News

Briefly

Associate professor of medicine at the UCSD School of Medicine and Veteran¹s Affairs Medical Center, Richard S. Kornbluth, has been selected as one of nine scientists worldwide to receive one of the first Sequella Global Tuberculosis grants to develop a tuberculosis vaccine. Kornbluth received his granted sum of $50,000 to study a method developed at UCSD to manipulate the immune system to better control the tuberculosis disease. Scripps professor honored for contributions to ocean science Joseph L. Reid, professor emeritus of physical oceanography in the Marine Life research Group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, was awarded the Maurice Ewing Medal of the American Geophysical Union Dec. 17. Reid was recognized for his numerous contributions to ocean science. The award is given annually for exhibited excellence in the understanding of physical, geophysical and geological processes in the ocean. Reid has been a member of the faculty at Scripps since 1974, serving first as professor of physical oceanography before going on to become director of the Scripps Marine Life Research Group. Reid is also known for his study of ocean circulation in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian oceans. UCSD researchers find new central nervous system gene Researchers from the UCSD School of Medicine and the Shirakawa Institute of Animal Genetics in Japan have discovered a new gene responsible for development and function in the central nervous system. The research team described its discovery of a protein called ³NUDEL² in the December 2000 issue of the journal ³Neuron.² NUDEL combines with a protein called LIS1 to form a transport complex that helps carry neural messages from a newborn¹s just-formed brain to the rest of its body. This discovery may help scientists solve the mystery of how an egg specifically becomes a human being. The team¹s findings may also help doctors cure or prevent human defects that occur during the neural migration process, such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. Scientists also learned that the NUDEL/LIS1 complex may be partly responsible for cell division, proliferation and survival. Board of Regents appoints commission to aid in growth UC Regents Chair S. Sue Johnson and UC President Richard Atkinson announced last month the selection of the Commission on the Growth and Support of Graduate Education composed of faculty, students and administrators to help the UC system reach its goal of adding 11,000 graduate students in the next 10 years. The commission will have to produce a report by summer concerning the necessary actions the university should take to increase enrollments and admissions for the additional graduate students. A large number of graduate students are required at the university to assist with important research and boost the number of employees at the school. The commission comes from the determination made by the regents earlier this year to enroll more students to remain competitive in California¹s economy. UCSD scientists discover hydrothermal vent field A team of scientists, consisting of members from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Duke University, the University of Washington and various other institutions found a new hydrothermal vent field Dec. 5 in the Atlantic ocean which they are calling ³The Lost City.² The field was discovered while the scientists were studying a mountain at that location during a scientific cruise aboard the research vessel Atlantis. The scientists say that this may be the largest system of its kind with the underwater structures rising 180 feet. They also note that it is unusual because the venting structures are made of carbonate materials and silica rather than sulfa and iron-based materials. ...

