News

Lights & Sirens

Sunday, Jan. 7 3:37 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a laptop computer from Beagle Hall. Loss: $1,800. Monday, Jan. 8 5:47 a.m.: Officers arrested a 61-year-old male nonaffiliate for violation of a seven-day exclusion order at the Preuss School. 9:32 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a white ’90 Toyota Camry from Regents Road. Loss: $2,000. Tuesday, Jan. 9 10:25 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a Palm Pilot from the first floor of Geisel Library. Loss: $250. 2:30 p.m.: A student reported indecent exposure in Lot 355. 4:12 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of books from the UCSD Bookstore. Wednesday, Jan. 10 2:09 a.m.: Officers arrested a 19-year-old male student at Brennan Hall for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. Subject rejected from detox and transported to Central Jail. 4:49 a.m.: Officers impounded a ’94 Nissan Maxima from Lot 504 for having more than five unpaid parking citations. Stored at Star Towing. 7:48 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of computer equipment from the Humanities and Social Sciences building. Loss: $50. 9:49 p.m.: Officers arrested a 26-year-old male nonaffiliate for misuse of a disabled placard in Lot 411. Cited and released. Friday, Jan. 12 8:35 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a handheld computer from UC 104. Loss: $150. 11:11 a.m.: An 18-year-old male student suffered a dislocated knee after slipping and falling in front of the Applied Physics and Mathematics building. Transport-ed to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. 2:03 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a bicycle from the UCSD Bike Shop. Loss: $150. 3:31 p.m.: A student reported the theft of video game cartridges from Tenaya Hall. Loss: $240. 3:34 p.m.: A student reported a burglary at Marshall Apart-ments. Loss: $268. Saturday, Jan. 13 4:27 p.m.: A nonaffiliate reported domestic violence at Marshall Apartments. ...

Briefly

Gov. Gray Davis announced his proposed 2001-2002 budget last week, which would give the University of California a financial boost. Under the proposed budget, the annual state allowance for the university would increase 6.3 percent to $3.4 billion allowing for the admission of an additional 5,700 students to be funded. The budget would also help maintain affordable tuition for students and their families, increased employee salaries, and aid in the proliferation of the university’s teaching, research and public programs to maintain their increasing excellence. The budget constitutes the second wave of provisions made to create the California Institutes for Science and Innovation, one of which, the Institute for Internet and Telecommunications Technology, will be built at UCSD in partnership with UC Irvine. In addition to these improvements, the budget will also allocate more support for UC graduate programs, summer instruction on certain campuses and greater student retention programs. Prior to the creation, Davis had made it clear that a strong partnership between his administration and the university would be forged. The plan calls for an annual increase in financial support for the university. Free workouts, rec classes offered to UCSD students In an effort to help UCSD students stick to their New Year’s resolutions to get or stay healthy, UCSD Recreation has announced that it will offer three free classes to students. This winter’s free classes are dance aerobics, which will take place from noon to 1 p.m. on Tuesdays at the Rec Conference Room, Kick Boxing, which will take place from noon to 1 p.m. on Thursdays in the Rec Conference Room, and Step Aerobics, which will take place from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at the Main Gym. All classes begin on Tuesday, Jan. 16. For more information about these or any other classes call (858) 534-4037. The A.S. Council presents UCSD’s new club Ritmo Ton Loc and DVC will perform at the opening of Club Ritmo, which will take place at 8:30 p.m. Friday at the stage in Porter’s Pub. Club Ritmo is a new nightclub presented by the A.S. Council. It is intended to make Friday nights on campus a little livelier. A student I.D. is required for free admission, and general admission is $8. Preuss School accepting applications for sixth graders UCSD’s Preuss School is currently accepting applications for sixth graders entering in fall 2001. An information session will be held for parents who are interested in enrolling their students. The session will be held at 1 p.m. on Jan. 20 at the Preuss School campus. In addition to the 100 open spaces for new sixth graders, the school also has a limited number of spots for students who will be entering the ninth grade this fall. The admission would bring the school’s total enrollment to 516 students with plans to raise that number to 700 by the year 2003. The school also has plans to offer instruction to students from sixth to 12th grades as opposed to only offering instruction to students up to the 10th grade as it does now. Volunteers needed for Eyes on the Elderly Program The Volunteer Connection will hold an information session for those interested in participating in the Eyes on the Elderly Program. The program will recruit UCSD students to interact with senior citizens at the Torrey Pines Convalescent Hospital. Volunteers will spend one to two hours per week with an elderly individual engaging in such activities as calling out numbers for bingo or eating pizza. The commitment to EOE is only quarterly and can be formatted to fit your schedule. Applications can be picked up at the Volunteer Connection and must be returned by Jan. 19. For more information, call (858) 534-1414. Student Foundation holds benefit for Preuss School The UCSD Student Foundation is currently having a “”Change for Change”” college competition to benefit the Preuss School. With UCSD students making donations and the UCSD Alumni Association matching contributions dollar for dollar up to $2,000, the Student Foundation is hoping to supply outdoor tables for Preuss students. The college with the highest amount of donations will receive a free movie night and popcorn at the Price Center Theater. The competition will end and the winner will be announced on Feb. 2 at Spirit Night. Money will be collected via bins passed around the residence halls which will then be deposited at RIMAC on Spirit Night before the winner is announced. ...

