also won 17 straight matches, with their last lost coming back on Sept. 22 against California State Dominguez Hills. “”You can’t go out better than this,”” Abizaid said. “”The first half was the most fun I’ve had playing soccer. I really appreciate the chance my teammates gave me to go out this way.”” ...

UCSD club Sports

CLUB SOCCER The UCSD club soccer team, on the strength of their 5-0-2 record in league play, was given the No. 1 ranking in the West region and invited to the national tournament in Orlando, Florida. A pumped up UCSD squad headed to the East Coast, where they handily dispatched University of Tennessee, University of Wisconsin Eau Claire, and Clemson on their way to a quarterfinal slot. In the quarterfinals, they were barely edged by eventual tournament champion Texas A&M, in a heart wrenching 2-0 loss. The UCSD soccer club was led throughout the tournament by offensive stalwarts Dana Carliss and Kevin McAllister, who were especially impressive in the Clemson game, where they had two goals apiece. Impressive performances also came courtesy of Tyler Thompson, who was named the team’s offensive most valuable player for compiling two goals and two assists in the tournament, and Wes Roberts, the adept ball handler who contributed an inspired effort for UCSD throughout the weekend. ICE HOCKEY The Triton ice hockey team, rife with stellar players, once again proved too much for their competitors, as they absolutely demolished Sacramento State to the tune of an embarrassing 12-1 final score. UCSD skated circles around the hapless Sacramento State skaters, utilizing a full bench to tire out and demoralize the opposing squad at UTC Ice Arena Friday night in their last home game of the quarter. UCSD’s Stephen Cohen turned in a sparkling performance, netting the match’s first five goals. With the win, UCSD increased their record to 3-0, looking to continue UCSD’s fine ice hockey tradition. WEEKEND EVENTS Saturday, Dec. 2 * Men’s rugby vs. USC 1 p.m. at Warren field Saturday through Sunday, Dec. 2 and Dec. 3 * Equestrian horse show at Pomona, all day Compiled by Scott Burroughs, Staff Writer ...

Tiger Tiger Burning Bright In the Forests

Tiger Woods is bigger than the PGA. This is a straight-up fact, and to extrapolate upon this a little further, Woods is bigger than just about anything out there, except maybe a Barcelona versus Madrid soccer match. Sorry to all those basketball and baseball and football prima donnas, but Woods overshadows just about any athlete, if not any event or personage around. Woods has captured the imagination of the country and of people around the world, and all through a sport such as golf. Golf is a great sport and it is fun to play, but conversely, how much fun is it to watch? Golf is usually just a bunch of tubby, pasty white men huffing around a golf course, each in pursuit of one of those enormous purses that golf tournaments provide. There is no action in golf like there is in football, basketball or baseball (though some people might disagree with me there). Despite golf’s innate disadvantage in the area of excitement, Woods, like The Bear before him, has transcended the sport of golf and has come to represent something better than just his sport. He is part of that new class of athletes, who have come to save us from the egos that so pervade America’s professional athletics system. In baseball we have Derek Jeter and Nomar Garciaparra. Football gives us Peyton Manning, Kurt Warner and Jevon Kearse. These are some good guys. Sorry about basketball, but all of those guys are still just whiners and show boaters. The above athletes have class and respect, which is more than can be said for a good portion of the athletes in professional sports, and Woods leads all of these people; He is the head of the class. I remember seeing Woods on “”Scholastic Sports,”” an old ESPN show, when I was about 12 years old, which would make him somewhere around 15 or 16. Even then, the guy had it in him, and you could tell he was going to be great. I just didn’t know that he was going to be this spectacular. He is winning major tournaments like they’re miniature golf at the local put-put and taking event after event from the best golfers in the world, relegating them the place of candyless, screaming babies. This year alone he has won 10 tournaments and collected over $12 million in prize money. By the way, as long as we are talking about money, let’s not forget the $54 million he will be making in endorsements this year. At the same time, he wins with class. He gives deference to those who have gone before and to those who will come after him. He has studied his game and plays it with edict. He had such a good start, no slip ups, no gargantuan sporting ego taking the place of his fragile perch atop America’s current sports heroes. We should have known, though, that the days where a man can stay atop forever are gone, if they even existed at all. Even Joltin’ Joe went through a phase of disdain when he became the first million-dollar man in baseball. But here is Woods, this year alone, $66 million richer, and he hints that because of his popularity, he and only he in this day and age should be entitled to more money: specifically some of the TV money that will be negotiated next year, because of the number of people that he attracts to the tournament. When asked if he thought he was entitled to more money than other players, Woods responded, “”Philosophically? In a perfect world I would be. Arnold [Palmer] would be. All the great ones would. Arnold is the one who got it all started.”” Right you are, Tiger, and good job maintaining your image of young upstart deferring to the greats, but as Dave Anderson of The New York Times points out, “”Palmer and Nicklaus helped resolve the Tour’s financial structure a quarter century ago, but they were acting on behalf of the other touring pros, not just themselves.”” Note to Tiger: This is not what you are doing. Furthermore Tiger has been complaining about how the commissioner of golf, Tim Finchem, doesn’t talk to him enough, saying, “”The only time he talks to me is when he wants me to do something for him — to play in this tournament or that tournament. It’s not like he comes up to me and asks me how I’m doing.”” What is he, 5 years old? I am sure Bud Selig is calling up Barry Bonds and Mike Piazza all the time just to shoot the breeze. Why don’t you grow some cajones and learn to survive on your own? The commissioner’s job is not to make you feel better, Tiger, but to make the sport that he presides over better for all the players in it. Finchem probably goes up to Phil Mickelson and David Duval once a week and asks them how their day is going. Wait, I forgot — those players don’t matter, do they. It is only Woods and his $66 million-plus that should matter to the PGA. Maybe this is just a stage. Tiger could be tired of the hype; I would be. All day every day, followed, harangued and accosted by anyone and everyone. Maybe this is his way of lashing out, and I hope so, because if that is what it is, then it is not that bad. He could be punching cameramen, like certain movie stars have been known to do. However, if Tiger has any common sense left in that brain, which seems to have been swelled by the sweet nectar known as feeling God-like, he will just get back to playing and retire 30 years from now as possibly the greatest sportsman the United States has ever produced. ...

