News

UCSD Freshman Dies in Fall at Blacks Beach

Revelle freshman Gilbert F.D. Nunez Jr. fell to his death from atop the cliffs above Blacks Beach Saturday at about 5 p.m. He was 18. Nunez and some of his friends had gone to the cliffs to study just after 4 p.m. The victim strayed away from the group to climb on a rock situated on the edge of the cliff when he lost his balance and fell. Lifeguards estimate that Nunez descended nearly 200 feet before landing on the beach below. “”He was an avid climber — he was practically a monkey,”” recalls Revelle freshman Becky Bowen, a friend of Nunez’s. “”He was climbing and slipped and fell to his death.”” Several people walking along the shore saw the victim plummet down the cliff. Shortly thereafter, paramedics from La Jolla’s engine company No. 9 arrived on scene along with San Diego lifeguards. CPR was performed, but there was little anyone could do to save the fallen student. Those that knew Nunez describe him as the type of person that everyone loved. “”He was a friend to all of us,””said Jennifer Pae, a friend of Nunez’s. “”He loved to make people laugh, he was so much fun to be around. He was the only person who knew everyone in the building. He was such a friendly, loving person, and that’s what makes it so difficult, because he was so close to everyone.”” When students heard of the accident, they immediately came together and took action. Some went to the cliff where the accident happened to lay flowers in memory of their friend. Others plan to hold a candlelight vigil this week. By Sunday afternoon, less than 24 hours after the accident took place, family members had arrived at Revelle College’s Atlantis Hall to retrieve Nunez’s belongings. Students could hardly maintain their composure as they assisted Nunez’s father in moving his belongings out of his room. Some openly wept as they packed boxes filled with personal items into a rented U-Haul trailer. Others wrapped their arms around those that were overtaken by the reality that their friend was gone. Perhaps the most emotional moment took place when several students presented the victim’s father with a picture frame containing a poem written especially for his son. The poem was surrounded by a dozen photographs of Nunez with his suitemates and friends taken at UCSD. Several friends worked through the night to finish the project in time to present it to the Nunez family. More than 20 students and several family members then held hands and formed a circle in the parking lot to remember their friend one last time. Each bowed their heads in respect, and some offered a few words in memory of their good friend. As the family prepared to depart, one student brought a bouquet of flowers to the victim’s father. At that moment, many students broke down crying. As one person ran to get tissues, the last of Nunez’s belongings were packed up. Family members thanked the students one last time for their support before they left UCSD for the long journey home. “”You got to kind of remember what he did, and not just what happened recently,”” said Graham Lubinsky, a Revelle freshman and suitemate of Nunez’s. “”He led a full life. He had an impact on everyone he dealt with, and that’s what you have to remember. You can’t be upset forever about one incident — you just got to keep him in your heart.”” ...

Lights & Sirens

Monday, Feb. 5 12:29 a.m.: Officers arrested an 18-year-old male student at Stewart Hall for possession of less than an ounce of marijuana. Cited and released. 10:00 a.m.: A student reported vandalism to a sign in Lot 106. 3:48 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a laptop computer from the Ratner Eye Center. Loss: $2,500. 3:55 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of cash from a wallet at Nierenberg Annex. Loss: $80. Thursday, Feb. 8 2:25 a.m.: Officers arrested a 48-year-old male nonaffiliate for an outstanding misdemeanor warrant for drinking alcohol in public. Cited and released. Bail: $92. 6:13 p.m.: A student reported the attempted theft of a silver ’87 Ford Taurus from Lot 510. No monetary loss. 8:22 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a blue ’87 Honda Accord in Lot 510. Loss: $735. Friday, Feb. 9 11:00 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a dark gray ’90 Chrysler New Yorker from Lot 702. Loss: $2,000. 12:20 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of U.S. currency from McGill Hall. Loss: $710. 11:56 p.m.: California Highway patrol recovered the dark gray ’90 Chrysler New Yorker stolen in Lot 702. Vehicle stored at Star Towing. Saturday, Feb. 10 12:36 a.m.: Officers detained an 18-year-old male nonaffiliate for being drunk in public in lot 406. Transported to Detox. Officers detained two 17-year-old male nonaffiliates for curfew violation and possession of coca-ine at same location. Released to parents. 2:39 a.m.: Officers impounded a black ’01 Toyota Tacoma from Lot 406 for driver being taken to Detox. Stored at Star Towing. 3:13 p.m.: A student reported vandalism to a vehicle in Lot 502. Loss: $300. 3:23 p.m.: A 19-year-old female nonaffiliate fainted in the Price Center Ballroom. Transported to Kaiser by paramedics. 8:08 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a cellular phone from CLICS. Loss: $100. 10:20 p.m.: Officers arrested a 21-year-old male student at Tenaya Hall for furnishing alcohol to a minor. Cited and released. ...

