Sports

Men Continue to Struggle

It was a rough couple of days for UCSD men’s basketball coach Greg Lanthier. On Wednesday, UCSD trekked out into the middle of the desert to face off with Grand Canyon University, and then hosted the lowly Antelopes two days later. Lyon Liew Guardian Both face-offs resulted in Triton losses. Despite overcoming an early 24-point deficit, the UCSD men’s basketball team could not seal the deal in the Wednesday game. The match was an up-and-down affair for the Triton squad. It fell behind 13-0 to open the game, and was down 40-16 at the end of the first half before coming back in the second. Capitalizing on some key GCU miscues, the Tritons pulled within one. But that was as close as they got, as the game ended with the Antelopes winning 84-75. GCU was led by Eddie Turner, who sparked a late 15-7 run to lock up the victory late in the game. He finished with 15 points to go with his 10 rebounds and three blocks. Toure Knighton also came up big for Grand Canyon in the win, notching a team-leading 21 points. The Tritons were led once again by the stellar play of Cole Miller, who had 21 points, going five for eight from three point land. Ryan Swed also continues to impress, scoring 13 points and pulling down a game-high 13 rebounds. Kyle Moyneur made the most of his limited playing time, notching 10 points in 11 minutes. Cameron Jackson was also solid for the Tritons, scoring seven points and dishing out six assists in the loss. When the squads met again in the gleaming hulk of metal and glass that is RIMAC Arena Saturday night, the end result was the same as when they met out in the wastelands of Arizona, with GCU once again taking home the victory by a score of 74-66 in front of a boisterous home crowd of 562, including the very audible and supportive men’s track and field team. However, the beginning was quite the reverse of the previous game, as the Tritons came out strong against Grand Canyon as they strayed from their usual three-point attack and dominated the Antelopes inside en route to a 15-6 advantage. However, Grand Canyon would eventually battle back. This time, though, it was Jovian Dobrzenski who stood out on the floor for the Antelopes. He had 24 points on eight of 12 shooting and and five for five perfection from the free-throw line. Kenny Mullins was also a key contributor, knocking down 15 points, while Chris Costello chipped in with 10 and Knighton pulled down nine boards for the victorious GCU squad. UCSD was led on the court by the exploits of senior guard Nick Christensen, who sparked the team with 17 points. Miller was once again a factor, draining 14 points, while Sam Higgins had 13 of his own. Those points were especially significant for Higgins, as it put him over the 1,000-point plateau for his career. His 1,010 points place him among only eight other players who have amassed 1,000 or more points while wearing Triton blue and gold. While history was made, the Tritons would rather have picked up a victory or two, especially against GCU, whose record, with the two wins over the Tritons, improves to a meager 5-7 in league play and 5-11 overall. No team is a walkover in the strong CCAA division though, as the Tritons and their 1-11 record will attest. They hope to pick things up a notch or two Friday night, when they will go head to head with a strong Chico State team at 8 p.m. at RIMAC Arena. ...

UCSD Club Sports

Women’s Ultimate The UCSD women’s ultimate team displayed its West Coast dominance by sweeping all its competitors at the Santa Barbara Classic this weekend. First, UCSD downed undefeated Claremont 13-2. Then it smacked around UCSB with a 15-3 victory to advance to the finals. Against Stanford in the final bracket, UCSD did not slow down, winning again 15-3. Bryan Martya and Alicia White were dominant forces for UCSD. The next big competition for UCSD will be the Presidents’ Day Tournament from Feb. 17 to Feb. 19, which it will host. Men’s Ultimate The UCSD men’s ultimate team did not have as much success as its female counterpart, but it did hold its own at the UCSB Classic. The men faced Stanford in the semifinals, knocking them off 14-10. Jeff Smile, Brian Chu and Philipp Miller had great games for UCSD. In the finals against UCSB, the men came up just short, losing 16-15. Jake Chang and Steven Ringel kept UCSD in the match until the very end. The next big event for UCSD is the Presidents’ Day Tournament, Feb. 17 to Feb. 19 at UCSD. Women’s Rugby The UCSD women’s rugby team suffered a disappointing loss against UC Santa Barbara on the road this weekend. The two teams were as even as can be heading into the game, which UCSB won 24-20. UCSD had their way with UCSB in the first half, and were actually up by 15 points at the end of the first half. Laura Reeves scored twice and Melina Madrigal also scored. In the second half, however, UCSB had an amazing comeback, pulling out the win. Candace Jackman and Teresa Facchini had big days for UCSD. The team next plays at home on Jan. 27 against Arizona State. Ice Hockey The UCSD ice hockey team had a weekend it would rather forget as it fell to California State University Long Beach 8-4. UCSD gave up four unanswered goals to open up play and never recovered. The team did struggle back, closing to within 5-4 at the end of the second period, but it was too little, too late. Long Beach strapped on its skates and gave it to UCSD in the third period for the dominating win. Casey Kempneil, Stephen Cohen, Rich Hsiao and Keith Davis all contributed goals. UCSD goalkeeper Scott Friedman tried his best, making 18 saves in the third period alone. Upcoming Events Friday, Jan. 26 Ice Hockey vs. Fresno State at UTC, 10:15 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 27 Men’s Lacrosse Scrimmage at Warren Field, 1 p.m. Men’s Rugby vs. UCLA at Warren Field, 1 p.m. Women’s Rugby vs. University of Arizona at Warren Field, 11 a.m. Ski/Board at Mammoth Mountain, all day Sunday, Jan. 28 Women’s Rugby vs. Arizona State at Warren Field, 11 a.m. Surf Contest 2 at Ventura Beach, all day Ski/Board at Mammoth Mountain, all day ...

