News

Hillel Seeks to Buy Vacant UCSD Lot

For many UCSD students, the ability to practice their religion and affiliate with those that share their beliefs is a right often taken for granted. UCSD Catholics, Lutherans, and Mormons each have facilities located on the fringe of campus where they can associate with those of their faith. While not the largest facilities, each group does have a building where they can practice their religion. The University Lutheran Church on La Jolla Shores Road is shared by the Catholics and the Lutheran student groups. Jewish students, however, are not as fortunate. Hillel, UCSD’s Jewish organization, shares an office with five other ministries on campus in the Office of Religious Affairs. In addition, the members of Hillel said the office and its lack of private space hampers the practice of the Jewish religion on campus. “”The Jewish students need a quiet retreat to have access to education and religion in a facility they can call their own,”” said Neal Singer, vice president of the UCSD chapter. “”Because they don’t have a facility of their own, they can’t have a kosher kitchen, which is required.”” Singer believes Jewish students at UCSD should have the same opportunities for religious exercise as other groups. “”Hillel is an organization that has facilities on hundreds of campuses across the country,”” Singer said. “”In fact, all the other UC campuses — namely Berkeley, UCLA and Santa Barbara — have Hillel facilities in proximity to campus.”” In order to alleviate this problem, Hillel began an extensive search in 1997 for an off-campus location to build a Jewish student center within walking distance of campus. Hillel felt they had found such a location when they discovered a small, undeveloped piece of land situated at the corner of La Jolla Village Drive and La Jolla Scenic Drive. However, Hillel was forced to battle with residents who did not want development in their neighborhood over this new 15,000 square foot, city-owned piece of property. Many of the residents around this area were vehemently opposed to the construction of a center on this lot, as it violates the city zoning laws that were established to protect homeowners from various forms of development. “”Our problem is that this is a land-use issue,”” said Penelope Bourk, a five-year resident of La Jolla who owns one of several homes in this area. “”If Hillel goes here, and spot zoning is against the law, then [any] house could easily be razed for, say, a Catholic institution.”” Spot zoning occurs when there is a substantial difference between two properties that are in close vicinity of each other. Bourk said that the structure Hillel supports would exemplify illegal spot zoning, and would also set a bad example for homes surrounding the neighborhood. “”If somebody wanted to build an institution on the other side of [La Jolla Village Drive] amongst other institutions, that wouldn’t be spot zoning,”” she said. “”But if somebody should get a permit to build here on this property, and it’s not clearly distinguishable from the property next door, then whatever applied to that property could apply to [neighboring] properties.”” Neighboring residents feel that doing this would establish a precedent for the city and the La Jolla Highlanders Homeowners. “”If [Hillel] can get a conditional use permit for a student center even though there should be no provision for that in land use zoning, then we have not been told by anyone why all of these houses couldn’t become essentially an extension of the university,”” Bourk said. Although Bourk and her neighbors understand the need for organizations such as Hillel to expand and build permanent structures of their own, they are simply opposed to doing it in ways that violate their rights as homeowners. Instead, Bourk and others have encouraged Hillel to search for alternative locations like the eastern periphery of campus, where homeowners are less likely to be disturbed and where new developments are constantly sprouting up. However, disagreement and resentment have risen over this issue. “”We can’t go someplace else,”” Singer said. “”We have made an exhaustive search of all the property around UCSD that would be available for something like this. If we built something on the east side of campus, or someplace that wasn’t within immediate walking distance, it would go unused and our money would be thrown away.”” Singer also refutes Bourk’s charge that the proposed Hillel student center would violate existing zoning regulations for the area. “”If you look at the 1975 community plan, it says specifically that this parcel is owned outright by the city and may be disposed of or used as the city council deems appropriate,”” he said. Singer feels that Hillel should be able to have the space because it has been vacant for 35 years. “”Here’s an asset of the city that has not produced a single penny of income for over 30 years,”” Singer said. “”Now [Hillel] comes in and says we’re offering to pay over half a million dollars for this piece of property, which benefits all the people of San Diego, not just the select few that are whining about it.”” Whatever the outcome of this struggle between La Jolla Highlands Homeowners, the City of San Diego, and Hillel, one thing remains certain: As long as religious institutions are prevented from building permanent structures on campus, they will be forced to venture out into the neighboring community in search of their own structure. This leaves homeowners to defend their community from disruptions that they feel will change the status quo of their peaceful streets and homes. ...

