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UCSD Professors Receive Honors Kiyoteru Tokuyasu, David Woodruff, Raffi Aroian, Daniel Dubin, Susan Taylor and George Feher, professors in the biology and physical sciences divisions at UCSD, are being recognized for their achievements. Tokuyasu, a professor emeritus in biology, received the 2000 Distinguished Scientist Award from the Microscopy Society of America. He is the third scientist at UCSD to receive the award. Woodruff, a biology professor, received the honorary degree of doctor of science from his alma mater, the University of Melbourne, Australia, for his work on 100 research papers presented in his thesis on the evolution and conservation of animal species. Aroian, an assistant professor of biology, received two awards: the New Investigator Award in the toxicological sciences from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, based in North Carolina; and the Beckman Young Investigator Award, awarded by the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation. Dubin, a physics professor, received the 2000 Award for Excellence in Plasma Physics Research from the American Physical Society for his outstanding contributions to the field. Taylor, a chemistry and biochemistry professor, received the 2001 Francis P. Garvin-John M. Olin Medal from the American Chemical Society for her contributions as a female chemist. Feher, a research professor in physics, is being named a fellow of the Biophysical Society for his part in the use of physical methods to study biological systems and in investigations of the primary processes in photosynthesis. UCSD Scientists Awarded $3 Million ‘Biocomplexity’ Grant The National Science Foundation has awarded physicists and biologists at UCSD a $3 million grant to study the development of the ameboid protozoan Dictyostelium discoideum, an organism commonly known as slime mold. The grant is being awarded for five years and was one of 16 grants awarded by the foundation this month to study the effects of the interaction between living things on all levels with their environment. UCSD scientists will collaborate with researchers at Cornell University to attempt to connect the underlying genetic information about slime mold to its morphology and multicellular organization. The scientists said they chose slime mold because it is the simplest organism to study for their purposes. Supercomputer Named one of Fastest in Nation With a recent upgrade to a speed of 1.7 tera flops, or 1.7 trillion calculations per second, Blue Horizon, the National Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure computer at the San Diego Supercomputer Center has been ranked No. 8 on the list of the top 500 supercomputers. The speed is a 70 percent increase over previous speeds. It will allow scientists to gather information more efficiently. Blue Horizon is helping researchers probe demanding computing problems, such as determining chemical reaction rates, designing new materials, stimulating the nervous system, modeling water and pollutant transport, modeling climate and predicting storms and understanding the origins of the universe. The list was compiled by the University of Mannheim and the University of Tennessee. Impact of Internet on Agriculture to be Examined Business and university experts will gather Dec. 4 at the University of California’s annual Executive Seminar on Agricultural Issues in Sacramento to discuss the effect of e-commerce on agriculture. Participants in the seminar will gain a better understanding of the technological and economic influences that dot-com businesses could have in world markets, California farms and agricultural supply. The seminar will feature speeches by industry experts representing companies such as John Deere and Bank of America. The speakers and participants will go over economic trends in the field and review issues facing California specifically. ...