College Bowl Format is Complete Bull

The college football season is winding down, and by the time we all return from our glorious winter break, the winner of the national championship will have been decided at the Orange Bowl in Miami. And if you believe that, I have some swamp land to sell you, also located in Florida. The way that college football decides on its national champion is ridiculous. Instead of a playoff format that would pit all deserving teams against one other, a special few are selected in what is known as the Bowl Championship Series. The Bowl Championship Series takes a school’s record, various polls, strength of schedule, how much it has outscored its opponents, the meaning of life, its mom’s age divided by the number of No. 1 Beatles songs, combines that with some fuzzy math, and voila! It magically comes up with the best college football team in the nation. Right now, Oklahoma stands at No. 1 because it is the only undefeated school. Fair enough. But what about second place? Who should be ranked second is not quite so clear. So far, Florida State looks like it will be second. Miami is ranked third and Washington is fourth. Even though Miami defeated Florida State and Washington knocked off Miami and each has only one loss, they are ranked in reverse order. Why is this? Well, first off, people back East don’t like any team that is not from the East, especially those from the West Coast. Also, football “”experts”” are infatuated with schools from Florida, especially Florida State. I don’t know what it is, but the football people in this country love Florida State. Another question arises: What if Oklahoma loses to Kansas Sate this weekend in the Big 12 championship game? That would leave a plethora of teams with only one loss. The top team will be determined by some computer, run by some guy who has never ever been within a mile of a football field. Boy, that’s fair. If Oklahoma loses this weekend to Kansas State, which very well may happen, Florida State will become No. 1 and Miami will be No. 2. The two teams will duke it out in the Orange Bowl, played in Miami. So, a pair of colleges from Florida will play in a bowl game in Florida. Whoopdee freakin’ doo. What is needed is a playoff format. Take the top 16 teams and start a tournament the first weekend in December, and have it run until New Year’s Day. Yes, there will be a lot of argument when it comes to who should be the 16th team, but at least this guarantees that the top elite eight or 10 schools will all be given a shot at playing in the national championship. This is the only sport to act so absurdly. Professional football has playoffs. College basketball has one of the biggest playoffs in the nation in their much-hyped Road to the Final Four. Football would be just as big, if they would only do it. Why don’t they? The sponsors of the bowl won’t let them. There is a lot of money involved in this business, but just as much can be made with a playoff. The powers that be must realize this. College football needs a playoff format to legitimize itself. Until then, it will wallow in the bullshit of polls and computers, with each year culminating in nothing more than a mythical national champion. ...