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UCSD Spine Surgeon Wins Honor Steven R. Garfin, professor and chair of the UCSD School of Medicine department of orthopedics, has been awarded the Wiltse Award by the North American Spine Society during its annual meeting in New Orleans. The Wiltse Award is given to physicians who make significant contributions in the field of spine surgery through research, teaching or through other innovations. The award is named after Leon Wiltse, M.D., a founder of NASS and a pioneer in the area of spine surgery. Garfin received the award because he has dedicated his life to surgery to help patients suffering from spine disorders. Garfin has also contributed to many published papers and books regarding spine care, with a special interest in cervical spine surgery. Scripps scientist receives Packard Fellowship Jeffrey Severinghaus, a geochemist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UCSD, has been awarded a Packard Fellowship to study the stability of past and future climates. Severinghaus is an associate professor in the geosciences research division at Scripps and specializes in analyzing Earth’s climate by studying air trapped in ice cores. He is known for discovering the cause of sudden climate changes that occurred just before the birth of civilization 12,000 years ago. The $625,000 fellowship will be granted over 5 years. It will allow Severinghaus to determine how methane, a colorless, odorless gas, can offer clues about Earth’s climate. UCSD Burn Center releases 1999 statistics The UCSD Regional Burn Center released its annual report Tuesday on people from San Diego and Imperial counties admitted to the center from January through December of 1999. Patients admitted during that time for injuries and smoke inhalation numbered 440. There was an increases of 68 burn patients from the previous year. Most patients were adults. However, infants and small children constituted 93 admissions, a 23 percent increase from 1998. Most reported injuries to younger patients were caused by home accidents, with most involving cooking or scalding accidents. Contact with hot objects such as curling irons and clothing irons, hot coals, fireworks, gasoline, gunpowder and barbecues were also common burn causes. It was found that most adult patients had come into direct contact with fire or flames, most often caused by cooking accidents. The majority of adults were burned in their homes. The Burn Center at UCSD was established in 1973 to provide specialized care for severely burned individuals. UCSD Extension launches Medicinal Chemistry Institute The UCSD Extension program plans to create a new institute focusing on one of industry’s key sciences, medicinal chemistry. The decision comes in response to San Diego’s concentration of nearly 100 drug discovery companies. The institute will open with an orientation program on Jan. 6, which will be followed by an 18-week intensive program designed for graduate and post-graduate chemists and biologists who have a basic knowledge of drug research and the professional requirements to broaden their perspective on the fundamentals of medicinal chemistry. Regular classes will begin on Jan. 10 at the new UCSD Extension Center in Sorrento Mesa. The all-inclusive enrollment fee is $1,995. Bell Labs President to give free public lecture at UCSD Dr. Arun Netravali, known for his work with digital technology and communications networking will give a free public lecture titled “”Beyond 2001: Trends, Developments and Opportunities in Communications Networking,”” at 1:30 p.m. in the Institute of the Americas Auditorium on Nov. 27. Netravali is the president of Bell Laboratories and is responsible for research and development across all of Lucent Technologies. ...

Events

Thursday, Nov. 9 Ceremony: First Annual Veterans’ Recognition Day The UCSD Veterans’ Association will sponsor the event, which will take place at 11 a.m. in the Sequoia Room at Muir college’s Sierra Summit Restaurant. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-1583. Friday, Nov. 10 Dance: “”Arcadia”” by Tom Stoppard The UCSD theater and dance department will sponsor the event, which will take place at 8 p.m. in the Mandell Weiss Forum Theater. General admission is $12 and $6 for students. The event is open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4574. Saturday, Nov. 12 Performing Arts: The Kathi Burg Band The University Centers will sponsor the event, which will take place at 8 p.m. at Espresso Roma in the Price Center. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4022. Performing Arts: “”Noche Flamenco”” Noche Flamenco is a celebration of passion, sensuality and the human spirit communicated through dance, song and music. The University Events Office will sponsor the event, which will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Center. The event is open to the public, and general admission is $25. Student admission is $18. For more information call (858) 534-4119. Tuesday, Nov. 14 Film: “”The Perfect Storm”” George Clooney stars in the film, which will air at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. in the Price Center Theater. Admission is $2. The film is sponsored by the University Centers. Wednesday, Nov. 15 Instruction: Credit/Debt Workshop Student Financial Services will sponsor the event, which will take place at the Women’s Center at 4 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4374. Appearance: Author Susan Gaines Susan Gaines, the author of a new book called “”Carbon Dreams,”” will talk about her first novel and sign copies of the book at the UCSD Bookstore at 5 p.m. during the Bookstore’s Wednesday “”Happy Hour.”” The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-7306. ...

