News

Communication Professor Passes Away

UCSD communication professor Helene Keyssar died Monday morning after a lengthy struggle with cancer. She was 57. Keyssar is fondly remembered by the communication department for her dedicated teaching style, leadership and innovative ideas. In 1981 she arrived at UCSD and immediately made her mark by bringing her immense knowledge of theater and the humanities into the communication department. Communication professor Chandra Mukerji remembers Keyssar’s dedication and love of students. “”She had such joy being in the classroom,”” Mukerji said. The bond Keyssar had with students did not stop with the classroom. Often, she would hold film screenings at her home. Mukersi added that by taking students seriously, Keyssar taught them to understand and learn about themselves. Always popular with students, she was eventually forced her out of the classroom by cancer, but it could not keep her away for long. Soon after she was in remission she was back at school, even though she did not have to be. “”Incredibly hard working and tenacious”” is how Mike Cole, a long-time communication professor, spoke of Keyssar’s love of teaching and how she never gave up. “”Helene had a lot to do with creating this interdisciplinary culture,”” said Dan Hallin, a communication professor. “”She was a broad intellect; her background was in drama but she knew a tremendous amount about journalism, television, language and other things. All of us in the department learned a tremendous amount from her.”” Communication chair Carol Padden spoke of Keyssar’s ability to bring the humanities into the a traditional social science department. According to Padden, she galvanized her students with her juxtaposition of pop culture and the classics. Keyssar also became a leader not only in the communication department but of women professors all over campus. Mukerji remembers that when Keyssar arrived from Amherst College in 1981, women professors were few and were overshadowed by their male counterparts. Keyssar helped to break that barrier with her free spirit and drive. Throughout the ’80s, Keyssar was adamant about improving US-Soviet relations. Her desire to lessen tension between the adversaries led to the innovative Space Bridge Project. The project consisted of a real-time video conference between the two countries, with the United States’ link at the UCSD Media Center. The video cast was the first of its kind, using satellites to connect the two countries. American children were able to talk to Russian children. World War II veterans from both countries were able to reminiscence about old times. The video conference created a dialogue between the two sides at the height of the Cold War. Cole worked with Keyssar on numerous projects during her time at UCSD and commented on the joy she got out of seeing the two sides sit down and talk without any tension. Social activism found its way into much of Keyssar’s work. Mukerji commented on how Keyssar always felt that the personal is political. While teaching in the South, she worked on the civil rights movement. She even helped organize part of the funeral parade for Martin Luther King, Jr. Keyssari’s belief and drive for social justice lead to her thesis and first book, “”The Curtain and the Veil: Strategies of Black Drama.”” Additionally, her role in the feminist movement led to feminist theater. Throughout her career she received many grants and awards, including fellowships from the MacArthur Foundation on International Peace and Security and the Rockefeller Foundation. Keyssar, a prolific writer of books and for film, theater and television, is survived by her husband, Tracy Strong, a UCSD political science professor, and her children, David Franke and Anise Strong, her sister Judith Redwing and her brother Alex Keyssar. A memorial service will be held Feb. 17 at 3:30 p.m. at the UCSD International House. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the UCSD Foundation — Attn: Helene Keyssar Fund, and sent to Paul Drake, Dean of Social Sciences, SSB 502, UCSD, La Jolla, CA 92093. ...