Bookstore Steps Up as Web Site Goes Under

Online textbook retailer BigWords filled its last order and “”succumbed … to the powers that be,”” according to an explanation posted on its Web site on Oct. 20. Like many other online retailers, BigWords has encountered financial difficulties that have ground its operations to a halt. The announcement makes matters difficult for college students across the nation, including UCSD students. Students who wish to return their textbooks or request a refund directly from BigWords will be unable to do so, given the company’s untimely failure. The UCSD Bookstore is offering a solution to students. John Turk, UCSD Bookstore director, has decided that the Bookstore will accept receipts from BigWords and honor book returns as if they were from the Bookstore. “”We feel it fills our mission to be of service for the academic community, particularly the students, who are caught in the middle by circumstances beyond their control,”” said David Wilson, course materials manager. “”It’s purely a service mission on our part.”” The bookstore’s new policy is designed to help students who purchased textbooks for the fall quarter from BigWords and later dropped the class or wished to return their books. Students who would not have been able to obtain a refund for their BigWords books can return them to the Bookstore for full credit. “”It’s not a give-away, exactly,”” Wilson said. “”We do get the book. We’re just giving [students] credit. It’s not as if we’re saying, ‘Whatever loss you suffered from BigWords, we’ll cover.'”” It is difficult to speculate how many UCSD students have been affected by BigWords’ closure, and how many will take advantage of the Bookstore’s offer. “”I hesitate to say whether it will be half a dozen or 20,”” Wilson said. “”It’s not just the number of students who ordered books from BigWords — it’s only the ones who had a problem and did not get it resolved.”” Students with a BigWords textbook they wish to return should bring it and its original receipt to the customer service area of the UCSD Bookstore by Nov. 11. The book must be in mint condition for a full credit. Otherwise, a 75 percent credit will be issued. For more information, please contact David Wilson at (858) 534-3771. ...

Coptic Club Invites Bishop to First Meeting

The recently formed Coptic Club, an organization that promotes Coptic Orthodoxy, held its first meeting Thursday in the Price Center. The club welcomed H.G. Bishop Serapion, bishop of Southern California and Hawaii, as a guest speaker. According to freshman Ramsey Marcus, UCSD students formed the club after witnessing the Coptic Club’s success at UC Irvine. “”It was so strong at UCI, we knew we could bring the club here and get it that big as well,”” Marcus said. “”It’s good to see the support we have so far from the first meeting.”” Several months ago, fourth-year UCSD student Bishoy Said attended a Los Angeles meeting where he saw Serapion speak at an American Orthodox church. Three weeks ago, Said met with the bishop to arrange for him to speak to the UCSD Coptic Club. Serapion was enthusiastic about orating for the club, according to Said. “”He was very encouraging and happy to be our guest,”” Said said. “”He has devoted his life to teaching about this, and it is an honor to have him come all the way from L.A.”” The purpose of the club is to educate and promote knowledge of the Coptic religion. There is a small Coptic church in Solana Beach, and the members of the Coptic Club hope the club can be another venue in which Coptics can celebrate their religion. Community members and students from other schools attended the meeting, suggesting that the club can serve as a bridge to connect with people interested in the religion outside campus. Club members sang a traditional hymn as Serapion arrived at the meeting in a customary black robe. He then led the room in prayer and gave a 45-minute-long overview of the religion, involving the members in his lecture as he asked questions throughout. An Egyptian branch of Orthodox Christianity, the Coptic Church has been in existence for about 2,000 years, forming in A.D. 45 in Alexandria. It is based on the teachings of St. Mark, who brought Christianity to Egypt during the reign of the Roman emperor Nero in the first century. Now an independent church, the Coptic religion exists all over the world, according to Serapion. The persecution it has survived only strengthens the deep spirituality of the church, he said. “”This is a church of ideology and spirituality that separates human nature from divine nature,”” Serapion said. “”The spiritual life is a life of joy.”” At the meeting, Serapion described the significance of the fasts that church members keep. According to Serapion, the Coptic Church has been described as the “”fasting church,”” as fasts occur Wednesday and Friday to remember the days of the week when Judas turned Jesus Christ over to the Jews and when he was crucified. There are also 14 occasions throughout the year when the church fasts to recognize religious holidays. “”After the fasting, we can join each other in celebration in the feasts,”” Serapion said. Serapion also referred to the Bible and mentioned its importance. “”How the church lives the Bible helps us to understand our life and what it contains,”” Serapion said. “”Everything the church says must be supported by the Bible.”” The speech ended with a question-and-answer period. Serapion then led the group in prayer. He consecrated bread, which was distributed to members. The club presented him with a UCSD coffee mug in appreciation for his presence. Serapion wished to visit with the members in a less formal atmosphere, so the Coptic Club arranged a dinner for members following the meeting, during which they could talk to the bishop personally. “”It was great to have him speak here,”” Said said. “”You get a feel for what the peace of the Coptic Church really is. “”The true heart of it is in the monastery, though,”” he added. Said visited a Coptic monastery last summer and described the experience as very serene and spiritual. The Coptic Club will post information and will continue to meet every week on Thursdays at 5 p.m. in the Price Center Gallery A. ...