It's Time to Play Ball!

The UCSD softball team is venturing into uncharted territory, hoping for a new beginning but with the same positive results. This is the first season that the team will participate at the competitive Division II level. At the Division III level, the Tritons held their own. Just last year, they went 25-13 and earned a playoff berth. This year’s competition will be much tougher, but the team hopes to still make some waves. With the move up to a higher division comes something else — a home in the California Collegiate Athletic Association. The CCAA is regarded as the best Division II conference in the nation. “”First of all, we’re very excited about it,”” said Triton head coach Patti Gerckens. “”I don’t really know a lot about the conference. I know the teams are strong. I don’t know if the strength is more in the pitching or in the hitting.”” The move up to a different and harder level requires a different approach to how the Tritons will deal with new nemeses. “”We’re adjusting, we’re working on a higher intensity level,”” Gerckens said. “”People have a lot of confidence right now. They believe in themselves, they believe in each other. The team chemistry at this point is probably stronger at the beginning of the season … than ever before. It’s all new, so there are a lot of uncertainties, definitely.”” UCSD is bringing back a number of top players from last year’s playoff team. Senior Michelle Wilson, who batted .366 last year, can be found in right field. Senior Jeanine Cordero also will be returning, as will senior Christina Searing at second base, bringing her .579 slugging percentage. The always-dangerous sophomore Kristin Hunstead will be back behind the plate. Juniors Samantha Hayes and Kristina Anderson are also coming back. “”We have a lot of strength, but I don’t know [how much] compared to what we’re going to face,”” Gerckens said. Leea Harlan will again take the mound and be the No. 1 pitcher. She finished last year with a 15-6 record and a .88 ERA. Also in the pitching rotation will be junior newcomer Christy Martineli. “”We only have two pitchers, but a lot of teams only have two pitchers,”” Gerckens said. “”We’re not going to have the luxury of having the third pitcher. We’re going to have to see.”” New talent coming through will also be strong, including up-and-comers such as Angie Carr in the outfield, Amy Mettee in the infield and Kim Aggabao at second base. “”We have some incredible, talented new people,”” Gerckens said. Gerckens understands the challenge before her team. Many tough teams in the CCAA will be licking their chops in anticipation of the new kids on the block. “”We’ll get hit,”” she said. “”I know we’re going to get hit, but I also think we will hit.”” Gerckens believes that her team will be strong at the plate and in the field, enabling UCSD to keep stride with other schools. “”I think our offense is going to be strong,”” Gerckens said. “”I also think our defense is going to be strong. We’re just going to see how much we’re challenged if we’re put on the defensive right away. Obviously, that’s nobody’s goal. Our goal is to score first and put the other team on the defense.”” All in all, it looks as if the Tritons are ready for the upcoming softball season. “”The team has been practicing hard,”” Gerckens said. “”They’re really focused and they’re excited about being in a conference.”” The Tritons’ first game will be Saturday, Feb. 3 at 1 p.m. at home against Biola University. ...

