News

Marshall College Welcomes Trick-or-Treaters

Trick-or-treating second graders from Valencia Park Elementary arrived at Marshall college Tuesday morning in an effort to eradicate its candy supply. Lyon Liew/ Guardian The trick-or-treating hoard was on campus as a part of the annual Active Community at Thurgood Marshall’s Safe Halloween event, an outreach event that brings inner-city school children to UCSD to enjoy a special Day of the Dead celebration. The event began at 10:30 a.m. with teachers and A.C.T. staff leading groups of 10 to 15 candy-seeking students through the Marshall residence halls and the upper and lower Marshall apartments. The trick-or-treating gave way to a short lunch on Marshall field followed by a Halloween carnival staffed by A.C.T. With the help of Marshall residential advisors, club members spread the word about the event in advance to prepare Marshall residents for the arrival of the trick-or-treaters. Lyon Liew/ Guardian “”The idea is to get students involved in the Marshall spirit while reaching out to the community,”” said A.C.T. co-chair Doriana Bailey. According to Bailey, this event is at least five years old and is one of several events that A.C.T. sponsors throughout the year. Another such event is the annual “”Senior”” Prom, where A.C.T. club members visit nursing homes in the spring, inviting residents to dance. Valencia Park Elementary is a public school in Southeast San Diego off Skyline Boulevard. It is one of three schools that belong to the UCSD Friends of Learning program, from which the university chooses the participants of events such as Safe Halloween on a rotational basis. Theona Young, a second-grade teacher at Valencia Park, praised the event as “”a day of safe fun.”” After trick-or-treating through the Marshall residence halls and apartments, the students went to the Dean’s office, where they were greeted by more candy and a special guest performance by “”Eminem.”” The Safe Halloween carnival featured a variety of games and activities like Pin-the-wart-on-the-witch and scary story telling. Although most of the children at the event planned to be trick-or-treating Halloween night as well, the A.C.T. safe Halloween gave them an opportunity to do so in the safety of a college campus during the daytime. For many children this is the first exposure they have had to a university. “”It’s a pretty place, but it’s a long walk,”” second grader Macio Liller said. ...

Students for Nader Hosts Teach-In

Students for Nader held a pre-election teach-in Thursday afternoon in the Price Center, focusing on environmental issues, women’s issues and other “”hidden”” issues that event organizers said Democrats, Republicans and the media do not want people to know about. “”I think we’d like to really charge this campus up politically and get this campus politically active,”” said Shaun McCollum, a member of Students for Nader. “”This is one of the best ways to do it.”” McCollum said that while members of various student organizations were invited to speak at the event, none of them was required to endorse Green Party presidential candidate Ralph Nader in order to speak, since the event was primarily one about issues, not one to promote Nader. Mark Spalding, a member of Students for Nader, spoke on environmental issues that he says are being ignored by the two major candidates. He said the world is facing a loss of biodiversity, continued extinctions, overpopulation and the increased use of genetically modified organisms. “”I don’t care how they taste, I don’t care if they taste good, I don’t care if they’re safe to eat — I don’t want them in my ecosystem,”” Spalding said of genetically modified crops. Jose Mendoza, a member of the International Socialist Organization, spoke on the economy and the struggles of working-class people. He said standards are declining for most people because the majority of Americans have no stock holdings. “”The majority of people in this country have not benefited from this economy,”” Mendoza said. He added that the plight of the working class is often ignored by the two major parties. “”Workers have no political party to call their own,”” he said. David Kuchta, a lecturer in the Revelle humanities department, spoke on what he called the “”corporatization”” of the university. He said Nader rejects the “”mind-numbing and mind-closing”” standardized tests often used to measure success in education and instead supports raising critical thinking and enabling people to participate in democracy. He said that many universities are run by people who do not teach and who have degrees in administration and business. “”When was the last time you met a Regent?”” Kuchta asked. “”I didn’t ask ‘When was the last time you wrote a check to the Regents,’ but when was the last time you met a Regent?”” He said universities should be more accountable to the needs of students and that Nader supports free tuition for students of public colleges and universities. Other issues discussed at the teach-in included gay and lesbian rights, media distortion, the two-party system, Al Gore’s oil interests and the crisis in the Middle East. McCollum said he was impressed by the turnout and hopes that many people left the event more educated on the issues. “”Get involved,”” he said. “”We can fight for change. We don’t have to sit back and watch society go in a direction we don’t like.”” ...

