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Events

Thursday, Jan. 18 Movie: Scary Movie The University Centers will sponsor the film which will be shown at 7 and 10 p.m. in the Price Center Theater. Admission is $2. Friday, Jan. 19 Grand opening: Club Ritmo The A.S. Council presents UCSD’s new night club Club Ritmo. The opening will feature Ton Loc. The event is open to the public and will take place at 8:30 p.m. at the Stage in the Porter’s Pub. UCSD students with a student identification will get in free. General admission is $8. Saturday, Jan. 20 Performing Arts: La Jolla Symphony and Chorus The La Jolla Symphony Chamber Chorus will sponsor the event which will take place at 8 p.m. at the Neurosciences Institute. The event is open to the public. General admission is $18 and student admission is $11. For more information call (858) 534-4637. Performing Arts: St. Lawrence String Quartet The string quartet will perform at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Auditorium. The University Events Office will sponsor the event. General admission is $22 and student admission is $10. The event is open to the public and tickets can be purchased at Ticketmaster and at the UCSD Box Office. For more information call (858) 534-8497. Sunday, Jan. 21 Performing Arts: The Kathie Burg Band The University Centers will sponsor the event which will take place at 8 p.m. at Espresso Roma in the Price Center. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4022. Tuesday, Jan. 23 Movie: Almost Famous The University Centers will sponsor the film which will be shown at 7 and 10 p.m. at the Price Center Theater. Wednesday, Jan. 24 Seminar: Student Scholars Series Undergraduate Ben Bunyi will present a lecture entitled “”Lincoln and Douglas Hotels: Race, Power, Urban Development.”” The Cross Cultural Center, the Office of Graduate Studies and Research and the Academic Enrichment programs will sponsor the event will sponsor the event which will take place at 4 p.m. at the Cross Cultural Center. The event is open to the public and admission is free. For more information call (858) 534-9689. Performing Arts: Noon Concert A.S. Programming will sponsor the concert which will take place at noon at the Price Center Plaza. The event is free and open to the public. ...

ACIU College Bowl Comes to Challenge UCSD Students

The 2001 ACIU college bowl has arrived at UCSD. The annual event challenges students with a knack for trivia to sign up within their college. The individual colleges’ bowls take place this week and next week. The top two teams from each college will compete in the university-wide event Jan. 31 in the Price Center Theater. The winning team will then represent UCSD at the ACIU regional College Bowl tournament at Sacramento State Feb. 16 to Feb. 18. The state winner will then try for the national title. Contestants in the tournaments are asked questions from all realms of academia. Teams must be prepared to grapple with all areas, from the sciences and humanities to sports and entertainment. Patricia Mahaffey, Muir’s assistant resident dean, enjoys the university’s celebration of the mind. “”College Bowl is an event I look forward to every year, she said “”The best and the brightest come out.”” Mahaffey also noted that many students come to watch both the individual college tournaments and the all-campus tournament. Although the Muir event was held on Wednesday night, there is still time to sign up to compete at the other colleges. Revelle college will hold its event Thursday. Warren and Marshall colleges are accepting sign-ups in their dean’s offices. Roosevelt students can sign up in the Residential Life office. The Warren event will be held Jan. 22, followed by Marshall college’s the next day. Finally, Roosevelt will meet for its college bowl Jan. 24. Sign-ups are accepted individually or as a team. Teams consist of four members with an optional alternate. There is no cost to enter. UCSD marketing coordinator and College Bowl overseer Matt Xavier is expecting everyone to have a great time with the tournament. “”The College Bowl is a lot of fun,”” Xavier said. “”It tests people’s intelligence and their ability to think quickly. You can really learn a lot. There is so much info. about art, science and history.”” Xavier predicts that several hundred students and faculty will attend the All-Campus bowl on Jan. 31. Free pizza, cookies and beverages will be provided to those in attendance. Winners of the separate colleges’ tournaments will receive free T-shirts and the winner of the all-campus tournament will be awarded a sweatshirt. The College Bowl seeks to maintain high levels of integrity. Questions are mailed to the college dean’s office the afternoon preceding the match. The questions come in 10 sealed envelopes that are not opened until the commencement of the event. The format of the Bowl game is similar to that of many academic competitions. The game begins with a general toss-up question open to response from both teams. The first player to buzz in gets to attempt to answer. If the player answers correctly, his or her team will be given a bonus question that only their team can answer. After the bonus question, another toss-up question is asked. Stanford University and the University of Southern California are consistent champions at the statewide regional event. These private schools actually offer courses aimed to prepare students for this event. UCSD teams are largely student run, not professionally coached like teams of some other universities. However, UCSD has managed to perform with great deal of success. Last year, a group from Revelle college came in third place in the regional contest. The five colleges, the University Centers, the Vice Chancellor’s Office of Student Affairs, and Imprints are all sponsors of the College Bowl. ...