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UCSD Awards First ‘Chancellor’s Medal’ Neil Morgan, an associate editor and senior columnist for the San Diego Union Tribune, received UCSD’s First “”Chancellor’s Medal”” Tuesday night in a ceremony held at Geisel Library. The event was attended by 150 San Diego civic and cultural leaders. Morgan was honored for his many unique contributions to the city of San Diego during his career. Chancellor Dynes spoke at the event, calling Morgan “”Mr. San Diego,”” who “”has worn many hats”” including those of “”author, civic leader, regional booster and critic of the status quo.”” UCSD Associate Chancellor for Extended Studies Mary Walshok also spoke at the ceremony. She cited Morgan’s role in urging UCSD to “”forge real bonds of trust and mutuality San Diego and Tijuana and highlighted the work and growth of San Diego Dialogue, the Center for U.S./Mexico Relations and the Institute of the Americas in the 1990s.”” An exhibition of the books authored by Morgan and memorabilia of his leadership in San Diego also opened Tuesday in the Special Collections area of the library; it will remain on display through December. Physics professors join list of most highly cited authors UCSD physics professosr Ivan K. Schuller and M. Brian Maple have been included in ISI’s newly created “”Highly Cited Researchers,”” a publicly available, Web-based resource of the world’s most cited authors and researchers. The database is a continuation of the ISI’s efforts to update its Current Contents, essays detailing highly cited authors and their discoveries and publications over the years. The new list will feature new information compiled over the last two decades. The Web site is currently in the data collection stage and will be completely launched and ready for navigation in 2001. Schuller and Maple were placed in the group because their peers had honored them with numerous citations throughout the course of their own research. The honor from ISI cited each as “”one of the most highly cited, influential researchers”” in his field. For more information about the database visit http://www.isinet.com/isi/highlycited/ UCSD Summer Program requests student suggestions The UCSD Summer Session Program is asking for student suggestions for more summer courses in order to expand the number and range of courses offered this summer. The program needs students’ specific requests by Dec. 8 for their list to be forwarded to the planning committee. Please submit suggestions by e-mail to [email protected] Career Services announces third career conference The Career Services Center has announced the date of its third annual parent/student Career Conference, to be held on Saturday, May 5, 2001. The conference will feature informative presentations, panel discussions and an inside look at the Career Services Center. It also allows students and parents to look at the challenge of finding a career after graduating from college. The program includes development tips and discussions of what becomes of UCSD graduates. Included on the agenda are sessions on graduate and professional school and their bearing on future employement, Career Services Center resources overview and sessions with graduate and professional school recruiters The cost is $15 for students and $25 for each parent. Registration is first-come-first served and required for attendance. Students can register Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. in the Career Services Center. ...

Events

Thursday, Nov. 30 Burke Lecture: John T. Noonan The Eugene M. Burke lectureship will sponsor the talk, to be given by John T. Noonan, judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit and noted author of prize-winning works in history, philosophy and theology. The event will take place at 8 p.m. in the Hojel Auditorium of the Institute of the Americas Building. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 452-0285. Recognition: World AIDS Day The Student Health Association and the AIDS Research Institution will sponsor the awareness event, which will take place at 11 a.m. on Library Walk and the Price Center Plaza. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-2419. Sunday, Dec. 3 Recital: Chamber Music The UCSD Music Department will sponsor the event which will feature performances from students of Janos Negyesy. The event will take place at 8 p.m. in Mandeville Center and is open to the public. General admission is $5 and student admission is $3. For more information call (858) 534-4830. Tuesday, Dec. 5 Discussion: Negotiating Extra-Territorial Citizenship The Center for Comparitive Immigration Studies will sponsor the event, which will take place at noon in the Copley International Conference Center of the Institute of the Americas. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 822-4447. Wednesday, Dec. 6 Discussion: The Revolution of Biology The 40/40 Lecture Series in honor of UCSD’s 40th Anniversary will present a discussion on the Revolution of Biology by UCSD research professor Russell Doolittle. The even will take place at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of the Institute of the Americas. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 822-0510. Saturday, Dec. 9 Aquarium: Tidepooling The Birch Aquarium at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography will sponsor the event, which will take place at 1 p.m. The event is open to the public. General and student admission is $12. For more information call (858) 534-7336. Performing Arts: La Jolla Symphony and Chorus The UCSD music department will sponsor the event, which will take place at 8 p.m. in the Mandeville Auditorium. The event is open to the public. General admission is $18. and student admission is $12. For more information call (858) 534-4830. ...