Miller is Bright Spot

Most of us have heard the saying “”What a difference a year makes.”” In the case of UCSD basketball forward Cole Miller, one year has definitely made a difference. This season Miller, a senior, is shooting a lethal 40 percent from three-point land and leads the team in points per game, rebounds per game, minutes played and free throw percentage. So is there anything more the senior could possibly do? Probably not, but his tremendous work ethic will no doubt propel him to even greater heights. Courtesy UCSD Athletics Although the transition from Division III to Division II has not been the easiest for the men’s basketball team, Miller is doing all he can to lead the Tritons to victory in his final season. The California Collegiate Athletic Association has proven to be a tough league, but Miller sees a lot of positives to playing in Division II. “”The events are more exciting because at both home and away games, a lot of people come out to watch,”” he said. “”It’s also easier to win at home in the new league.”” And after looking at UCSD’s pair of home games last weekend, it is easy to see why Miller believes in home court advantage. Even though the Tritons lost both games, they were never out of contention in either game, losing by 10 points to California State University Los Angeles and a mere two points to CSU Dominguez Hills. Miller led the team in scoring both nights, finishing up the weekend with a total of 45 points and nailing eight of 15 three-pointers against Dominguez Hills. With just over 10 games remaining in the season, Miller says that the team has a positive outlook and has to remain as competitive as it has been. When asked if he feels any pressure to put up big numbers game in and game out, Miller simply said that there is no pressure, but that he does it for his teammates. “”I don’t really have to do anything extra,”” he said. “”We have a team-oriented offense, so it doesn’t have to come down to just one person.”” However, head coach Greg Lanthier recognizes the extra effort that Miller has put into his game since his junior year. “”Cole has worked hard in the offseason to get better, and he’s played outstandingly well this season,”” Lanthier said. “”You have to credit him for that.”” “”He’s always been a hard worker,”” he added. “”The only thing that surprises me about him is how comfortable he is on the floor when you compare this year to last year.”” Aside from hard work, there are a few other things that have helped Miller with his remarkable season. His superstitions and pregame rituals include wearing a particular ankle brace and using visualization. Despite having a wide array of ankle braces to choose from, Miller has been wearing the same black ankle brace for quite some time. The reason? “”I’ve been shooting well ever since I started wearing it,”” he said. Visualization is a technique that many athletes use to help them perform well in games. As shown by Miller’s numbers this season, this technique is certainly working. “”My dad gave me an article from ‘Sports Illustrated’ about an Olympic athlete who uses visualization,”” Miller said. “”It works really well for my shooting.”” Miller, an art major who does a lot of oil painting in his free time, is graduating this year and has aspirations of continuing to play basketball, perhaps overseas, after leaving UCSD. He and fellow senior forward Sam Higgins will be attending the Showcase Camp in Utah, where coaches and scouts will be watching for potential players. So, if the basketball career doesn’t work out, what will Miller do? “”I guess I’ll have to go out into the real world and find a job,”” he laughed. What the future holds for Miller is uncertain, but in the meantime the UCSD men’s basketball team can count on him, lucky ankle brace and all, to lead the way. ...

Super Bowl is All About the 'D'

