News

'Bang Bang You're Dead' Emphasizes Anti-Violence

A troupe of 12 high school students from the Coronado School of the Arts performed the one-act play “”Bang Bang You’re Dead”” at the Mandell Weiss Forum Theater on Tuesday night. David Pilz Guardian The play, written by William Mastrosimone, was directed by Liz O’Neill, a drama teacher at CoSA. At the playwright’s request, the show was free and was followed by an open discussion for the audience. The play, which is inspired by the actual May 1988 school shooting in Springfield, Ore., chronicles the mental state of the perpetrator of a high school shooting before and after he committed the crime. Kip Kinkel was the 15-year-old charged with killing his parents and two classmates in the Springfield shooting. “”Bang Bang You’re Dead”” has spread across the nation. High schools and performance groups have picked up the free script and performed it, hoping the message of the play would be conveyed to at-risk students. Matthew Weatherman played Josh, the youth who turns in desperation to violence. Josh, like Kinkel, turns the gun on his parents, as well as five classmates. The play featured performances by Phillip Botello, Adriana Campos, Daisy Cross, Markus Erdmann, Alison Hoover, Annika Keller, Annalyn Lehnig, Jenny McArthur, Alma Schneider, Geoffrey Sykes and Weatherman. The actors are all students at CoSA. Dr. Vivian Reznik of the Academic Center of Excellence on Youth Violence Prevention was responsible for bringing the play to UCSD. At the end of the play, much of the audience was in tears. The post-performance forum opened an intimate discussion between the cast and audience on issues of violence. O’Neill began the discussion with an account of her past as a violent person and her recovery from that through “”nonviolent communication.”” Kelly Bryson, a psychotherapist and trainer for the International Centers for Nonviolent Communication, led the discussion. But with Bryson’s help, O’Neill said she has been able to overcome her violent tendencies. She proudly announced to the audience that she has never abused her 4-year-old child. “”I’ve broken the chain,”” she said. A high school student in the audience told about the “”disaster drills”” that are now being practiced in many high schools. Along with typical earthquake and fire drills, high school students are being told what to do if a violent act occurs at their schools. A special siren rings, the audience member told, notifying the students of gun violence or a threat on the campus. The students involved in the play emphasized how much the experience has affected them. The script of “”Bang Bang You’re Dead,”” as well as additional information on performance venues and dates, is available online at http://www.bangbangyouredead.com. ...

Briefly

UCSD Chancellor Robert C. Dynes met with members from four South County community groups last week as part of UCSD’s 40th anniversary. Dynes met with members at Southwestern Community College, including board members and superintendents, elementary school students and the National City Kiwanis Club. He met with them to discuss various UCSD community service programs that serve the South County. Other members of the UCSD community, including Robert Langer, a professor of family and preventative medicine who heads the Women’s Health Initiative in Chula Vista, and Christine Salomon, a UCSD Scripps Institution of Oceanography graduate student, joined Dynes in his meetings. Steve Napear of the San Diego Supercomputer Center located on the UCSD campus also joined the chancellor to discuss “”Classroom 21,”” an online high school curriculum planned for South County schools. UCSD Researchers Create Silicon Chip to Grow Liver Cells UCSD researchers have created a silicon chip with spaces allowing for upkeep of naturally functioning liver cells. This invention may help scientists sustain liver cells outside the body leading to new treatments for liver disease. The chip is about the size of a dime and is being dubbed the “”liver bioreactor.”” It was discovered by bioengineers at the Jacobs School of Engineering and chemists in UCSD’s Division of Physical Sciences. Cancerous cells may be grown in culture dishes, however, liver cells require highly specialized environments to grow. The structure of the chip will allow nutrients and chemicals to flow unobstructed and will filter bacteria and viruses. One of the first intended uses of the chip is to test the toxicity of experimental therapeutic drugs. Awards Banquet Honors Scripps Scientists Scripps supporters, the E.W. Scripps Associates, held a special banquet March 21 at the Birch Aquarium at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography to recognize recipients of the 2000 E.W. Scripps Award. At the ceremony, awards were presented to Wells Fargo Bank, the late Mia Tegner of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Scripps Committee for Humanity and Public Service. The E.W. Scripps Associates group is dedicated to upholding the goals and mission of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and does so through events such as this one. Wells Fargo Bank received the 2000 Benefactor of the Year award for its support of its faculty and programs. The Scripps Committee for Humanity and Public Service received the 2000 Leadership award for its leadership in community service. UCSD’s Science Programs and Professional Schools Ranked Among Best in the Nation In a study conducted recently by “”U.S. News and World Report,”” many of UCSD’s social sciences programs were ranked among the top 10 in the country. Also ranked very highly was the UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering; it ranked 10th among public universities and second in the UC system behind UC Berkeley. The findings will be published in the April 9 issue of the magazine and again in the magazine’s 2002 “”Best Graduate Schools Guidebook.”” The results are based upon surveys filled out by deans and faculty members in specific fields who judged the reputation of each of the institutions considered. Factors examined in the process include research activity, faculty resources and student selectivity. ...