Chancellor's 5K Challenge Raises Funds for Scholarships

Over 1,000 students, staff, faculty and alumni braved the damp and the drizzle Friday afternoon to try to raise undergraduate scholarship money and defeat Chancellor Robert Dynes on the course of the fifth annual Chancellor’s 5K Challenge on Oct. 27 Jayme Del Rosario/ Guardian Dynes kicked off the race by announcing “”Let’s go do it,”” and participants flocked to the starting point at RIMAC Field. Corporate and individual sponsors helped to raise funds for undergraduate scholarships. Dynes and his wife, professor Frances Dynes-Hellman, donated $25 for every person who beat Dynes and for every woman who passed Dynes-Hellman. The event raised approximately $178,000, an increase from last year’s total of $158,000. Dynes placed 123rd in the competition with a time of 22:10 and Dynes-Hellman placed 22nd among the women, prompting Dynes to speculate that their combined personal contribution toward undergraduate scholarships will be $3,600. Jayme del Rosario/ Guardian The course started at RIMAC Field and continued in a loop that encompassed much of the campus and Library Walk. Freshman Amy Ruff, a member of the women’s basketball team, found the course challenging yet rewarding. “”I felt the race went pretty well,”” Ruff said. “”I got a little discouraged when all these people who were older than me passed me in the Eucalyptus Grove, but I went on to finish.”” The chancellor and the A.S. president compete annually. “”My motivation was to beat Doc,”” said Dynes of his competition with A.S. President Doc Khaleghi. The stakes in this year’s competition between the two stated that if Dynes beat Khaleghi, Dynes would help support the A.S. Council barbeque, and the reverse outcome would result in Khaleghi washing Dynes’ car. “”I’m sorry to tell you there will be no barbeque — maybe next year … but [the students] should start training,”” said Dynes, referring to his victory over Khaleghi. UCSD sports teams banded together to compete in the race. A handful of competitors dressed in Halloween costumes such as Elvis, a human pumpkin and a man sporting a large diaper. The spirit of competition was also represented by one coed student team whose members boasted the threat “”Dynes is Mynes”” written in black ink across their chests. The female student winners were Sally Anderson, coming in first, and second-place winner Melanie Tormos. The male student winners included James Nielson in first place and Nathan Garcia in second. ...

BRIEFLY

Jacobs School Hosts Robot Olympics Eight student teams showcased their microprocessor-controlled robot olympiads at the Jacobs School of Engineering First Annual Robot Olympics on Thursday. Each team built a robot, completely controlled by a microprocessor, to perform precise movements on a balance beam in under two minutes. Each team constructed its robot from a kit consisting of a plastic gymnast figure, DC motor, aluminum sheet metal and extruded shapes, acrylic and a variety of mechanical components. The teams also received a $30 budget for additional parts. General Motors’ ‘Concept: Cure’ Comes to UCSD General Motors brought its “”Concept: Cure”” campaign to UCSD Friday to raise awareness and money for breast cancer as part of the sixth annual “”Glamour”” Venus College Campus Music Tour, presented by “”Glamour”” magazine and Atlantic Records. Two Chevy Cavaliers decorated by Betsey Johnson and Tommy Hilfiger were shown at the Price Center Plaza in conjunction with a contest in which a donation of $10 to breast cancer research gave students a chance to win prizes, including Chevy Cavaliers. The Music Tour featured Victoria Williams and other Atlantic Records recording artists and took place at Blind Melons in Pacific Beach. Since the event was started five years ago, it has raised over $3.3 million. Cultural workshop to take place in November “”The Workshop on the Cultures of Border Crossing,”” a workshop exploring how people cross over different cultures and borders, will take place on Nov. 21 in the Social Sciences Building. The workshop will feature four speakers from diverse backgrounds and cultures discussing the transformations and exchanges associated with migration, transition and cultural change. The workshop is sponsored by UCSD’s African and African-American Studies Research Project and is coordinated by UCSD sociology professor Bennetta Jules-Rosette. The workshop is the first presentation in AAASRP’s 2000-2001 academic-year program:Borders, Boundaries and New Frontiers. The four panelists speaking at the workshop are Richard Werbner from the University of Manchester, Filip De Boeck from the University of Leuven, Denis-Constant Martin from the Fondation Nationale de Sciences Politiques, Paris, and Ian Condry from Union College. Eleanor Roosevelt College to hold Halloween special Eleanor Roosevelt College will present “”A Halloween Special: Witches, Pagans, Spirits and More …”” on Monday at 7 p.m. in the Pepper Canyon Lodge. Guest speakers Daryl and Katheryn Fuller, leaders of The Circle of the Wildewood Wiccan Coven, will discuss witchcraft, which is thought to be one of the fastest growing and most misunderstood faiths in the United States. The Fullers have led the local Wiccan coven for eight years and are active in both local and national networking for witches. Career Services offers program for students with disabilities The Career Services Center will hold a workshop discussing career strategies for students with disabilities on Nov. 7. Professionals will give their advice about working in their respective fields and will describe their own career development, disclosure of disability issues and more. The panelists at the event are Jonathon Mooney, a nationally recognized lecturer on learning disabilities and cognitive diversity; Steven Bock, a software consultant for IBM; Valois Vera, a coordinator for employment services for the Access Center of San Diego, Inc.; and Barbara Butterton, a faculty assistant at UCSD’s department of mechanical & aerospace engineering. ...