This weekend, the New York Giants and the Baltimore Ravens will engage in Super Bowl XXXV. Who will the winner be, you may ask? Well, New York, of course. The big game this year pits two teams better known for defense than for offense. In other words, this will not be an offensive blockbuster. Defense, though, is awesome to watch when it is done right. It can be just as fun to observe as high-flying offenses such as those of the Rams and Vikings. The question just flips around. It is no longer a wonder how much a team will score, but how little the opponents will be held to. The Ravens have a stellar defense. Unfortunately, that is all they have. The superiority of the Baltimore defense is not up for debate. They have some of the best defense in recent memory, maybe even as good as the Bears’ defense in 1985. It is their offense that has a problem. Defense does win championships, but you need at least a little bit of offense to make some points. The Ravens’ plan so far this year has been to have the defense hold an opponent’s offense in check so the Ravens’ offense can get into field goal range. Sorry, but that is not going to work in the Super Bowl. Frankly, the Ravens’ offense is downright pitiful. Folks, we’re talking about a bunch that did not score a touchdown during the month of October — an entire month. Trent Dilfer is not a Super Bowl caliber quarterback, and he does not have the potential to be one, yet he is in the big game. He’s a nice backup, sure, but not a championship starter by any means. Why do you think Tampa got rid of him in favor of Sean King? At running back they have Jamal Lewis, which is not too bad considering he rumbled for over 1,300 yards this year, but he can’t do it by himself. Plus, the Giants’ defense will be all over him like Bill Clinton on an intern. Who else do they have? Shannon Sharpe? He is the best tight end playing today, but someone has to get him the ball. If they put Sharpe in as quarterback and have him throw the ball to himself, maybe they would have a game plan. The Ravens got extremely lucky a couple of Sundays ago against an overrated Oakland team in the AFC Championship game. If it hadn’t been for a lucky pass play to Sharp and a turnover by the Raiders, they may still be playing that game as we speak. On a scale of 1 to 10, the Ravens defense is a 9.8, but their offense is not even on the chart. The Giants’ defense is not nearly as good, but their offense is a whole lot better. On defense, the Giants will not have to do much to keep the game close, but there are high school teams that could stop the Ravens’ offense. OK, that may be a little much, but what the Giants do have to offer will prove sufficient. Hell, look at what they did to Minnesota’s high-flying attack a couple of weeks ago. With inspired play, they made the Vikings look like the Chargers. On the offensive side, the Giants running game is decent with Tiki Barbar and Ron Dayne. Will they be able to get anything done against the Ravens? Not at all, but that is not to say they won’t try. The difference in this game is the Giants quarterback, Kerry Collins. OK, no more scoffing, or at least cut out your boisterous laughter. But I think Collins has it in him to win this game. Many forget the good parts of Collins’ career and concentrate on the bad. Yes, he did have an alcohol problem that nearly cost him his career. He also simply gave up with the Carolina Panthers, making him look like a jackass. But hey, this is the NFL, home of second chances. When Collins was not acting like a dumbass, he was pretty good. He led the Panthers to the NFC championship game during his third year. He was a hell of a college quarterback. If he remains focused, he can make things happen. He did throw for 3,600 yards this year. The way I see the Super Bowl shaping up is this: The Ravens’ defense will get a safety some time in the first half. They will also cause a turnover early on, setting the ball up for their offense deep in Giants territory, giving them a field goal. For these accomplishments, Ray Lewis will be named the game’s Most Valuable Player. Yes, someone charged with murder will be named the MVP of the Super Bowl. Not only that, he will be on the losing team — only the second time that will have happened. The Giants’ defense will keep the Ravens’ offense at bay, aside for the field goal, the entire game. Kerry Collins and the offense will have two big plays in the second half, setting up two field goals and a championship. My final score: Giants 6, Ravens 5. ...

Fighting the Shortage

It is said that the best gift a person can receive is the gift of life. With the blood supply critically low in San Diego County right now, the gift of life is certainly more important than ever. Over the holidays, there was a drop in donations and as a result blood is more in demand than ever. Fortunately, the UCSD athletic department is eager to do all it can to alleviate the problem. Each quarter, the athletic department participates in a community outreach activity, and this winter the activity is a blood drive. This Tuesday, the athletic department, working in conjunction with the American Red Cross, will be sponsoring the blood drive. Associate Athletic Director Ken Grosse has taken a genuine interest in encouraging UCSD students and faculty to donate blood. The goal is to get everyone involved and ultimately to help increase the blood supply. “”We’re looking to generate at least 125 units of blood,”” Grosse said. Students who are interested should call the athletic department at (858)534-4211 or (858)534-8460 and sign up to donate blood. The blood drive will take place in the green room of RIMAC, which can be entered through the Arena. The doors will be open from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and from 2 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Most slots are taken by coaches and athletes, so if more students participate, the turnout will be phenomenal. Keep in mind that it does not take much effort to give blood. Here are 10 great reasons to donate, according to Blood Centers of the Pacific Online: – Blood transfusions save lives. – There is no substitute for human blood. – Every three seconds, someone needs a blood transfusion. – About 60 percent of the population is eligible to donate blood, yet less than 5 percent do so. – A pint of blood, separated into components, can help up to three people. – You will make your community a safer and better place. – Donating fulfills your desire to “”give back”” to the community. – You will receive a mini physical (blood pressure, temperature, iron level). – You will learn your blood type. – It is safe, simple and it saves lives. So, if you are at least 17 years old, are in good health and weigh at least 110 pounds, come to the green room at RIMAC on Tuesday or call the athletic department to set up a time when you can come in and donate some much-needed blood. The UCSD athletic department has done its part in establishing this wonderful opportunity, so the least students can do is show an equal commitment to the San Diego community by giving a little. ...