Briefly

Gov. Gray Davis announced his proposed 2001-2002 budget last week, which would give the University of California a financial boost. Under the proposed budget, the annual state allowance for the university would increase 6.3 percent to $3.4 billion allowing for the admission of an additional 5,700 students to be funded. The budget would also help maintain affordable tuition for students and their families, increased employee salaries, and aid in the proliferation of the university’s teaching, research and public programs to maintain their increasing excellence. The budget constitutes the second wave of provisions made to create the California Institutes for Science and Innovation, one of which, the Institute for Internet and Telecommunications Technology, will be built at UCSD in partnership with UC Irvine. In addition to these improvements, the budget will also allocate more support for UC graduate programs, summer instruction on certain campuses and greater student retention programs. Prior to the creation, Davis had made it clear that a strong partnership between his administration and the university would be forged. The plan calls for an annual increase in financial support for the university. Free workouts, rec classes offered to UCSD students In an effort to help UCSD students stick to their New Year’s resolutions to get or stay healthy, UCSD Recreation has announced that it will offer three free classes to students. This winter’s free classes are dance aerobics, which will take place from noon to 1 p.m. on Tuesdays at the Rec Conference Room, Kick Boxing, which will take place from noon to 1 p.m. on Thursdays in the Rec Conference Room, and Step Aerobics, which will take place from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at the Main Gym. All classes begin on Tuesday, Jan. 16. For more information about these or any other classes call (858) 534-4037. The A.S. Council presents UCSD’s new club Ritmo Ton Loc and DVC will perform at the opening of Club Ritmo, which will take place at 8:30 p.m. Friday at the stage in Porter’s Pub. Club Ritmo is a new nightclub presented by the A.S. Council. It is intended to make Friday nights on campus a little livelier. A student I.D. is required for free admission, and general admission is $8. Preuss School accepting applications for sixth graders UCSD’s Preuss School is currently accepting applications for sixth graders entering in fall 2001. An information session will be held for parents who are interested in enrolling their students. The session will be held at 1 p.m. on Jan. 20 at the Preuss School campus. In addition to the 100 open spaces for new sixth graders, the school also has a limited number of spots for students who will be entering the ninth grade this fall. The admission would bring the school’s total enrollment to 516 students with plans to raise that number to 700 by the year 2003. The school also has plans to offer instruction to students from sixth to 12th grades as opposed to only offering instruction to students up to the 10th grade as it does now. Volunteers needed for Eyes on the Elderly Program The Volunteer Connection will hold an information session for those interested in participating in the Eyes on the Elderly Program. The program will recruit UCSD students to interact with senior citizens at the Torrey Pines Convalescent Hospital. Volunteers will spend one to two hours per week with an elderly individual engaging in such activities as calling out numbers for bingo or eating pizza. The commitment to EOE is only quarterly and can be formatted to fit your schedule. Applications can be picked up at the Volunteer Connection and must be returned by Jan. 19. For more information, call (858) 534-1414. Student Foundation holds benefit for Preuss School The UCSD Student Foundation is currently having a “”Change for Change”” college competition to benefit the Preuss School. With UCSD students making donations and the UCSD Alumni Association matching contributions dollar for dollar up to $2,000, the Student Foundation is hoping to supply outdoor tables for Preuss students. The college with the highest amount of donations will receive a free movie night and popcorn at the Price Center Theater. The competition will end and the winner will be announced on Feb. 2 at Spirit Night. Money will be collected via bins passed around the residence halls which will then be deposited at RIMAC on Spirit Night before the winner is announced. ...