Many UCSD Expansion Projects in the Works

As a result of recommendations by the UC president to expand the university campuses nearly a year ago, UCSD is in the process of designing a new large expansion set to completely open by 2004. “”We have taken more students than we had contemplated,”” said Director of Campus Planning Nada Borsa. “”We expect more to be graduating from high school and going on as well.”” Borsa said expansion will soon be in the works at UC Irvine and UC Riverside as they too have room to expand their campuses. Currently, over 15 large expansions are in the design or construction phase at UCSD and should be completed within the next five years. Of substantial consequence to UCSD students will be the opening of the new Eleanor Roosevelt College on the north side of campus in 2002. The possibility of seventh and eighth colleges are currently being discussed, although the likelihood of their existence has yet to be determined. “”We aren’t sure how many colleges we are going to have,”” Borsa said. “”The problem is that we can’t build that far to the North because it will be hard to get to class within 15 minutes.”” For this reason, classes in Galbraith Hall were canceled because students walking from there to Warren Lecture Hall could not walk to class on time. In addition, construction starts later this month on the new Natural Science building while a new computer science building is currently in the process of being designed. There are plans for a new theater between the Mandell Weiss Theater and the dance facility, as well. “”As the growth of students continues to occur, new facilities like housing will have to be expanded,”” Borsa said. The number of undergraduates is expected to grow from 17,000 to 23,000 in the next 10 years, and the number of students in total will climb to 31,000. Some students, however, are opposed to this large increase in students on campus. “”It could make upper division classes harder to enroll in,”” Muir sophomore Steve Reis said. “”At the same time it will spread out the very talented faculty that we have right now among more people.”” However, the Medical Center only stands to have an increase in services available on this campus. Currently, the new Brain Imaging Center in the Medical Center is set to open in 18 months, the Eye Center will be expanded next year, the new Cancer Center with the new, state-funded pharmacy school will open in 2004. In addition, designs have been made for a new medical research center. “”The med school’s already great — the expansion will make it even better,”” Revelle sophomore Eisha Christian said. “”This may put us in the top 10 med schools in the country.”” New temporary parking lots in the Medical Center and in East parking will be built to help ease the parking problems that may be associated with the construction of new structures. Borsa said these interim lots might become full structures in the future once the funding has been allocated. An outside consulting firm has been hired to determine the sources of the parking problems on campus. Borsa said one possible solution would be the construction of new parking structures, although this is currently unlikely. “”We need to determine how many spots we will need and what kind of policies we will need to adopt,”” Borsa said. “”We also need to figure out how many we can afford to make before permit prices become too high.”” ...