Extension to Offer Two Graphic Design Certificates

The UCSD Extension has announced two new information technology certificates in response to the increased demand for Web graphic designers. The certificate programs, Animation and Graphic Design for the Web and Web Design for Graphic Professionals, will be offered starting winter 2001. “”As the need for qualified Web designers continues to increase, we are constantly creating new programs to meet these demands,”” stated Jim Brown, director of UCSD Extension’s Graphics and Digital Media Department. “”These new certificates are intended to provide graphic designers with the skills they need to move into highly desirable Web-based positions as well as provide the San Diego community with the trained professionals needed to support our growing high-tech industries,”” Brown stated. The Animation and Graphic for the Web specialized certificate program is a four-course, hands-on program that provides students with intensive professional training in graphics and animation. Students learn animation techniques, design techniques, programming and specific industry software such as Flash and PhotoShop. The Web Design for Graphic Professionals specialized certificate is designed for those with backgrounds in graphics who want to use their skills to design Web sites. The program focuses on effective visual communications and gives graphic professionals the opportunity to learn how to apply their experience and knowledge to the Web. This program differs significantly from the current Web Publishing certificate, as the focus is on visual graphics and multimedia rather than on HTML, javascripting and technical aspects of Web design. The emphasis will be on practical, effective applications and the perspective will be toward the graphically inclined student or one who desires solid Web graphics training. Students in the new Web design program will focus on three primary skill areas: digital design, including the principles of design, color, typography and digital technologies; “”what-you-see-is-what-you-get”” Web page design and software applications; and graphic optimization and multimedia on the Web. Enrollment is open to the general public, and there is a $35 enrollment fee. Program certification fees vary. An information technologies free information seminar will be held Jan. 4 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the UCSD Extension’s Sorrento Mesa center to provide more information on the new programs. Existing certificates in e-commerce, Web publishing, multimedia development, XML programming, and PDA programming will also be discussed. Make reservations by calling (858) 622-5740 or by e-mailing [email protected] Dates and times for all Winter 2001 courses are available at http://www.extension.ucsd.edu. UCSD Extension’s information technologies department offers a broad array of courses and certificate programs to aid professionals in upgrading their high-tech skills in graphic design, communications and networking, software analysis and design, programming, Oracle, Microsoft, UNIX/Linux system administration, e-commerce, Web technologies, and multimedia development. UCSD Extension is a division of UCSD’s Extended Studies and Public Programs, and offers more than 90 professional and specialized certificate programs in a wide variety of disciplines for business, science, engineering, education, interpretation and foreign languages. Nearly 40,000 adults attend classes each year at its facilities on the UCSD La Jolla campus, the Sorrento Mesa Center and the North County inland center in Carmel Valley Ranch. ...

UCSD Bows to ACLU Lawsuit

Over a year after agreeing to revise its posting policy, UCSD continued to distribute an outdated version of the policy, which states that the content of postings in residence halls are not permitted to be offensive to any individual or group within the university community. Last week, an e-mail was sent out notifying the campus community of the error, and clarifying that the new policy “”prohibits UCSD officials from engaging in any content-based censorship on the basis of the perceived offensiveness or discriminatory nature of the speech of materials posted on campus.”” In March 1999, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit against the university on behalf of Ben Shapiro, a Warren student who was ordered by the university to remove a sign from his residence hall window that stated, “”Fuck Netanyahu and Pinochet.”” The university agreed in August 1999 to rescind all existing policies relating to the distribution and posting of noncommercial flyers, posters and banners and to replace them with policies that prevent university administrators from censoring the content of these postings. The agreement was made in response to an order by federal district court judge John Rhoades. In April 2000, the ACLU learned that the old policy was still being distributed, and the university promised to take immediate corrective action. At the beginning of this academic year, Shapiro noticed that the old policy was still being distributed on campus. He said he was shocked to see the old policy in this year’s student organization handbook. Director of Student Affairs Nick Aguilar said the erroneous dissemination was an inadvertent oversight on the part of the staff at Student Organizations and Leadership Opportunities. In addition, Shapiro noticed that the old policy was sent to the San Diego Supercomputer Center, something Shapiro only noticed because he happens to work there. Jordan Budd, the ACLU attorney handling Shapiro’s case, sent a letter to the University of California, demanding that the university review everything distributed this year that might address posting policies and certify in writing to the ACLU any instances where the old policy has been distributed. Budd also demanded that the university replace all handbooks and documents containing the outdated policy with new versions containing the new policy, and to notify the entire university community in a hard-copy format of the errors and changes. Christopher Patti, counsel for the University of California, responded saying that the university will comply with Budd’s request, except for notifying the entire campus community in hard-copy format of the changes. Patti said that the university would instead send the notice electronically, because hard-copy notification is “”far slower, less effective, less likely to actually reach members of the university community than electronic communication and would be unnecessarily costly.”” The university also agreed to a request from Budd to pay the ACLU $2,500 in legal costs. Budd said he finds it inconceivable that the university still has not complied with the ruling of a federal judge. “”At best, this conduct on the part of the university reflects a striking level of incompetence for a world-class institution of higher education. At worst, the university has blatantly defied an order from a federal court,”” Budd said. “”Either way, it is inexcusable.”” Budd went on to accuse the university of misrepresenting students’ Constitutionally guaranteed free-speech rights by failing to inform the community of the court-mandated policy revision. “”Because of the university’s failure to meet its legal obligations, not only was the campus community given wrong information about the First Amendment rights of students, but the university — and the taxpayers who support it — have also unnecessarily paid for work and legal costs to correct the problem,”” he said. “”Someone should certainly be held accountable for this irresponsible behavior.”” Aguilar said the campus structure makes it difficult to uniformly distribute new policies. “”It’s unfortunate that we had this oversight, but in the decentralized structure of UCSD it is not surprising that one out of hundreds of administrators involved in campus policy would commit this unfortunate error,”” he said. “”As soon as we became aware of this we took action.”” Budd said that while the case is near resolution, it will not be entirely resolved until the university certifies to the ACLU its review of all campus documents. ...

