News

52-33-28 Protests Policies

Hundreds of students who believe that the UC system wrongly eliminated its affirmative action program rallied at the Price Center Plaza Thursday in support of reinstating it. Students at the 52-33-28 Rally were alarmed at the decline in black students enrolling at UCSD. In 1997, the last year affirmative action was used in the admissions process, 64 black freshmen enrolled at UCSD. A year later, that total fell to 52. The drop continued, and 33 enrolled in 1999. In 2000, only 28 blacks enrolled at UCSD, marking an all-time low. Blacks now compose 1 percent of new enrollees at UCSD. “”It’s not a white problem, it’s not a black problem,”” said student Denise Pacheco. “”It’s a people problem.”” In 1995, the regents passed resolution SP-1, which banned consideration of race and gender in the UC admissions process. SP-1 also provided for an outreach program aimed at minorities. Rally Coordinator Jessica Lopez, Pacheco and other opponents of SP-1 believe that reinstating affirmative action will provide a more accurate representation of minorities at UCSD. “”We need to have about five times as many of you here,”” Jorge Mariscal, a UCSD literature professor, said to the mostly nonwhite crowd of approximately 300. “”The playing field is dramatically out of whack. “”[Students] are not getting a good education if they don’t have people of color in the classroom,”” Mariscal said. Participants in the rally were also concerned with declining numbers of minorities and women in the UCSD faculty. SP-2, which also went into effect in 1997, prevents race and gender from use as criteria for employment by the UC system. Before SP-2, 33 percent of UCSD’s faculty was female, compared with 25 percent of the faculty now. Mariscal said that Chicanos and blacks each make up about one percent of UCSD’s faculty. UCSD typically accepts one-third of its applicants, and about a quarter of those admitted choose to attend. Last year, UCSD accepted 20 percent of blacks and 49 percent of Asian-Americans who applied. Fourteen percent of accepted blacks enrolled. Whites composed 59 percent of UCSD’s student population in 1990; today they are just 39 percent. Asian-Americans, who made up 16 percent of UCSD’s population then, now compose 30 percent of the student body. ...

Briefly

Biology researchers at UCSD have recently discovered that nerve cells in a fetus are directed throughout the body by intracellular calcium that acts as gophers between the embryo and the cells. The scientists published their findings in the March 9 issue of “”Science,”” which describes how filopodia, which are projections from a nerve cell, test the outside environment and create calcium as is needed to serve as a transmitter for information between the organism’s developing brain and other parts of its body. Timothy Gomez, an assistant professor of anatomy at the University of Wisconsin Medical School, led the research and explained that the calcium phenomenon may have previously gone undetected because of their minute size. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke funded the team’s research. The team used spinal nerve cells from frog embryos in their research, because they are easily multiplied and grow rapidly. UCSD to Present 17th Annual Film Festival Later This Month David G. McKendrick and Stephan Haggard, researchers at UCSD have written “”From Silicon Valley to Singapore: Location and Competitive Advantage in the Hard Disk Drive Industry,”” with Richard Donor, a professor at Emory University. The book explores the dominance of the United States in the global hard disk drive industry. In the book, the researchers present their findings as to why the United States has excelled in the industry, which has made the information age possible with the ever-growing use of the personal computer. They say that much of United States’ success is due to effective globalization and the fact that they chose to research and develop the product in California, but to manufacture in Singapore, thus giving them an edge over Japanese companies. McKendrick is currently the research director of UCSD’s Information Storage Industry Center and Haggard is currently acting as Interim Dean of UCSD’s Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies. UCSD will sponsor this year’s annual San Diego International Film Festival, which will be held March 30 through April 12 at Mann’s Hazard Center Theater in Mission Valley. UCSD Scientists Collaborate to Author Book on Hard Disk Drive Industry Twenty-two films will be shown at the Hazard Center Theater and many will be shown on campus. The evening of April 10 will feature 22 short films, and on April 11, an event devoted solely to international animation will be held, featuring 19 animated films. Films from France, England, Australia, China, India, South Korea, the Netherlands, Austria, Turkey, Thailand, Taiwan, Spain, Italy, Poland, Hungary, Sweden and South Africa will be shown. Opening night will offer films that proved successful at the Cannes Film Festival, including “”With a Friend Like Harry,”” a French film directed by Gilles Marchand. For more information and a complete listing of all the films to be screened during the festival call the University Events Office at (858) 534-0497. Jacobs School Structural Engineers Survey Seattle Structural Engineers at UCSD’s Jacobs School of Engineering will hold a free public seminar March 12 to discuss their conclusions from a recent trip to Seattle, the site of a recent major earthquake. The team of engineers, which includes professors Andre Filiatrault and Chia-Ming Uang, looked at the damage done to buildings and bridges in the Puget Sound area. The quake measured 6.8 on the Richter scale, but damage remained limited because the earthquake was deep below the ground. The engineers found that structural damages were prevalent even though earthquake retrofit procedures had worked successfully. Damages have reached $2 billion and according to the Washington Emergency Management Division, there were over 400 injuries related to the Seattle earthquake. The seminar will take place at noon at UCSD’s Center for Magnetic Recording Research auditorium, and the complete findings of the research group can be found online at http://www.structures.ucsd.edu/UCSD%20Reconnaissance%20Report.htm. For more information about the seminar call Andre Filiatrault at (858) 822-2161. ...