Lights & Sirens

Lights & Sirens is a selection of entries compiled from the log book of the UCSD Police Department. UCSD crime statistics can be attained by all persons from the Police Department or at http://police.ucsd.edu Sunday, Oct. 29 12:34 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a white ’88 Toyota Camry from Lot 406. Loss: $5,000. 12:34 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a CD player from Lot 208. Loss: $300. 4:42 p.m.: A student reported peeping at Tenaya Hall. Monday, Oct. 30 2:41 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a laptop from the Humanities and Social Sciences building. Loss; $2,000. 3:35 p.m.: A 35-year-old male staff member suffered from inhalation of chlorine gas at the Keck building. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. 4:05 p.m.: A staff member reported vandalism to a black ’95 Volvo. Loss: $1,000. 6:02 p.m.: An 18-year-old female student suffered an ankle injury while at Muir Field. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Tuesday, Oct. 31 1:54 p.m.: Units and the San Diego Fire Department responded to a fire at the Pepper Canyon Apartments caused by burning wax. Fire marshal and Housing Maintenance notified. Wednesday, Nov. 1 4:06 a.m.: Officers detained an 18-year-old male student in Lot 304 for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. 6 a.m.: Officers impounded a green ’95 Jeep Cherokee in Lot 705 for investigation of stolen plates. 10:53 a.m.: Officers arrested a 24-year-old male student in Lot 403 for misuse of a handicapped placard. Cited and released. 10:35 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a computer from the Social Sciences Building. Loss: $5,140. 12:01 p.m.: A 17-year-old female student complained of dizziness at Peterson Hall. Transported to Kaiser Hospital by paramedics. 1:50 p.m.: A student reported theft of license plates from Lot 705. Thursday, Nov. 2 5:30 a.m.: A 56-year-old male nonaffiliate was ordered off campus for seven days after illegally lodging at the Cognitive Sciences Building. 1:05 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from Peterson Hall. Loss: $35. 4:16 p.m.: Units and the San Diego Fire Department responded to a 6-month-old female fall victim. Evaluated and released by paramedics. 6:09 p.m.: A 37-year-old female staff member suffered a head injury after losing consciousness at the Ratner Eye Clinic. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Friday, Nov. 3 11 a.m.: Officers arrested a 23-year-old female nonaffiliate at the University Bookstore for petty theft. Cited and released. 12:22 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a silver ’97 Honda Civic in Lot 702. Loss: $170. 5:38 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a white ’86 Nissan pickup from Lot 702. Loss: $2,500. 8:04 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from Tioga Hall. Loss: $86. Saturday, Nov. 4 2:01 a.m.: Officers arrested a 47-year-old male nonaffiliate at 2900 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. Later rejected and transported to Central Jail. 3:36 a.m.: A 19-year-old male nonaffiliate suffered from alcohol poisoning at the Muir Apartments. Subject refused treatment. 9:13 p.m.: Units and paramedics responded to an 18-year-old female student who passed out at Mandeville Auditorium. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. –Compiled by Lauren I. Coartney, News Editor ...