Scripps Ritter Building to be Demolished

Ritter Hall, once the site of many classrooms and labs, currently stands as only a concrete shell. The destruction of the large academic building, located on the campus of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, began Dec. 11 of last year. The company contracted to do the demolition is Clauss Construction. Bernard Clauss is the project manager in charge of the SIO project. Vaughn Hall, where the aquarium used to be located, is also scheduled to be demolished. This will occur simultaneously with the Ritter Hall demolition. Much of the material out of Ritter Hall is being recycled; 96 percent, according to Clauss. “”The only material not recycled out of that building was the hazardous material,”” he said. The first step to demolishing Ritter Hall was the removal of asbestos from the ceilings and other surfaces. The asbestos removal was completed last week. The air inside the building was then tested to make sure no airborne fibers were present after the asbestos removal. These particles are a health hazard if people inhale them. The building was pronounced safe for workers, and demolition continued. Steel, metal and wood materials were removed from the hall next and sent to be recycled. The metals go to a recycler, where they are melted to form new steel for reuse. The wood products are either to be reused or sold as scrap wood. “”When they’re all done with that, all there is is a concrete shell,”” Clauss said. This “”concrete shell”” is currently still standing on the Scripps campus. According to Clauss, the demolition is approximately 75 percent complete. Once the building has been completely demolished, the building will be crushed and used as road base or back-fill material. Road base is the layer put down on roads before asphalt or concrete is laid. The steel rebar of the concrete structure is also recycled after the concrete is taken to be crushed. The Ritter Hall and Vaughn Hall demolitions are scheduled to be completed March 23, 2001. The space that will remain when the building is demolished will be turned into a park. The park will be built with funds provided by the family of a deceased Scripps graduate student as a memorial. ...

Briefly

The UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering will hold its Research Review, which is themed “”A Blueprint for the Information Infrastructure,”” on Friday, Feb. 23 in the Price Center. Five industry leaders and various faculty will be at the review to give presentations. Information about current graduate work in the field and technical exhibits from 38 companies will also be on display. Approximately 600 students, graduates, faculty and alumni are expected to attend the event, which will start at 8 a.m. with registration and a continental breakfast and will end at 4:30 p.m. Some industry leaders participating in the Executive Forum include Paul Horn, senior vice president and director of research for the IBM Corporation; Paul Jacobs, the executive vice president of Qualcomm, Inc.; Greg Papadopoulos, senior vice president and chief technology officer for Sun Microsystems, Inc.; and Larry Smarr, the director of UCSD’s new California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology. Bank of America president to speak at UCSD Liam McGee, the president of Bank of America California, is scheduled to visit UCSD on Feb. 13 for the UCSD Economics Roundtable, which will commence at 7:30 a.m. in the Faculty Club with a breakfast for those in attendance. McGee graduated from UCSD and joined Bank of America in 1990, eventually rising to become the chief executive of California’s largest bank. McGee has also served two terms on the board of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Tickets for the roundtable are $50. The price includes continental breakfast and parking. To purchase tickets for the event contact Edie Munk at (858) 822-0510. Construction to be completed on campus electrical system The Office of the Assistant Vice Chancellor announced this week that the final phase of construction on the campus electrical system will be completed, alleviating electrical supply and distribution worries on campus. The work done on the Campus High Voltage Electrical system will take five months and will connect the new Cogeneration plant, enable high voltage cabling to be run underneath Interstate 5 and facilitate the installation of a third transformer at the main campus substation. Efforts will be made to ensure that the campus power supply will not be affected by the work. Construction alerts will be made prior to any major work. Work on the system will also be done Saturday, Feb. 10 starting at 6 a.m. and ending at 9 p.m. Questions can be directed to John Dilliott, the project manager for facilities design and construction at (858) 822-3349, or Mike Griffith, the assistant director of physical plant services at (858) 534-2927. Electronic music event to take place at Porter’s Pub The UCSD DJs and Vinylphiles Club, in cooperation with the A.S. Council, will present Heartbreakz, a free evening of electronic music, on Friday, Feb. 9. The event will showcase the older talent of the DVC and will also introduce several new DJs. There will be two sound areas, one outside and one inside. Heartbreakz will go from 5 p.m. to 1 a.m., and while tickets are free, early attendance is recommended as the Pub has limited capacity. This event is open only to UCSD students. Mexican-American singer/songwriter Perla Batalla will perform in Mandeville Auditorium on Feb. 23. at 7:30 p.m. Perla Batalla to perform at UCSD Feb. 23 Over the years, Batalla has lived and performed in San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Mexico. Her music has included everything from Gershwin to Mexican lullabies. Named “”Best Emerging Artist of 1999″” by Amazon.com, Batalla’s music is a mix of Latin-American-gypsy-fospel-folk-pop. Her songs range from traditional Latino melodies to bluesy ballads with a contemporary twist – each with a distinctive voice. ...