Basketball Loses Two More

The UCSD men’s basketball team once again had its mettle tested last weekend in two key California Collegiate Athletic Association matches. Both tilts were held at RIMAC Arena, vs. California State University Los Angeles on Friday night and CSU Dominguez Hills on Saturday evening. The Tritons, despite inspired play and some solid individual performances, were vanquished in both contests. The CSU Los Angeles game was a back-and-forth affair early on, with the score a close 32-28 as the first half came to a close. CSU Los Angeles parlayed that four-point lead into 10 points, however, in the second half, to pick up the victory with a final score of 71-61. The Eagles won by virtue of a balanced attack, with four players scoring in double figures. They were led by forward Ronald Johnson, who shot 7 for 14 from the floor en route to compiling a team-high 17 points. His supporting cast included guard Quincy Stinson, who had 16 points, on 4-7 shooting, while going six of seven from the charity stripe and chalking up four assists. Teammate Ricky Maiden also rang up 16 points, while Jonathan Levy had 15 of his own in the victory. The Tritons were led by forward Cole Miller, who had a game-high 18 points and dished out five assists. Senior guard Nick Christenson was also a major contributor for UCSD, notching 15 points on six-for-eight shooting and pulling down four rebounds. Also chipping in with a double-figure tally was Erik Ramp, who had 11 points on the night. Alas, it was not to be, as the Eagles’ four-pronged attack could not be contained and the victorious Cal State Los Angeles squad improved its record to 5-4 in CCAA play and evened up at 7-7 overall. If Friday’s game was disheartening for the Triton players, the match held the following night vs. Cal State Dominguez Hills was probably more akin to having that vital organ ripped from their bodies and then repeatedly stomped upon. In a horrifically close contest, the Tritons were nudged out 56-54. The two teams were-neck-and neck throughout the match, with the score knotted at 25-25 when the whistle sounded signaling the end of the first half. Dominguez Hills, though, had the final two-point lead at the end, and the team took home the victory in front of a crowd of 790. It was led by forward Reggie Williams, who had 23 points on nine of 16 shooting to go along with his nine rebounds. Guard Geoffrey Meeks also chipped in with 12 points for the Dominguez squad, who upped it’s record to 3-7 in conference play. The Tritons, in defeat, were once again carried by Miller, who led all players with 27 points, including a whopping eight three-pointers. He was not only on fire from downtown, but also under the boards, pulling down an impressive nine rebounds. Sam Higgins also kicked in three three-pointers and seven rebounds for the Tritons. These individual efforts just weren’t enough, especially with the rest of the starting five combining for a mere seven points. With the weekend’s two in-league losses, UCSD’s record fell to 1-9 in CCAA play and 2-13 overall. While their record may not reflect it, the Tritons are making progress on the hardwood. With a more consistent team effort and a couple of bounces here and there, the Tritons would have picked up the victory versus Dominguez and been right in the thick of things at the end of Cal State Los Angeles match. Let’s hope their luck improves, as this Wednesday they head out to Arizona to do battle with Grand Canyon University. ...

Volleyball Has Tough Date With USC

The UCSD men’s volleyball team tested its powers in front of a Division I powerhouse on the road and found out where it stands — not in a very good place. The Trojans of USC downed the Tritons 3-0, winning the three games by scores of 30-21, 30-21 and 31-29. UCSD actually threatened in the third game, holding a 27-23 lead at one point. A great comeback was not to be, though, as USC battled back for the win. It was all USC as they out-hit the Tritons 0.291 to 0.079. Zack Hite and Griffin Cogorno were offensive highlights for UCSD, each garnering eight kills during the loss. Defensively, Donald Chen led the way with eight blocks. The Tritons will try to get back on the winning side of things this Friday when they host Pepperdine at 7 p.m. ...