Suitcase Dance Sends Students Packing

Muir first-year students gathered at Sierra Summit Friday night to take part in the Muir College Council’s annual Suitcase Dance. The doors opened at 8 p.m., and Muir first years streamed in, lugging suitcases packed for a trip to an unknown destination. The students checked their suitcases as they arrived. The MCC announced that at some point during the dance, a drawing would be held to determine who would win the trip for two to the secret location. Some students speculated about the destination. “”I think it’s Philly,”” said Nigel Delaney, a first-year student. “”They told us it would be cold and to bring a snowboard, but that it wasn’t in California.”” Delaney’s prediction proved incorrect after the drawing, which was held shortly before 9 p.m. Master of Ceremonies Colin Parent announced that a limousine was waiting outside to take the lucky freshmen to the airport. Fortune shined on Kristyn Molle that night, as her name was drawn, awarding her an all-expense-paid weekend for two to the Hampton Inn in Orlando, free Disney World passes, and $200 in spending cash. Nearly speechless, all she could say was, “”I didn’t know.”” “”There was enough demand to bring [the dance] back and we gave them lots of clues to keep them interested,”” said MCC Chair Cristina Villegas. According to Villegas, the event was entirely Muir-sponsored. “”We wanted it to be a community-building activity put on by our community,”” Villegas said. “”Even the dean chipped in.”” MCC Public Relations Representative Matt Bechtel served as DJ for the evening. Although many left after the announcement of the winner, others stayed to enjoy the music and await the other prizes the MCC had in store. Throughout the night, the MCC gave away gift certificates for free meals at Islands and In-N-Out and gift certificates for merchandise at Ralphs and Cost Plus. ...

CUDA Celebrates Diversity

Drums at the Cultural Unity Day of Awareness beat rhythmically Thursday despite the downpour outdoors. The event, co-sponsored by the Cross Cultural Center, the Women’s Center, the Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender Resource Office and Student Legal Services, took place in the Price Center Ballroom, instead of in the Plaza as planned, due to bad weather. Emelyn DelaPeua, a program director at the Women’s Center and one of two main coordinators of CUDA, initially expressed concern about the turnout at the event. “”We were hoping to get at least 100, but because it’s raining we don’t know how many people are going to come,”” DelaPeua said. The event, which according to DelaPeua has occurred annually for a decade, has evolved extensively from its beginnings. It was originally intended as an act of protest. Most organizations of minority students would attend and plan a march on the chancellor’s office protesting the lack of diversity at UCSD. The event was initially held on Columbus Day. According to DelaPeua, who was a student at the time the event was first held, students marched around campus with coffins on their shoulders to symbolize the oppression of the holiday. The basis of the event shifted over the years, according to the second main coordinator, Laura Barraclough. “”For the last three years, as long as I’ve been working on it, it’s been a celebration that there are organizations working to increase diversity,”” said Barraclough, the acting assistant of the Cross Cultural Center. CUDA is now used to start off the celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The Ballroom was set up with participating organizations’ tables on the side walls and a circle of chairs in the middle. The LGBTRO, the program of Graduate Studies, the Hawaiian Club, the Asian-Pacific Student Association, the African-American Student Union, the Cross Cultural Center and the Women’s Club all had information tables. The celebration featured a drum circle led by drummers from World Beat. World Beat leaders Nana Yaw Asiedu and Brana Matejic arrived with their percussion instruments. The instruments were placed around the circle of chairs. DelaPeua welcomed spectators to CUDA, invited them to the drum circle, and read a message from Chancellor Robert Dynes. Dynes thanked the organizations for participating in the awareness program and challenged everyone to a second “”Chancellor’s Challenge,”” this one having the goal of cultural unity. The event was then turned over to Asiedu, who greeted everyone in the Guinea West African language of Malinke. He stressed the importance of knowing how to count in drumming and gave a quick lesson. Each different type of drum or bell had a different part, and he showed everyone their parts in turn. Together, the beats formed a song called Ferakodaba, or “”Rites of Passage”” in Malinke. Students drifted in to watch when they heard the drumming. Some joined the circle. The second performance was by Eric and Erisa Johnson, who are in the fourth and 10th grades. Erisa played the piano while Eric, dressed in a bright red suit, recited Martin Luther King, Jr.’s famous “”I Have a Dream”” speech. The siblings have been performing this act for nearly five years. According to Eric, the speech took only three days to memorize. Erisa has been playing the piano since she was three years old. Next, members of the UCSD Gospel Choir, directed by Ken Anderson, took the stage. The performance took place the day after the choir’s first practice of the year, and despite this, the musicians managed to get the audience to respond. “”Get close to someone else so you don’t feel like you’re singing alone,”” Anderson said to the crowd as the choir rang out with “”This Little Light of Mine.”” CUDA concluded with a second drum circle led by Asiedu. Choir members and the Johnson family picked up instruments to join the rhythm. “”I think it went well even thought it got rained out and not many people came,”” DelaPeua said. “”The people who were here were great, they had energy. I thought the drum circle was a wonderful way to bring people together. We had just enough people to have a good circle.”” ...