Events

Thursday, Feb. 8 Seminar: Hear Me: A Legacy of Student Activism Student activists will discuss how they have worked for change on the UCSD campus. The event is sponsored by the Cross Cultural Center and will begin at 4 p.m. in the Cross Cultural Center. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-9689. Friday, Feb. 9 Workshop: Social Issues and Action Research Group The Cross Cultural Center will sponsor the forum, which will explore the politics of the University of California. The event is free and open to the public. The event will take place at 2 p.m. in the Cross Cultural Center. For more information call (858) 534-9689. Dance Party: Heartbreakz The UCSD DJ and Vinylphiles Club and the A.S. Council will sponsor the event which will take place at 5 p.m. in the Porter’s Pub. The event is open to UCSD students and admission is free. Saturday, Feb. 10 Performing Arts: ‘Bash’ The UCSD theater and dance department will sponsor Neil LaBute’s presentation, which explores everyday evil in three short plays. The event is open to the public. General admission is $12 and student admission is $6. For more information call (858) 534-4574. Sunday, Feb. 11 Performing Arts: ‘Satish’ The University Centers will sponsor the event, which will take place at 8 p.m. in Espresso Roma in the Price Center. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4022. Monday, Feb. 12 Seminar: Special Molecular Biology Section Seminar The Division of Biology will sponsor the event, which will take place at noon. in Pacific Hall. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-9737. Tuesday, Feb. 13 Community Service: Condom Awareness Week The Student Health Advocates will sponsor the event, which will call attention to the week-long awareness event and will provide free condoms to students. The event will take place at 11 a.m. in the Price Center Plaza. Film: “”Love and Basketball”” The University Centers will sponsor the film, which will be shown at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m in the Price Center Theater. Admission is $2. Wednesday, Feb. 14 Special Event: Undeclared Majors Faire Marshall College Academic Advising will sponsor the event, which will take place at 11:30 a.m. on Library Walk. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4110. ...

