News

Awareness Week Aims to Educate Students

In recognition of Valentine’s Day, health advocates across the United States rallied to support Condom Awareness Week. Despite the rain, Student Health Services manned an information booth on Library Walk Tuesday to support sexual health awareness. Condoms and other forms of sexual protection were handed out to students. Student Health Advocate Natalie Lamb spoke of the need for increased awareness of the dangers of unprotected sex. “”The purpose of the awareness week is not to push condoms,”” Lamb said. “”People are already using them and we want them to be aware of the different options available. There are many misconceptions that need to be understood.”” Among the misconceptions noted by the advocates were misunderstandings of the correct functions of protection. “”Many people don’t understand how to be safe,”” said Sara Working, a student health advocate and Marshall senior. “”For example, many condoms are made from lamb intestines which can be used as birth control but not for protection against sexually transmitted diseases such as the AIDS virus.”” Advocates cited other protection failures such as using two condoms, misconceiving oral sex as intrinsically safe from virus transmission and using improper lubricants, such as petroleum jelly or whipped cream, which dissolve the latex condom. Working explained some incorrect assumptions about oral sex. “”Many people think that oral sex is safe,”” Working said. “”The only requirement for the virus to exist is a warm, moist area.”” Working promoted the practice of using a dental dam, a protective latex covering for male and female genitalia, to prevent the transmission of disease during oral sex. The table also offered games and trivia intended to educate people on sexual safety. Students gathered to play “”Pin the condom on the man.”” Students found the distribution of condoms and the games either amusing or embarrassing. Health advocates aimed to erase these sentiments. Debbie Pino-Saballett, outreach coordinator for Student Health Services, spoke of the need for increased awareness without shame. “”Many people find the table offensive,”” Pino-Saballett said. “”The goal is actually to desensitize. If we do some games with condoms, maybe when they need them they won’t be so offended.”” The group also wanted to stress the week as “”Latex Awareness Week”” as opposed to “”Condom Awareness Week,”” so as not to discriminate against relations in which latex protection takes a different form. “”Latex should be used among lesbians as well,”” Pino-Saballett said. Pino-Saballett has worked in sexual education since 1988. For the past three years, she has worked at UCSD at the Student Health Center educating college and high school students. Health advocates hold on-campus information sessions by request. They also hold several assemblies at local high schools, informing high school seniors about sexually transmitted diseases. Students observing the table applauded the efforts to bring awareness of sexual issues. “”I think it’s a good idea that people need to learn about,”” said Roosevelt senior Andrew Culberson. “”College students should be confronted with these issues in a grown-up way.”” Other students spoke of the need for abstinence from sexual activity prior to marriage. Revelle senior Sandra Zipperer promoted abstinence on two grounds. “”Abstinence is not only the ultimate protection but it also allows you to save the gift of sexuality for your lifetime partner,”” Zipperer said. Working concurred with Zipperer on the superior safety of abstinence. “”Abstinence is the only 100 percent form of protection,”” Working said. Another event planned for this week is the play concerning female sexual issues, “”The Vagina Monologues.”” The Student Health Service Center has teamed up with the Women’s Center to bring “”The Vagina Monologues”” to UCSD. “”The Vagina Monologues”” are a series of interviews with women about their vaginas. Money raised by ticket sales will go to end violence against women. The event is extremely popular and is already sold out for the Feb. 17 performance. Student Health advocates stressed the existence of a variety of student resources that are available. Latex and lubricants are available all year long for students. Sexual health information sessions go on every day of the week. There is also help for diet and proper eating, including cholesterol screening and fitness awareness training. HIV tests are offered for a $10 lab fee. There is also a little-known Men’s Center to match the more popular Woman’s Center. Students are encouraged to come to Student Health with any questions concerning their personal health. ...