A.S. President Ranked in USA Today Top 100

UCSD’s A.S. Council President Doc Khaleghi has been named one of the top 100 college students in the nation by USA TODAY in the Feb. 15 issue. Khaleghi, 20, is a Revelle senior and a premedical bioengineering major. He was selected for the USA Today distinction on the basis of scholarship, leadership and extracurricular activities. Khaleghi feels that being one of the 100 awarded out of the 638 applicants was a result of his diversity of experience. Khaleghi has served as a teaching assistant 12 times, received two research grants and served as A.S. Commissioner of Academic Affairs and is currently the A.S. President. He has worked as a research assistant at Scripps Research Institute and as a researcher at the UCSD School of Medicine. Last year, he discovered an error on the MCAT exam. Khaleghi has a cumulative 3.6 grade point average in his studies at UCSD, a lower GPA than most applicants. “”They look at GPA first,”” Khaleghi said. “”This is why I thought I had no chance of winning.”” Rather, he was evaluated on his “”academic product,”” an essay in which he described his role as A.S. president. Assistant Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Tom Tucker wrote the letter nominating Khaleghi. “”I think Doc is a special student leader and a special student, so I thought it would be appropriate to nominate him,”” Tucker said. “”I just think he’s unique: his energy and involvement in a variety of campus activities.”” Tucker pointed out Khaleghi’s qualities in the academic realm in his nomination letter. “”[Khaleghi] is also dedicated, honest and provides leadership while preserving an uncompromised pattern of personal integrity,”” Tucker stated in the letter. “”Khaleghi frequently demonstrates the exceptional management ability to foster concise solutions to complex and intricate organizational and operational problems.”” Both Khaleghi and Tucker remember when each learned of Khaleghi’s win of the honor. Twice a day Khaleghi was checking the mail that arrived in the A.S. boxes because he was waiting for medical school acceptances. He spotted a big envelope from USA Today. “”I tore it open, looked and went nuts,”” Khaleghi said. ...