Communication Professor Passes Away

UCSD communication professor Helene Keyssar died Monday morning after a lengthy struggle with cancer. She was 57. Keyssar is fondly remembered by the communication department for her dedicated teaching style, leadership and innovative ideas. In 1981 she arrived at UCSD and immediately made her mark by bringing her immense knowledge of theater and the humanities into the communication department. Communication professor Chandra Mukerji remembers Keyssar’s dedication and love of students. “”She had such joy being in the classroom,”” Mukerji said. The bond Keyssar had with students did not stop with the classroom. Often, she would hold film screenings at her home. Mukersi added that by taking students seriously, Keyssar taught them to understand and learn about themselves. Always popular with students, she was eventually forced her out of the classroom by cancer, but it could not keep her away for long. Soon after she was in remission she was back at school, even though she did not have to be. “”Incredibly hard working and tenacious”” is how Mike Cole, a long-time communication professor, spoke of Keyssar’s love of teaching and how she never gave up. “”Helene had a lot to do with creating this interdisciplinary culture,”” said Dan Hallin, a communication professor. “”She was a broad intellect; her background was in drama but she knew a tremendous amount about journalism, television, language and other things. All of us in the department learned a tremendous amount from her.”” Communication chair Carol Padden spoke of Keyssar’s ability to bring the humanities into the a traditional social science department. According to Padden, she galvanized her students with her juxtaposition of pop culture and the classics. Keyssar also became a leader not only in the communication department but of women professors all over campus. Mukerji remembers that when Keyssar arrived from Amherst College in 1981, women professors were few and were overshadowed by their male counterparts. Keyssar helped to break that barrier with her free spirit and drive. Throughout the ’80s, Keyssar was adamant about improving US-Soviet relations. Her desire to lessen tension between the adversaries led to the innovative Space Bridge Project. The project consisted of a real-time video conference between the two countries, with the United States’ link at the UCSD Media Center. The video cast was the first of its kind, using satellites to connect the two countries. American children were able to talk to Russian children. World War II veterans from both countries were able to reminiscence about old times. The video conference created a dialogue between the two sides at the height of the Cold War. Cole worked with Keyssar on numerous projects during her time at UCSD and commented on the joy she got out of seeing the two sides sit down and talk without any tension. Social activism found its way into much of Keyssar’s work. Mukerji commented on how Keyssar always felt that the personal is political. While teaching in the South, she worked on the civil rights movement. She even helped organize part of the funeral parade for Martin Luther King, Jr. Keyssari’s belief and drive for social justice lead to her thesis and first book, “”The Curtain and the Veil: Strategies of Black Drama.”” Additionally, her role in the feminist movement led to feminist theater. Throughout her career she received many grants and awards, including fellowships from the MacArthur Foundation on International Peace and Security and the Rockefeller Foundation. Keyssar, a prolific writer of books and for film, theater and television, is survived by her husband, Tracy Strong, a UCSD political science professor, and her children, David Franke and Anise Strong, her sister Judith Redwing and her brother Alex Keyssar. A memorial service will be held Feb. 17 at 3:30 p.m. at the UCSD International House. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the UCSD Foundation — Attn: Helene Keyssar Fund, and sent to Paul Drake, Dean of Social Sciences, SSB 502, UCSD, La Jolla, CA 92093. ...

UJS Sponsors Speakers to Educate Students

In response to last week’s Anti-Zionism Week, the Union of Jewish Students is sponsoring this week “”A Positive and Pragmatic Approach to Peace in the Middle East,”” featuring speakers and a booth on Library Walk Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. UJS President Wade Strauss said the purpose of the week was to educate students more fully on what is going on in the region. “”The purpose is to add something to the current issues facing Israel, to present some tangible proof and evidence of what is going on there,”” he said. Muslim Student Association President Eahab Ibrahim said that while he believes the UJS should have its voice heard, he objects to the fact that Wednesday night’s speakers referred to Anti-Zionism Week as Anti-Semitic. “”Definitely they should make their views heard,”” he said. “”I have no problem with that. But the tagging of our group as Anti-Semitic was a direct blow to us that’s not substantiated by any actions that we’ve done.”” Dr. Richard Katz, a member of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee’s national board of directors, and Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean of the Wiesenthal Center, spoke Wednesday night at the Institute of the Americas Auditorium. Katz spoke about the current situation in Israel, giving a recent history of the peace process in the Middle East. He said he wanted to bring a sense of hopeful optimism to the situation. “”There is no panic in Israel,”” he said. “”There is no sense of fear. The streets are safe. It’s much worse from a distance than when you’re there.”” He added that Israel is choosing a peaceful political route in the Middle East. “”Israel, if it wanted to, could prevail over the PLO,”” he said. “”But they won’t because it’s not the Jewish way, it’s not the Israeli way, it’s not the way that country chooses to operate.”” Cooper then spoke on the use of Holocaust denial and anti-Semitic rhetoric by the Palestinian authority in its schools and media. “”One of the biggest problems has been the failure of Israel to take a look and keep tabs on what Palestinian children are being taught,”” he said. Cooper ended his speech with a video presentation featuring several Anti-Semitic Web sites that have been indexed by the Wiesenthal Center. He said one reason for showing the sites to the crowd was to inspire them with the “”creativity and commitment of the other side.”” Thursday’s speaker will be Deanna Armbruster, executive director of American Friends of Neve Shalom/Wahat al-Salam. Armbruster will speak and answer questions about Neve Shalom/Wahat al-Salam, a village in Israel established jointly by Jews and Palestinian Arabs of Israeli citizenship and engaged in educational work for peace, equality and understanding between the two peoples. Thursday’s program will take place from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Center Hall, room 101. Friday’s speaker, Sanford Lakoff, the founding chair of UCSD’s department of political science, will speak after Shabbat services and dinner about the history of Zionism and Israel, as well as the broader political situation in the Middle East. Friday’s program will take place from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the International Center. Strauss said this week’s programs have focused and will focus on a “”future paved with peace, tolerance, mutual understanding and respect.”” ...