Lights & Sirens

Lights & Sirens is a selection of entries compiled from the log book of the UCSD Police Department. UCSD crime statistics can be attained by all persons from the Police Department or at http://police.ucsd.edu Sunday, Oct. 22 3:00 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a black ’00 Honda Civic in Lot 502. Loss: $220. Monday, Oct. 23 10:18 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a portable radio at Geisel Library. Loss: $250. 4:58 p.m.: A student reported receiving annoying phone calls at Pepper Canyon Apartments. Tuesday, Oct. 24 7:00 a.m.: A staff member reported burglary to UC 504. Loss: $490. 9:11 a.m.: Officers arrested a 29-year-old male nonaffiliate in Lot 002 on a misdemeanor warrant for an unleashed dog. Bail: $108. Cited and released. 10:30 a.m.: A male nonaffiliate reported the theft of a white and blue Royce Union B21 bicycle from 8138 Regents Rd. Loss: $220. 3:54 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of aluminum cans from Warren College. Loss: $180. Thursday, Oct. 26 2:20 p.m.: A student reported vandalism to a white ’98 Ford van at the Price Center loading dock. Loss: $200. Friday, Oct. 27 9:55 a.m.: A staff member reported burglary to an office at Stein Clinical Research. Loss: $2,300. 11:19 a.m.: A staff member reported receiving threatening e-mails at the Warren Apartments. 11:02 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a ladder from the Mandeville Art Gallery. Loss: $400. 12:21 p.m.: A 17-year-old male student bicyclist suffered a concussion and cuts to the face and legs after colliding with another bicyclist near Outback Adventures. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. Saturday, Oct. 28 5:34 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a wallet from Greenhouse Lane. Loss: $30. 5:47 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a green ’96 Honda Civic in Lot 406. Loss: $960. 9:22 p.m.: A 70-year-old male nonaffiliate suffered chest pains at the La Jolla Playhouse. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. Sunday, Oct. 29 12:01 a.m.: Officers detained a 19-year-old male student at Marshall Apartments for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. — compiled by Lauren Coartney, News Editor ...

'Got Milk' Campaign Visits UCSD Homecoming

On Saturday the “”got milk?”” campaign came to UCSD as part of the Homecoming celebration held at RIMAC Field. Along with inflatable slides, moon jumps and face painting, the “”got milk?”” booth managed to attract the attention of many passers-by interested in hearing its message: “”Make sure you’re drinking your milk!”” A recent national study indicates that eight out of every 10 incoming college students are leaving behind their primary meal providers: their parents. With more students making their own decisions regarding their diets, parents are concerned that their sons and daughters are not drinking the amount of milk their body requires. “”We’re trying to have college kids drink three glasses of milk a day,”” said event coordinator Maureen Brennan. “”If you drank three eight-ounce glasses of milk each day, you would get the amount of calcium you need.”” Students often forget the importance of milk in their diets. Soft drinks and bottled water pose strong competition to milk, but they fail to provide the nutrients that milk contains. One such nutrient is calcium, which helps build bone mass, among many other vital functions. “”If people don’t get the amount of calcium they need now, then they’re going to suffer for it later,”” Brennan said. “”You don’t really think about your bone growth later on in life, but everything you do now is going to affect you.”” Participants in the event were asked to sign the “”Drink 3 Pledge,”” which serves as a promise to themselves to remember to drink the amount of milk their body needs. “”It’s easy because you can have [milk] in your cereal, at lunch — to go to McDonalds, you can get milk there, and you can have it in coffee before you study at night,”” Brennan said. “”It’s not as hard as it sounds, you can get it in your diet a lot of different ways.”” Along with the informative advice, the “”got milk?”” event allowed students to imitate the popular “”got milk?”” celebrity ads by posing alongside cardboard cutouts of their favorite celebrities with milk mustaches of their own. Photo highlights from UCSD can be viewed online at http://www.whymilk.com along with photos from some of the other 20 campuses throughout the nation participating in the event. A handful of students that took part in the event claimed that they were not too surprised by the “”got milk?”” recommended daily consumption of milk. Students did, however, admit that they often fell short of the recommended three glasses in their daily diet. “”I probably do about two a day,”” said Daniel Yates, Roosevely freshman. “”I think I’ll add another glass each day.”” The “”got milk?”” campaign is made possible by the sponsorship of the Milk Processor Education Program and the National Dairy Council. ...

