News

Hillel Seeks to Buy Vacant UCSD Lot

For many UCSD students, the ability to practice their religion and affiliate with those that share their beliefs is a right often taken for granted. UCSD Catholics, Lutherans, and Mormons each have facilities located on the fringe of campus where they can associate with those of their faith. While not the largest facilities, each group does have a building where they can practice their religion. The University Lutheran Church on La Jolla Shores Road is shared by the Catholics and the Lutheran student groups. Jewish students, however, are not as fortunate. Hillel, UCSD’s Jewish organization, shares an office with five other ministries on campus in the Office of Religious Affairs. In addition, the members of Hillel said the office and its lack of private space hampers the practice of the Jewish religion on campus. “”The Jewish students need a quiet retreat to have access to education and religion in a facility they can call their own,”” said Neal Singer, vice president of the UCSD chapter. “”Because they don’t have a facility of their own, they can’t have a kosher kitchen, which is required.”” Singer believes Jewish students at UCSD should have the same opportunities for religious exercise as other groups. “”Hillel is an organization that has facilities on hundreds of campuses across the country,”” Singer said. “”In fact, all the other UC campuses — namely Berkeley, UCLA and Santa Barbara — have Hillel facilities in proximity to campus.”” In order to alleviate this problem, Hillel began an extensive search in 1997 for an off-campus location to build a Jewish student center within walking distance of campus. Hillel felt they had found such a location when they discovered a small, undeveloped piece of land situated at the corner of La Jolla Village Drive and La Jolla Scenic Drive. However, Hillel was forced to battle with residents who did not want development in their neighborhood over this new 15,000 square foot, city-owned piece of property. Many of the residents around this area were vehemently opposed to the construction of a center on this lot, as it violates the city zoning laws that were established to protect homeowners from various forms of development. “”Our problem is that this is a land-use issue,”” said Penelope Bourk, a five-year resident of La Jolla who owns one of several homes in this area. “”If Hillel goes here, and spot zoning is against the law, then [any] house could easily be razed for, say, a Catholic institution.”” Spot zoning occurs when there is a substantial difference between two properties that are in close vicinity of each other. Bourk said that the structure Hillel supports would exemplify illegal spot zoning, and would also set a bad example for homes surrounding the neighborhood. “”If somebody wanted to build an institution on the other side of [La Jolla Village Drive] amongst other institutions, that wouldn’t be spot zoning,”” she said. “”But if somebody should get a permit to build here on this property, and it’s not clearly distinguishable from the property next door, then whatever applied to that property could apply to [neighboring] properties.”” Neighboring residents feel that doing this would establish a precedent for the city and the La Jolla Highlanders Homeowners. “”If [Hillel] can get a conditional use permit for a student center even though there should be no provision for that in land use zoning, then we have not been told by anyone why all of these houses couldn’t become essentially an extension of the university,”” Bourk said. Although Bourk and her neighbors understand the need for organizations such as Hillel to expand and build permanent structures of their own, they are simply opposed to doing it in ways that violate their rights as homeowners. Instead, Bourk and others have encouraged Hillel to search for alternative locations like the eastern periphery of campus, where homeowners are less likely to be disturbed and where new developments are constantly sprouting up. However, disagreement and resentment have risen over this issue. “”We can’t go someplace else,”” Singer said. “”We have made an exhaustive search of all the property around UCSD that would be available for something like this. If we built something on the east side of campus, or someplace that wasn’t within immediate walking distance, it would go unused and our money would be thrown away.”” Singer also refutes Bourk’s charge that the proposed Hillel student center would violate existing zoning regulations for the area. “”If you look at the 1975 community plan, it says specifically that this parcel is owned outright by the city and may be disposed of or used as the city council deems appropriate,”” he said. Singer feels that Hillel should be able to have the space because it has been vacant for 35 years. “”Here’s an asset of the city that has not produced a single penny of income for over 30 years,”” Singer said. “”Now [Hillel] comes in and says we’re offering to pay over half a million dollars for this piece of property, which benefits all the people of San Diego, not just the select few that are whining about it.”” Whatever the outcome of this struggle between La Jolla Highlands Homeowners, the City of San Diego, and Hillel, one thing remains certain: As long as religious institutions are prevented from building permanent structures on campus, they will be forced to venture out into the neighboring community in search of their own structure. This leaves homeowners to defend their community from disruptions that they feel will change the status quo of their peaceful streets and homes. ...