UJS Sponsors Speakers to Educate Students

In response to last week’s Anti-Zionism Week, the Union of Jewish Students is sponsoring this week “”A Positive and Pragmatic Approach to Peace in the Middle East,”” featuring speakers and a booth on Library Walk Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. UJS President Wade Strauss said the purpose of the week was to educate students more fully on what is going on in the region. “”The purpose is to add something to the current issues facing Israel, to present some tangible proof and evidence of what is going on there,”” he said. Muslim Student Association President Eahab Ibrahim said that while he believes the UJS should have its voice heard, he objects to the fact that Wednesday night’s speakers referred to Anti-Zionism Week as Anti-Semitic. “”Definitely they should make their views heard,”” he said. “”I have no problem with that. But the tagging of our group as Anti-Semitic was a direct blow to us that’s not substantiated by any actions that we’ve done.”” Dr. Richard Katz, a member of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee’s national board of directors, and Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean of the Wiesenthal Center, spoke Wednesday night at the Institute of the Americas Auditorium. Katz spoke about the current situation in Israel, giving a recent history of the peace process in the Middle East. He said he wanted to bring a sense of hopeful optimism to the situation. “”There is no panic in Israel,”” he said. “”There is no sense of fear. The streets are safe. It’s much worse from a distance than when you’re there.”” He added that Israel is choosing a peaceful political route in the Middle East. “”Israel, if it wanted to, could prevail over the PLO,”” he said. “”But they won’t because it’s not the Jewish way, it’s not the Israeli way, it’s not the way that country chooses to operate.”” Cooper then spoke on the use of Holocaust denial and anti-Semitic rhetoric by the Palestinian authority in its schools and media. “”One of the biggest problems has been the failure of Israel to take a look and keep tabs on what Palestinian children are being taught,”” he said. Cooper ended his speech with a video presentation featuring several Anti-Semitic Web sites that have been indexed by the Wiesenthal Center. He said one reason for showing the sites to the crowd was to inspire them with the “”creativity and commitment of the other side.”” Thursday’s speaker will be Deanna Armbruster, executive director of American Friends of Neve Shalom/Wahat al-Salam. Armbruster will speak and answer questions about Neve Shalom/Wahat al-Salam, a village in Israel established jointly by Jews and Palestinian Arabs of Israeli citizenship and engaged in educational work for peace, equality and understanding between the two peoples. Thursday’s program will take place from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Center Hall, room 101. Friday’s speaker, Sanford Lakoff, the founding chair of UCSD’s department of political science, will speak after Shabbat services and dinner about the history of Zionism and Israel, as well as the broader political situation in the Middle East. Friday’s program will take place from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the International Center. Strauss said this week’s programs have focused and will focus on a “”future paved with peace, tolerance, mutual understanding and respect.”” ...

Change in Code Pushes Lawyers Out of Hearings

Revisions to the Student Code of Conduct, eliminating a student’s right to attorney representation during hearings of misconduct, took effect fall quarter. The right to have attorney representation at hearings has been a student right at UCSD since 1978, when the first draft of the Student Code of Conduct was created. Nick Aguilar, the director of student policies and judicial affairs, said that students have not lost a right because they never had a constitutional right to representation by attorneys. “”There is no constitutional right to be represented by an attorney in administrative hearings,”” Aguilar said. “”The right to attorney relates to the constitutional right of a criminal defendant to be represented by an attorney while administrative hearings are based on civil law, not criminal law.”” Aguilar said the goal of eliminating attorneys from the hearing process is to prevent hearings from being thrust into more formal civil law proceedings. “”My experience when attorneys represent students [is that] hearings tend to become formalistic and cumbersome with no noticeable advantage to students,”” Aguilar stated. Tony Valladolid, the director of student legal services, said he does not believe the change will compromise a student’s rights. “”The students will be able to have a student advocate to be present at the hearing,”” Valladolid said. “”And if a student elects to have an attorney present during the hearing for advice, he or she can.”” Valladolid said that attorneys are generally unfamiliar with the process and administration of the Student Conduct Code. “”It’s the tendencies of attorneys to come in and apply the very rigid rule of law from their experience with criminal justice system,”” Valladolid said. “”Consequently, attorneys tend to be ineffective in the administrative setting.”” Valladolid said that the way the Student Conduct Code was revised was fair. “”There was a fair airing of the issue between students and faculty before it was voted upon,”” Valladolid said. The revisions were handled by the Student Regulations Revision Committee, which is composed of administrators, staff, deans, graduate students, one student from every college and two representatives appointed by A.S. Council. According to the revised Student Conduct Code 22.17.16.13, students no longer have the right to have attorney representation at hearings of misconduct. At hearings students may be accompanied by a non-attorney advisor. The accused student may also have an attorney present at the hearing to serve as a resource. Warren Junior Erik Smith, one of the members of the Student Regulations Revision Committee, said elimination of attorney representation at a student hearing is related to the intent of the hearing. “”The hearing board is made entirely of students and is for a student; it is not meant to be as formal as an actual court hearing,”” Smith said. “”Thus, bringing in a lawyer for student representation complicates the matter in that it would raise the hearing to a more formal level than was intended.”” Smith said that he does not believe students will be harmed by the change because there is the option of having a student advocate represent them at the hearing. “”The student advocates do an excellent job of defending students, and because their service is available, I feel that students do not lose from not being able to have an actual attorney represent them,”” Smith said. “”It could even be argued that the student advocates could do a better job than an attorney since they can relate with their fellow students and immediately understand the circumstances surrounding a student’s case.”” Smith said UCSD’s system of informal hearings gives an advantage to the students. “”The chance to have a group of peers judge your case should make a student feel safe from being wrongfully accused of something,”” Smith said. Johan Hill, a member of the A.S. revisions committee, said he would have protested the change if he had still been on the committee, but lost his position before the revision was proposed. “”I never would have voted for it, because it isn’t in the best interests of students,”” Hill said. “”If I was there, I would have spoken against it.”” Hill raised the concern of low student attendance to the meetings as possibly affecting the unanimous passage of the revisions. “”You’d have great faculty and administrators attendance and then have two or three of the students show up for the meetings,”” Hill said. “”So not enough students were there to protect rights of students.”” Hill also questioned why he was the only student appointed by the A.S. Council to the committee when there were two vacancies. Hill said he is very concerned that his position was not filled after he left the committee. “”I am concerned because with two less students, combined with low student attendance, there were more administrators there, thus more votes,”” Hill said. ...