Chancellor Gives State-of-the-Campus Address

In an effort to increase communication with the campus community, Chancellor Robert C. Dynes discussed campus growth issues last Friday at the Hillcrest Medical Center. Dynes gave a similar speech on the La Jolla campus on March 22. Over the next decade, UCSD will grow by approximately 10,000 students and 450 faculty members. This growth is due to state mandates which require the UC system to serve the top 12.5 percent of graduating high school seniors and maintain an 18.7-to-1 student-to-faculty ratio. The UC system as a whole will take on 60,000 students over the next 10 years. “”I know a lot of people have mixed feelings about this,”” Dynes said. “”I know I have mixed feelings about this. Sometimes it terrifies me. But sometimes I lie awake at night and my mind races thinking of all the possibilities. “”I can’t say it’s going to be wonderful,”” he continued. “”But I can say it will be inevitable.”” Dynes said UCSD plans to open a new school of pharmacy, which will accept its first incoming class in September of 2002. The school will eventually be housed in a 75,000 square-foot building that will be completed in 2005. Dynes stressed the fact that the campus, as a public university, needs to serve the community as a whole. “”It isn’t just our campus — UCSD belongs to the citizens of San Diego and the citizens of California,”” he said. “”It’s their campus as well.”” The La Jolla and Hillcrest medical centers, the new John and Becky Moores Cancer Center, and a world-class child care facility are ways in which UCSD has and will reach out to the community. Dynes pointed out that UCSD teams also helped in the recent Santana and Granite Hills high school shootings. Dozens of union members, clad in green T-shirts, called upon Dynes during the question-and-answer period to address staff issues such as the lack of pay raises and a shortage of employees. Dynes said that he has already set up a committee to look into issues of staff expansion. “”Yes, we are going to hire new staff, of course we are,”” he said. “”But we don’t know how and where we are going to do that. “”I have appointed a committee to work on these figures,”” he added. “”I have said to this committee, ‘I don’t want a series of recommendations, I want changes.'”” When members of the audience pressed Dynes to include staff members on this committee, he said that the committee would set up focus groups consisting of staff members so that it can properly understand and address the issues facing UCSD staff. To continue the dialogue begun by these state of the campus addresses, Dynes has set up an Office of the Chancellor Web site. Part of the Web site will show letters sent to the chancellor via e-mail. “”I cannot respond to every one,”” he said. “”But I assure you that I read every one and I learn something from every one.”” He said he hopes letters on the Web site will serve as an ongoing town forum. “”Some of it will drive you crazy, some of it you’ll agree with and some of it will be stimulating,”” he said. Dynes is scheduled to address the campus again Tuesday for a Diversity Council Town Hall Meeting. ...