Color Conference to Come to UCSD

The A.S. Council, in conjunction with the UC Student Association, will host its annual Students of Color Conference Friday in the Price Center. The theme of this year’s conference is “”The Politics of Silence: Establishing a Voice at the Crossroads of the New Millennium.”” According to organizers of the event, the theme encompasses one of its main goals: to encourage more students, particularly those who are typically under-represented, to become active voices in their community. “”It’s going to be a beautiful thing having all these people coming together,”” said A.S. Vice President External Eugene Mahmoud. “”But ultimately you’d want to see even more infusion of students of color in things like student organizations and governments.”” The origins of the conference were at UCSD 12 years ago. In 1990, UCSD hosted the first conference to create a forum in which students could have open discussion with one other about issues concerning higher education within the contexts of race and ethnicity. Mahmoud says the conference gives UCSD students a chance to talk to all sorts of students, including those from all the UC schools, as well as some California State and private universities. Kicking off the conference Friday will be a presentation of the film, “”Malcolm X”” at 2 p.m. in the Price Center Theater. The conference will run until Feb. 18. Activities for Friday will include an evening concert featuring the L.A. Symphony in the Price Center Ballroom. A march and rally with the coalition Justice for Janitors and Bus Riders Union will take place at noon Saturday. A banquet with keynote speaker, Professor George Lipsitz of UCSD’s ethnic studies department and the play “”Vagina Monologues”” will conclude the evening’s activities. Sunday’s events will include various workshops including one on HIV and AIDS in communities of color, as well as a panel titled “”Changing Face of Activism.”” Mahmoud sees the conference as an important opportunity for students to learn from their greatest teachers, their peers. “”It’s a conscience-building conference,”” Mahmoud said. “”Students of all different backgrounds will be able to identity with others on a much more personal level because of their similar backgrounds.”” Organizers of the event expect about 300 students from across California to attend the conference. Some issues that planners anticipate addressing are recent statewide proposals such as SP1 and SP2, which essentially ban the use of affirmative action in the UC system. ...