Lights & Sirens

Lights & Sirens is a selection of entries compiled from the log book of the UCSD Police Department. UCSD crime statistics can be attained by all persons from the Police Department or at http://police.ucsd.edu Sunday, Nov. 5 10:39 a.m.: A 34-year-old graduate student suffered a dislocated shoulder while playing football at RIMAC field. Transported to Thornton Hospital by a friend. 5:30 p.m.: A nonaffiliate reported burglary to a silver ’94 Buick in Lot 102. Loss: $280. 9:30 p.m.: A 21-year-old male nonaffiliate was ordered off campus for seven days after creating a disturbance at RIMAC. 11:22 p.m.: Officers arrested an 18-year-old male nonaffiliate at 3200 La Jolla Village Drive for an outstanding warrant for failure to appear in court for driving with a suspended license. Transported to Central Jail. Bail: $5,000. Monday, Nov. 6 9:22 p.m.: Officers transported a 26-year-old male nonaffiliate to Scripps Memorial Hospital. Subject was later pronounced dead. Coroner notified. Tuesday, Nov. 7 11:07 a.m.: A student reported burglary to a burgundy ’86 Honda Accord in Lot 020. Loss: $200. 6:58 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from Geisel Library. Loss: $355. Wednesday, Nov. 8 7:49 a.m.: A nonaffiliate reported the theft of chemical tanks from the Marshall Parking structure. Loss: $250. 11:45 a.m.: Officers arrested a 22-year-old male nonaffiliate in Lot 601 for an outstanding misdemeanor warrant for failure to appear. Cited and released. Bail: $5,000. 3:07 p.m.: A 21-year-old male student suffered a head injury after falling in York Hall. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. 4:34 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from RIMAC. Loss: $7. Thursday, Nov. 9 2:19 a.m.: A student reported vandalism at the Price Center. Loss: unknown. 6:55 a.m.: A nonaffiliate reported the theft of equipment from North Torrey Pines construction site. Loss: $1,700. 11:30 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from the women’s locker room at RIMAC. Loss: $24. 11:27 a.m.: A staff member reported vandalism at Geisel Library. Loss: $200. 2:30 p.m.: Officers arrested a 54-year-old male nonaffiliate at the University Bookstore for petty theft. Cited and released. 4:05 p.m.: A nonaffiliate reported vandalism to a gray ’01 Acura TL in Lot 411. Loss: $1,000. 10:21 p.m.: Two 19-year-old male students suffered from alcohol poisoning in Brennan Hall. Both subjects refused treatment. –Compiled by Lauren I. Coartney, News Editor ...

Former Chancellor York Receives Prestigious Enrico Fermi Award

Herbert F. York, a nuclear physicist and the founding chancellor of UCSD, was named a recipient of this year’s Enrico Fermi Award by President Clinton for his extensive work in nuclear deterrence and arms control agreements. The Enrico Fermi Award annually recognizes individuals who have made great efforts and contributions in the field of nuclear deterrence and arms control agreements. Established in 1956, it is the government’s oldest science and technology award. It is named for Enrico Fermi, who led the group of scientists at the University of Chicago that achieved the first self-sustained, controlled nuclear reaction in 1942. York is one of three scientists who will receive the award on Dec. 18. He will be joined by Sidney Drell, a physicist at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, and Sheldon Datz, a physicist at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. “”These scientists have made important scientific contributions in the fields of chemistry and physics,”” Clinton said in a press release. “”Their pioneering work in the very complex area of arms control has benefited our nation and the world.”” The award will be presented by Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson in Washington. In addition to receiving a gold medal, each scientist will also get a $66,000 honorarium. “”[York] is the perfect choice for this award,”” stated UCSD Chancellor Robert C. Dynes. “”He has devoted most of his life to assuring the responsible stewardship of nuclear weapons in the United States and has been the voice of reason for the last half century in the management of this country’s nuclear weapons arsenal.”” York founded the UC Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation in 1983. He is currently the emeritus director of the institute. “”[York] recognized that building peace was more than controlling arms,”” stated Peter F. Cowhey, the director of the Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation and a professor of international relations at UCSD. “”His capstone experience at the University of California was his pioneering leadership of the university’s Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation. The Institute’s work brings together work on arms control, conflict resolution, economic cooperation and environmental stewardship in an effort to build an intellectual foundation for the ‘long peace’ that [York] wished for the world.”” Among York’s other achievements are that he was the first director of the University of California’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a science advisor to President Eisenhower and a co-founder and first chief scientist of the Advanced Research Projects Agency. York was also the ambassador and chief negotiator for the Comprehensive Test Ban Negotiations under President Carter and has headed efforts to reduce international tensions through deterrence and negotiated arms control agreements. In the official citation for the award, the White House acknowledged York “”for his participation in the formulation, conduct, promotion and explication of arms control policy; for his participation in the Manhattan Project; and for his founding direction of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; and his leadership in research and engineering at the Department of Defense. His publications have set forth with clarity and simplicity an understanding of the issues involved in all these actions. He has dedicated decades of his life to the informed advocacy of sensible choices in nuclear weapon systems and to the reduction of the nuclear threat.”” In addition, the White House commended York for his influence that has extended “”beyond the halls of government. His work as an educator and author introduced several generations of Americans to the best thinking on the history, science and politics of nuclear weapons development and arms control. His writings are among his most enduring contributions to society’s understanding of peace and security issues.”” York has penned six books to date. They include “”Arms Control; The Advisors: Oppenheimer, Teller and the Superbomb;”” “”Race to Oblivion: A Participant’s View of the Arms Race;”” “”Making Weapons, Talking Peace: A Physicist’s Journey from Hiroshima to Geneva;”” “”A Shield in Space? Technology, Politics and the Strategic Defense Initiative;”” and “”Arms and the Physicist.”” ...