Hundreds of Students Walk In San Diego's MLK Day Parade

Saturday marked the 14th year of UCSD’s participation in the Martin Luther King Jr. parade. The 22nd annual MLK parade was held from 11 a.m. until noon along Harbor Drive, ending on Pacific Highway in San Diego. An estimated 250 members of the UCSD community, including family members of students and faculty, marched in the procession, making this the largest group UCSD has ever had in the parade. Clad in UCSD shirts with the slogan “”Freedom Through Education”” emblazoned on the back, students and faculty marched for one mile holding banners representing each college. Members from the UCSD Medical Center, the Preuss School and the Early Academic Outreach Program marched along with Chancellor Robert Dynes, Revelle Provost Thomas Bond, and Marshall Provost Cecil Lytle in the parade. Nikki Cayanan, Chairwoman of the MLK Jr. Campus Parade Committee, was pleased at the turnout of the event. “”It just totally blew us away,”” Cayanan said. “”This is the biggest contingent that UCSD has ever had. It was huge. We’ve never had this many people.”” According to Cayanan, preparations for the event took about three months and cost about $5,000. Funds were allocated from various sources on campus such as the chancellor, the dean and the A.S. Council, in addition to private contributions such as those from the Princeton Review. A portion of the funds went to advertising for the parade. Posters and banners promoted the parade starting a week before the celebration. Free transportation to the parade and a continental breakfast were provided for students and faculty. There were also two contests held, one for the most participants out of the five colleges, and another for the most participants out of the student organizations on campus, in an effort to increase student involvement. The prize for both contests was a free pizza party paid for by Papa John’s. Marshall college won the first contest by a wide margin with an estimated 40 students participating, followed by Revelle with 25, Muir with 24, Warren with 20 and Roosevelt with 15. The Pep Band won the second contest with 13 members in the parade, followed by the Alpha Kappa Theta fraternity with 10 members. The Marshall College Council felt the event was significant enough to make it mandatory for all council members to attend. “”I think it’s important that our college and community show that we still remember Martin Luther King, not only this day but [also that] the things that he did still have effect on us,”” said Vice Chair of the Marshall Council Michelle Law. Other Council members agreed and wanted to celebrate diversity, which is a main focus of Marshall college. “”It’s just a time to celebrate how far our country has come in terms of diversity and appreciating other cultures,”” said Chair of the Marshall Council Emiko Burchill. The lively atmosphere of the parade is another reason for some to participate. “”I really like the energy here,”” said Jill Donofrio, a member of Leaders of the 21st Century at Revelle. “”Everyone’s happy and cheerful and excited. It makes you want to be the same way.”” Other participants who were alive to witness King’s efforts wanted to support the memory of his struggle. “”I grew up in the 60’s, so I remember vividly the freedom marches,”” Dynes said. “”I remember Martin Luther King and what he did.”” For some faculty members, marching in the parade is an annual tradition. “”I’ve marched in this parade every year,”” Bond said. “”I think it’s a lot of fun. It’s a chance for UCSD to see San Diego and for San Diego to see UCSD. It was a beautiful day and Martin Luther King is one of my heroes.”” For others, the parade was also a chance to spend time with their families and feel a sense of unity in the community. “”I’ve been with the university for 13 years and I think I’ve only missed two parades,”” said Yvonne Reid-Hairston, who works in the chancellor’s office. “”It’s like an annual tradition for us and usually I bring my two daughters. I just like to see the unity that this event brings to the campus and to the city. We need to have more days like this.”” ...