Lights & Sirens

Sunday, Jan. 28 7:35 a.m.: A student reported vandalism in Lot 502. Loss: $1,000. 8:16 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of bagels from the Preuss School. Loss: $60. 1:30 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a black and white ’94 E-Z Go golf cart from the Sierra Summit loading dock. Loss: $3,100. 2:20 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a red 1321 Specialized mountain bike from the the south side of Tioga Hall. Loss: $600. 1:57 p.m.: A nonaffiliate reported the theft of eight hydraulic jacks from the construction site at North Scholars Drive and Marshall Lane. Loss: $5,100. Tuesday, Jan. 30 2:00 a.m.: A student reported the theft of fog lights from a ’00 Honda coupe. Loss: $200. Wednesday, Jan. 31 9:29 a.m.: A 22-year-old male nonaffiliate complained of head pain at Round Table Pizza. Transported to Kaiser Hospital by paramedics. 10:03 a.m.: Officers arrested a 36-year-old male nonaffiliate for an outstanding misdemeanor warrant for dog ownership and issued him an order to stay off campus for seven days after creating a disturbance at the Guardian office. Total bail: $520. Booked into Central Jail. 12:00 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from the Geisel Library. Loss: $30. 7:01 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a white ’91 Plymouth Acclaim from Lot 704. Loss: $3,000. 8:36 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a black ’96 Acura Integra in the Gilman Parking Structure. Loss: $200. Friday, Feb. 2 12:30 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a cash box from the Humanities and Social Sciences Building. Loss: $85. 3:45 p.m.: A 37-year-old female nonaffiliate suffered a twisted ankle after falling while stepping down from a curb across from UC 302. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital. 10:41 p.m.: A 20-year-old female student suffered from alcohol poisoning at Douglas Hall. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Saturday, Feb. 3 12:27 a.m.: Officers arrested a 19-year-old male nonaffiliate for minor in possession at Pepper Canyon. Cited and released. 2:28 a.m.: An 18-year-old student suffered a panic attack at Marshall F Building. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. 2:27 p.m.: A 23-year-old male nonaffiliate suffered a neck injury while playing rugby at Warren West Field. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. ...