We Could be Heroes, if We Played Well

One thing that gets me as a sports journalist and a sports fan is the way that sports commentators throw around the word “”hero.”” Too often, I will hear a television or radio announcer use the word when referring to athletes and their performances. More often than not, the performance is all but heroic. An athlete will do his job really well under difficult conditions, and he will thus be referred to as a hero. This is preposterous. A running back ran for over 200 yards with 40 carries during this year’s NFL playoffs. The announcer who was covering the game had the gall to refer to it as “”a heroic effort.”” Heroic? Please. Yes, it was difficult, strenuous, even gutsy. Hell, I know I could not carry the ball 40 times for over 200 yards against a playoff defense. I doubt many of you readers could do it. But if I could, would it be heroic? Hardly. Well, maybe if it were in the name of skinny journalists of average height, then it might be heroic. But otherwise, no. A pitcher will throw nine innings of one-hit baseball during a big game. It will be called “”heroic.”” Was it heroic? No, it should be called “”doing his job.”” The term “”heroic”” should be reserved for true heroes. The thousands who have died during wars in the name of America are heroic. Firefighters and policemen are heroic. A doctor who volunteers time in developing countries is a hero. Those scientists fighting AIDS are heroic. Santa Claus is heroic. Harriet Tubman was heroic. The list goes on and on. Heroes are those who help mankind, save mankind and try to better mankind. They are not football players who run for a lot of yards or basketball players who lead their teams to victory. They may look good, but not heroic. That is not to say that there are not athletes out there who are heroes. There are plenty of heroic athletes, and their heroism spreads beyond the field or court. The one that sticks out the most is Jackie Robinson. He went through so much shit in breaking the color barrier that few of us can understand. He is a hero not only to African Americans but to anyone who has experienced prejudice. Sean Elliot of the San Antonio Spurs is another athlete hero. He had a kidney transplant and still came back to play in the NBA. Before, if there was something wrong with your kidney, you were best off calling your lawyer to work on your will. Elliot proved that now, even though you may be down, you are never out. Magic Johnson is another such athlete, much like in the Elliot theme. He came back with HIV to play some more in the NBA. He now tours and raises money for various charities. Definite hero. All those baseball players who gave up the best years of their life to fight during World War II are heroes. Just think of what Ted Williams’ stats would have looked like, had he not lost those prime years fighting overseas. Can you picture that happening today, if the United States got into a major military conflict on the level of WWII? I can just picture the greedy self-congratulatory athletes of today complaining about how the war is interrupting their rhythms. The list of athlete heroes goes on. It includes the NFL’s work with United Way, Dikembe Mutombo and his work in his homeland of Nigeria, Arthur Ashe and his color barrier-breaking and AIDS-fighting greatness, and many more. A hero is someone extra special, one who does something extraordinary, something that goes beyond the regular bullshit. An athlete having a great game is great to talk about around the water cooler, but he is not a hero. ...

Women's Basketball Splits a Pair at Home

The UCSD women’s basketball team had mixed reviews this weekend, splitting a pair of games. Lyon Liew Guardian On Friday, the Tritons downed California State University Los Angeles 76-65 but fell Saturday night to California State University Dominguez Hills 50-49. The loss to Dominguez Hills was a heartbreaker. With four-and-a-half minutes left in the game, UCSD held a 46-38 advantage after an Ali Ginn bucket. The Toros stormed back after a basket by Tomica Coleman and a three-pointer by Fercia Rambacal, closing the gap to two, at 46-44. UCSD’s Maya Fok answered with a bucket of her own, but Dominguez Hills eventually tied it up with 44 seconds left at 48-48. With time running down, Toros star Tracee Lewis drove the lane and connected with an off-balance junk shot, giving her team the lead at 50-48. The Tritons still had six seconds left and they gave the ball to their star Fok. Fok drove the lane and put up a shot. Her prayer fell short, but she was fouled with only two-tenths of a second left. At the line for the evening, Fok had been 6-6, but all of those had come in the first half. She missed the first shot. In an attempt to miss the second shot and hope for a rebound and game- tying miracle shot, Fok made the foul shot. She would end the game 7-8 from the line. Fok led the Tritons with 17 points and Nicholle Bromley chipped in with 10 points and eight rebounds. Against Los Angeles, UCSD had to work a little comeback magic. The Tritons found themselves down 38-33 at the half. They proceeded to go on a 43-27 run in the second half for the victory. Bromley scored 17 to lead all scorers and she had nine rebounds. Fok participated with 14 points. Genevieve Ruvald had a great game, almost accomplishing a triple-double when she scored nine points, had 10 rebounds and dished nine assists. Next up for the Tritons is a trip to Grand Canyon University on Wednesday at 5:45 p.m. ...