Lights & Sirens

Sunday, Jan. 7 3:37 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a laptop computer from Beagle Hall. Loss: $1,800. Monday, Jan. 8 5:47 a.m.: Officers arrested a 61-year-old male nonaffiliate for violation of a seven-day exclusion order at the Preuss School. 9:32 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a white ’90 Toyota Camry from Regents Road. Loss: $2,000. Tuesday, Jan. 9 10:25 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a Palm Pilot from the first floor of Geisel Library. Loss: $250. 2:30 p.m.: A student reported indecent exposure in Lot 355. 4:12 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of books from the UCSD Bookstore. Wednesday, Jan. 10 2:09 a.m.: Officers arrested a 19-year-old male student at Brennan Hall for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. Subject rejected from detox and transported to Central Jail. 4:49 a.m.: Officers impounded a ’94 Nissan Maxima from Lot 504 for having more than five unpaid parking citations. Stored at Star Towing. 7:48 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of computer equipment from the Humanities and Social Sciences building. Loss: $50. 9:49 p.m.: Officers arrested a 26-year-old male nonaffiliate for misuse of a disabled placard in Lot 411. Cited and released. Friday, Jan. 12 8:35 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a handheld computer from UC 104. Loss: $150. 11:11 a.m.: An 18-year-old male student suffered a dislocated knee after slipping and falling in front of the Applied Physics and Mathematics building. Transport-ed to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. 2:03 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a bicycle from the UCSD Bike Shop. Loss: $150. 3:31 p.m.: A student reported the theft of video game cartridges from Tenaya Hall. Loss: $240. 3:34 p.m.: A student reported a burglary at Marshall Apart-ments. Loss: $268. Saturday, Jan. 13 4:27 p.m.: A nonaffiliate reported domestic violence at Marshall Apartments. ...

Briefly

The UCSD Cancer Center has chosen Carol E. Salem, M.D., a specialist in urologic oncology and urinary reconstruction, to head the school’s new Urologic Cancers Unit, where she will help treat bladder, prostrate, testicular, renal, urethral and penile cancers. Salem graduated from UCSD with a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and earned her medical degree from USC. Salem now comes to the UCSD School of Medicine as an assistant professor of surgery in the urology division. Salem has spent many years studying the effect of DNA methylation as a possible sign of bladder cancer and was honored by the American Foundation for Urologic Diseases in 1997. Kidney cancer treatment being tested at UCSD An experimental stem cell transport drug used to treat kidney cancer is currently being evaluated at the UCSD Blood and Marrow Transport Program. Kidney cancer is known to be resistant against conventional treatments, but the stem cell being used has proven promising in a recent study conducted by the National Institutes of Health. This particular treatment, which is called the nonmyeloablative allogenic peripheral-blood stem-cell transport, is open to patients in the trial who have a sibling who can donate stem cells for the experiment. Patients receive minimal chemotherapy before the stem-cell transplant. For more information about the study, call the UCSD Blood and Marrow Transplant program at (858) 657-6840. Off-Campus Housing office moves to new location As of Dec. 11, the Off-Campus Housing office has moved from Student Center B to its new location in Student Center A, Suite 200-202 in the Eucalyptus Lounge. The Eucalyptus Lounge is located on the second floor above the Bike Shop. The Off-Campus Housing office will continue to offer commuter advising, services and housing referrals as well as directory and rental listings for all students, staff and faculty. The office can be reached at (858) 534-3670. UCSD’s Mark Shuckit honored for exemplary research Mark A. Shuckit, a UCSD professor of psychiatry and director of the Alcohol Research Center at the Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center, was awarded a lifetime Achievement Award at this winter’s annual U.S. Psychiatric Congress meeting. John Schwartz, editor in chief of the Psychiatric Times, presented Shuckit with his award. Schwartz cited Shuckit’s research on the role of genetics in alcoholism. Shuckit has done extensive work concerning alcoholism and genetics including a study that found a relationship between the effects of alcohol on a young person and its manifestation later in life. Shuckit authored the textbook “”Drug and Alcohol: A Clinical Guide to Diagnosis and Treatment,”” which is now in its fifth edition. UC natural reserve system receives packard grant The University of California has received a Packard Grant of $263,600 to develop a program for long-term research in an effort to save California’s endangered coastal-oak system. Over 3 million acres of the system have been sacrificed to residential and agricultural development. The Packard Grant will fund a nine-month planning period by UC environmental field scientists from UC campuses at Berkeley, Davis, Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz. The researchers will also develop partnerships with other organizations to analyze possible methods for restoring the ecosystem at risk. The funding for the Packard Grant comes from the Packard Foundation’s Conserving California Landscapes Initiative. ...