Concert Kicks Off Series

Despite high attendance expectations and a history of playing to sold-out arenas, Lost at Last performed Friday night in the Price Center Plaza to a consistent crowd of approximately 100. The Maui-based band, which dedicates its shows to a resolution for the problems existing between Israelis and Arabs, was brought to campus by the A.S. Council as part of the school’s “”Thank Goodness It’s Friday”” concert series. “”I thought they were awesome,”” said A.S. Programmer Cassie Williams. “”They definitely have a lot of skill.”” Though many in attendance had not previously heard of the band, most were satisfied yet surprised by the concert. “”I think they were pretty good, with a nice beat,”” third-year medical student Bret Neiderman said. “”I thought it was a bit underpopulated, though. I thought it would be a lot more crowded for what it was.”” Williams attributes the small turnout to the lack of interest UCSD students have when it comes to new bands. “”People want to see what they already know,”” Williams said. “”They are not going to come, regardless if what I bring in is quality.”” However, some students believed that the unexpectedly small attendance was more a problem stemming from the school itself. “”This school has no school spirit,”” Warren Senior Austin Kennedy said. “”The students have to get involved.”” Kennedy also said the little publicity he saw for the show must have been a factor in the diminutive crowd size. “”I haven’t seen any flyers at all,”” he said. “”It sucks for kids who like this music and didn’t get to go because they didn’t know about it. The school needs to be promoting stuff like this.”” Williams was surprised and disappointed by this allegation. The programming office stated that it put up flyers all throughout the Price Center and Library Walk, in addition to going to the majority of the on-campus residence halls to pass out flyers for the show. “”I think the concert was marketed to the best of A.S. Council programming committee’s ability,”” Williams said. “”There were flyers and paper everywhere, there was a campus-wide e-mail and there was a lot of word of mouth.”” The band members, however, did not mind the small crowd, saying that the loyal fans they did entertain loved their performance. Williams said the group was given the option of not playing because of the small crowd, but it chose to perform to those did come. “”We like to find good in all the shows we do,”” drummer Daniel Paul said. “”It was a nice, intimate crowd. I think they were all hypnotized and they stuck to us.”” The remaining band members enjoyed playing a smaller venue, as it gave them an opportunity to experience an atypical crowd. “”It was a lot of fun,”” pianist and guitarist Timi said. “”It was definitely a challenging crowd. I like that people didn’t know anything about this kind of music.”” The band’s view of the area was equally positive. Deva Priyo, who plays over 10 different instruments throughout the show, said he enjoyed performing because of the feel that exists around the school. “”Though I can’t really make a strong opinion of [San Diego], it has a nice community, a nice family and a nice vibe,”” he said. Williams said the fact this type of music is not mainstream may have contributed to the small attendance. “”I decided for the first [TGIF], I wanted to test the waters of this school,”” she said. “”I know now that this school only responds well to top-40 stuff.”” The band classifies its music as “”ethno-techno,”” in that it combines current dance and trance music with lesser-known foreign instruments such as the sitar, tabla, conga and djembe. “”The music puts you on a carpet ride,”” Priyo said. “”The music takes you away on a journey. It is quite powerful.”” However, the unusual nature of the songs is what interested many in the crowd. “”I like the fact it gets me in a peaceful state of mind,”” said Esthela Becerra, visiting from Mount. St. Antonio College in Los Angeles. “”I like the fact it is different. You can interpret it in your own words.”” Because those in attendance did enjoy the concert, Williams said that a band such as this would be better suited to play during a big festival when there are headlining bands also present. “”This would have been great for a show like that,”” Williams said. “”Students would be forced to expand their horizons.”” However, Becerra felt that the lack of energy and attendance of the crowd prohibited her from losing herself in the performance. “”Maybe there would have been more energy with more people,”” she said. “”I think if there were, I would be in more of a mood to dance.”” Williams said the lack of dancers at the show may have occurred due to the concert’s early starting time of 7:30 p.m., before which the DJs and Vinylphiles Club spun for one hour. A later starting time might have attracted more dancers. Those in attendance expressed enjoyment of the TGIF and said they would attend another concert next quarter for its cultural benefits. “”This definitely has the potential to bring a lot of people together,”” Becerra said. “”With a variety of concerts like this one, it would be easier to understand other people’s cultures.”” The next TGIF is set to take place in February, in conjunction with Black History Month and the Student of Color Conference. In addition, the A.S. Council is holding a “”Nooner”” concert Wednesday, with a possible guest appearance by ’80s music star Tiffany. The A.S. Council has plans to start a dance club, slated for Friday nights in Porter’s Pub throughout the next two quarters. ...