Is there a championshipin the house?

The Triton water polo team is going to the NCAA Final Four,after sweeping the competition at the Western Water Polo Association Championships two weeks ago. Lyon Liew/ Guardian It will compete with UCLA, Navy and USC. Although USC lost to Pepperdine in the first round of the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation Tournament, it was awarded an at-large berth based upon its regular season record. UCSD dominated the WWPA tournament with its defense. It allowed fewer than five goals in each game. For his efforts, Glenn Busch, Triton goalkeeper, was named to the all-WWPA second team. “”Our defense really re-emerged this tournament and led us to the win,”” said head coach Denny Harper. The Tritons’ first game in the tournament was against Chaminade, and it was a laugher. UCSD made it look like second graders with a bed-wetting problem and took it down 17-4. Air Force was UCSD’s next opponent and the toughest of the tournament. In the end, though, UCSD proved too strong and won 6-4. The last game against Loyola Marymount was close, but UCSD pulled away to win 10-5. Jonathan Samuels, who has been a rock for UCSD all season long, rose to the occasion at this tournament and annihilated opposing defenses, shredding any front thrown at him. Samuels was named the all-WWPA Most Valuable Player. “”[Samuels is a] man amongst boys,”” Harper said. “”All season long he has lead the team and has been the dominant player in the pool.”” Justin Wylie and Samuels were named to the all-WWPA first team. Joining Busch on the second team were Jason Boettner and Vladimir Djopic, each outstanding contributors in the Tritons’ run to this year’s Final Four. “”Who lead us through this tournament were our seniors,”” Harper said. “”[Vladimir] Djopic, Jason [Boettner], Ken Woodruff, Justin Wylie and Glenn Busch really emerged and gave it their all and helped us win.”” UCSD will face tough competition in the first round of the NCAA championships. It will play USC, which just barely squeaked by the Tritons 7-5 at Canyonview Pool earlier this season. The Tritons had a chance to beat USC, but gave up a couple of goals from 9 meters, which doomed them. Despite their year-end slump, the Tritons seem to have regained the confidence and form that allowed them to start the season on a tear. They ranked as high as fifth in the nation, a position that they held for two weeks. If the Tritons can retain this form and eliminate the kinds of mistakes that belayed their loss to USC, they have a serious chance to overcome the Trojans. “”The Trojans might be looking past us to UCLA,”” Harper said. “”They have such a rivalry there and after their earlier loss they have a lot of emotion invested. With the way we are playing that is going to play to our advantage.”” The NCAA Final Four will be played this weekend in Malibu. The UCSD vs. USC game will be held at 2:30 p.m. Saturday. The winner of this game will play UCLA or Navy in the championship game at 2:30 p.m. Sunday. The third-place game will be held at 1 p.m. Sunday. ...