BRIEFLY

Dynes to Preside at UCSD Anniversary Free gifts will be distributed to students, staff and faculty attending a cake-cutting ceremony to mark UCSD’s 40th anniversary at noon, Nov. 16 in the Price Center Plaza. Chancellor Dynes will preside over the cake-cutting ceremony, which will include a brief program and music. The event will kick off a yearlong observance of the university’s official founding by the UC Board of Regents on Nov. 18, 1960. Also planned is a reception scheduled for 2:30 p.m. on Nov. 17 in the Price Center Ballroom honoring UCSD community volunteers. Prior to the reception, a memory wall will be unveiled outside the ballroom, which will contain photos of UCSD during the last four decades. Many historic mementos have been uncovered for the display, ranging from a beanie cap worn by early UCSD students to photos of the first Sun God festival. The focus of the year’s anniversary celebration is UCSD’s service to the community. A compilation of the nearly 300 outreach programs provided by the university will be included in a directory, “”UCSD and You,”” which will be distributed as an insert in the Nov. 16 issue of the San Diego Union-Tribune. The directory will also include a listing of 40 special service gifts to be contributed by faculty, staff and students in the community this year. These gifts range from UCSD’s Housing and Dining Services donating cookie decorating events at the Polinski Center for Children during the holidays, to faculty from the philosophy department holding “”philosophy cafes”” at community bookstores. San Diego premiere to benefit UCSD libraries An exclusive premiere of “”How the Grinch Stole Christmas,”” starring Jim Carey, is scheduled to take place on Nov. 14 at the Museum of Photographic Arts’ Joan & Irwin Jacobs Theater in Balboa Park to benefit the Museum of Photographic Arts and UCSD’s libraries. The film also stars Jeffrey Tambor, Molly Shannon, Christine Baranski, Bill Irwin, Taylor Momesen and Clint Howard. The film is directed by Ron Howard and its San Diego premiere is made possible by Universal Pictures and Imagine Entertainment. Tickets for the premiere are $200 per person and include an exclusive viewing, a reception and dinner. For more information, call (858) 534-8490. UC system and employees reach tentative contract The University of California and the Coalition of University Employees have reached a tentative agreement on a first contract for the clerical and allied services bargaining unit. The tentative agreement provides wage increases for 1999-2000, 2000-2001 and 2001-2002 budget years and would expire in 2001. The university will present the proposed 2001-02 budget at a meeting of the UC Regents next week. Included in the budget will be some augmentations for staff salaries which are currently below market averages. The agreement includes a 2.8 percent salary increase and regular merit increases for eligible employees. Last week, the University of California also reached tentative contract agreements with three other unions, including the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and the Federated Police Officer Association. Capitol Fellows Program to Hold Information Session The Capitol Fellows Program will hold an information session at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday at Center Hall 207. The Capitol Fellows Programs are nationally recognized public policy fellowships which offer college graduates a unique experience in policy-making and development. The Assembly, Senate, Executive and Judicial Administration Fellowships are considered to be among the oldest and most prestigious fellowships in the nation. Fellows receive the opportunity to engage in public service and prepare for future careers while actively contributing to the implementation of policy in California. Distinguished alumni of the programs include a California Supreme Court Justice and elected members of the U.S. Congress. During participants’ eleven month appointment they get to work as full-time staff with the California Senate, Assembly, Executive or Judicial Branch; earn a monthly salary plus full benefits and earn 12 units of graduate credit in conjunction with the Center for California Studies. For more information call UCSD Student Legal Services at (858) 534-4374. ...