Weekend Power Outage Interrupts UCSD Plays

A blown transformer at Revelle’s Mayer Hall cut off the electrical supply to several areas of the UCSD campus Sunday afternoon. The power outage occurred just before 4 p.m. and affected a few buildings in Revelle College. Students were largely unaffected by the power outage since most went home for the Thanksgiving weekend, but performances at the La Jolla Playhouse were disturbed by the darkness. Two simultaneous incidents caused the outage. First, a transformer at RIMAC caught fire, forcing the fire department to close RIMAC for the day. Physical Plant Services rerouted electricity through another substation, restoring power and allowing the gym to reopen Monday. The second incident occurred at Mayer Hall when a 12 KVR electrical switch exploded. This incident was thought to be responsible for knocking out power from Galbraith Hall to Scripps Institution of Oceanograghy, as well as the La Jolla Playhouse. The fire department investigated, but after a careful investigation they concluded that the explosion was not a fire hazard. By 3:30 p.m. Monday, Physical Plant Services had replaced the broken electrical switch in Mayer Hall and power was restored to Revelle College. The electrical problems at RIMAC and Mayer Hall were believed to be unrelated, despite having occurred at roughly the same time. Theater-goers enjoying a performance of “”Thoroughly Modern Millie”” at the La Jolla Playhouse were in the last 10 minutes of the play when all the lights abruptly went out, causing a premature end to the play. Not only did the outage prevent actors from completing the afternoon performance, but it also led to the cancellation of the 7 p.m. show since the power was still out. Most of the audience members were understanding of the problem, and many were more concerned about the ending of the play. The most curious even asked at the box office to find out how the final scene would have turned out. ...

Lights & Sirens

Lights & Sirens is a selection of entries compiled from the log book of the UCSD Police Department. UCSD crime statistics can be attained by all persons from the Police Department or at http://police.ucsd.edu Sunday, Nov. 19 5:15 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a black ’95 Ford Explorer in Lot 703. Loss: $500. 11:25 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a white ’98 Acura Integra in Lot 102. Loss: $4,400. Monday, Nov. 20 11:50 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a black and purple Trek B21 bicycle from the south bike racks at the Price Center. Loss: $400. 12:06 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from RIMAC. Loss: $20. 1:00 p.m.: A student reported losing a cellular phone at the Price Center. 3:03 p.m.: Officers arrested a 52-year-old male nonaffiliate for burglary at the Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Booked into Central Jail. 7:53 p.m.: Units and the San Diego Fire Department responded to a fire at Bates 106. Caused by burning food. Tuesday, Nov. 21 9:46 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a parking meter from Lot 113. Loss: $575. 11:00 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a camera from the Argo Hall elevator. Loss: $150. 2:46 p.m.: Officers arrested a 34-year-old female nonaffiliate for petty theft at Geisel Library. Cited and released. 5:19 p.m.: A 24-year-old male student suffered an ankle injury after falling at Humanities and Social Sciences Building. Sought private treatment. Wednesday, Nov. 22 10:45 a.m.: A staff member reported vandalism to a gold ’96 Geo Prism in Lot 753. Loss: $500. 12:15 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a blue B10 Magna Glacier Point bicycle from the racks on the south side of Geisel Library. Loss: $75. 1:30 p.m.: Officers arrested a 19-year-old male student in Lot 104 for misuse of a handicapped placard. Cited and released. 10:18 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a VCR from Thornton Hospital. Loss: $400. Thursday, Nov. 23 1:10 p.m.: Units and the San Diego Fire Department responded to a 20-year-old male nonaffiliate who suffered a head injury while surfing at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. Friday, Nov. 24 9:51 a.m.: A 17-year-old male nonaffiliate suffered a head injury while playing soccer at Warren Field. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. — Compiled by Lauren I. Coartney, News Editor ...