Sophomores Will Need to Find Off-Campus Housing

For the first time, UCSD is not guaranteeing its second year students on-campus housing. Approximately 35 percent of continuing second year students will be housed on campus for the 2001-2002 school year, an immense drop from this year’s 80 percent. The reason for the change is the University of California’s need to accommodate 1,000 to 1,500 more students over the its eight campuses. UCSD is already behind in numbers from last year, when it only filled 3,200 of 3,500 spots. The university is admitting more freshmen for next year to make up for this and to compensate for the additional freshmen being admitted into the entire system, which has created the housing crunch. “”UCSD is in a planned growth mode as part of the UC system,”” said Muir Resident Dean Pat Danylyshyn-Adams. There are about 5,100 beds available on campus, while the total undergraduate enrollment is around 17,000. Typically, 90 percent of incoming freshman accept on-campus housing, according to Director of Housing and Dining Services Mark Cunningham. The current first-year class was admitted with the knowledge that they would not have guaranteed second-year housing. Cunningham said this was decided upon last year around this time so potential freshmen could be notified that they would not have the guarantee. Some first-year students believe that they were misled to believe that they would have a chance of living on campus similar to that of past years. “”I don’t think they gave us fair warning that we’d have such a small chance that we’d live in the apartments,”” said Muir freshman Zac Hays. Warren Resident Dean Claire Palmer said the number of continuing students who will be able to get on-campus housing next year is still changing. The ultimate goal of the self-supporting Housing and Dining Services is to return to the two-year guarantee as soon as possible. This year’s freshman class and next year’s incoming freshman do not have a two-year guarantee, and the following year may not either. This is partially due to the construction of the new Eleanor Roosevelt College housing on North Campus. When completed, the structures will hold 1,240 additional beds with 440 in residence halls and 800 in apartments. The project was originally intended to be completed for fall 2002, but it will not be done until fall 2003. Cunningham attributed this to the good economy and the demand for construction. The housing crunch is being dealt with in three ways, Cunningham said. The construction of the new Eleanor Roosevelt College is one part, and more potential building is being considered. This may be made possible with a faster construction process. Housing and Dining Services is also looking into off-campus acquisitions. UCSD currently owns La Jolla Del Sol, an apartment complex off Regents Road. Housing and Dining Services bought it in 1987. The complex has 381 units, 126 of which are undergraduates. The rest of the building is occupied by faculty, staff, graduate students and medical students. In addition to the loss of the two-year guarantee, transfer students will not receive housing next year. Also, Cunningham said that the college Residential Life programs decided to abolish the all-campus housing program so that there could be equality among the colleges in numbers of spaces available. According to Danylyshyn-Adams, Tioga and Tenaya halls will all be freshmen next year, whereas this year they house about 40 continuing students. Fifty-two beds in Tuolomne Apartments will also be allotted for freshmen. Sixty-two spaces for Muir students will be available on the Warren campus. These spaces will be clustered so that students can live in an environment with other Muir students. Revelle sophomores will be housed in the Matthews Apartments. There will be spaces for about 250 students there. Argo Hall currently holds many sophomores, but next year there will be no continuing students in the residence halls. There will be spaces for Revelle students in Pepper Canyon and Warren apartments as well. Warren sophomores will be housed in Douglass and Goldberg Halls, as they have been in the past. “”The other colleges don’t have enough apartments,”” Palmer said. “”It’s not a good situation.”” Students are apprehensive about problems arising from not being able to live on campus. “”We either have to share singles with three people or we have to live off-campus, and that would force people to get cars,”” said Roosevelt student Katie Dalton. “”Parking is already bad as it is. Some people can’t afford cars and living off-campus because La Jolla is really expensive.”” Room selection day will occur April 6. It will be followed by an off-campus housing fair in the Price Center. Off-campus housing facilities will come to campus to allow students to investigate options and prices if they do not receive on-campus housing. “”Groups have priority over singles and doubles in room selection,”” Cunningham said. He advised that one thing students can do to increase their chances of receiving on-campus housing is to form groups and apply for housing in those groups. Most on-campus apartments house four people, though some Muir apartments hold five. Waiting lists will also be formed through all the colleges’ Residential Life Offices for students who do not receive housing in the initial raffle and still want it. “”Don’t be discouraged from going through room selection,”” Cunningham said. “”It’s worth it to go through it and see when you end up.”” All the colleges have been holding off-campus housing informative sessions, and they will continue to do so through the remainder of the year. Warren college is planning socials for students to meet and interact with potential off-campus roommates. “”Take a deep breath and step back and reassess the situation,”” Danylyshyn-Adams said. “”It’s workable. Lots of people do it already.”” On-campus students will be receiving brochures in their mailboxes in the next week. These will include information about on-campus room selection. “”My heart goes out to the students that will be going off-campus,”” Palmer said. “”I know some will be ready to go off-campus and others wish they had another year.”” ...

SIO Engineer Receives Nichol Award

Scripps Institution of Oceanography research engineer and senior lecturer Richard Seymour was recently honored with the 2000 John G. Moffatt and Frank E. Nichol Harbor and Coastal Engineering Award. The prestigious honor is awarded annually by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Seymour received the award in recognition of his lifelong contributions and leadership in the field of coastal engineering. His status with the ASCE was also elevated to Fellow in Commendation for his life work in the field. “”It is very rewarding to be recognized by your peers,”” Seymour said. The rich history of past recipients of the prestigious award is not lost on him. “”I’m very proud to get the award,”” Seymour said. “”The gods of coastal engineering have been past recipient s. I’m very proud to be included.”” Robert Guza, a professor at Scripps, acknowledged Seymour as having a “”long and illustrious career,”” as well as “”being a leader in studying the California wave climate.”” Throughout his career, Seymour’s research has covered a wide range of topics from the practical to the theoretical. On the practical side, he has studied coastal sediment transport and shoreline erosion. He is also renowned for his theoretical work with surface gravity waves. His greatest achievement may be the creation of the Scripps Coastal Data Information Program for furthering the study of surface gravity waves. What started in 1976 with a single buoy off Imperial Beach has blossomed into one of the world’s largest scientific data collection networks. Scripps research associate Ron Flick credits the success of the CDIP to Seymour’s innovative thinking and ability to make the theoretical accessible. Flick noted that Seymour “”was the first to make a practical system to measure statistical properties of ocean waves.”” One of the goals of the project was to bring a research tool to the level of common practicality. Seymour helped make this goal a reality. Currently, he is working on an expansion of CDIP to measure the impact of waves on the shoreline. The research is taking place at North Torrey Pines. It will include monitoring sand movement on and off the beach, all of which is valuable for testing computer models. ...