Lights & Sirens

Sunday, Jan. 28 7:35 a.m.: A student reported vandalism in Lot 502. Loss: $1,000. 8:16 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of bagels from the Preuss School. Loss: $60. 1:30 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a black and white ’94 E-Z Go golf cart from the Sierra Summit loading dock. Loss: $3,100. 2:20 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a red 1321 Specialized mountain bike from the the south side of Tioga Hall. Loss: $600. 1:57 p.m.: A nonaffiliate reported the theft of eight hydraulic jacks from the construction site at North Scholars Drive and Marshall Lane. Loss: $5,100. Tuesday, Jan. 30 2:00 a.m.: A student reported the theft of fog lights from a ’00 Honda coupe. Loss: $200. Wednesday, Jan. 31 9:29 a.m.: A 22-year-old male nonaffiliate complained of head pain at Round Table Pizza. Transported to Kaiser Hospital by paramedics. 10:03 a.m.: Officers arrested a 36-year-old male nonaffiliate for an outstanding misdemeanor warrant for dog ownership and issued him an order to stay off campus for seven days after creating a disturbance at the Guardian office. Total bail: $520. Booked into Central Jail. 12:00 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from the Geisel Library. Loss: $30. 7:01 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a white ’91 Plymouth Acclaim from Lot 704. Loss: $3,000. 8:36 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a black ’96 Acura Integra in the Gilman Parking Structure. Loss: $200. Friday, Feb. 2 12:30 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a cash box from the Humanities and Social Sciences Building. Loss: $85. 3:45 p.m.: A 37-year-old female nonaffiliate suffered a twisted ankle after falling while stepping down from a curb across from UC 302. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital. 10:41 p.m.: A 20-year-old female student suffered from alcohol poisoning at Douglas Hall. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Saturday, Feb. 3 12:27 a.m.: Officers arrested a 19-year-old male nonaffiliate for minor in possession at Pepper Canyon. Cited and released. 2:28 a.m.: An 18-year-old student suffered a panic attack at Marshall F Building. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. 2:27 p.m.: A 23-year-old male nonaffiliate suffered a neck injury while playing rugby at Warren West Field. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. ...