Events

Friday, Nov. 3 Concert: Lost at Last UCSD’s first TGIF concert will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Price Center Plaza. Lost at Last, Maui’s Ethno-Techno-Tribal-Trance-Dance-Chants Band, will perform. The show will be a tribute to peace in the Middle East between Arabs and Jews. Students with a valid ID will be admitted free. For more information, call (858) 534-0477. Saturday, Nov. 4 Performing Arts: Mighty Mahler The La Jolla Symphony and Chorus will present their first concert of the season at 8 p.m. in the Mandeville Auditorium. The event is open to the public and admission is $11 for students and $18 for general admission. For more information, call (858) 534-4637. Sunday, Nov. 5 Concert: MTV Campus Invasion Wyclef Jean, De La Soul and Black Eyed Peas will perform at RIMAC Arena at 7:30 p.m. Student tickets are available at the Price Center Box office. For more information, call (858) 534-0477. Monday, Nov. 6 Rally: Nader 2000 at UCSD Students for Nader will sponsor the event which will take place at noon in the Price Center Plaza. Admission is free and the event is open to the public. For more information, call (619) 531-1636. Forum: Voting Mentality in the United States Professor Michael Schudson of the communications department will speak at the event which will explore the mentality of the voters who will choose the next president in the upcoming election. The International Affairs Group will sponsor the event which will take place at 7 p.m. in the Pepper Canyon Lodge. Admission is free and the event is open to the public. For more information, call (858) 534-2261. Film: “”The Fragile Promise of Choice”” The Women’s Center and Concentric Media will sponsor the film which explores how legislation, funding and violence affect reproductive freedom. The event will take place at 4 p.m. in the Women’s Center conference room. Admission is free and the event is open to the public. For more information, call (858) 822-0074. Discussion: Reds, Whites and Blues UCLA sociology professor William Roy will discuss his paper outlining his current research. The event is sponsored by the Department of Sociology and will take place at 3 p.m. in Social Sciences Building Room 101. Admission is free and the event is open to the public. For more information, call (858) 534-5310. ...

Speaker Addresses Crimes of Identity Theft

Identity Theft Resource Center Director Linda Goldman-Foley spoke at an identity theft workshop on Tuesday at the Women’s Center. A nonprofit, grant-funded program, ITRC works to serve two functions: assisting victims of identity theft and increasing public awareness about the crime. The organization was founded late last year by Goldman-Foley, a victim of identity-theft herself. Considered nationally an expert in the subject, Goldman-Foley has traveled across the United States in addition to testifying before courts at the state and federal levels and in front of Congress. The workshop was sponsored by the Women’s Center and Student Legal Services. It served as a forum for discussing the impact of identity theft as well as preventative measures for decreasing the risk of becoming a victim. Goldman-Foley alluded to a recent WASHINGTON POST poll that showed that the biggest area of concern for Americans is privacy and identity theft. The issue ranks higher than terrorism, the economy or any other national problem. These concerns are reasonable, according to Goldman-Foley. She says the reason it has become a major crime is because of the ease in committing the crime. Goldman-Foley said that identity theft is the one of the fastest rising crimes in the United States today. Perpetrators prey on everyday transactions that require the sharing of personal information, including bank and credit card account numbers, one’s income, Social Security number, address and phone numbers, to name a few. Identity thieves co-opt a piece of a victim’s personal information and use it without the victim’s knowledge to commit fraud or theft. One of the most common examples of this is when a thief uses a victim’s personal information to open a credit card account in the victim’s name without their knowledge. According to Goldman-Foley, there are two types of identity theft: financial and criminal. Financial identity theft occurs when an impostor takes a victim’s information and uses it for their own financial gain. Criminal identity theft occurs when an impostor commits crime under someone else’s identity, usually with the aid of a fake driver’s license. One of the themes of the discussion was how no person is immune from becoming a victim. ITRC statistics show that most victims don’t find out about the crime until 14 to 16 months after the crime has occurred. Goldman-Foley elaborated on her own experience as a victim and the trauma most victims go through. “”Most victims of identity theft go through the same range of emotions as someone who has been a victim of violent crime or even rape,”” Goldman-Foley said. “”There’s denial and a sense of ‘I did something wrong; this is my fault.'”” She went on to say that victims experience a very deep sense of personal violation because of the nature of the crime itself. “”You’re trying to prove that you haven’t done something,”” Goldman-Foley said. “”Isn’t it our justice system that says you are innocent until proven guilty? Identity theft is just the opposite, it’s ‘I am guilty until I prove my innocence.'”” Students are affected by identity theft crimes as well. Students need to be aware of any false reports on their credit histories. Since college students are at an age when most credit card companies are vying for their attention, students are easy targets for identity theft criminals. Goldman-Foley stressed that victims come in all ages, even referring to one case in which the victim was a 4-year-old. “”It’s not how old you are or how much money you have,”” Goldman-Foley said. “”It’s the credit that they want.”” It is not unlikely for criminals to be victims’ family members or friends, Goldman-Foley said. In her case, it was her employer who stole her identity. Goldman-Foley said that the following preventative measures would help in decreasing the risk of becoming a victim: Carefully destroy papers you don’t need, preferably with a shredder; guard your Social Security Number; check your credit report once a year; block your name from marketing lists; guard your personal information by carrying as little as possible in your wallet, especially extra credit cards; be suspicious of telephone solicitors; and lastly, demand that businesses you frequent take good care of your information and find out how they protect you from ID theft. ...