StudentLink Repaired After Outage

Students attempting to register for classes last Wednesday found themselves unable to do so, as StudentLink’s WebReg system was beleaguered on the first day of undergraduate registration for winter quarter. Due to the discontinuation of the TeSS telephone registration system this quarter, WebReg, an Internet tool for adding and dropping classes, was left as students’ only means to register for classes at UCSD aside from walking into the Registrar’s office. Students primarily affected by the irregularity in service were athletes, Regents scholars and National Merit scholars who have the privilege of first-day registration. The first sign of trouble came around 8:30 a.m., when athletes with the earliest registration times found the system inoperable. “”I ran back from water polo practice at 8:15 a.m. to register and I had no problems,”” Muir freshman Laura Holshouser said, a goaltender for the women’s water polo team. “”But, some of the girls who got back at 8:30 a.m. found out they couldn’t register.”” Holshouser was the one of few without problems during the day. As registration opened to Regents and National Merit Scholars beginning at 10 a.m., they too found the system inoperably slow as they attempted to register for classes. WebReg allowed students to access the add/drop screen for winter quarter, but would return errors, stating an inability to connect to the student database as soon as students attempted to add a section. However, many students found a simple solution to their woes by walking to the Registrar’s office. “”I first tried to register at about 10 a.m.,”” Revelle freshman Nick Butko said. “”Then, I called the Registrar’s, and they said, ‘It’s down, they’re fixing it. Come here and register.’ So I went there and registered. It was easy — it took about two minutes per person with two windows open, and there were only about five people there.”” Registrar’s office staff reported more traffic than Butko witnessed. A staff member who asked not to be named said that on Nov. 1, “”traffic [there] was very heavy as a result of StudentLink being down.”” Later that evening, StudentLink was completely shut down and a notice was posted that stated: “”We are currently experiencing technical difficulties.”” By late that night, the system was apparently working again. Marty Backer of Administrative Computing and Telecommunica-tion tried to allay campus concerns about the technical difficulties. “”We have not solved the problem at this time,”” Backer said. “”But can assure you and all students that it is not related to the volume of students beginning their registration process for winter quarter.”” There were difficulties the next day as WebReg posted a message asking students to retry their request, should they run into any trouble. However, the system was once again slow and barely operable. “”We had to keep trying for, like, an hour, repeating the same thing over and over,”” Muir freshman Cori Atkinson said, who admitted that she was able to register on her second try. While it would be easy to correlate the first-day failure of StudentLink to the discontinuation of TeSS, this apparently was not the case. “”[Nov. 1] was not an unusual volume for student WebReg,”” Backer stated. Many students expressed support for WebReg over TeSS regardless of system irregularities. “”I would actually prefer the Internet, even if it is slower, because there’s a weekly planner to make sure you do nothing stupid,”” Atkinson said. ...

Workers Discuss Strategies for Disabled

A panel of three distinguished members of the disabled community spoke at the Career Services Center Tuesday afternoon, addressing career strategies for students with disabilities in a career exploration panel co-sponsored by Career Services and the UCSD Alumni Association. The panel’s primary goal was to provide people with disabilities the opportunity to learn from those who had succeeded in their careers, despite various physical and nonvisible impairments. The panelists addressed the audience in a prearranged question-and-answer format with information about their own career paths. They discussed the rewards and challenges of their respective careers by tackling issues such as disclosure and accommodation in the job search process. The three panelists were Steven Brock, an advisory software engineer for IBM Corporation; Jonathan Mooney, two-time author and executive director of his own nonprofit organization Eye-to-Eye; and Valois Vera, employment coordinator at The Access Center of San Diego. Brock, who is deaf, received a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting from California State University at Northridge and has been working for IBM for 18 years. Brock now provides technical consulting for many major corporations including Exxon, Target and Motorola. He also serves on the Internal Corporate Advisory Council for People with Disabilities. Brock spoke of the difficulties he faced as a result of being hard of hearing in the workplace. “”A disability becomes even more of a challenge as the face of a management team changes,”” Brock said. Mooney, who is dyslexic and has attention deficit hyperactive disorder, is nationally recognized for his lecturing on learning disabilities and cognitive diversity. “”People have this misconception that learning is about menial things like spelling and reading, when it it’s actually about ideas,”” Mooney said. Having graduated from Brown University in May with a 4.0 grade point average and a degree in English Literature, Mooney has already authored two books, including Learning Outside the Lines, a handbook for academic success for students who think differently. He is now the founder and head of Project Eye-to-Eye, which pairs young children who have ADHD with college students with the same condition to help kids cope with the learning disability. “”People don’t seem to understand that ADHD is a facet of my mind, not a disease, as it is with all physical and nonvisible disabilities alike”” Mooney said. Above all, the panelists stressed the idea that disabilities and accommodation for those who suffer from them is a diversity issue very similar to race or gender relations and that people with disabilities are basically like everybody else. “”I’m married, I have sex, I drink beer and I like sports … I’m just like any regular guy,”” Vera said. ...