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Founding Biology Dean Appointed Professor Eduardo Macagno, associate vice president of arts and sciences for research and graduate education, and dean of the graduate school of arts and sciences at Columbia University, has been named founding dean of UCSD’s division of biology. Macagno has worked at Columbia since 1973 and will begin his work at UCSD starting Feb. 1, 2001. The division of biology, formerly a UCSD department, was created in July when UCSD’s division of natural sciences split into two divisions, each with its own dean. Mark Thiemens, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry, is the founding dean of the division of physical sciences. Macagno is a developmental neurobiologist and serves as co-editor of the “”Journal of Neurobiology.”” As dean of Columbia’s graduate school of arts and sciences, Macagno oversaw a major improvement in graduate student financial aid and the development of a new endowment for graduate fellowships within Columbia’s capital campaign. Macagno also initiated the development and implementation of several very successful interdepartmental masters degree programs and created several new programs that have significantly enhanced graduate alumni involvement with the school. A.S. President to Wash Chancellor Dynes’ Car Monday A.S. President Doc Khaleghi will wash Chancellor Dynes’ car on Library Walk Monday at noon as part of his defeat in the Chancellor’s 5K Run challenge. The annual stakes between the A.S. president and the chancellor state that if the chancellor finishes before the A.S. president, he must fund the annual A.S. barbecue. If the A.S. president finishes behind the chancellor, he must wash the chancellor’s car. Khaleghi came in 241st out of 719 entries. The chancellor came in 124th, and his wife Frances Dynes Hellman came in 171st. The chancellor pledged to donate $25 for every person who beat him to the finish line donating $3,075. Dynes Hellman pledged to donate $25 for every woman who beat her to the finish line donating $525. Dynes contributed an additional $40,000 in undesignated funds. All proceeds were put toward undergraduate research scholarships. Among the winners in the various 5K categories were Michael Breen, Terri Dowie, James Nielsen, Sally Anderson, Robert Starkey, Kevin Harley and Tamara Mau. Cross Cultural Center to Recognize World AIDS Day The UCSD Cross Cultural Center will present the World AIDS Day Celebration 2000 from Nov. 27 through Dec. 1 with poetry, artwork and informational materials. Included in the celebration will be an AIDS Resource Fair from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 30 on Library Walk in cooperation with Student Health Advocates, the AIDS Research institute and the Women’s Center. A movie screening of “”And the Band Played On”” will be held at 5:30 p.m. at the Cross Cultural Center. Scholarship Office Seeks Goldwater Applicants Science and engineering sophomores and juniors with excellent grades and research experience are encouraged to apply for national Goldwater Scholarships, which provide winners with $7,500 a year for up to two years. The awards are intended for students who plan to pursue graduate studies in engineering and the sciences. UCSD students have been quite successful nationally, winning three awards in 2000, two in 1999 and four in 1998. Applications are available at http://www.act.org/goldwater or at student financial services’ scholarship lobby and must be returned to the UCSD scholarship office by Jan. 16, 2001. Thomas Bond is the UCSD campus representative for the Goldwater Scholarship and can discuss the application with interested students. For more information, call (858) 534-3263. ...