Workers Discuss Strategies for Disabled

A panel of three distinguished members of the disabled community spoke at the Career Services Center Tuesday afternoon, addressing career strategies for students with disabilities in a career exploration panel co-sponsored by Career Services and the UCSD Alumni Association. The panel’s primary goal was to provide people with disabilities the opportunity to learn from those who had succeeded in their careers, despite various physical and nonvisible impairments. The panelists addressed the audience in a prearranged question-and-answer format with information about their own career paths. They discussed the rewards and challenges of their respective careers by tackling issues such as disclosure and accommodation in the job search process. The three panelists were Steven Brock, an advisory software engineer for IBM Corporation; Jonathan Mooney, two-time author and executive director of his own nonprofit organization Eye-to-Eye; and Valois Vera, employment coordinator at The Access Center of San Diego. Brock, who is deaf, received a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting from California State University at Northridge and has been working for IBM for 18 years. Brock now provides technical consulting for many major corporations including Exxon, Target and Motorola. He also serves on the Internal Corporate Advisory Council for People with Disabilities. Brock spoke of the difficulties he faced as a result of being hard of hearing in the workplace. “”A disability becomes even more of a challenge as the face of a management team changes,”” Brock said. Mooney, who is dyslexic and has attention deficit hyperactive disorder, is nationally recognized for his lecturing on learning disabilities and cognitive diversity. “”People have this misconception that learning is about menial things like spelling and reading, when it it’s actually about ideas,”” Mooney said. Having graduated from Brown University in May with a 4.0 grade point average and a degree in English Literature, Mooney has already authored two books, including Learning Outside the Lines, a handbook for academic success for students who think differently. He is now the founder and head of Project Eye-to-Eye, which pairs young children who have ADHD with college students with the same condition to help kids cope with the learning disability. “”People don’t seem to understand that ADHD is a facet of my mind, not a disease, as it is with all physical and nonvisible disabilities alike”” Mooney said. Above all, the panelists stressed the idea that disabilities and accommodation for those who suffer from them is a diversity issue very similar to race or gender relations and that people with disabilities are basically like everybody else. “”I’m married, I have sex, I drink beer and I like sports … I’m just like any regular guy,”” Vera said. ...