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UCSD Professors Receive Honors Kiyoteru Tokuyasu, David Woodruff, Raffi Aroian, Daniel Dubin, Susan Taylor and George Feher, professors in the biology and physical sciences divisions at UCSD, are being recognized for their achievements. Tokuyasu, a professor emeritus in biology, received the 2000 Distinguished Scientist Award from the Microscopy Society of America. He is the third scientist at UCSD to receive the award. Woodruff, a biology professor, received the honorary degree of doctor of science from his alma mater, the University of Melbourne, Australia, for his work on 100 research papers presented in his thesis on the evolution and conservation of animal species. Aroian, an assistant professor of biology, received two awards: the New Investigator Award in the toxicological sciences from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, based in North Carolina; and the Beckman Young Investigator Award, awarded by the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation. Dubin, a physics professor, received the 2000 Award for Excellence in Plasma Physics Research from the American Physical Society for his outstanding contributions to the field. Taylor, a chemistry and biochemistry professor, received the 2001 Francis P. Garvin-John M. Olin Medal from the American Chemical Society for her contributions as a female chemist. Feher, a research professor in physics, is being named a fellow of the Biophysical Society for his part in the use of physical methods to study biological systems and in investigations of the primary processes in photosynthesis. UCSD Scientists Awarded $3 Million ‘Biocomplexity’ Grant The National Science Foundation has awarded physicists and biologists at UCSD a $3 million grant to study the development of the ameboid protozoan Dictyostelium discoideum, an organism commonly known as slime mold. The grant is being awarded for five years and was one of 16 grants awarded by the foundation this month to study the effects of the interaction between living things on all levels with their environment. UCSD scientists will collaborate with researchers at Cornell University to attempt to connect the underlying genetic information about slime mold to its morphology and multicellular organization. The scientists said they chose slime mold because it is the simplest organism to study for their purposes. Supercomputer Named one of Fastest in Nation With a recent upgrade to a speed of 1.7 tera flops, or 1.7 trillion calculations per second, Blue Horizon, the National Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure computer at the San Diego Supercomputer Center has been ranked No. 8 on the list of the top 500 supercomputers. The speed is a 70 percent increase over previous speeds. It will allow scientists to gather information more efficiently. Blue Horizon is helping researchers probe demanding computing problems, such as determining chemical reaction rates, designing new materials, stimulating the nervous system, modeling water and pollutant transport, modeling climate and predicting storms and understanding the origins of the universe. The list was compiled by the University of Mannheim and the University of Tennessee. Impact of Internet on Agriculture to be Examined Business and university experts will gather Dec. 4 at the University of California’s annual Executive Seminar on Agricultural Issues in Sacramento to discuss the effect of e-commerce on agriculture. Participants in the seminar will gain a better understanding of the technological and economic influences that dot-com businesses could have in world markets, California farms and agricultural supply. The seminar will feature speeches by industry experts representing companies such as John Deere and Bank of America. The speakers and participants will go over economic trends in the field and review issues facing California specifically. ...

Bookstore Steps Up as Web Site Goes Under

Online textbook retailer BigWords filled its last order and “”succumbed … to the powers that be,”” according to an explanation posted on its Web site on Oct. 20. Like many other online retailers, BigWords has encountered financial difficulties that have ground its operations to a halt. The announcement makes matters difficult for college students across the nation, including UCSD students. Students who wish to return their textbooks or request a refund directly from BigWords will be unable to do so, given the company’s untimely failure. The UCSD Bookstore is offering a solution to students. John Turk, UCSD Bookstore director, has decided that the Bookstore will accept receipts from BigWords and honor book returns as if they were from the Bookstore. “”We feel it fills our mission to be of service for the academic community, particularly the students, who are caught in the middle by circumstances beyond their control,”” said David Wilson, course materials manager. “”It’s purely a service mission on our part.”” The bookstore’s new policy is designed to help students who purchased textbooks for the fall quarter from BigWords and later dropped the class or wished to return their books. Students who would not have been able to obtain a refund for their BigWords books can return them to the Bookstore for full credit. “”It’s not a give-away, exactly,”” Wilson said. “”We do get the book. We’re just giving [students] credit. It’s not as if we’re saying, ‘Whatever loss you suffered from BigWords, we’ll cover.'”” It is difficult to speculate how many UCSD students have been affected by BigWords’ closure, and how many will take advantage of the Bookstore’s offer. “”I hesitate to say whether it will be half a dozen or 20,”” Wilson said. “”It’s not just the number of students who ordered books from BigWords — it’s only the ones who had a problem and did not get it resolved.”” Students with a BigWords textbook they wish to return should bring it and its original receipt to the customer service area of the UCSD Bookstore by Nov. 11. The book must be in mint condition for a full credit. Otherwise, a 75 percent credit will be issued. For more information, please contact David Wilson at (858) 534-3771. ...