Internship Program Recruits at UCSD

Enthusiastic visitors proclaiming that students can make at least $5,000 this summer through the Summer Management Program’s internships are appearing in classes throughout campus, requesting phone numbers and e-mail addresses from interested students. Brian Golder, a general manager for the Summer Management Program says the summer internship program is an ideal experience for “”motivated entrepreneurs”” who are interested in heading their own businesses for a summer. Students are trained and are later given responsibility for hiring painters, training new employees and eventually arranging their own jobs with clients. Golder summarized the programs as a “”painting internship.”” “”You are responsible for finding the painters, getting new employees and booking your own jobs with clients,”” Golder said. “”Painting is a rejuvenating industry — every few years it is always needed.”” Golder said that students must be extremely diligent and put in long hours to reap the benefits of the internship. “”It’s good to have had the experience of working a 40-hour week,”” Golder said. “”You don’t pay anything to be involved in the program, but you must work hard and we guarantee each person a $5,000 net profit. Basically, no one loses money.”” Golder also said the company makes money by including its profits into the overhead costs. “”We make a profit because our profits are factored into the overhead in each job — it’s part of the regular business costs,”” Golder said. “”We don’t make money if they [the students] don’t make money.”” The Summer Management Program is a for-profit organization with locations in 16 states and annually recruits from 100 college campuses throughout California. According to Golder, despite the large number of interested applicants numbering approximately 60,000, only about 250 students will participate in the internship. “”We start with information meetings that include information about painting, and then we set up a pre-interview,”” Golder said. “”We also allow the student to ask questions about us and our company so they become satisfied that it is not a scam but a full-time job. We make sure that they’re motivated and we allow them to call people that have done the program in the past. “”Ultimately, the applicants meet with the vice president of the company who will try to convince them not to do it,”” Golder said. Golder cites school credit as an incentive for students to participate. “”Many students talk to their individual college and try to see what classes [the internship] could apply to,”” Golder said. According to Golder, the commitment for many students may begin in the spring quarter, as they may try to arrange one-half of the painting projects before the summer starts. “”In the summer is when the work starts and we’re not here to hire painters, we’re here to teach you to run your own business,”” Golder says. “”At the end of summer you can wash your hands of it.”” Golder said he believes the Summer Management Program is a way for undergraduates to distinguish themselves from their classmates. ...