Briefly

Floyd Gaffney, an emeritus drama professor at UCSD, will direct “”Before it Hits Home,”” a play about AIDS written by Cheryl West. The play will be presented March 1 through March 18 at the Urban Village Theater in City Heights. The play tells the story of a black bisexual jazz musician who fails to tell those around him that he is HIV positive. Community Partners will present the play in an effort to fight the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the black and Hispanic communities in San Diego. Tickets for the play are on sale for $10 each. For more information call the Center for Social Support & Education at (619) 574-8015. UCSD Extension Innovates With CDMA Course Approach UCSD has found a convenient way to offer education about Code Division Multiple Access technology to extension students in San Diego and across the nation. The program is designed to suit the needs of engineering students who travel and cannot make it to weekly classes. The program is being dubbed “”bookend delivery”” because some instruction is provided in class and the rest can be done via the Internet. The program has three phases. The first phase begins Mar. 26 when UCSD Extension in San Diego will present five days of seminars. Phase II will begin in April with the commencement of the online instruction. After completing these phases, students can earn the UCSD Extension Specialized Certificate in CDMA Engineering. For more information and costs, or to apply for the program, call Suzie Baranowski at (858) 451-7696. Indian Earthquake Relief Drive to be Held on Campus UCSD student associations are currently accepting donations to aid survivors of the earthquake in western India, which killed over 300,000 people. The associations are teaming up with the American Red Cross to collect medicines, blankets, warm clothing, hygiene products, socks, shoes, canned and dry foods and anything else people are willing to donate. Financial contributions must be made in the form of a check and may be mailed to the American Red Cross at 3650 Fifth Ave., San Diego, CA 92103, or sent via campus mail to the Association for India’s Development at mailbox #G-6, S.O.L.O. Office. Donation drop-off points are located around campus at Library Walk, EDNA, the Marshall Residence Life Office, the Muir College Center, the Warren Residence Life Office, Eleanor Roosevelt College, the International House Student Activities Center, the Cross Cultural Center and the Women’s Center. UCSD Offers Public Seminars on Ethics of Genetics The UCSD School of Medicine will sponsor a number of free lectures starting Feb. 2 regarding the ethical issues raised by the genetic revolution. The seminar series is titled “”Ethical and Policy Challenges in the Genetic Revolution,”” and each 90-minute talk will be held in the Center for Molecular Genetics Conference Room of the School of Medicine. Topics covered will include “”Germ Line Modification — In Humans?,”” “”Ethical and Policy Problems of Gene Therapy,”” “”Policy Implications of New Genetic Technologies,”” “”Mammalian Cloning — Human Applications?”” and “”DNA Sequence Information and Patenting.”” The series is sponsored by the UCSD Whitehall Chair of Medical Ethics, the San Diego Science and Technology Council and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. For more information call (858) 534-4268. ...

Academic Senate Updates Requirements, Grad Programs

Members of the Representative Assembly met Tuesday at the Academic Senate meeting and were updated on the status of the Next Generation Network Plan. The assembly voted in favor of establishing three new programs of graduate study and revising the academic requirements for Roosevelt and Revelle colleges. The Next Generation Network, which is the new telecommunication plan for UCSD, will be implemented on July 1, 2001. The new plan will merge voice, data and Internet to make intracampus connections faster. Real-time video, audio, high-volume transfers and other high-end capabilities will become easy-to-obtain services. The Next Generation Network will result in an overall net reduction in the telecommunication bill for the university. As a result of the plan, long-distance phone charges are expected to drop approximately 40 percent, according to Associate Vice Chancellor David Miller, who spoke about the new plan. There will be a $60 monthly communication user fee for some campus employees. The total cost for the Next Generation Network is approximately $10 million per year, which includes equipment, staffing, supplies and connectivity charges to the external service providers. The communication user charges are estimated to provide $6.5 million; the deficit will be subsidized by campus-wide state funds. Campus committees will provide oversight and monitoring to assure quality of service and cost control, and during the third year of assessment of the new technologies, they will establish the next year’s Next Generation Network networking plans. The assembly also voted in favor of a proposal to establish a program of graduate studies in bioinformatics for the Ph.D. degree. The new Ph.D. program will provide research and an education structure dedicated to the development of sophisticated computer-based handling tools used for understanding the integrated functions of thousands of genes in the post-genome sequencing era. In addition, the assembly voted in favor of the proposal to establish a program of graduate study leading to masters of education degree. The program was submitted by the Teacher Education Program at UCSD and will further articulate the existing credential programs at the university. The M.Ed. will be an intensive 15-month professional degree designed specifically to help elementary and secondary teachers earning their initial teaching credential at UCSD. The program will allow students to earn their teaching credential and M.Ed. degree before entering the teaching profession. The new program was developed in response to the demand for well-prepared teachers in California. The program for graduate studies in art history, theory and criticism for the Ph.D. and M.A. degrees, which will be established by the department of visual arts, was the third proposal the assembly voted in favor of. Modifications to the Roosevelt college general education requirements for entering freshmen were voted on. The assembly voted in favor of amending Regulation 625. The changes were proposed to enhance curricular flexibility for students by increasing the applicability of some advanced placement credits toward college requirements, providing scheduling room for electives and shortening time to degree for students with highly structured majors. The modifications also seek to improve the distribution of undergraduate student enrollment across the colleges by increasing the alignment of ERC’s requirements with those of other colleges. The proposed changes include changes to the foreign language, fine arts and natural sciences requirements. For specific course information, see ERC academic advising. ...