Here We Aren't Now, Entertain Us

The role of athletics, as associated with school spirit, should be one of importance. That is not to say sports should be of more importance than academics or quality of life at the school attended, but it should be of some importance. Sky Frostenson/ Guardian UCSD boasts a top-notch athletic program, full of national champions and All-Americans, and with its move to Division II, the Tritons are showing that they have no problem adjusting to the new level of competition and that they will continue to produce A-list athletic teams. If both these assertions are to be believed, then the question must be posed, where do athletics stand in relation to school spirit at UCSD? The answer to this question is simple: There’s no relation. Triton Assistant Athletic Director Ken Grosse said “”Athletics do not play as much of a role in school spirit as we, meaning the athletic department, wish it would.”” David Pilz/ Guardian Athletics, outside of the athletic community at UCSD, plays no role in the UCSD student body’s conception of itself as Tritons. “”As an athlete on the volleyball team, the other guys on the team and I make an effort to go out and support the other teams,”” said Marshall sophomore Bill O’Connor. “”For instance, we went to the State game last week. I just don’t see that effort from most students here at UCSD.”” If athletics play little or no role in school spirit, then what forms the core of a Triton? It seems as if the focus of the administration at UCSD is on the academic aspect of student life. This creates an atmosphere in which it is very hard for students to come together outside of the stressful arena of the quarter system. There seems to be an invasive malaise that has seeped into the very pores of this La Jolla campus that makes it impossible to have fun while attending school here. Is it really impossible, are classes that hard, or is the student body just apathetic? Now, going to a basketball game or a water polo game is not a cure-all for this elusive malaise, but at the same time, it does give students something to do and it brings students together in a community that fosters unity. There is a purpose to being at that game and the purpose is to cheer on UCSD, to support YOUR school. “”Athletic events create a critical mass, a place where students can be brought together,”” said men’s basketball coach Greg Lanthier. “”Bringing students together is what creates school spirit. The chance to become a part of this campus is there and is provided for students. All they have to do is get up and take advantage of it.”” Why sit around and complain about how boring life is as a Triton, as many UCSD students have been known to do, when there are usually between one and four home games a week featuring one or more of UCSD’s 23 NCAA teams? One group that certainly does care about Triton athletics is the pep band. The pep band is made up completely of volunteers, as opposed to most schools of comparable size and athletic stature, where the band is fully funded by the music department and is offered as an actual class. Even though they are volunteers, the band still manages to make it to at least one game a week where they play anything from jazz to rock to pep band classics like “”Louie Louie.”” The pep band makes a deliberate decision to go to the games, and the student body could do the same thing, so why don’t they? For some, the choice to go or not to go is hamstrung by their schoolwork. “”I would love to check out a basketball game or go to a soccer match,”” said Muir freshman Kirk Miller. “”But half the time I’m either too tired or too busy with a job and schoolwork to go.”” However, this is not the only reason students don’t go to the games. For many, sports are obscured in anonymity. “”Most of the time I just don’t hear about the games. If the advertising for the games was better, and I knew when and where they were, I would definitely show more often,”” said Roosevelt junior Adam Taylor. The move to Division II could alleviate this problem. “”In the CCAA, we play doubleheaders and it makes it much easier to advertise and much more spectator-friendly since in Division III, many of our games were played during the break,”” Grosse said. Athletics can offer an outlet for the student body, and it can help form UCSD’s vision of itself. Events present times and places for students to come together and, if even just for the hour it takes to play a water polo match, feel like they are part of something more than a study group for their Chem 6A class. How to make this happen is a hard question to answer, but the tools are there. We have a great athletic program and students who want to get out and be a part of something, but do students want athletics to be that something? UCSD cyclist Pete Knudsen said “”One of the reasons I came to UCSD was because we didn’t have the rah-rah attitude of other schools, and I like the balance we strike here between athletics and academics.”” Students need to realize that UCSD is lacking in school spirit. In order to make this campus a better place to go to school and in order to foster a sense of school spirit and unity, both the students and the administration need to let athletics or another aspect of campus life rise up and become equals with that masterful slave-driver, academia. ...

UCSD Men's Basketball Falls To Cal Poly

The UCSD men’s basketball team faced another tough opponent last Monday when it squared off on the road against Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. The Mustangs gave the Tritons more than they could handle, winning 89-67. UCSD did make it a game early on, down only 10-9 after a pair of Sam Higgins’ three-pointers. Later, the Tritons’ Cole Miller hit a three-pointer to give his team a 17-16 lead. It was all Cal Poly after that. The Mustangs went up 45-30 at halftime and led by as much as 25 at one point. The Tritons did rally back to pull to within 13 points, but that would be as close as they would get en route to the loss. Cameron Jackson led UCSD with 18 points and four assists. Higgins chipped in with 14 points and Miller finished with 12 points and five rebounds. The Mustangs sported four players scoring in double-digits, including Scott Jamaal with 20. The win was the first game of the year for Cal Poly, while the loss made UCSD fall to 0-2. After playing a two tough games against a pair of Division I schools, UCSD looks to pick up a victory on Wednesday when it face Christian Heritage College at 7 p.m. at home. ...