Stapled Condoms Given Out on Library Walk

Students from a Visual Arts 2 course handed out condoms punctured with staples on Library Walk last Wednesday as part of a performance art project promoting abstinence. The students’ actions caused discontent among those from Student Health Services. The small group of students handed out condoms on Library Walk around 3 p.m. Wednesday. Some of the condoms were found with messages attached reading, “”Don’t be Stupid”” or “”No Glove, No Love.”” Other condoms were correctly attached to information from Student Health Services. An anonymous member of the visual arts group said that the condoms were attained from Student Health Services at various times throughout the week. A group of students was given the condoms and they returned to inform the group that the condoms were unusable. One of the students visited Student Health Services on the assumption that the art students were student health advocates. Sherrie Hendrickson, a nurse at Student Health Services, called the police and went outside to speak with the group of students. In the meantime, the offended students pressured the visual arts group to leave. By the time the police arrived, the group had left. Harmony Rhoades, a Marshall sophomore, found the group offensive. “”We walked back to them and said, ‘Do you guys know that these condoms are not usable?’ They replied, ‘Abstinence is the only safe sex.’ We came back and told them that what they were doing was wrong and that people could get STDs if they use these condoms,”” Rhoades said. The visual arts students insisted that the staples were intentional. “”I was totally surprised,”” Rhoades said. “”They’re misleading people. I’m totally upset.”” Stephanie Medina was also present at the table and echoed Rhoades’ words. “”Their message was very unclear. They took a serious topic and mocked it,”” Medina said. It is unclear if the group was playing the part of serious abstinence advocates or if they were genuinely concerned with the issues at hand. Visual arts students defended their actions and claimed that their motives were less ambiguous. “”The act of handing out stapled condoms was clearly and unmistakably a demand to UCSD students, and any other passers by, to address the serious gamble and threat that promiscuity poses,”” said visual arts student Adriana Barraza. “”The condoms served as a tangible reminder of the uncertainty that comes hand-in-hand with sex, be it protected or not.”” Lupe Samaniego-Kraus, an educator at Student Health Services, was upset that the visual arts students were being mistaken for student health advocates. “”People trust the student health advocates,”” Samaniego-Kraus said. “”We were worried that students would think these people were associated with Student Health.”” Hendrickson, who called the police, was also annoyed. “”I was not pleased,”” Hendrickson said. “”I’m fine with people expressing their opinions, but when they attach my name, the name of Student Health Services, then I’m not all right with that. If it was a joke, it wasn’t funny. Unwanted pregnancy is not funny.”” Barraza asked people to consider their message. “”My response to the anger is that the encouragement of false trust that is perpetuated by the common act of passing out condoms is far more dangerous than the commentary on the risks of sex that these students were making,”” Baraz said Workers at Student Health Services were also upset that the visual arts group would destroy condoms that are provided by Student Health Services and paid for by student registration fees. The visual arts students claimed that the destruction was necessary for the message to get across. ...

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The National Academy of Engineering has elected Sia Nemat-Nasser, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering, as one of 74 of the nation’s top engineers in industry and academia. Nemat-Nasser is an expert with materials, and directs UCSD’s Center for Advanced Materials. He is the 16th member of the Jacobs school to be honored with this recognition, which is based on work in theory and practice of engineering and the pioneering of new fields of technology. Nemat-Nasser’s work deals specifically with the reaction between materials and thermo-mechanical loads that come from their environment. In addition to this latest honor, he has also been chosen as Teacher of the Year and Outstanding Teacher at the Jacobs School and serves as editor in chief of the international journal, “”Mechanics and Materials.”” Plans Announced for UCSD’s Next Generation Network The Office of the Vice Chancellor announced its plans for UCSD’s Next Generation Network this week. The new data and voice network will allow for increased traffic throughout the campus and will feature additional security and expanded help desk services. The A.S. Council is currently working on securing the funding necessary for the project, minimizing the fiscal impact on students and staff, establishing a mechanism to recognize vocal commands and eliminate existing phone line charges. Campus users will pay a $60 charge for the network, with undergraduate and graduate students exempt from the fee. More information about the new network can be found at http://ngn.ucsd.edu. Legislators Recognized at Annual UC Day in Sacramento The Alumni Association of the University of California awarded state Sen. Joseph Dunn of Garden Grove, Calif., and Assembly Speaker Robert M. Hertzberg of Van Nuys, Calif., with “”Legislator of the Year”” awards Tuesday in Sacramento for their contributions to legislation that directly affected the university in the past year. Dunn has been instrumental in the Senate Budget Committee. He supported the budget that gave the University of California unprecedented funding for outreach programs and teacher training. Dunn also secured funding for the California Institutes for Science and Innovation. Hertzberg restored $180 million in university funding that was removed in the 2000-2001 state budget. The Alumni Associations of the University of California present the “”Legislator of the Year”” awards annually to one member of the Senate and one member of the Assembly. Enrollment Now Open for Student Wellness Program UCSD Recreation is now enrolling students for its Student Wellness Program. The program helps students develop personal fitness goals and results through the establishment of individual fitness profiles, weekly meetings and a pre- and post- fitness evaluation. The program is free to students and will begin April 2. Sixty applicants will be chosen on a first-come, first-serve basis. Registration forms are available in the spring recreation guide or at RIMAC. 52-33-28 Rally in Support of Affirmative Action Thursday Students from a statewide coalition have been working to pressure the UC Regents to repeal SP1 and SP2, policies that have eliminated affirmative action from the admissions and hiring practices of the University of California. A rally will be held Thursday at noon in the Price Center Plaza to promote the cause. Proponents of the repeal of the policies argue that the institution of SP1 and SP2 caused the population of blacks admitted to UCSD to drop significantly with each freshman class. Fifty-two were admitted three years ago when the policies went into effect and the number dropped to 28 with the most recent freshmen class. In addition, proponents of the repeals say that SP1 and SP2 have led to a drop in female faculty at UCSD to 32. 8 percent. ...