Neuroscience Professor Passes Away

UCSD Professor of Neurosci-ences and founder of Myelos Neurosciences Corporation, John S. O’Brien, passed away in his La Jolla home Thursday, February 1. Internationally known for his discovery of the genetic cause of Tay-Sachs disease and his development of screening tests for the disease, O’Brien was first recruited by the UCSD School of Medicine in 1968 after six years as a faculty member at the University of Southern California. His scientific work and his efforts in support of screening led to the establishment of widespread, coordinated screening, education and counseling programs for high-risk individuals, resulting in a decrease in the number of Tay-Sachs deaths. Chairman of the Department of Neurosciences at the UCSD School of Medicine, Leon Thal, remembers O’Brien fondly. “”John was a world-class scientist, an esteemed colleague, a wondrful mentor to his students and a warm, caring individual who will be deeply missed,”” Thal said. UCSD Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences Edward W. Holmes remarked on O’ Brien’s contributions to the field of science. “”[He] was an early pioneer in the application of knowledge gained in the laboratory to help patients,”” Holmes said. “”He built upon his imporant scientific work to become an advocate for genetic screening and education programs, effectively bridging the gap between basic science and patient care.”” O’Brien is survived by his wife Susan, his mother, Esther, his sister Linda and her husband Peter O’Brien-Rothe, six children, John E. and his wife Janet, Maggie and her husband Jack Mathers, Kathleen and her husband Chris Alex, Bridgt and her husband Douglas Youngdale, Michael and his wife Terri, Patrick and his wife Lisa and 20 grandchildren. At this time, only private family services are planned. The family requests that all donations be sent in lieu of flowers to support the UCSD Graduate Program in Neurosciences. In addition, checks should be made out to the UCSD Foundation and sent to the following name and address: Leon J. Thal, MD, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA. 92093-0624. ...

Briefly

Thurgood Marshall college recently initiated the Public Service minor at UCSD, which will focus on public service to the nonprofit sector and will be available to all UCSD students beginning next fall quarter. The minor will require students to take a series of seven courses which will educate them in the histories of four areas of education, government, social research and health. Internships with local nonprofit organizations with also be available to students choosing to pursue the new minor. This is the first minor of its type and it is expected to teach people what an important role nonprofit organizations play in society. Selected Study Abroad Deadlines Extended The deadlines for some Study Abroad destinations in Europe, the Middle East, Asia and the Americas have recently been extended. It is not too late for students wishing to travel to Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Russia, Sweden, the U.K., Vietnam, Egypt, Israel, Turkey, Barbados, Canada, Chile or Mexico to apply. In order to make the new deadlines, it is recommended that students pick up applications now in the Programs Abroad office or Library, make an advising appointment and go to an Education Abroad Program application workshop. The Programs Abroad office is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and can be reached for more information at (858) 534-1123. Rape Aggression Defense System to be Taught at UCSD Thurgood Marshall college and the Women’s Center will sponsor R.A.D., a 12-hour self-defense training system. The Rape Aggression Defense System teaches women how to realistically defend themselves in the face of a sexual assault. The course will begin Feb. 21 and end March 2. The course is for women only and will take the students through various stages including awareness, prevention, risk education and avoidance. With its proven effectiveness and simplicity, the R.A.D. system is quickly becoming an accepted and trusted method of self defense and is currently being taught at numerous colleges and universities. The class size will be limited to 14, so early registration is strongly recommended. The cost is $10 for registered Marshall students and $12 for students of other colleges, staff and faculty. For more information, call Emelyn dela Pena at (858) 822-1475. CHAD Rally to Benefit Community Service Agencies A UCSD United Way/Combined Health Agency Drive rally will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Sun God. Various activities will be set up to raise money to help CHAD assist local community service agencies make the community a better place to live. Money raised from the activities, which include a book fair, will go to programs that enhance senior wellness, develop diverse communities, empower disabled persons, improve health and wellness, protect the environment, strengthen families, and invest in children and youth. The rally will kick off UCSD’s own CHAD campaign and the UCSD United Way Campaign Steering Committee members will be on hand to provide literature and information about UCSD’s campaign. ...