Events

Thursday, Feb. 1 Performing Arts: Paul Hom and R. Carlos Nakai Carlos Nakai, one of the world’s best Native American flautists, and Grammy winner Paul Hom will perform at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Auditorium. The University Events Office will sponsor the event. General admission is $20 and student admission is $15. For more information call (858) 534-4119. Showcase: The UCSD Speech and Debate Team The UCSD speech and debate team will hold its annual Speech and Debate Night at 5 p.m. in Center Hall 216. For more information call (858) 457-4297. Film: ‘Remember the Titans’ The film is sponsored by the University Centers and will be shown at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. in the Price Center Theater. Admission is $2. Friday, Feb. 2 Pep Rally: Triton Tide Spirit Night Rally The cheer squad and the pep band will perform at 12:30 p.m. in the Price Center Plaza. The five colleges will participate in games such as body painting. The Triton Tide will sponsor the event, which is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 546-7827 Saturday, Feb. 3 Film: Teeny-Tiny Pit Orchestra for Silent Films A novelty orchestra will perform live music at the Seuss Room of Geisel Library at 11 a.m. The Music Library will sponsor the event, which is open to the public. Admission is free. For more information call (858) 534-8074. Sunday, Feb. 4 Community Service: Street Clean-up The Ocean Awareness Club will hold its third annual street cleanup in Pacific Beach. Those participating will meet at 11 a.m. at Charlie’s Best Breads near Brueger’s Bagels on Garnet Avenue, or at 10:30 a.m. at the Muir tennis courts. For more information call (858) 695-0969. Wednesday, Feb. 7 Author Appearance: Susan Miller Author and creator of the popular Web site http://astrologyzone.go.com will appear at the UCSD Bookstore at 3 p.m. to discuss astrology. She will give a lecture on “”Planets and Possibilities: Explore the Worlds Beyond Your Sun Sign,”” in which she will explain how people can envision new possibilities for themselves through astrology. The UCSD Bookstore will sponsor the event, which is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-7306. ...

Briefly

UCSD biologists recently discovered a process to alter leaves genetically so they take the form of petals. The biologists published their findings in the February issue of Current Biology. The findings describe how the scientists found a new floral gene which, when combined with three other genes, creates the capability to turn leaves into petals. UCSD biology professor Martin F. Yanofsky conducted the experiment along with Soraya Pelaz, Rosalinda Tapia-Lopez and Elena R. Alvarez-Buylla. Yanofsky described the other genes in the May issue of “”Nature”” and explained how the mutation of these genes can create a “”double flower”” where the petals, stamens and carpels of a flower all become sepals. The discovery will allow scientists to create entirely new plant species. Nominations Teaching Awards Being Sought The Academic Senate Committee on Distinguished Teaching, which is comprised of faculty and student representatives, is soliciting nominations for this year’s annual Distinguished Teaching Awards. The awards will be given to a select number of faculty and graduate students who have made extraordinary contributions to UCSD as distinguished teachers. The committee will consider nominations from students and department faculty and will recommend a slate of candidates to be voted on by the Representative Assembly. Award recipients will be honored at an awards presentation and reception in June. Nominations must include the nominee’s name, the course or courses for which they are being nominated and a detailed letter explaining the quality and nature of the nominee’s teaching effectiveness. The deadline for submission is March 2. Additional details concerning award criteria and the nomination process can be obtained from the chair or director of the nominee’s department or program. Student Regent to Speak About Application Process UC student Regent Tracy Davis is scheduled to visit UCSD on Feb. 16 to have lunch with students and discuss the student regent application process that is currently underway. Davis is a graduate student at UCLA and was appointed by the Regents in September 2000. Davis will begin her term on July 1, 2001. Applications can be obtained on each campus from the student regent campus coordinator. The deadline for application submission is 5 p.m., Friday, Feb. 23. For more information visit www.ucop.edu/regents. UCSD Researchers Imitate Lupus Gene in Mice Researchers at the UCSD School of Medicine have discovered a gene in mice that simulates the systemic lupus erythamatous (SLE) disease. Lupus is a fatal disease in humans that attacks numerous organs and turns people’s immune systems against them. The UCSD scientists published their findings in the Jan. 30 issue of “”Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.”” In the issue, they explain that a mutation in an enzyme called alphamannosidase causes the development of a systemic autoimmune disease that is similar to lupus. Approximately 1 million people in the United States suffer from lupus, according to the Lupus Foundation of America. The discovery may lead to new treatments of the disease. The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Howard Hughes Institute, along with contributions from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council and Welcome Trust. Cancer Center Researchers Make Cells Self-Destruct UCSD Cancer Center researchers have discovered a new way to make leukemia cells self-destruct. The process began by using a two-drug combination and coaxing a deadly cancer-causing molecule called Bcr-Abl from its command center in the cell cytoplasm. Next, the team trapped it deep into the cell nucleus where it eventually self-destructed. Two drugs that the team found to be useful in this process were STI571 and Leptomycin B. ...