Briefly

The UCSD Cancer Center has chosen Carol E. Salem, M.D., a specialist in urologic oncology and urinary reconstruction, to head the school’s new Urologic Cancers Unit, where she will help treat bladder, prostrate, testicular, renal, urethral and penile cancers. Salem graduated from UCSD with a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and earned her medical degree from USC. Salem now comes to the UCSD School of Medicine as an assistant professor of surgery in the urology division. Salem has spent many years studying the effect of DNA methylation as a possible sign of bladder cancer and was honored by the American Foundation for Urologic Diseases in 1997. Kidney cancer treatment being tested at UCSD An experimental stem cell transport drug used to treat kidney cancer is currently being evaluated at the UCSD Blood and Marrow Transport Program. Kidney cancer is known to be resistant against conventional treatments, but the stem cell being used has proven promising in a recent study conducted by the National Institutes of Health. This particular treatment, which is called the nonmyeloablative allogenic peripheral-blood stem-cell transport, is open to patients in the trial who have a sibling who can donate stem cells for the experiment. Patients receive minimal chemotherapy before the stem-cell transplant. For more information about the study, call the UCSD Blood and Marrow Transplant program at (858) 657-6840. Off-Campus Housing office moves to new location As of Dec. 11, the Off-Campus Housing office has moved from Student Center B to its new location in Student Center A, Suite 200-202 in the Eucalyptus Lounge. The Eucalyptus Lounge is located on the second floor above the Bike Shop. The Off-Campus Housing office will continue to offer commuter advising, services and housing referrals as well as directory and rental listings for all students, staff and faculty. The office can be reached at (858) 534-3670. UCSD’s Mark Shuckit honored for exemplary research Mark A. Shuckit, a UCSD professor of psychiatry and director of the Alcohol Research Center at the Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center, was awarded a lifetime Achievement Award at this winter’s annual U.S. Psychiatric Congress meeting. John Schwartz, editor in chief of the Psychiatric Times, presented Shuckit with his award. Schwartz cited Shuckit’s research on the role of genetics in alcoholism. Shuckit has done extensive work concerning alcoholism and genetics including a study that found a relationship between the effects of alcohol on a young person and its manifestation later in life. Shuckit authored the textbook “”Drug and Alcohol: A Clinical Guide to Diagnosis and Treatment,”” which is now in its fifth edition. UC natural reserve system receives packard grant The University of California has received a Packard Grant of $263,600 to develop a program for long-term research in an effort to save California’s endangered coastal-oak system. Over 3 million acres of the system have been sacrificed to residential and agricultural development. The Packard Grant will fund a nine-month planning period by UC environmental field scientists from UC campuses at Berkeley, Davis, Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz. The researchers will also develop partnerships with other organizations to analyze possible methods for restoring the ecosystem at risk. The funding for the Packard Grant comes from the Packard Foundation’s Conserving California Landscapes Initiative. ...