Events

Thursday, Jan. 11 Celebration: Cultural Unity Day of Awareness The Women’s Center, Cross Cultural Center, Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Resource Office, and Student Legal Services will sponsor the event, which will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Price Center Plaza. The celebration will feature cultural events, including a drum circle, entertainment, information tables, music and a keynote speaker. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call (858) 822-1475. Friday, Jan. 12 Performing Arts: Cab Calloway’s Legacy of Swing Cab Calloway’s daughter, Chris Calloway, will appear with the Hi-De-Ho Orchestra to perform swing and jazz music. Calloway debuted with her father on the Ed Sullivan Show in the ’60s and traveled with him for over 20 years. The University Events Office will sponsor the performance, which will be held at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Recital Hall. The even is open to the public. General admission is $22 and student admission is $16. For more information, call (858) 534-4119. Saturday, Jan. 13 Aquarium: Sea Kayaking The Birch Aquarium will sponsor the activities which will start at 8 a.m. in the waters of La Jolla. Activities are open to the public for a $40 fee. For more information and exact location, call (858) 534-7336. Parade: Martin Luther King Jr. Parade UCSD and others will sponsor the parade, which will honor the life and work of Martin Luther King Jr. The event will take place at 10 a.m. in downtown San Diego. The event is free and open to the public. Students can sign up to be a part of the parade at their Dean’s or Residential Life office. Free transportation will be provided for those who need it. For more information, call (858) 534-1585. Monday, Jan. 15 Performing Arts: UCSD Gospel Choir The UCSD Music Department will sponsor the gospel choir’s performance to honor Martin Luther King Jr. The concert will take place at 8 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Recital Hall. The event is open to the public. General admission is $5 and student admission is $3. For more information, call (858) 534-4830. Wednesday, Jan. 17 Food Sales: A.S. Barbecue The A.S. Council will serve free lunch to all UCSD students starting at 10 a.m. on Library Walk. For more information, call (858) 534-0473. Performing Arts: Stacey Fraser DMA Concert The UCSD Music Department will sponsor the event, which will take place at 8 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Recital Hall. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4830 ...

Scripps Scientist Mia Tegner Dies in Diving Accident

Longtime Scripps researcher Mia Tegner died Sunday in a scuba diving accident off the coast of Mission Beach. She was 53 years old. An accomplished diver and scientist, she spent her adult life associated with UCSD. “”We knew Mia when she was a young adult just beginning her scientific endeavors,”” said Charles Kennel, director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. “”She grew to maturity with us, and spent her life at Scripps.”” Tegner, a native of Southern California, graduated from UCSD with a bachelor’s degree in biology in 1969. Five years later she earned a doctorate in marine biology from Scripps. She based her research from Scripps ever since. Wayne Pawelek, head diving safety instructor at Scripps, had the pleasure of knowing, working and socializing with Tegner since she arrived at Scripps in 1969. “”She lost her life doing what she truly enjoyed,”” Pawelek, said. Tegner’s research dealt with the ecology of kelp forest communities and near-shore marine resources. She spent nearly three decades studying and protecting the Point Loma kelp beds. Tegner’s work has helped other scientists better understand the kelp forests, and has also helped government officials to better understand the effects of urban runoff and sewage on marine life. Her work greatly contributed to the decision by the California Department of Fish and Game to implement a moratorium on the taking of abalone from offshore Southern California. “”She dedicated more than 25 years of work to the ecology of the kelp beds off Point Loma in San Diego, and she developed a new and deep appreciation for this delicate, undersea rain forest,”” Kennel said. At the time of her passing, Tegner was researching the effects of El Nino and La Nina on the plants and animals of the kelp ecosystem. In August of 2000, Tegner, along with colleagues Paul Dayton, Peter Edwards and Kristin Riser, was honored with the prestigious Cooper Ecology Award for research on the Point Loma kelp forest ecosystem. Two years earlier, in 1998, she received a fellowship with the Pew Fellow Program in Marine Conservation to further study the effects the changing ocean has on kelp forests. In 1986 Tegner was honored with the UCSD Distinguished Alumna of the Year Award. Tegner is survived by her husband, Eric Hanauer of San Diego, a daughter, Sandi Hanauer of Costa Mesa, her parents Oly and Allie Tegner of Palos Verdes, and a sister, Lars Palsoson of Palos Verdes. In lieu of flowers, donations in Mia Tegner’s memory can be made to Scripps Institution of Oceanography to support kelp forest research. For more information, the development office at Scripps can be reached at (858) 822-1865. A memorial service for Tegner will be held at the Birch Aquarium at Scripps Friday at 4 p.m. ...