UCSD Receives Record Number of Fall 2001 Applicants

UCSD received more minority applications for fall 2001 in its second record-setting year, while the overall minority percentages in the whole pool remain relatively unchanged. Freshman applications rose 7.6 percent to 38,082 applications. The university also received 6,936 transfer applications, up 12.3 percent from last year, making the total number of undergraduate applications a record 45,018. Among the freshman applicants, sizable increases in number were recorded for all ethnicities. Applications of black students rose 10.9 percent to a total of 1,192 of the 38,082 freshman applications received. Black students submitted 3.1 percent of the fall 2001 freshman applications, up slightly from last year’s 3 percent. Freshman Mexican-American applications totaled 3,537, or 9.3 percent of all applications. The percentage of applications submitted by Mexican-Americans rose to 9.3 percent of the whole from 8.4 percent in the fall 2000 applicant pool. In addition, Latino applications rose 9.6 percent to reach a total of 1,155. Latinos submitted 3 percent of the applications received for fall 2001, the same as the previous year. Applications from Native-Americans increased to 210 from last year’s 186, a rise of 12.9 percent. This is 0.6 percent of the applications received, up slightly from fall 2000’s 0.5 percent. Asian-American applications rose 7.3 percent to constitute 29.2 percent of the total for the fall 2001 quarter, and Filipino-American applicants submitted 16.4 percent more applications than they did last year to make up 4.8 percent of the applicants. The Filipino-American total for 2001 was up from the previous year’s 4.4 percent. Caucasian applications constituted 14,095 of the 38,082, a rise of 4.1 percent over last year, to make up 37.0 percent of the applications, down from fall 2000’s 39.7 percent. Transfer applications have been on the rise since 1999. They rose 15.4 percent in 2000. “”For two years we have had a remarkable and welcome increase in our transfer and freshman applications, as well as from African-Americans, Mexican-Americans and Native-Americans,”” said Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Joseph Watson. “”It is reassuring to see that such well-qualified students are responding to our intensive recruitment efforts, such as our partnerships with high schools and community colleges.”” The gender breakdown of the applicant pool for fall 2001 was 54.7 percent female, 44.7 percent male and 0.5 percent undeclared for freshman applications. The female-to-male ratio among applicants has increased since fall 2000, when females constituted 53.9 percent of the applicant pool and males 47.7 percent. Among transfer applicants, men’s applications rose 15.5 percent, while women’s rose only 9.6. The largest section of applicants declaring a major (20.9 percent) applied to the social sciences majors. Science and math applicants were 17.2 percent of the total, and applications to the engineering majors constituted 18.1 percent. The engineering majors saw many more applicants than for fall 2000, with a whopping 14.7 percent increase. A total of 10,578 freshman applicants applied as undeclared majors, 29.9 percent of the applicant pool. The arts and humanities majors pulled 3.6 percent of the pool apiece. The academic attributes of applicants remained similar to that of the fall 2000 pool. The average high school grade point average of a freshman applicant for next year is 3.72, down slightly from fall 2000’s average of 3.73. The mean GPA of transfer students remained stable at 3.26, the same as last year. The average SAT composite score rose to 1213 from 1211. The two-point rise was in the verbal score average, which, this year, was 587. The mean SAT math score remained 626. ...