Nader Visits UCSD to Talk Energy

In the midst of a power crisis, there was no shortage of energy in the Price Center Ballroom on Thursday, March 23. But some people brought flashlights just in case. Nearly 1,000 people filled the ballroom to hear Ralph Nader speak about California’s power crisis. Former U.S. Senate candidate Medea Benjamin, Texan radio host Jim Hightower and local environmental journalist Robert Nanninga also spoke at the event. California’s electric utilities have lost millions of dollars in the last year. Their financial trouble made “”rolling blackouts,”” once industry jargon, a household word in California. Nader and other Green advocates want the state either to readopt cost-based regulation or to take over the state’s electrical grid. “”There is no reason why electricity should be subjected to corporate price manipulation,”” Nader said. Cost-based regulation would require utilities to charge consumers the price of generating their electricity plus a small, set profit. Southern California Edison and Pacific Gas & Electric welcomed deregulation and thought they would become international energy companies. Their parent companies, Edison International and PG&E Corp., bought profitable holdings in other parts of the United States and the world, but have been beat at home by bigger companies from out of state, and are begging for their second consumer bailout in four years. When deregulation took effect, the two utilities had incentive to sell their fossil fuel plants. Most of the plants were sold for more than market value to corporations such as Texas-based Dynegy, Inc. and North Carolina-based Duke Energy. But instead of offering the output of their plants to the California Power Exchange at slightly more than the cost of generating it, as was intended by deregulations architects, out-of-state suppliers have sold power only at inflated prices, or not at all. Dynegy, which owns three major California power plants, tripled its net income last year “”You’ve got corporations caught with their hands in the cookie jar,”” Nader said. “”If they are truly going bankrupt, then why are they paying [Edison International] CEO John Bryson $3 million a year?”” Consumers have been overcharged $5.5 billion for electricity, according to California’s Independent System Operator. Benjamin was also skeptical about the crisis. “”Consumption has increased 4 percent, but rates have increased 289 percent,”” said Benjamin. Now, compared with March 2000, five times as many power plants are down for undisclosed reasons, often cited as “”unscheduled maintenance.”” The power shortage is so severe that blackouts recently occurred when the state’s peak demand was at 30,000 megawatts, far less than the summertime peak of 45,000 megawatts. Benjamin suggested that instead of bailing out the utilities, California should buy them out. If the utility companies are really going bankrupt, she said, “”they should be having a fire sale. They should sell [the grid] to us for half of what it’s worth.”” Thirty communities in California, including Los Angeles and Sacramento, have municipally owned utilities. Consumers there are not affected by blackouts and typically pay 25 percent less than elsewhere in the state for electricity. But instead of taking over the grid, the California Public Utilities Commission recently approved a rate increase of 3 cents per kilowatt-hour, a 40 percent hike that could cost customers $5 billion a year. Nanninga said that the rate increase would be especially hard on the poor. “”They have to decide between putting food on the table and turning on the lights or the heat.”” He also suggested that California develop alternate sources of energy. “”We have an energy source that comes up every morning,”” Nanninga said. “”We’re wasting all this space on top of strip malls that could be used as a source of solar power.”” ...