BRIEFLY

Veteran’s Recognition to Take Place Congressman Bob Filner will speak at a Veteran’s Recognition Ceremony on Nov. 9. It is sponsored by The Veteran’s Association at UCSD, and will be at the Sequoia Room in the Muir College Commons. The event will recognize and appreciate veterans’ continuing contribution to higher education and their sacrifices made in defending their country. At the ceremony, UC President Richard C. Atkinson will receive recognition for designating Veteran’s Day, Nov. 10, an official UC holiday. Rogers Davis, UCSD assistant vice chancellor for human resources, will also be recognized for initiating the authorization of the Veteran’s Association at UCSD. On Nov. 11 members of the UCSD Veteran’s Association will participate in the San Diego Veteran’s Day parade. UCSD colleagues, co-workers, family and friends are invited to join the first march with other San Diego veterans. University of California Calls First-Ever ‘Lygus Summit’ UC scientists will forge alliances against a pest known as the Lygus bug, the eating habits of which have destroyed a wide variety of crops, including cotton, seed alfalfa, strawberries, beans and tree fruit. The bugs feed in large groups under certain field conditions that cause farmers to suffer sudden losses due to actions or conditions out of their control. At the Nov. 9 summit in Visalia, scientists representing various crops will talk to panelists. Scientists will focus on the future management of the Lygus bug and make suggestions for agriculturists to handle infestations of the destructive insect. Student Employees May See Wage Increase A proposal is being made to increase the salaries of students holding positions classified as Assistant II-IV by 2 percent. The only exception to the increase is the Assistant I classification, which will remain at the state minimum wage of $5.75 per hour. These classifications are “”by agreement”” with the university, meaning workers’ wages do not undergo immediate or automatic rate changes unless an increase is required to meet the established minimum for the Assistant classification. The tentative effective date for the proposed rate increases would be retroactive to Oct. 1, 2000 for student employees paid monthly or biweekly. Career Services welcomes comments on the proposals. UCSD to Hold Fourth Annual Community Outreach Fair UCSD will have its fourth annual community outreach fair on Nov. 16 at Southwestern College. Representatives from UCSD will staff information booths, interactive displays and workshops focusing on student admissions, educational opportunities, university events and resources available to students, employment and business contracting. There will also be entertainment, refreshments and door prizes. CALPIRG to Host “”Clean Air Car Show”” CALPIRG is hosting a “”Clean Air Car Show”” on Thursday to showcase some of the top zero-emission vehicle technologies on the market today and encourage students to contact Gov. Davis in support of the Zero Emission Vehicle Program. The California’s Zero Emission Vehicle mandate requires 10 percent of new cars sold by 2003 to be zero- and low-emission. Davis will make a final decision in a month, and the auto and oil industries are lobbying heavily for Davis to veto the mandate. The “”Clean Air Car Show”” will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the west side of the Career Services Center. ...

Events

Thursday, Oct. 26 Film: “”Shaft”” The movie starring Samuel L. Jackson will show at the Price Center Theater at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Admission is $2. Friday, Oct. 27 Performing Arts: “”Phantom Bodies”” The Patricia Rincon Dance Collective and Jean Isaac’s San Diego Dance Theater present the world premiere of their collaborative “”Phantom Bodies,”” featuring guest artists Charlie Oates, Les Waters and Jim Winker, with music by Steven Schick. The event is sponsored by the University Events Office and will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Center. The event is open to the public, and admission is $12 for students, $15 for faculty and staff and $18 for the public. For more information, call (858) 534-4119. Race: The Chancellor’s 5K Run/Walk for Scholars Chancellor Dynes will personally donate $25 to the UCSD Undergraduate Scholarship Fund for every participant who finishes before him. The event is open to the public and requires a $5 registration fee for students and $10 for others. Registration starts at 10:30 a.m. and the race starts at noon. For more information, call (858) 822-1537. Sunday, Oct. 29 Party: Halloween Costume Dance Party The Ballroom Dance Club at UCSD will sponsor the dance featuring ballroom, latin, swing and nightclub dancing. The event is free and open to the public and will take place in the Price Center Ballroom at 7 p.m. Costumes are strongly recommended. For more information, call (858) 535-9579. Tuesday, Oct. 31 Film: “”Friday the 13th”” “”Friday the 13th”” will shown in the Price Center Theater at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Admission is $2. Seminar: Identity Theft: How to Protect Yourself Linda Goldman-Foley, director of the Identity Theft Resource Center, will discuss the impact of crime on victims and explain how individuals can protect themselves against crime. It is sponsored by Student Legal Services and will take place at the Women’s Center at noon. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call (858) 693-7935. Competition: Halloween Costume Contest The Halloween Costume Contest, sponsored by the UCSD Bookstore, will take place at the Price Center Plaza. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m. and the contest will begin at 11:45 a.m. The first-place prize is a $100 gift certificate to the UCSD Bookstore, and the second-place prize is a UCSD sweatshirt. The event is free and open to the public. ...