Briefly

Floyd Gaffney, an emeritus drama professor at UCSD, will direct “”Before it Hits Home,”” a play about AIDS written by Cheryl West. The play will be presented March 1 through March 18 at the Urban Village Theater in City Heights. The play tells the story of a black bisexual jazz musician who fails to tell those around him that he is HIV positive. Community Partners will present the play in an effort to fight the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the black and Hispanic communities in San Diego. Tickets for the play are on sale for $10 each. For more information call the Center for Social Support & Education at (619) 574-8015. UCSD Extension Innovates With CDMA Course Approach UCSD has found a convenient way to offer education about Code Division Multiple Access technology to extension students in San Diego and across the nation. The program is designed to suit the needs of engineering students who travel and cannot make it to weekly classes. The program is being dubbed “”bookend delivery”” because some instruction is provided in class and the rest can be done via the Internet. The program has three phases. The first phase begins Mar. 26 when UCSD Extension in San Diego will present five days of seminars. Phase II will begin in April with the commencement of the online instruction. After completing these phases, students can earn the UCSD Extension Specialized Certificate in CDMA Engineering. For more information and costs, or to apply for the program, call Suzie Baranowski at (858) 451-7696. Indian Earthquake Relief Drive to be Held on Campus UCSD student associations are currently accepting donations to aid survivors of the earthquake in western India, which killed over 300,000 people. The associations are teaming up with the American Red Cross to collect medicines, blankets, warm clothing, hygiene products, socks, shoes, canned and dry foods and anything else people are willing to donate. Financial contributions must be made in the form of a check and may be mailed to the American Red Cross at 3650 Fifth Ave., San Diego, CA 92103, or sent via campus mail to the Association for India’s Development at mailbox #G-6, S.O.L.O. Office. Donation drop-off points are located around campus at Library Walk, EDNA, the Marshall Residence Life Office, the Muir College Center, the Warren Residence Life Office, Eleanor Roosevelt College, the International House Student Activities Center, the Cross Cultural Center and the Women’s Center. UCSD Offers Public Seminars on Ethics of Genetics The UCSD School of Medicine will sponsor a number of free lectures starting Feb. 2 regarding the ethical issues raised by the genetic revolution. The seminar series is titled “”Ethical and Policy Challenges in the Genetic Revolution,”” and each 90-minute talk will be held in the Center for Molecular Genetics Conference Room of the School of Medicine. Topics covered will include “”Germ Line Modification — In Humans?,”” “”Ethical and Policy Problems of Gene Therapy,”” “”Policy Implications of New Genetic Technologies,”” “”Mammalian Cloning — Human Applications?”” and “”DNA Sequence Information and Patenting.”” The series is sponsored by the UCSD Whitehall Chair of Medical Ethics, the San Diego Science and Technology Council and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. For more information call (858) 534-4268. ...

Academic Senate Updates Requirements, Grad Programs

Members of the Representative Assembly met Tuesday at the Academic Senate meeting and were updated on the status of the Next Generation Network Plan. The assembly voted in favor of establishing three new programs of graduate study and revising the academic requirements for Roosevelt and Revelle colleges. The Next Generation Network, which is the new telecommunication plan for UCSD, will be implemented on July 1, 2001. The new plan will merge voice, data and Internet to make intracampus connections faster. Real-time video, audio, high-volume transfers and other high-end capabilities will become easy-to-obtain services. The Next Generation Network will result in an overall net reduction in the telecommunication bill for the university. As a result of the plan, long-distance phone charges are expected to drop approximately 40 percent, according to Associate Vice Chancellor David Miller, who spoke about the new plan. There will be a $60 monthly communication user fee for some campus employees. The total cost for the Next Generation Network is approximately $10 million per year, which includes equipment, staffing, supplies and connectivity charges to the external service providers. The communication user charges are estimated to provide $6.5 million; the deficit will be subsidized by campus-wide state funds. Campus committees will provide oversight and monitoring to assure quality of service and cost control, and during the third year of assessment of the new technologies, they will establish the next year’s Next Generation Network networking plans. The assembly also voted in favor of a proposal to establish a program of graduate studies in bioinformatics for the Ph.D. degree. The new Ph.D. program will provide research and an education structure dedicated to the development of sophisticated computer-based handling tools used for understanding the integrated functions of thousands of genes in the post-genome sequencing era. In addition, the assembly voted in favor of the proposal to establish a program of graduate study leading to masters of education degree. The program was submitted by the Teacher Education Program at UCSD and will further articulate the existing credential programs at the university. The M.Ed. will be an intensive 15-month professional degree designed specifically to help elementary and secondary teachers earning their initial teaching credential at UCSD. The program will allow students to earn their teaching credential and M.Ed. degree before entering the teaching profession. The new program was developed in response to the demand for well-prepared teachers in California. The program for graduate studies in art history, theory and criticism for the Ph.D. and M.A. degrees, which will be established by the department of visual arts, was the third proposal the assembly voted in favor of. Modifications to the Roosevelt college general education requirements for entering freshmen were voted on. The assembly voted in favor of amending Regulation 625. The changes were proposed to enhance curricular flexibility for students by increasing the applicability of some advanced placement credits toward college requirements, providing scheduling room for electives and shortening time to degree for students with highly structured majors. The modifications also seek to improve the distribution of undergraduate student enrollment across the colleges by increasing the alignment of ERC’s requirements with those of other colleges. The proposed changes include changes to the foreign language, fine arts and natural sciences requirements. For specific course information, see ERC academic advising. ...