BRIEFLY

UCSD Spine Surgeon Wins Honor Steven R. Garfin, professor and chair of the UCSD School of Medicine department of orthopedics, has been awarded the Wiltse Award by the North American Spine Society during its annual meeting in New Orleans. The Wiltse Award is given to physicians who make significant contributions in the field of spine surgery through research, teaching or through other innovations. The award is named after Leon Wiltse, M.D., a founder of NASS and a pioneer in the area of spine surgery. Garfin received the award because he has dedicated his life to surgery to help patients suffering from spine disorders. Garfin has also contributed to many published papers and books regarding spine care, with a special interest in cervical spine surgery. Scripps scientist receives Packard Fellowship Jeffrey Severinghaus, a geochemist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UCSD, has been awarded a Packard Fellowship to study the stability of past and future climates. Severinghaus is an associate professor in the geosciences research division at Scripps and specializes in analyzing Earth’s climate by studying air trapped in ice cores. He is known for discovering the cause of sudden climate changes that occurred just before the birth of civilization 12,000 years ago. The $625,000 fellowship will be granted over 5 years. It will allow Severinghaus to determine how methane, a colorless, odorless gas, can offer clues about Earth’s climate. UCSD Burn Center releases 1999 statistics The UCSD Regional Burn Center released its annual report Tuesday on people from San Diego and Imperial counties admitted to the center from January through December of 1999. Patients admitted during that time for injuries and smoke inhalation numbered 440. There was an increases of 68 burn patients from the previous year. Most patients were adults. However, infants and small children constituted 93 admissions, a 23 percent increase from 1998. Most reported injuries to younger patients were caused by home accidents, with most involving cooking or scalding accidents. Contact with hot objects such as curling irons and clothing irons, hot coals, fireworks, gasoline, gunpowder and barbecues were also common burn causes. It was found that most adult patients had come into direct contact with fire or flames, most often caused by cooking accidents. The majority of adults were burned in their homes. The Burn Center at UCSD was established in 1973 to provide specialized care for severely burned individuals. UCSD Extension launches Medicinal Chemistry Institute The UCSD Extension program plans to create a new institute focusing on one of industry’s key sciences, medicinal chemistry. The decision comes in response to San Diego’s concentration of nearly 100 drug discovery companies. The institute will open with an orientation program on Jan. 6, which will be followed by an 18-week intensive program designed for graduate and post-graduate chemists and biologists who have a basic knowledge of drug research and the professional requirements to broaden their perspective on the fundamentals of medicinal chemistry. Regular classes will begin on Jan. 10 at the new UCSD Extension Center in Sorrento Mesa. The all-inclusive enrollment fee is $1,995. Bell Labs President to give free public lecture at UCSD Dr. Arun Netravali, known for his work with digital technology and communications networking will give a free public lecture titled “”Beyond 2001: Trends, Developments and Opportunities in Communications Networking,”” at 1:30 p.m. in the Institute of the Americas Auditorium on Nov. 27. Netravali is the president of Bell Laboratories and is responsible for research and development across all of Lucent Technologies. ...

Events

Thursday, Nov. 9 Ceremony: First Annual Veterans’ Recognition Day The UCSD Veterans’ Association will sponsor the event, which will take place at 11 a.m. in the Sequoia Room at Muir college’s Sierra Summit Restaurant. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-1583. Friday, Nov. 10 Dance: “”Arcadia”” by Tom Stoppard The UCSD theater and dance department will sponsor the event, which will take place at 8 p.m. in the Mandell Weiss Forum Theater. General admission is $12 and $6 for students. The event is open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4574. Saturday, Nov. 12 Performing Arts: The Kathi Burg Band The University Centers will sponsor the event, which will take place at 8 p.m. at Espresso Roma in the Price Center. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4022. Performing Arts: “”Noche Flamenco”” Noche Flamenco is a celebration of passion, sensuality and the human spirit communicated through dance, song and music. The University Events Office will sponsor the event, which will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Center. The event is open to the public, and general admission is $25. Student admission is $18. For more information call (858) 534-4119. Tuesday, Nov. 14 Film: “”The Perfect Storm”” George Clooney stars in the film, which will air at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. in the Price Center Theater. Admission is $2. The film is sponsored by the University Centers. Wednesday, Nov. 15 Instruction: Credit/Debt Workshop Student Financial Services will sponsor the event, which will take place at the Women’s Center at 4 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4374. Appearance: Author Susan Gaines Susan Gaines, the author of a new book called “”Carbon Dreams,”” will talk about her first novel and sign copies of the book at the UCSD Bookstore at 5 p.m. during the Bookstore’s Wednesday “”Happy Hour.”” The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-7306. ...