Coptic Club Invites Bishop to First Meeting

The recently formed Coptic Club, an organization that promotes Coptic Orthodoxy, held its first meeting Thursday in the Price Center. The club welcomed H.G. Bishop Serapion, bishop of Southern California and Hawaii, as a guest speaker. According to freshman Ramsey Marcus, UCSD students formed the club after witnessing the Coptic Club’s success at UC Irvine. “”It was so strong at UCI, we knew we could bring the club here and get it that big as well,”” Marcus said. “”It’s good to see the support we have so far from the first meeting.”” Several months ago, fourth-year UCSD student Bishoy Said attended a Los Angeles meeting where he saw Serapion speak at an American Orthodox church. Three weeks ago, Said met with the bishop to arrange for him to speak to the UCSD Coptic Club. Serapion was enthusiastic about orating for the club, according to Said. “”He was very encouraging and happy to be our guest,”” Said said. “”He has devoted his life to teaching about this, and it is an honor to have him come all the way from L.A.”” The purpose of the club is to educate and promote knowledge of the Coptic religion. There is a small Coptic church in Solana Beach, and the members of the Coptic Club hope the club can be another venue in which Coptics can celebrate their religion. Community members and students from other schools attended the meeting, suggesting that the club can serve as a bridge to connect with people interested in the religion outside campus. Club members sang a traditional hymn as Serapion arrived at the meeting in a customary black robe. He then led the room in prayer and gave a 45-minute-long overview of the religion, involving the members in his lecture as he asked questions throughout. An Egyptian branch of Orthodox Christianity, the Coptic Church has been in existence for about 2,000 years, forming in A.D. 45 in Alexandria. It is based on the teachings of St. Mark, who brought Christianity to Egypt during the reign of the Roman emperor Nero in the first century. Now an independent church, the Coptic religion exists all over the world, according to Serapion. The persecution it has survived only strengthens the deep spirituality of the church, he said. “”This is a church of ideology and spirituality that separates human nature from divine nature,”” Serapion said. “”The spiritual life is a life of joy.”” At the meeting, Serapion described the significance of the fasts that church members keep. According to Serapion, the Coptic Church has been described as the “”fasting church,”” as fasts occur Wednesday and Friday to remember the days of the week when Judas turned Jesus Christ over to the Jews and when he was crucified. There are also 14 occasions throughout the year when the church fasts to recognize religious holidays. “”After the fasting, we can join each other in celebration in the feasts,”” Serapion said. Serapion also referred to the Bible and mentioned its importance. “”How the church lives the Bible helps us to understand our life and what it contains,”” Serapion said. “”Everything the church says must be supported by the Bible.”” The speech ended with a question-and-answer period. Serapion then led the group in prayer. He consecrated bread, which was distributed to members. The club presented him with a UCSD coffee mug in appreciation for his presence. Serapion wished to visit with the members in a less formal atmosphere, so the Coptic Club arranged a dinner for members following the meeting, during which they could talk to the bishop personally. “”It was great to have him speak here,”” Said said. “”You get a feel for what the peace of the Coptic Church really is. “”The true heart of it is in the monastery, though,”” he added. Said visited a Coptic monastery last summer and described the experience as very serene and spiritual. The Coptic Club will post information and will continue to meet every week on Thursdays at 5 p.m. in the Price Center Gallery A. ...