Events

Thursday, Jan. 11 Celebration: Cultural Unity Day of Awareness The Women’s Center, Cross Cultural Center, Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Resource Office, and Student Legal Services will sponsor the event, which will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Price Center Plaza. The celebration will feature cultural events, including a drum circle, entertainment, information tables, music and a keynote speaker. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call (858) 822-1475. Friday, Jan. 12 Performing Arts: Cab Calloway’s Legacy of Swing Cab Calloway’s daughter, Chris Calloway, will appear with the Hi-De-Ho Orchestra to perform swing and jazz music. Calloway debuted with her father on the Ed Sullivan Show in the ’60s and traveled with him for over 20 years. The University Events Office will sponsor the performance, which will be held at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Recital Hall. The even is open to the public. General admission is $22 and student admission is $16. For more information, call (858) 534-4119. Saturday, Jan. 13 Aquarium: Sea Kayaking The Birch Aquarium will sponsor the activities which will start at 8 a.m. in the waters of La Jolla. Activities are open to the public for a $40 fee. For more information and exact location, call (858) 534-7336. Parade: Martin Luther King Jr. Parade UCSD and others will sponsor the parade, which will honor the life and work of Martin Luther King Jr. The event will take place at 10 a.m. in downtown San Diego. The event is free and open to the public. Students can sign up to be a part of the parade at their Dean’s or Residential Life office. Free transportation will be provided for those who need it. For more information, call (858) 534-1585. Monday, Jan. 15 Performing Arts: UCSD Gospel Choir The UCSD Music Department will sponsor the gospel choir’s performance to honor Martin Luther King Jr. The concert will take place at 8 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Recital Hall. The event is open to the public. General admission is $5 and student admission is $3. For more information, call (858) 534-4830. Wednesday, Jan. 17 Food Sales: A.S. Barbecue The A.S. Council will serve free lunch to all UCSD students starting at 10 a.m. on Library Walk. For more information, call (858) 534-0473. Performing Arts: Stacey Fraser DMA Concert The UCSD Music Department will sponsor the event, which will take place at 8 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Recital Hall. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4830 ...

Scripps Scientist Mia Tegner Dies in Diving Accident

Longtime Scripps researcher Mia Tegner died Sunday in a scuba diving accident off the coast of Mission Beach. She was 53 years old. An accomplished diver and scientist, she spent her adult life associated with UCSD. “”We knew Mia when she was a young adult just beginning her scientific endeavors,”” said Charles Kennel, director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. “”She grew to maturity with us, and spent her life at Scripps.”” Tegner, a native of Southern California, graduated from UCSD with a bachelor’s degree in biology in 1969. Five years later she earned a doctorate in marine biology from Scripps. She based her research from Scripps ever since. Wayne Pawelek, head diving safety instructor at Scripps, had the pleasure of knowing, working and socializing with Tegner since she arrived at Scripps in 1969. “”She lost her life doing what she truly enjoyed,”” Pawelek, said. Tegner’s research dealt with the ecology of kelp forest communities and near-shore marine resources. She spent nearly three decades studying and protecting the Point Loma kelp beds. Tegner’s work has helped other scientists better understand the kelp forests, and has also helped government officials to better understand the effects of urban runoff and sewage on marine life. Her work greatly contributed to the decision by the California Department of Fish and Game to implement a moratorium on the taking of abalone from offshore Southern California. “”She dedicated more than 25 years of work to the ecology of the kelp beds off Point Loma in San Diego, and she developed a new and deep appreciation for this delicate, undersea rain forest,”” Kennel said. At the time of her passing, Tegner was researching the effects of El Nino and La Nina on the plants and animals of the kelp ecosystem. In August of 2000, Tegner, along with colleagues Paul Dayton, Peter Edwards and Kristin Riser, was honored with the prestigious Cooper Ecology Award for research on the Point Loma kelp forest ecosystem. Two years earlier, in 1998, she received a fellowship with the Pew Fellow Program in Marine Conservation to further study the effects the changing ocean has on kelp forests. In 1986 Tegner was honored with the UCSD Distinguished Alumna of the Year Award. Tegner is survived by her husband, Eric Hanauer of San Diego, a daughter, Sandi Hanauer of Costa Mesa, her parents Oly and Allie Tegner of Palos Verdes, and a sister, Lars Palsoson of Palos Verdes. In lieu of flowers, donations in Mia Tegner’s memory can be made to Scripps Institution of Oceanography to support kelp forest research. For more information, the development office at Scripps can be reached at (858) 822-1865. A memorial service for Tegner will be held at the Birch Aquarium at Scripps Friday at 4 p.m. ...