UC to Pay $22.5 Million in Billing Fraud Settlement

The University of California agreed this week to pay $22.5 million in response to an audit by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General. The settlement effectively closed suits of two alleged False Claims Act violations brought against the university in 1996 and 1999 in Federal District Courts in San Francisco and Sacramento. The suits alleged fraudulent billing procedures, claiming that the five UC medical school hospitals used incorrect coding procedures. Government-funded programs such as Medicare and Medi-Cal were allegedly billed incorrectly for procedures done by residents instead of teaching physicians. John Lundberg, general deputy counsel for the UC Board of Regents, said there was no fraud. “”There were certainly no damages, fines or penalties,”” Lundberg said. The False Claims Act enables plaintiffs in a lawsuit to receive at least 15 percent of the recovered amount if the case is settled. In this situation, there was no payment from the university to the individuals who filed the suit. In fact, Lundberg said that the 1996 San Francisco case will be dismissed entirely, being “”devoid of facts.”” The 1999 Sacramento case against UC Davis’ medical facility will also be dismissed, except for one claim charging the institution with falsely charging California’s government-funded health care provider, Medi-Cal. It is unknown whether the plaintiffs are receiving any of the compensation the government derived from the settlement. The Office of General Counsel stated that the University of California “”came out rather well”” in this settlement, due to its “”high degree of compliance to begin with.”” In an audit including 500 patient charts, 7,000 entries, technical vocabulary and specialized billing codes, the charges centered around “”up-coding,”” or billing in such a way that inappropriately assesses the complexity of the services rendered, resulting in the care provider being overcharged for the procedures. Lundberg said the institutions were down-coding as much as they were up-coding, that the occurrence of both were both minimal, and that the hospital practices were close to accurate. The Physicians at Teaching Hospitals initiative was started by the Office of the Inspector General to evaluate the billing practices of over 40 hospitals across the nation. In 1995, as a result of the same audit, the University of Pennsylvania paid $30 million to the federal government for the violations of one hospital. Public universities have also been hit. The University of Texas San Antonio paid a $17 million settlement, again for only one hospital. The UCSD School of Medicine spent $3.5 million during the course of the investigation, according to sources within the medical school. The UC system spent approximately $15 million in professional fees during the course of the audit. The motivation for this settlement was economic, as running out the litigation would have cost millions more than the $22.5 million paid as a result of the settlement. According to Lundberg, the real savings was time. Attempting to settle the matter in court would have been “”a long, protracted litigation,”” he said. Following the audit, the UC schools have implemented compliance plans that call for specialized officers on each campus, a committee to deal with potential violations, and education programs designed to increase awareness of proper accounting procedures. This increase in oversight aims to bring the hospitals into further compliance with federal regulations. Lundberg cited the clearer regulations put in place in 1996 as enabling the university to implement effective plans for financial accountability. ...