Ten UCSD Professors Honored

Ten UCSD professors from the division of social sciences were recently recognized for their achievements in their fields. Diana Deutsch, a professor of psychology, was named a fellow of the division of applied experimental and engineering psychology of the American Psychological Association. “”I was pleased, not in the sense that it was inappropriate, but it wasn’t something I’d worked toward,”” Deutsch said. “”But I was obviously very pleased. I felt good about it.”” Deutsch had previously been named a fellow to two other divisions of the APA: the division of psychology and the arts in 1991 and the general psychology division in 1997. Deutsch’s work is heavily integrated with audio studies, particularly with differences in how music is perceived. She has also done studies involving balance and placement of instruments within an orchestra. Deutsch has been named a fellow to many other societies in areas of psychology and audio engineering. She founded the Society for Music Perception and Cognition and is the founding editor of the journal Music Perception. She gave a speech on perfect pitch at a Mozart festival at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. in 1998. “”The fact that I’m fellow of all these societies really does reflect that my work is interdisciplinary,”” Deutsch said. Economics professor Rob Engle was named a fellow of the American Statistical Association, for his individual contributions to the advancement of statistics. Engle has been a member of this society since 1989. He has been a member of UCSD staff since 1975. Engle is currently working in New York for a year. “”A People’s History of the Supreme Court”” (1999, Viking; 2000, Penguin), by political science professor Peter Irons has received a 2000 Silver Gavel Certificate of Merit from the American Bar Association for its “”contribution to public understanding of law and the legal system.”” Irons, a UCSD staff member since 1982, received his master’s and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Boston University and a J.D. degree from Harvard University. Rebecca Klatch, an associate professor of sociology, received various awards for her book, A Generation Divided: the New Left, the New Right, and the 1960s (1999, UC Press). The book was chosen Book-of-the-Month by the libertarian organization Freedom Network. She was honored by the American Sociological Association with the 2000 Distinguished Scholarship Award from the section on social movements and collective behavior. Klatch was a finalist for the C. Wright Mills Award, which is given to authors whose books are written in the tradition of Mills. “”I’m very happy to have received such recognition from scholars and the larger community,”” Klatch said. “”A Generation Divided”” is currently being translated into Chinese. Andrew Kehler, assistant professor of linguistics, was awarded two grants for his work in the area of computational linguistics. One grant was awarded by the National Security Agency for Leveraging Minimal Training Data to Improve Information Extraction Performance, and the other was from the National Science Foundation for Multimodel Access to Spatial Data. Kehler received his bachelor’s degree in computer science and engineering from the University of Pennsylvania and his master’s and Ph.D degrees in computer science from Harvard. Arend Lijphart, 22-year UCSD faculty member, research professor emeritus in the political science department, and former president of the American Political Science Association, was named a Phi Beta Kappa visiting scholar for 2000-2001. He will travel to several colleges nationwide, meeting with undergraduate students in both informal and classroom settings to give a major address at each campus for the entire academic community. Phi Beta Kappa’s visiting scholars program is designed to enrich the intellectual atmosphere of colleges with chapters and to let undergraduates meet and interact with distinguished scholars of many disciplines. The British Society for the History of Science awarded sociology professor Steven Shapin the Dingle Prize for “”Best Book Bringing the History of Science before a Wider Audience for his book, The Scientific Revolution.”” Shapin holds master’s and Ph.D. degrees in history and sociology of science from the University of Pennsylvania. He has been a member of UCSD’s staff since 1989. Political Science professor Kaare Strom was elected a fellow of the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters. This organization is the oldest scholarly society in Norway, Strom’s country of origin, and it is similar to the United States’ National Academy of Sciences. Strom lived in Norway until 1974, and then again from 1983-1985. The society, which is based in Trondheim, Norway, has meetings six times per year. Strom will be attending a meeting in May for his official induction. Strom received his bachelor’s degree in political science from Saint Olaf College, and his master’s and Ph.D. in the same area from Stanford. He also studied at the University of Oslo, Norway. David Swinney, a professor in the psychology department, was named an honorary university professor at the University of Queensland, Australia. Swinney, a UCSD faculty member since 1992, received his bachelor’s degree in psychology and his master’s in language disorders and speech pathology from Indiana University and his Ph.D. in psycholinguistics and cognition from the University of Texas. Twelve-year UCSD faculty member psychology professor John Wixted received the 2000 George A. Miller award as a co-author of his 1999 paper “”Psychophysics of Remembering,”” which appeared in the “”Journal of Experimental Analysis of Behavior.”” The “”Journal of Experimental Analysis of Behavior”” publishes basic experimental psychological research in animals and humans, with an emphasis on behavior. Wixted, who teaches Psychology 144: Memory and Amnesia, co-authored the paper with K. Geoffrey White, a professor of psychology at the University of Otago in New Zealand. “”I was notified through e-mail first [of winning the award] and I thought it was a joke,”” Wixted said. “”I thought they preferred super high-profile papers.”” Wixted felt his paper was more laboratory-based than most winners of the award. ...