Events

Thursday, March 8 Performing Arts: UCSD Singers The UCSD Music Department will sponsor the event which will take place at 8 p.m. in Mandeville Center. The event is open to the public. General admission is $5 and student admission is $3. For more information call (858) 534-4830. Film Screening: ‘Cairo Chronicles’ The Women’s Center will sponsor the MFA Film Screening, which will feature the film “”Cairo Chronicles”” about the filmmaker’s return to Egypt. The film will be shown at 6 p.m. in the Women’s Center. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 822-0074. Saturday, March 10 Performing Arts: Miami String Quartet The University Events Office will sponsor the event which will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Auditorium. The event is open to the public. General admission is $22 and student admission is $10. For more information call (858) 534-4119. Sunday, March 11 Performing Arts: Roma Nights The University Centers will sponsor the event which will feature Tom Griesgraber. The performance will be at 8 p.m. at Espresso Roma in the Price Center. Admission is free and the event is open to the public. For more information (858) 822-2068. Tuesday, March 13 Seminar: The Renaissance of Lesbianism in Early Modern England The Literature Department will sponsor the event which will take place at 4 p.m. in the Literature Building. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 822-0074. ...

Revelle Celebrates Founder's Birthday

Gloomy skies and the threat of rain did not deter hundreds of hungry students from a barbecue yesterday afternoon honoring the founder of UCSD, the late Roger Revelle, on what would have been his 92nd birthday. The annual event, fittingly held at Revelle Plaza, lured students, staff and faculty from all over campus with a free barbecue lunch complete with cake and an entertainment. “”This is cool,”” said Revelle student Celine Sanchez regarding the event. Although people came for the food, the true meaning of the event was not lost on those in attendance. “”Happy birthday Roger Revelle,”” Jessica Slocomb said. Revelle Provost Thomas Bond remembered Revelle fondly. “”This is fitting for a Roger Revelle birthday celebration; he loved things like this,”” Bond said. “”He would wear the funny little hats.”” Roger Revelle attended the event regularly until his passing in 1991. His widow has attended past celebrations but was absent yesterday. The UCSD community has Revelle to thank for establishing the campus. He persisted through many controversies to realize his dream of the opening of a world-class institution here in 1960. The event was sponsored by the Revelle Programming Board in conjunction with the Commuter Activity Board. Lance Feller, co-chair of the RPB, was pleased with the turnout. “”We will have people until we run out of food,”” Feller said. Aside from pleasing the masses who came for the free barbecue, Feller sees the celebration as a way for students to “”remain aware of the history of Revelle.”” Although celebrating the invaluable contributions Revelle made to UCSD was the main goal, everyone had a good time. Students bounced around in the entertainment as if they were in grade school again. “”This is also an excuse to have a good time,”” Bond said. “”Everybody needs a break, especially students.”” The music had a late start in getting set up, but people agreed that no music was better than the barbershop quartets that used to attend at Roger Revelle’s request. Barbershop quartets proved to be one of the few forces that could get in the way of college students and free food. Marshall student Hiro Sugano summed up the afternoon by saying, “”We should have these more often.”” ...