CUE and University Reach Agreement

University clerical workers, following a ratification vote by members of the Coalition of University Employees, have a new contract with the university that provides for wage increases through 2001, including retroactive payments. “”We are very pleased to have reached this agreement with CUE,”” said Judith W. Boyette, UC associate vice president for human resources and benefits. “”I want to thank clerical employees for their patience and for their continued dedication to the university during the negotiations process.”” The contract, signed by UC and CUE representatives on Dec. 20, 2000, took two-and-a-half years to negotiate. “”This is a historic first for CUE,”” said CUE President Claudia Horning, a library worker at UCLA. “”This is the first contract for CUE, and we’ve made many significant improvements over the previous union’s contract. CUE members should be very proud.”” The contract includes a 7.8 percent cost of living increase over two years, and maintains a “”step-merit”” system of salary increases. The contract includes new procedures that require a bona fide business purpose to conduct an employee background check, and agreement that allegations of discrimination not tied to other provisions of the contract can be appealed to arbitration, and a term stating that UC managers will commit to “”fair and respectful treatment”” of clerical employees. CUE represents 18,000 employees statewide, about 3,000 of which are at UCSD. Horning said the CUE contract is the strongest contract the university has negotiated with a union. She added that CUE took the best parts from other contracts and incorporated them into one. She said students may even see indirect results of the new contract. “”Students will find that the clerical employees they deal with are a little happier,”” Horning said. CUE and the University of California will resume negotiations in May 2001 for the next contract. Horning said that while the first contract was difficult to negotiate, she thinks the next contract will go smoother. “”We don’t think it will be as difficult,”” she said. “”We certainly learned a lot in the process.”” ...

North Torrey Pines Parking Structure Opens

An additional 380 “”S”” parking spaces became available Saturday when the new North Torrey Pines parking structure in Thurgood Marshall College opened. The structure, which has been in construction since August 1999, also contains 309 “”B”” Spots, 161 “”A”” spots, 104 metered visitor spots and 18 handicapped spots. The North Torrey Pines Lot, located between Scholars Drive North and North Torrey Pines Road, has six floors and two entrances. A new entrance onto campus on North Torrey Pines Road is set to open March 1, which will provide more convenient access to the structure. Students believe that the ability to park everywhere on campus will be made much easier due to this opening. “”Hopefully it will alleviate the parking problems in Muir,”” Muir sophomore Adam Roston said. “”Parking there has become virtually impossible past 8 a.m.”” The fall opening of the Gilman parking structure provided an additional 307 “”S”” parking spaces as well. However, the six-level structure fills to capacity early in the morning and is full until late in the afternoon when most students have already gone home. “”Based upon our fall quarter 2000 survey, the ‘S’ spaces in this structure filled to peak capacity about 9 a.m.,”” Director of Parking and Transportation Greg Snee said. “”The ‘B’ spaces, 197, filled to peak capacity at about 11 a.m., and ‘A’ spaces, 147, reach their maximum usage at 2 p.m.”” Students who arrive past 10 a.m., though they cannot park in the two new structures, said they still reap the benefits of them being there. “”It just makes parking easier other places on campus,”” Marshall sophomore Eric Robin said. “”East parking is a lot less crowded now that people are parking closer to campus. The lazy students are getting a break, too.”” Although many like the fact that there is new parking on campus, some have begun to question the new North Torrey Pines structure. “”[The new structure] is in the middle of nowhere,”” Revelle junior Yang Fan said. “”It seems like it is only for Marshall students. There should have been more student input.”” Fan said the types of parking spaces are disproportional to the number of people who actually need them. “”There are way too many ‘B’ spots,”” he said. “”There are not enough ‘S’ spaces.”” Moreover, parking still remains a large problem plaguing the school as the demand for permits and parking spaces increases every day. “”Our fall 2000 average weekday parking space occupancy levels indicate that on the La Jolla campus, 82 percent of the total parking space inventory was occupied at peak, 12 noon,”” Snee said. “”‘S’ spaces filled to 86 percent occupancy at 1:00 p.m.”” In order to combat this problem, Transportation and Parking Services and Nelson/Nygard Consulting Associates are working together to produce a new transportation and parking study to determine the magnitude of the problem and where to go from here. “”The UCSD parking and transportation study should be completed in the winter quarter 2001,”” Snee said. “”The UCSD Transportation Policy Committee will be reviewing these recommendations at the end of winter quarter 2001.”” Warren junior Rick James said the only way this study will be beneficial is if they finally begin to see that parking for students is both vital and necessary. “”I just hope they don’t take the easy way out and say that all this campus needs is more carpooling and vanpooling,”” he said. “”That is all well and good, but it really doesn’t fill the students’ needs. They need to realize that a lot of the problems just won’t go away and that students just need extra spots to park in.”” A similar study was done in 1996 to make parking projections and recommendations for the 2005-2006 school year. Among the ideas discussed in this document was the possibility of building a new parking structure in or near University Center. The study projected it could be constructed by the 2005-2006 fiscal year. Most students agree this was a good idea, although they wish it were built five years ago. “”Unless I take four senior years this really won’t have any effect on me,”” Robin said. “”But at least my brother will get a chance to park close to Price Center.”” Many considerations, including the size, location and its level above or below ground are still immediate considerations that have to be decided before any new structure is built. The study said the new structure, if built, should contain around 750 parking spots. Of similar importance, the committee made the proximity of the structure to all major buildings on campus a large priority. According to the study, the new structure should be built no more than half a mile from all major buildings on campus such as Geisel Library, the Price Center and the International Center, as the extra walk would not allow for quick access to these sites. Additionally, the decision as to whether the structure will be above or below ground has yet to be made. If above ground, the structure will have to comply with height and design requirements. If the parking were to be below-ground, an additional building will have to be constructed above the subterranean parking levels. The above-ground portion of the structure could possibly become a new expanded bookstore or career services center, among other possibilities. According to the study done in 1996, the committee was considering at least 11 other possible sites. Among the sites in contention are a 875-spot, five-story complex along Myers Drive that would cost around $9,500,000, a 765-spot, five-story complex west of Russel Lane that would cost around $7,300,000, and a 960-spot, four-story underground parking structure and four story above ground medical building west of the school of medicine that would cost about $13,000,000. ...