Concert Kicks Off Series

Despite high attendance expectations and a history of playing to sold-out arenas, Lost at Last performed Friday night in the Price Center Plaza to a consistent crowd of approximately 100. The Maui-based band, which dedicates its shows to a resolution for the problems existing between Israelis and Arabs, was brought to campus by the A.S. Council as part of the school’s “”Thank Goodness It’s Friday”” concert series. “”I thought they were awesome,”” said A.S. Programmer Cassie Williams. “”They definitely have a lot of skill.”” Though many in attendance had not previously heard of the band, most were satisfied yet surprised by the concert. “”I think they were pretty good, with a nice beat,”” third-year medical student Bret Neiderman said. “”I thought it was a bit underpopulated, though. I thought it would be a lot more crowded for what it was.”” Williams attributes the small turnout to the lack of interest UCSD students have when it comes to new bands. “”People want to see what they already know,”” Williams said. “”They are not going to come, regardless if what I bring in is quality.”” However, some students believed that the unexpectedly small attendance was more a problem stemming from the school itself. “”This school has no school spirit,”” Warren Senior Austin Kennedy said. “”The students have to get involved.”” Kennedy also said the little publicity he saw for the show must have been a factor in the diminutive crowd size. “”I haven’t seen any flyers at all,”” he said. “”It sucks for kids who like this music and didn’t get to go because they didn’t know about it. The school needs to be promoting stuff like this.”” Williams was surprised and disappointed by this allegation. The programming office stated that it put up flyers all throughout the Price Center and Library Walk, in addition to going to the majority of the on-campus residence halls to pass out flyers for the show. “”I think the concert was marketed to the best of A.S. Council programming committee’s ability,”” Williams said. “”There were flyers and paper everywhere, there was a campus-wide e-mail and there was a lot of word of mouth.”” The band members, however, did not mind the small crowd, saying that the loyal fans they did entertain loved their performance. Williams said the group was given the option of not playing because of the small crowd, but it chose to perform to those did come. “”We like to find good in all the shows we do,”” drummer Daniel Paul said. “”It was a nice, intimate crowd. I think they were all hypnotized and they stuck to us.”” The remaining band members enjoyed playing a smaller venue, as it gave them an opportunity to experience an atypical crowd. “”It was a lot of fun,”” pianist and guitarist Timi said. “”It was definitely a challenging crowd. I like that people didn’t know anything about this kind of music.”” The band’s view of the area was equally positive. Deva Priyo, who plays over 10 different instruments throughout the show, said he enjoyed performing because of the feel that exists around the school. “”Though I can’t really make a strong opinion of [San Diego], it has a nice community, a nice family and a nice vibe,”” he said. Williams said the fact this type of music is not mainstream may have contributed to the small attendance. “”I decided for the first [TGIF], I wanted to test the waters of this school,”” she said. “”I know now that this school only responds well to top-40 stuff.”” The band classifies its music as “”ethno-techno,”” in that it combines current dance and trance music with lesser-known foreign instruments such as the sitar, tabla, conga and djembe. “”The music puts you on a carpet ride,”” Priyo said. “”The music takes you away on a journey. It is quite powerful.”” However, the unusual nature of the songs is what interested many in the crowd. “”I like the fact it gets me in a peaceful state of mind,”” said Esthela Becerra, visiting from Mount. St. Antonio College in Los Angeles. “”I like the fact it is different. You can interpret it in your own words.”” Because those in attendance did enjoy the concert, Williams said that a band such as this would be better suited to play during a big festival when there are headlining bands also present. “”This would have been great for a show like that,”” Williams said. “”Students would be forced to expand their horizons.”” However, Becerra felt that the lack of energy and attendance of the crowd prohibited her from losing herself in the performance. “”Maybe there would have been more energy with more people,”” she said. “”I think if there were, I would be in more of a mood to dance.”” Williams said the lack of dancers at the show may have occurred due to the concert’s early starting time of 7:30 p.m., before which the DJs and Vinylphiles Club spun for one hour. A later starting time might have attracted more dancers. Those in attendance expressed enjoyment of the TGIF and said they would attend another concert next quarter for its cultural benefits. “”This definitely has the potential to bring a lot of people together,”” Becerra said. “”With a variety of concerts like this one, it would be easier to understand other people’s cultures.”” The next TGIF is set to take place in February, in conjunction with Black History Month and the Student of Color Conference. In addition, the A.S. Council is holding a “”Nooner”” concert Wednesday, with a possible guest appearance by ’80s music star Tiffany. The A.S. Council has plans to start a dance club, slated for Friday nights in Porter’s Pub throughout the next two quarters. ...