Lights & Sirens

Saturday, March 24 1:15 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a green `95 GMC 1500 truck from 8800 Villa La Jolla Dr. Loss: $10,000. 4:02 p.m.: An 18-year-old male nonaffiliate suffered head injuries during a soccer event at RIMAC field. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. Sunday, March 25 12:23 a.m.: Officers detained an 18-year-old male student at Pepper Canyon Apartments for being drunk in public. Rejected from detox and released to the Thornton Hospital emergency room staff. Resident Dean notified. Tuesday, March 27 5:20 p.m.: A student reported the theft of tires from Lot 357. Loss: $400. Wednesday, March 28 9:52 a.m.: A 12-year-old Preuss School student suffered a knee injury at the Preuss School field. Transported to Kaiser by paramedics. 10:44 a.m.: A 22-year-old student suffered a shoulder injury at Center Hall. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Thursday, March 29 10:22 a.m.: A 31-year-old female student fainted at Cellular and Molecular Medicine West. Subject sought private treatment. 1:37 p.m.: A student reported vandalism to a green `87 Ford Escort at Mesa Apartments. Loss: $2,000. 2:22 p.m.: A 47-year-old female staff member fainted at Nierenberg Hall. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Friday, March 30 4:01 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a blue and yellow Concorde mountain bike from the bike racks at the north side of Muir Apartments. Loss: $150. 4:48 p.m.: A staff member reported appropriation of stolen property from Torrey Pines Road. Loss: $95. 5:03 p.m.: Officers detained a 46-year-old male nonaffiliate on Russell Lane for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. 4:21 p.m.: A 16-year-old female nonaffiliate suffered a neck injury while playing soccer at RIMAC. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics Saturday, March 31 9:33 a.m.: Units and the San Diego Fire Department responded to a 31-year-old student complaining of breathing difficulties at 3765 Miramar St. Treated at the scene. 8:22 p.m.: A 53-year-old male nonaffiliate complained of chest pains at Gilman Drive and Villa La Jolla Drive. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. ...

Tuesday Classes Canceled Due to Power Crunch

In response to complications arising from California’s energy crisis, Tuesday classes in some on-campus buildings will be canceled due to a critical power supply shortage. Facing difficulties from multiple angles — campus power supplier Enron Corporation, California’s own waning power supply and the UCSD cogeneration plant, still under construction — UCSD will become subject starting Monday at midnight to the rolling blackouts that have plagued San Diego County for two weeks. Unreliable power supply forced UCSD Physical Plant Services and the Office of the Vice Chancellor of Resource Management and Planning to issue a joint statement Friday, indicating that power would be cut to major campus facilities on Tuesday between 7 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. The mandate affects classes in Warren Lecture Hall, the Humanities and Social Sciences Building, McGill Hall and all classes in Center Hall. Students who have not been contacted by their professors about Tuesday’s schedule should e-mail or call campus departments for details and rescheduling. In the last month, the California Energy Commission has issued seven Stage 3 power alerts, three of which were on consecutive days. Stage 3 is the most serious of the alert levels, indicating that only 1 percent of power reserves remain. University of California campuses, under contract with Enron Corp., are supposed to receive a supply of power unaffected by the California energy crisis. However, disputes with Enron have caused the company to revoke its contract with the university, pending a lawsuit filed by the university three weeks ago. The termination of the contract affects all nine UC campuses, including UCSD. Without its uninterrupted supply from Enron, UCSD must rely on the California market for its power, subjecting it to the turbulence caused by Stage 3 alerts. Catherine Navarro, spokeswoman for PPS, said that the timing of the Enron contract dispute is bad for UCSD in several ways. “”It’s enough that California is having its own energy problems,”” she said. “”But UCSD happens to be in a tight spot as well at the moment, since the cogeneration plant isn’t finished.”” She said that while the construction of the campus cogeneration plant, which will reliably supply UCSD with its own power, is well on its way to being completed, the plant will not be functional until May. PPS and its administrative contact, the Office of the Vice Chancellor of Resource Management and Planning, looked for a solution less drastic than the cancellation of classes. However, it was impossible to buy power from the already-drained California utilities, and the campus budget does not provide enough to subsidize the cost of buying power from other states. After receiving approval from the Office of the Chancellor, PPS made the decision to self-impose blackouts in the busiest parts of campus on Tuesday, when the state enters another Stage 3 alert. Navarro said that PPS has explored alternative power sources in its attempt to keep the rest of the campus powered through Tuesday night. The Price Center fountain will provide enough power to illuminate the Price Center and Student Health Services by means of a small hydroelectric generator located underneath the grass around the fountain. The Revelle Plaza fountain, however, works against the force of gravity, so it cannot be exploited in the same way. Navarro called upon UCSD’s substantial biology and medical research faculty to assist in a unique way: by the donation of their laboratory rodents. “”If we can get enough lab rats and hamsters by Monday night, we can cage them all up in a bunch of hamster wheels we’ve got lined up at PPS,”” she said. “”We’ve hooked up these wheels to a generator, and the amount of power that could be produced by all the animals in captivity at UCSD would be enough to get at least H&SS started again.”” Interested faculty can contact PPS for more information at (858) 534-3250. ...