UCSD Medical School's Harold Simon Honored

Dr. Harold J. Simon, a founding father of the UCSD School of Medicine and world leader in international medicine, has been honored with the recent establishment of an endowed chair in his name. An anonymous donor gave a large sum of money to see the creation of a new position in the medical school and ensure that the name of that position will honor the lifetime achievements of Simon. The chair is in recognition of Simon’s role in the design of health care systems serving developing nations and his leadership in developing cultural awareness among UCSD medical students. Simon said he was gracious to have the chair position named in his honor. “”A lot of people who don’t deserve things like this get it,”” Simon said. “”A lot of people who do deserve it get it. I don’t know if I have done anything extraordinary, but I’m very grateful for the honor.”” The gift and honor are intended to serve two functions. Primarily, the chair is to honor Simon’s work. It will also allow the Medical School to recruit new talent to the UCSD School of Medicine. “”Simon has been an international leader in Europe and most of the Western world,”” said Robert M. Kaplan, chairman of the Department of Family and Preventative Care. “”He has been an important shaper in the UCSD School of Medicine and it is very nice that someone wants to honor him in this way.”” Kaplan also saw the open position as a chance for the medical school to do something different. Simon has been at the school of medicine since before any students had arrived. He came to UCSD in 1966, after being recruited from Stanford University. He was the medical school’s first dean of admissions, education and student affairs. He established much of the curriculum and criteria for admission. Simon created a class for the second-year medical students called “”Fundamentals of Medical Spanish.”” This class allows for future doctors to work side-by-side with Spanish speaking doctors. The students learn basic Spanish to converse in the medical world. The class is extremely popular and is the first of its kind in the country. Simon is currently co-teaching an undergraduate seminar titled “”Elements of International Health.”” Colleague and Associate Professor Richard Kronick said he was elated upon hearing of Simon’s honor. “”Simon has had a distinguished career,”” Kronick said. “”We are very pleased that we received a contribution in his name. He helped grow the UCSD Medical School into the distinguished institution that it is today.”” Kronick is the chair of the search committee for the endowed chair. He and others have been bringing in a team of experts to educate themselves on the field and to create a suitable job description. Kronick also evoked Simon’s work in the faculty and staff health care package. “”He has worked to keep the benefits high and the costs low,”” Kronick said. Simon also expressed excitement at the election of a new chair. “”I hope to work with the new chair,”” Simon said. The naming of the endowed chair comes as a change in the status quo. “”Chairs are often named for the donor who gives the money,”” said Director of Health Sciences Communications Leslie Franz. “”In this case, the honor goes to another individual. It shows the amount of esteem held for the work of Simon.”” Simon has worked on issues such as infectious diseases, physical and psychological trauma experienced by refugees, population growth, malnutrition and health care resources. Simon has written eight books and over 130 articles in scientific journals. He is a fellow in many international societies, including the American College of Physicians, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Royal Society of Medicine, the American College of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, and the American Public Health Association. Simon was born in Karlsruhe, Germany and came to the United States in 1938. He got his premedical undergraduate degree at UC Berkeley and received his doctorate at Harvard Medical School. He joined the faculty of Stanford University School of Medicine in 1959 before coming to San Diego in 1966. ...