Briefly

Associate professor of medicine at the UCSD School of Medicine and Veteran¹s Affairs Medical Center, Richard S. Kornbluth, has been selected as one of nine scientists worldwide to receive one of the first Sequella Global Tuberculosis grants to develop a tuberculosis vaccine. Kornbluth received his granted sum of $50,000 to study a method developed at UCSD to manipulate the immune system to better control the tuberculosis disease. Scripps professor honored for contributions to ocean science Joseph L. Reid, professor emeritus of physical oceanography in the Marine Life research Group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, was awarded the Maurice Ewing Medal of the American Geophysical Union Dec. 17. Reid was recognized for his numerous contributions to ocean science. The award is given annually for exhibited excellence in the understanding of physical, geophysical and geological processes in the ocean. Reid has been a member of the faculty at Scripps since 1974, serving first as professor of physical oceanography before going on to become director of the Scripps Marine Life Research Group. Reid is also known for his study of ocean circulation in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian oceans. UCSD researchers find new central nervous system gene Researchers from the UCSD School of Medicine and the Shirakawa Institute of Animal Genetics in Japan have discovered a new gene responsible for development and function in the central nervous system. The research team described its discovery of a protein called ³NUDEL² in the December 2000 issue of the journal ³Neuron.² NUDEL combines with a protein called LIS1 to form a transport complex that helps carry neural messages from a newborn¹s just-formed brain to the rest of its body. This discovery may help scientists solve the mystery of how an egg specifically becomes a human being. The team¹s findings may also help doctors cure or prevent human defects that occur during the neural migration process, such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. Scientists also learned that the NUDEL/LIS1 complex may be partly responsible for cell division, proliferation and survival. Board of Regents appoints commission to aid in growth UC Regents Chair S. Sue Johnson and UC President Richard Atkinson announced last month the selection of the Commission on the Growth and Support of Graduate Education composed of faculty, students and administrators to help the UC system reach its goal of adding 11,000 graduate students in the next 10 years. The commission will have to produce a report by summer concerning the necessary actions the university should take to increase enrollments and admissions for the additional graduate students. A large number of graduate students are required at the university to assist with important research and boost the number of employees at the school. The commission comes from the determination made by the regents earlier this year to enroll more students to remain competitive in California¹s economy. UCSD scientists discover hydrothermal vent field A team of scientists, consisting of members from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Duke University, the University of Washington and various other institutions found a new hydrothermal vent field Dec. 5 in the Atlantic ocean which they are calling ³The Lost City.² The field was discovered while the scientists were studying a mountain at that location during a scientific cruise aboard the research vessel Atlantis. The scientists say that this may be the largest system of its kind with the underwater structures rising 180 feet. They also note that it is unusual because the venting structures are made of carbonate materials and silica rather than sulfa and iron-based materials. ...