Krispy Kreme to Displace Che

The university signed an agreement Friday with Krispy Kreme Doughnut Corp., allowing the corporate giant to open a store on the UCSD campus in the building currently inhabited by the Che Cafe. The agreement will involve a one-year, multi-million dollar renovation of the building. The new Krispy Kreme will be open 24 hours a day and include a convenient drive-through window. For the time being, the restaurant will be opening its doors beginning Friday morning and remain open for business for the rest of the quarter. The store will be closed while the building undergoes a complete renovation over the summer, and will reopen fall quarter. The university will receive over $100,000 per year from the company in exchange for the space. This additional revenue will go toward badly needed administrative pay raises. Members of the Che Cafe expressed outrage over the termination of their space agreement with the university. University administrators said that the Che Cafe will be given new space on the campus once the campus life fee referendum passes this spring. They added that the transition would be smooth, and that the Che would only be without space for a year or two. Most students expressed excitement over the new store while five students staged a protest on Library Walk over the temporary loss of the Che Cafe. “”This is a terrible example of ongoing corporate greed on this campus,”” one demonstrator said. “”We are completely student-run and the university is basically closing us down. It is just another in a series of steps taken against us over the past three years.”” Passersby, however, had their own opinions about the new project. “”This will be a great use of space that is basically going unused,”” said Warren junior Sandra Collins. “”I can’t wait until we can get fresh Krispy Kremes on campus. And I also think it’s great that we’ll be generating revenue for the administration.”” ...

List o' Fools

Warren College Res Life Staff George W. Bush Sierra Summit Campus Crusade UC Berkeley (your fucking initials are UCB — not UC, you arrogant pricks) Reid Monaster Chancellor Dynes (and his posse) Doc Khaleghi Jim Stephens (for old times’ sake) Muir Academic Advising Parking Wanna-be Cops Arnel Guiang UJS & MSA The Aladdin Hotel Staff Kirsten Dunst (Did you know she’s a Muir student?) The Visual Arts Department Jack Stroman Groundwork Bookstore (Why the hell don’t you take Visa? As if we have cash — we’re students.) ...

Busted by your Mom

Tuesday, March 27 3:24 a.m.: A 22-year-old male student was arrested for sodomy outside the Student Center. Damage: Matt Damon’s anal virginity. 8:01 a.m.: A 55-year-old male chancellor was detained by campus police for being intoxicated in public. Transported to detox. Rejected from detox, then taken to county jail. Expired green card revoked and subject deported to Canada. 2:31 p.m.: Campus police impounded your mom’s ass for parking without a service yard permit while carrying a gross unladen weight of four tons. Stored at Star Towing. 3:41 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of Eleanor Roosevelt College. No monetary loss. 11:10 p.m.: Campus police responded to a noise complaint at an office behind the Che Cafe. Officers recoil in horror. Wednesday, March 28 11:44 p.m.: All your base are belong to us. What you say! 3:41 p.m.: Campus police arrest a 54-year-old Critical Gender Studies professor for masterminding a child porn ring. Two computers and eight Preuss School students seized. Thursday, March 29 8:32 p.m.: Campus police raided Koala office in Student Center. Police confiscated an altar, nine goats, and Doc Khaleghi (subject found tied up and naked). 10:22 p.m.: Units and the San Diego Fire Department responded to a fire at CLICS ignited by the nude table dancing of 20-year-old and 21-year-old female Groovejets. Hot damn. Friday, March 30 2:15 p.m.: Officers responding to a noise complaint found an 18-year-old male student and an 18-year-old female nonaffiliate copulating in the showers at Tioga Hall. Cited for “”getting some”” at this school and released. 9:49 p.m.: Officers detained three Guardian staff members for promoting a rave in the Guardian offices (Paul Oakenfold spun, BTW). Cited for drug violations and released. Saturday, March 31 1:13 p.m.: Officers arrested three Muir students for disposing of toxic waste. Muir Quarterlies confiscated and transported to nuclear disposal site in Tijuana. Students dragged out and shot. ...