Dr. Drew and Adam Corolla Come to UCSD

Just under 500 people attended a sold-out “”Loveline with Adam Corolla & Dr. Drew”” Monday night at the Price Center Theater. Vicky Bender, A.S. commissioner of programming and one of the show’s main coordinators, said the show was a success due to the hard work of the staff as well as the easygoing nature of both guest celebrities. “”Adam and Drew were really easy to get along with,”” Bender said. “”They even said how they had a good time at UCSD later that night on 91X.”” Bender was referring to how the two went straight from UCSD to San Diego radio station 91X to record their nationally syndicated show “”Loveline.”” Days before the event, the radio station promoted the event on the air and gave out complimentary tickets. Corolla and Drew stepped on stage at approximately 7:20 p.m. to the applause of an at-capacity crowd of students, staff members and other members of the community. Corolla began the night by joking about how much he preferred UCSD to SDSU. “”When I think of UCSD, I’ll think of great drainage,”” said Corolla, referring to the campus’ high elevation and how efficiently the drains redirect rain water. Corolla and Drew went on to answer questions from the audience the rest of the night. Topics discussed ranged from the origins of their current success and enjoying college life to their well-known advice on drugs and sex. In addition, the two responded to one student’s question about the recent shootings at Santana High School. Corolla said he did not see how anyone could make sense out of such a senseless act. Drew offered advice to students on how to deal with the common questions that arise about finding a career. “”You should follow your instincts and that the money will come if you work hard,”” Drew said. Corolla added to this sentiment, saying how a person should love what he does for a living, regardless of the money he makes. “”I thought Adam was hilarious,”” said Revelle senior Jill Donofrio. “”It was darn good fun.”” A.S. Events Promoter for Programming Tarun Bajaj, another main coordinator of the event, described how the A.S. Council booked Corolla and Drew for the event. “”At first we were thinking of getting only Drew,”” Bajaj said. “”Eventually though, we were able to get Adam and decided to sell it as “”Loveline.”” According to Bajaj, talk began last quarter of booking Drew. Bajaj said that Drew’s agent mentioned that Corolla would also be available to make the short commute from Los Angeles to San Diego. “”Loveline”” was originally to take place at RIMAC Arena but was moved to the Price Center Theater after the latter venue became available, Bajaj said. He welcomed the change because the new location provided a more intimate setting than RIMAC Arena. “”Honestly, I think it was better because it was more appropriate for the personal nature of the show.”” After leaving the show, Revelle senior Joe Lake said he enjoyed the show immensely. “”It was dope like a muffin,”” Lake said. “”I didn’t know that Dr. Drew was so willing to bag on Adam, but their chemistry made it all the more entertaining.”” ...

Lights & Sirens

Monday, Feb. 26 6:33 p.m.: A student reported the theft of laundry from the Goldberg Hall laundry room. Loss: $392. Tuesday, Feb. 27 8:32 a.m.: Units and paramedics responded to an 18-year-old male student having a possible seizure at Sequoyah Hall. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. 11:38 a.m.: A student reported burglary to a white ’00 Honda Civic in Lot 502. Loss: $1,200. 3:05 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a gray Specialized Stump Jumper mountain bike from the bike racks on the west side of Tioga Hall. Loss: $400. 3:10 p.m.: An 80-year-old male staff member suffered a broken nose after falling at the Center for Molecular Genetics. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Wednesday, Feb. 28 2:37 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a black and red K2 mountain bike from outside Center Hall 205. Loss: $1,000. 7:57 p.m.: Officers arrested a 20-year-old male student for misuse of a handicap placard in Lot 309. Cited and released. Thursday, March 1 9:30 a.m.: Missing juvenile located and detained at Goldberg Hall. Transported to Juvenile Detention Facility. Guardians were notified. Friday, March 2 3:57 p.m.: Officers impounded a black ’95 Acura Integra from Lot 206 for having more than five unpaid parking citations. Stored at Star Towing. Saturday, March 3 1:12 a.m.: A student reported burglary to an ’83 Toyota Celica in the Pangea Parking Structure. Loss: $150. 11:38 a.m.: A nonaffiliate reported burglary to a blue ’96 Ford Escort in Lot 208. Loss: $920. 12:43 p.m.: A nonaffiliate reported the theft of a briefcase from a restroom at Thornton Hospital. Loss: $1,025. 3:27 p.m.: Officers ordered a 36-year-old male nonaffiliate off campus for seven days after causing a disturbance at Revelle Plaza. Sunday, March 4 2:42 a.m.: Officers detained a 17-year-old female nonaffiliate for being drunk in public at Tioga Hall. Released to parents. ...