Trolley Stop Debate Starts

The Metropolitan Transit Development Board and the A.S. Council have narrowed down the 12 original on-campus trolley station location proposals to four, in preparation for the Feb. 22 deadline when only two proposals will remain. “”The way parking is going to be, we need a way to get [drivers] out of their cars,”” said A.S. President Doc Kaleghi. “”We need something that will serve the entire campus community.”” Currently, the four proposed sites for the extension of the San Diego Trolley are underneath Price Center, in Pepper Canyon and there are two proposals for a station in East Campus. Though each site has its own advantages, Khaleghi has expressed major interest in the building of the Price Center station. “”I hope the city and the administration get together to recognize that we all need an alternative form of transportation that is as close to the center of campus as possible,”” he said. Most students believe that this location is the best of the proposed sites, as it would not require a shuttle to get to the center of campus unlike the other sites. “”It would be so nice just being able to hop on a trolley and having it actually taking me to where I want to go,”” said Revelle junior Scott Simmonds. “”Waiting in line for shuttles and buses would defeat the whole purpose for me because I could easily park my car in East Parking and take the shuttle there.”” Moreover, many say that this site would save them money by not forcing them to buy a parking permit. “”I think some people would take it depending on how efficient it was,”” said Muir freshman Allison Long. “”It would be convenient and cheap.”” Currently, the San Diego Trolley costs between $1 and $2.25 per ride, although monthly passes are available. The proposed Price Center site would be located underground, with an entrance in close vicinity of the food court. By contrast, the other sites would involve students taking a shuttle that would take more time. This extra time may be a strong enough deterrent that students may not use the trolley and may instead encourage them to continue driving. “”Having to take a shuttle from the parking lot to the center of campus would actually take more time than it would just driving into East Parking and waiting,”” Simmonds said. “”I would be willing to wait for the trolley if it took me where I needed to go, but not for [Pepper Canyon or East Campus].”” Mark Thompson, Senior Transportation Planner for MTDB, said there is still some time before the final location will be decided, and that no such date can be estimated at this time. However, Khaleghi said the elimination process will continue this week, as he is meeting with Campus Community Planning Commission today to discuss the four suggested sites. Once the list has been refined to three, UCSD Chancellor Robert C. Dynes, in collaboration with MTDB, will narrow down the locations by Feb. 22 to two possible sites, taking into consideration cost, location and convenience to students, among other factors. The Trolley Board will make the ultimate decision once the university and the administration have approved it. Even though the location of the trolley station will be decided within the next six months, the UCSD site would not open until October of 2008, according to Thompson. Students are unhappy over this late date, because putting a trolley on campus was originally proposed 20 years ago, although nothing happened until recently. “”This is typical government bureaucracy,”” said Muir sophomore Steve Reis. “”It takes years for anything to get done.”” The structure will not be completed until this late date, as the Federal Transit Administration and Congress will only fund one large trolley project within a certain radius at a time. A trolley station is currently being built for San Diego State University near Mission Valley, which will be completed in 2004. Once this $117 million project is done, construction will begin with the Balboa extension that will include a stop at UCSD on the Orange and Blue line. The Blue line is a 25.2 mile line that makes 23 stops between Mission Valley and the International Border, while the 21.6 mile Orange line makes 15 stops between Bayside in Centre City and Santee Town Center Station. ...