Briefly

Researchers at the UCSD-based Cannabis Center have discovered that eating Powerpuff Girls cereal after smoking marijuana nicely complements the drug’s effects. The cereal’s active ingredients are Pop Rocks, which cause a fizzing sensation on the tongue when the cereal is eaten. Researchers say it is this sensation that enhances the experience. “”If it’s already hypersensitive from smoking marijuana, your tongue would be delighted to have fizzing cereal on it,”” said researcher Eric Harmon. Further research will pair marijuana with Crazy Dips lollipops. “”They’re foot-shaped lollipops that you dip in popping powder. You decide how much powder to put on the lollipop, so that introduces a variable,”” Harmon said. “”It should be interesting.”” Student Health Services Hands Out Free Cigarettes Student Health Advocates from UCSD’s Student Health Services handed out free cigarettes on Library Walk Friday afternoon of finals week. The act was intended to relieve the tension of overworked students during finals week, which is traditionally a very stressful time and causes confusion, delight and anger among many students. Some students thought the group was performing a visual arts project for a class, but Student Health Advocates defended their actions, saying that smoking, when done in moderation, can be very effective for relieving stress. UCSD to Host Tenth Annual Porn Olympics Starting Monday The tenth Porn Olympiad comes to La Jolla, bringing together sex superstars from all over the world who possess the most speed, endurance, strength and girth. Opening ceremonies, to be held Tuesday at 9 p.m. in the Price Center Plaza, will feature a parade of porn with reigning trailer-hitch chrome remover champion Jenna Jameson lighting the Porn Olympic flame with the dildo torch. The competition is trying to regain its former lustre after it was rocked by a Chinese Viagra scandal in the `97 games. Competition will begin Monday, featuring butt darts, Greco-Roman cream corn wrestling, muff diving, the dildo toss and pole vault. Wednesday’s action will showcase boxing, diaphragm discus, trailer-hitch cleaning and hardcore anal sex. Closing ceremonies will be Thursday at 11 a.m. in the Price Center Plaza. Here, the winnng cuntry will be presented with the coveted Golden Strap-On. For more information call EDNA at (858) 534-LAMO. MSA, UJS Clash in Third Day of Violence, Dozens Injured Twenty-eight Muslim protesters and three of their Jewish counterparts were slain yesterday on Library Walk in a third straight day of violence at UCSD after the MSA-sponsored Anti-Zionism Week. Yesterday’s deaths brought the toll of the recent spate of violence to 43 Muslim and five Jewish students. The majority of yesterday’s deaths occurred when a UJS-affiliated tank rolled down Library Walk around noon, haphazardly crushing MSA protesters throwing stones at a UJS-sponsored table. “”While we regret the deaths of students on both sides of the conflict, we felt the intervention was necessary to prevent further violence,”” explained UJS member Mike Rubensteinion. “”You understand that security for our staff manning the booth, and all UCSD students, is our foremost goal.”” MSA students reject those accusations. “”These UJS students have incurred the wrath of MSA and all UCSD students by tearing down our booth proclaiming the truth of anti-Zionism,”” said an anonymous MSA militant wearing a black hood. “”May they burn in hell for what they’ve done.”” Yesterday’s unrest is an escalation from that of previous days, during which UJS members sprayed rubber bullets on protesting Muslim students during a rally in the Price Center. ...