Marshall College Welcomes Trick-or-Treaters

Trick-or-treating second graders from Valencia Park Elementary arrived at Marshall college Tuesday morning in an effort to eradicate its candy supply. Lyon Liew/ Guardian The trick-or-treating hoard was on campus as a part of the annual Active Community at Thurgood Marshall’s Safe Halloween event, an outreach event that brings inner-city school children to UCSD to enjoy a special Day of the Dead celebration. The event began at 10:30 a.m. with teachers and A.C.T. staff leading groups of 10 to 15 candy-seeking students through the Marshall residence halls and the upper and lower Marshall apartments. The trick-or-treating gave way to a short lunch on Marshall field followed by a Halloween carnival staffed by A.C.T. With the help of Marshall residential advisors, club members spread the word about the event in advance to prepare Marshall residents for the arrival of the trick-or-treaters. Lyon Liew/ Guardian “”The idea is to get students involved in the Marshall spirit while reaching out to the community,”” said A.C.T. co-chair Doriana Bailey. According to Bailey, this event is at least five years old and is one of several events that A.C.T. sponsors throughout the year. Another such event is the annual “”Senior”” Prom, where A.C.T. club members visit nursing homes in the spring, inviting residents to dance. Valencia Park Elementary is a public school in Southeast San Diego off Skyline Boulevard. It is one of three schools that belong to the UCSD Friends of Learning program, from which the university chooses the participants of events such as Safe Halloween on a rotational basis. Theona Young, a second-grade teacher at Valencia Park, praised the event as “”a day of safe fun.”” After trick-or-treating through the Marshall residence halls and apartments, the students went to the Dean’s office, where they were greeted by more candy and a special guest performance by “”Eminem.”” The Safe Halloween carnival featured a variety of games and activities like Pin-the-wart-on-the-witch and scary story telling. Although most of the children at the event planned to be trick-or-treating Halloween night as well, the A.C.T. safe Halloween gave them an opportunity to do so in the safety of a college campus during the daytime. For many children this is the first exposure they have had to a university. “”It’s a pretty place, but it’s a long walk,”” second grader Macio Liller said. ...

Technology Questionable in Classroom

UNIVERSITY PARK — Technology is taking over the classroom at rapid speed, but electronics are seen by some as an obstacle to creative and interactive learning. Teachers are utilizing computers, projectors and videos to help them present their material to the class. However, many teachers and students have differing views of whether or not technology is the beneficial route to learning. Tim Robinson teaches first-year seminar classes at Pennsylvania State University and believes that technology is essential to the learning process. “”Students in my classes need to know how to use Web searches, how to make their own Web pages and know how to make PowerPoint presentations,”” Robinson said. Robinson feels that it is worth spending the hours creating a presentation with Microsoft PowerPoint with a huge class because once the presentation is saved, it can be re-used another year. As a teacher, Robinson feels that some things can’t be explained in stick figures. He believes that seeing the material visually helps almost everyone. A professor of meteorology, Alistair Fraser’s views are different than Robinson as he thinks that professors don’t use technology in the proper way. “”Technology has the potential to be helpful to students, but some professors don’t use it that way,”” Fraser said. Although he was instrumental in supplying projectors in the Walker Building classrooms and uses computers as visual interactive models to show students, for example, how clouds grow, he feels that not all technology is designed for the classroom. “”The PowerPoint was not made for students or faculty, it was made for the business community,”” Fraser said. On the other hand, Rachel Scheer (junior-geography) said that technology is essential in her Geography 121 (Mapping) class. “”Without technology, I don’t think that I would learn half as much. The class is very hands on, and it makes learning easier,”” Scheer said. Scheer’s professor for the class puts all of the lectures on the Web, which makes listening easier in the classroom, she said. Because the professor takes attendance, Scheer said that she doesn’t feel that the attendance rate suffers at all. –Daily Collegian ...