UCSD Freshman Dies in Fall at Blacks Beach

Revelle freshman Gilbert F.D. Nunez Jr. fell to his death from atop the cliffs above Blacks Beach Saturday at about 5 p.m. He was 18. Nunez and some of his friends had gone to the cliffs to study just after 4 p.m. The victim strayed away from the group to climb on a rock situated on the edge of the cliff when he lost his balance and fell. Lifeguards estimate that Nunez descended nearly 200 feet before landing on the beach below. “”He was an avid climber — he was practically a monkey,”” recalls Revelle freshman Becky Bowen, a friend of Nunez’s. “”He was climbing and slipped and fell to his death.”” Several people walking along the shore saw the victim plummet down the cliff. Shortly thereafter, paramedics from La Jolla’s engine company No. 9 arrived on scene along with San Diego lifeguards. CPR was performed, but there was little anyone could do to save the fallen student. Those that knew Nunez describe him as the type of person that everyone loved. “”He was a friend to all of us,””said Jennifer Pae, a friend of Nunez’s. “”He loved to make people laugh, he was so much fun to be around. He was the only person who knew everyone in the building. He was such a friendly, loving person, and that’s what makes it so difficult, because he was so close to everyone.”” When students heard of the accident, they immediately came together and took action. Some went to the cliff where the accident happened to lay flowers in memory of their friend. Others plan to hold a candlelight vigil this week. By Sunday afternoon, less than 24 hours after the accident took place, family members had arrived at Revelle College’s Atlantis Hall to retrieve Nunez’s belongings. Students could hardly maintain their composure as they assisted Nunez’s father in moving his belongings out of his room. Some openly wept as they packed boxes filled with personal items into a rented U-Haul trailer. Others wrapped their arms around those that were overtaken by the reality that their friend was gone. Perhaps the most emotional moment took place when several students presented the victim’s father with a picture frame containing a poem written especially for his son. The poem was surrounded by a dozen photographs of Nunez with his suitemates and friends taken at UCSD. Several friends worked through the night to finish the project in time to present it to the Nunez family. More than 20 students and several family members then held hands and formed a circle in the parking lot to remember their friend one last time. Each bowed their heads in respect, and some offered a few words in memory of their good friend. As the family prepared to depart, one student brought a bouquet of flowers to the victim’s father. At that moment, many students broke down crying. As one person ran to get tissues, the last of Nunez’s belongings were packed up. Family members thanked the students one last time for their support before they left UCSD for the long journey home. “”You got to kind of remember what he did, and not just what happened recently,”” said Graham Lubinsky, a Revelle freshman and suitemate of Nunez’s. “”He led a full life. He had an impact on everyone he dealt with, and that’s what you have to remember. You can’t be upset forever about one incident — you just got to keep him in your heart.”” ...

Lights & Sirens

Monday, Feb. 5 12:29 a.m.: Officers arrested an 18-year-old male student at Stewart Hall for possession of less than an ounce of marijuana. Cited and released. 10:00 a.m.: A student reported vandalism to a sign in Lot 106. 3:48 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a laptop computer from the Ratner Eye Center. Loss: $2,500. 3:55 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of cash from a wallet at Nierenberg Annex. Loss: $80. Thursday, Feb. 8 2:25 a.m.: Officers arrested a 48-year-old male nonaffiliate for an outstanding misdemeanor warrant for drinking alcohol in public. Cited and released. Bail: $92. 6:13 p.m.: A student reported the attempted theft of a silver ’87 Ford Taurus from Lot 510. No monetary loss. 8:22 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a blue ’87 Honda Accord in Lot 510. Loss: $735. Friday, Feb. 9 11:00 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a dark gray ’90 Chrysler New Yorker from Lot 702. Loss: $2,000. 12:20 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of U.S. currency from McGill Hall. Loss: $710. 11:56 p.m.: California Highway patrol recovered the dark gray ’90 Chrysler New Yorker stolen in Lot 702. Vehicle stored at Star Towing. Saturday, Feb. 10 12:36 a.m.: Officers detained an 18-year-old male nonaffiliate for being drunk in public in lot 406. Transported to Detox. Officers detained two 17-year-old male nonaffiliates for curfew violation and possession of coca-ine at same location. Released to parents. 2:39 a.m.: Officers impounded a black ’01 Toyota Tacoma from Lot 406 for driver being taken to Detox. Stored at Star Towing. 3:13 p.m.: A student reported vandalism to a vehicle in Lot 502. Loss: $300. 3:23 p.m.: A 19-year-old female nonaffiliate fainted in the Price Center Ballroom. Transported to Kaiser by paramedics. 8:08 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a cellular phone from CLICS. Loss: $100. 10:20 p.m.: Officers arrested a 21-year-old male student at Tenaya Hall for furnishing alcohol to a minor. Cited and released. ...