UCSD to Receive Science Institute, Davis Announces

Gov. Gray Davis announced at a press conference Dec. 7 that UCSD, in partnership with UC Irvine, will receive an Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, as one of three California Institutes of Science and Information. “”Cal-(IT2) will seek to merge the twin marvels of the Internet and wireless communications to forge the new information age,”” said Chancellor Robert Dynes. Researchers and students working with the Institute and its partner UCI will study modes of transformation from the use of slower modems to faster broadband Internet connections as the Internet becomes more a part of the physical world. “”The enormous span of activity that is going to take place at this institute is really mind–boggling,”” said UCI Chancellor Ralph J. Cicerone, who commended not only the partnership between the two universities, but also between the universities and their contributing business partners. “”It’s going to go all the way from basic materials, science and the creation of electronic and physical devices, all the way through to social politics and policies and management techniques.”” The institute is expected by many to charge California’s economy, much like the Silicon Valley has done in the northern half of the state. “”I believe the governor’s initiative will demonstrate that old maxim ‘We’ll come around again’ because where California goes, so goes the nation and ultimately, goes the world,”” Dynes said. Six UC campuses competed for the institutes, but only three received them. UCSD won because of a proposal it submitted in July. Winning means that the California legislature will allocate $100 million over four years to develop the project. Davis demanded that the individual winning universities match the government funds two-to-one with outside resources. However, each university’s chancellor managed to garner a three-to-one match for their school with most of the money coming from the private sector and businesses surrounding the individual campuses. “”This is a proud day for California,”” Davis said. “”These centers of science and innovation will not just be portals to the new economy, they will be the pilots of the new economy.”” In addition to the announcement of UCSD’s new center, Davis also announced that UCLA will receive the Nanosystems Institute and that UCSF will receive the Bioengineering, Biotechnology and Quantitative Biomedicine Institute. “”I believe that our proposal succeeded because UCSD and UCI are in the right place at the right time,”” Dynes said. “”The southern California corridor between our campuses is home to some of the world’s leading high-tech pioneers.”” UCSD has over 40 industry partners in the institute, including the Boeing Company, Qualcomm Incorporated, Ericsson Wireless Communications, Inc., Texas Instruments, Compaq and Microsoft Corporation. “”We at Ericsson believe that research conducted by the various partners of the Cal-(IT2) program will help ensure California’s continued global competitiveness and leadership in the high-tech area,”” said Ericsson President Ake Perrson. “”We are very proud to be a part of this institute and we are very proud to be a part of the San Diego community.”” Irwin Jacobs, chairman and CEO of Qualcomm, was also on hand to comment on his company’s involvement with the new center. “”I think this center is going to make a major difference on the campus, to the industry in San Diego and up in the Irvine area and to the nation,”” Jacobs said. “”It’s going to [provide] a major capability of performing basic research in the communications area and applications that I think are really going to make substantial differences. We really, even with a good proposal, can’t imagine all of the interesting things that are going to come out of this.”” Larry Smarr, professor of computer science and engineering at UCSD, will serve as director of the new institute. “”Our institute’s mission is simple: extend the reach of current information infrastructure throughout the physical world, but as simple as that statement is, the research required to bring the new Internet into being is formidable,”” Smarr said. “”No single investigator could hope to study this emerging system in its entirety, nor does any single company have sufficient resources to dominate the market. That’s why we need an interdisciplinary institute of such broad scope.”” A 215,000 square-foot building will be constructed at UCSD and a 119,500 square-foot building will be constructed at UCI to house the institute. Both facilities are expected to be completed by 2004. ...

Lights & Sirens

Tuesday, Jan. 2 3:52 a.m.: A 36-year-old female suffered food poisoning on Regents Road. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Wednesday, Jan. 3 9:09 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a pair of sunglasses from the Price Center. Loss: $200. 3:42 p.m.: A student reported burglary to the second floor of Brennan Hall. Loss: $300. Thursday, Jan. 4 2:05 a.m.: Officers detained a 53-year-old male nonaffiliate on La Jolla Shores Road for being in the country illegally. Transported to Border Patrol. 2:50 p.m.: A student reported the theft of an ATM card from Pepper Canyon Apartments. No monetary loss. Friday, Jan. 5 12:19 a.m.: Officers arrested a 33-year-old male nonaffiliate near the embankment east of 8600 La Jolla Shores Drive for an outstanding misdemeanor warrant for being drunk in public. Transported to Central Jail. Bail: $5,000. 9:35 a.m.: Units and paramedics responded to a 36-year-old male staff member complaining of shoulder pain. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. 1:04 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of cash from the Science Engineering Research Facility. Loss: $1,100. 3:15 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a laptop computer from a shuttle bus. Loss: $3,775. Sunday, Jan. 7 3:14 a.m.: Officers arrested a 61-year-old male nonaffiliate at Warren Lecture Hall for false activation of pull stations. Cited and released. ...