San Diego Women's League of Voters Visits UCSD

A League of Women Voters representative came to the Women’s Center Wednesday to educate voters on upcoming ballot propositions. Nancy Loevinger, director of the Women’s Center, said she was impressed by the dozens of people that came, and said she hopes that many students went away from the talk more educated and less intimidated by the ballot propositions. Loevinger, an East Coast native, said she was intimidated by the number of propositions that appear on California ballots. She said she organized this information session because she feels many students voting for the first time may feel the same way she did. Alice McCauley, a member of the League of Women Voters, went through eight state propositions and three local ones, telling attendees about the pros and cons of each proposition. McCauley said educating voters is part of the League’s mission. “”The League of Women Voters goes out and talks to various groups,”” she said. “”We’ve given about 65 talks so far this year.”” After her talk, McCauley briefly went through the League’s position on certain propositions. She said, however, that the League only takes stands on issues it has thoroughly researched. The League opposes propositions 34, 37 and 38, and supports proposition 39. Because the League is a nonpartisan group, McCauley said it does not endorse candidates, only issues. It does, however, print pamphlets consisting of candidates’ answers to questions posed to them by the League. McCauley said she likes the fact that the League does not endorse candidates. “”I think it frees us to take action on the issues without consideration to the candidates,”” she said. “”You’re not considered a special interest.”” Loevinger said she liked the League’s presentation because it did not push a certain ideology. “”We want people to feel comfortable coming in here regardless of who they’re voting for,”” she said. She added that the information provided by the League will be available at the Women’s Center until the election. The Women’s Center will co-sponsor a roundtable discussion on Nov. 3 to discuss the privatization of education, an issue that will appear on the November ballot. ...

Sound Found to Be Linked with Sight

Researchers at the UCSD School of Medicine have completed a study supporting the theory that drawing attention to a sound enhances the ability to see objects that appear at the same location. John McDonald, post-doctoral researcher, collaborated with UCSD professor of neurosciences Steven Hillyard and UCSD assistant project scientist Wolfgang A. Teder-Salejarvi. Together they examined two senses rather than just one, as previous studies had done, to discover that the sense of sound influences that of sight. “”We used new techniques in relating cross modal interactions with attention processing,”” McDonald said. “”We’re basically trying to figure out how the brain works and how sensory information in one modality affects information of other modalities.”” The study consisted of two separate experiments using 33 volunteers who were asked to indicate whether a dim light in their peripheral vision appeared following a sound. The light and sound either appeared on the same side or on opposite sides. “”These studies show a stronger linkage between sight and hearing than previously demonstrated,”” Hillyard said. “”Our results suggest that you will see an object or event more clearly if it makes a sound before you see it.”” Hillyard said he considers the findings a first step to helping researchers better understand mental disorders, such as attention deficit disorder and schizophrenia. Industrially, the study opens possibilities of safer warning systems and man-machine interfaces where attention is crucial, such as air-traffic control systems. “”Audio/visual and brain electricity studies such as this give us a clearer picture of how the brain works and can greatly contribute to the world of neuroscience in the field of human selective attention as well as having real world applications,”” McDonald said. “”My interest is in looking at interactions between sensory modalities and ultimately see how people perceive objects in the real world.”” Not only did the researchers observe behavioral reactions to sound and sight, but they also recorded brain waves and electrical patterns that are associated with people’s sensory experience as an attempt to see where the brain analyzes sensory information. “”No one study can show how the brain puts together both auditory and visual inputs,”” Hillyard said. “”But this study is a first step to understanding this.”” The next phase for research includes more studies of normal brain function involving different senses and comparisons to individuals with abnormal brain function. UCSD is a leader in cognitive neuroscience and is one of the world’s most advanced centers for this type of research, according to Hillyard. ...