Many UCSD Expansion Projects in the Works

As a result of recommendations by the UC president to expand the university campuses nearly a year ago, UCSD is in the process of designing a new large expansion set to completely open by 2004. “”We have taken more students than we had contemplated,”” said Director of Campus Planning Nada Borsa. “”We expect more to be graduating from high school and going on as well.”” Borsa said expansion will soon be in the works at UC Irvine and UC Riverside as they too have room to expand their campuses. Currently, over 15 large expansions are in the design or construction phase at UCSD and should be completed within the next five years. Of substantial consequence to UCSD students will be the opening of the new Eleanor Roosevelt College on the north side of campus in 2002. The possibility of seventh and eighth colleges are currently being discussed, although the likelihood of their existence has yet to be determined. “”We aren’t sure how many colleges we are going to have,”” Borsa said. “”The problem is that we can’t build that far to the North because it will be hard to get to class within 15 minutes.”” For this reason, classes in Galbraith Hall were canceled because students walking from there to Warren Lecture Hall could not walk to class on time. In addition, construction starts later this month on the new Natural Science building while a new computer science building is currently in the process of being designed. There are plans for a new theater between the Mandell Weiss Theater and the dance facility, as well. “”As the growth of students continues to occur, new facilities like housing will have to be expanded,”” Borsa said. The number of undergraduates is expected to grow from 17,000 to 23,000 in the next 10 years, and the number of students in total will climb to 31,000. Some students, however, are opposed to this large increase in students on campus. “”It could make upper division classes harder to enroll in,”” Muir sophomore Steve Reis said. “”At the same time it will spread out the very talented faculty that we have right now among more people.”” However, the Medical Center only stands to have an increase in services available on this campus. Currently, the new Brain Imaging Center in the Medical Center is set to open in 18 months, the Eye Center will be expanded next year, the new Cancer Center with the new, state-funded pharmacy school will open in 2004. In addition, designs have been made for a new medical research center. “”The med school’s already great — the expansion will make it even better,”” Revelle sophomore Eisha Christian said. “”This may put us in the top 10 med schools in the country.”” New temporary parking lots in the Medical Center and in East parking will be built to help ease the parking problems that may be associated with the construction of new structures. Borsa said these interim lots might become full structures in the future once the funding has been allocated. An outside consulting firm has been hired to determine the sources of the parking problems on campus. Borsa said one possible solution would be the construction of new parking structures, although this is currently unlikely. “”We need to determine how many spots we will need and what kind of policies we will need to adopt,”” Borsa said. “”We also need to figure out how many we can afford to make before permit prices become too high.”” ...

StudentLink Repaired After Outage

Students attempting to register for classes last Wednesday found themselves unable to do so, as StudentLink’s WebReg system was beleaguered on the first day of undergraduate registration for winter quarter. Due to the discontinuation of the TeSS telephone registration system this quarter, WebReg, an Internet tool for adding and dropping classes, was left as students’ only means to register for classes at UCSD aside from walking into the Registrar’s office. Students primarily affected by the irregularity in service were athletes, Regents scholars and National Merit scholars who have the privilege of first-day registration. The first sign of trouble came around 8:30 a.m., when athletes with the earliest registration times found the system inoperable. “”I ran back from water polo practice at 8:15 a.m. to register and I had no problems,”” Muir freshman Laura Holshouser said, a goaltender for the women’s water polo team. “”But, some of the girls who got back at 8:30 a.m. found out they couldn’t register.”” Holshouser was the one of few without problems during the day. As registration opened to Regents and National Merit Scholars beginning at 10 a.m., they too found the system inoperably slow as they attempted to register for classes. WebReg allowed students to access the add/drop screen for winter quarter, but would return errors, stating an inability to connect to the student database as soon as students attempted to add a section. However, many students found a simple solution to their woes by walking to the Registrar’s office. “”I first tried to register at about 10 a.m.,”” Revelle freshman Nick Butko said. “”Then, I called the Registrar’s, and they said, ‘It’s down, they’re fixing it. Come here and register.’ So I went there and registered. It was easy — it took about two minutes per person with two windows open, and there were only about five people there.”” Registrar’s office staff reported more traffic than Butko witnessed. A staff member who asked not to be named said that on Nov. 1, “”traffic [there] was very heavy as a result of StudentLink being down.”” Later that evening, StudentLink was completely shut down and a notice was posted that stated: “”We are currently experiencing technical difficulties.”” By late that night, the system was apparently working again. Marty Backer of Administrative Computing and Telecommunica-tion tried to allay campus concerns about the technical difficulties. “”We have not solved the problem at this time,”” Backer said. “”But can assure you and all students that it is not related to the volume of students beginning their registration process for winter quarter.”” There were difficulties the next day as WebReg posted a message asking students to retry their request, should they run into any trouble. However, the system was once again slow and barely operable. “”We had to keep trying for, like, an hour, repeating the same thing over and over,”” Muir freshman Cori Atkinson said, who admitted that she was able to register on her second try. While it would be easy to correlate the first-day failure of StudentLink to the discontinuation of TeSS, this apparently was not the case. “”[Nov. 1] was not an unusual volume for student WebReg,”” Backer stated. Many students expressed support for WebReg over TeSS regardless of system irregularities. “”I would actually prefer the Internet, even if it is slower, because there’s a weekly planner to make sure you do nothing stupid,”” Atkinson said. ...