Student Life Referendum Meets Criticism

The proposed Campus Life Referendum was the subject of heated debate at a committee meeting Monday in the Chancellor’s Complex. With the Feb. 2 deadline for campus organizations’ funding requests rapidly approaching, the committee opened the floor to public input on the referendum. While many support the Campus Life Referendum, which would potentially increase graduate and undergraduate quarterly fees by as much as $75, the bill collided head-on with fervent criticism and opposition at Monday’s meeting. Among the topics of debate was the referendum’s goal of providing funding for the expansion of the Muir College Stuart Commons. Some in attendance, such as Mark Stickel of the Revelle College Council, see the item as inappropriate on a bill that, according to A.S. Council President Doc Khaleghi, is intended to benefit all of UCSD at once. “”I don’t see how a college-specific item should be on the table. It’s not campus-wide,”” Stickel said. “”How do I convince a Revelle student to vote for the referendum when this item affects only Muir students?”” In response, Muir College Council Chair Cristina Villegas defended the item, pointing out that each of the university’s five colleges had the opportunity to submit a proposal for individual college expansion, and that Muir was the only college to have made a submission. “”At least one-fifth of the students will benefit from this item,”” Villegas said. “”[The Stuart Commons] is a huge part of Muir life.”” According to Villegas, more than 30 student organizations use the area for their various meetings and events. Pat Danylyshyn-Adams, resident dean of Muir campus, also supported the item’s inclusion in the referendum. “”[Non-Muir] students may also use the Commons,”” she said. “”College affiliation is not required for that.”” Danylyshyn-Adams likened the dispute to the fact that, although not every UCSD student is an intercollegiate athlete, the referendum will most likely include funding aimed at making UCSD seem more like a Division II university. Despite his reservations concerning the Stuart Commons, Stickel is an optimistic supporter of the referendum. “”Things are coming along,”” he said. While many support further revision of the referendum before it is voted upon, more adamant opponents of the proposal would like to see it scrapped altogether. Carolyn Gan of the UCSD Student Co-ops, along with other co-op representatives, attacked the referendum at the meeting, calling it poorly framed and in violation of certain national, state and UC-wide regulations. Gan objected on behalf of the co-ops to the Campus Life Referendum Committee’s failure to follow proper procedure for initializing a student referendum. She reasoned that the referendum could not be considered to be entirely student run, as it was intended to be, since university administrators had hand-picked various committee members. She also said that a year 2000 Supreme Court ruling requires that all student fees must go toward education, leaving to question the referendum’s intent to further expand many of the on-campus university centers. Gan said the co-ops are calling for an end to the committee’s “”unnecessary inertia”” in its efforts to pass the referendum. “”We should take the time to do it right.”” she said. “”Had we used a student initiative [in creating] the referendum, we would have avoided many problems.”” Gan said the co-ops are pushing for the dissolution of the committee. Probably the point of highest contention at Monday’s meeting was the discussion of the recent removal of Graduate Students Association Vice President of Academic Affairs Kris Bohling as well another member from the referendum committee. GSA President Lea Ruiz made the decision to withdraw the two as voting members on the committee, taking their places herself. “”I made an executive decision to remove Kris and Josh from the committee,”” Ruiz said. “”[The GSA] felt like it wasn’t getting enough information from the committee. With the kinds of decisions being made, we need to be a presence.”” Bohling, an outspoken opponent of the referendum, spoke to the committee on Monday. “”I am not in agreement personally with the decision made by the GSA president,”” he said. “”The decision is in violation of GSA bylaws … I believe it to be part of a larger administrative attack on those opposed to the referendum.”” Bohling spoke cordially about Ruiz, noting that he considered her a friend. Bohling requested of the committee that he be allowed to stay on as a voting member until the situation is properly resolved. Ruiz, who has decided to abstain from all committee votes, believes the issue is something to be resolved within the GSA. “”This is something that is not to be discussed at these meetings,”” she said. “”It’s a matter of GSA reps’ responsibilities and of those responsibilities not being fulfilled.”” A motion was introduced and seconded to conduct a vote on whether the two GSA members in question should be allowed to remain as voting members of the committee. While six of the committee’s members voted unopposed in favor of the motion, 12 abstained and the motion was not passed. “”The vote we took reflects the committee’s opinion that this is an internal matter to be resolved by the GSA,”” said committee co-chair Jenn DeCamp. At the meeting’s end, Khaleghi announced that the committee would be deciding on a date for a campus-wide vote on the referendum, for which there were two options: either during A.S. Council elections in the second week of the spring quarter, or at another date to be decided upon later. Despite the various conflicts and items of debate, Khaleghi has strong feelings about the fate of the referendum. “”Something like this will happen eventually,”” he said. “”The University Centers and athletic program have demonstrated a need for action of this kind. Whether it will happen now or later, I don’t know, but it will happen. We need it.”” ...