AASU Holds UCSD Kwanzaa Celebration

Dozens of students from many cultures gathered at the Price Center ballroom last Monday to share in the African-American Student Union’s celebration of Kwanzaa. The celebration was a three-hour event that featured music, poetry, food and a keynote speaker. Tyler Huff/ Guardian The event’s program was a busy one, beginning with a drum call and other traditions that have been part of the celebration of Kwanzaa since its inception in the 1960s. Owna Cortes performed the Libation ceremony, an ancient African teaching intended to honor one’s ancestors by pouring water into earth. “”Our ancestors suffered a great many hardships to bring us to where we are today,”” Cortes said. “”Let us not forget this; let us be grateful and honor them every day.”” She then invited those present, instead of honoring just those historical heroes of the African culture, to name deceased family members so they might be honored during the pouring of the Libation. Sherman’s Cajun Creole provided dinner, while UCSD catering presented and served the food. Included on the menu were gumbo, red beans and rice, collard greens, sweet potatoes and crawfish, among other dishes. “”Kwanzaa is the celebration of the harvest,”” said AASU Director of Publicity Ashley Winston of the cultural basis for the menu. “”Traditionally the meal has very little meat and is made primarily of grains and vegetables.”” After dinner, the AASU presented its keynote speaker, Mzee (Elder) Kadumu Moyenda. Moyenda, in addition to being an iridologist who has studied under Paul Gross, is a teacher in the San Diego Unified School District and an Elder in the “”Rites of Passage”” for Boys and Girls in San Diego. Moyenda spoke generally about the meaning of Kwanzaa and the motivations behind its creation. “”For 400 years, our culture had been oppressed in America,”” Moyenda said. “”It needed a tradition. It needed something that reflected us as a people.”” Moyenda made it clear that, like other holiday traditions, the idea of Kwanzaa is not to exclude other cultures, but to be specifically representative of the African culture, much as Christmas is specifically representative of the Christian tradition. Moyenda’s oration also focused on the idea of transitions and rites of passage, the steps and stages necessary to properly progress to full adulthood. “”It’s my second time here at UCSD and it’s always nice to see what’s going on on college campuses today,”” Moyenda said. “”That’s because today’s universities are the foundations of the future.”” As much as it was a cultural event, the AASU Kwanzaa celebration was an educational one as well. The program included a history of Kwanzaa as well as a demonstration and explanation of its many traditions, symbols and practices. Entertainment during the evening included several poetry readings and a performance by the hip-hop group PackaBlacks. “”The food was good, so was the entertainment, and the speaker was very poignant,”” UCSD student Antonio Chamberlain said. “”Bravo, AASU.”” Kwanzaa has been celebrated at UCSD for seven years and was first observed at the UCSD Cross Cultural Center. Winston said that the organization begins planning for the annual celebration at the onset of the academic year. Winston and Activities Coordi-nator Amelia Baxter served as masters of ceremony for the evening. ...