News

Muirstock Attracts Record Numbers to the Muir Quad

Muirstock, a campus festival of music, food and vendors, invaded the Muir quad on Friday afternoon and received mixed reviews from students. Although most students enjoyed the music and overall event, some were concerned with the April 20 event’s apparent relationship to “”420,”” a date often celebrated by marijuana users. Nonetheless, hundreds of students came to what some called the largest crowd ever to fill the Muir quad. Two stages, set up in front of Tenaya and Tioga halls, featured seven bands: N-Z Rough, Straight No Chaser, Munkafust, Thrice, Taken, 34 Below and headliner Common Sense. Prior to the show, Muir sophomore Missy Tierney expressed her sentiments about the show: “”I’m excited to see Common Sense.”” The band did not disappoint. “”All the guys from Common Sense were really cool,”” said Muir freshman Gabe Grossman. “”They were out afterward cleaning up and they still stopped to talk to their fans. They signed my hat.”” Other bands also thrilled the crowd. “”Thrice was awesome,”” said Muir sophomore Tomas Bogardus. Muir sophomore Nick Lieberknecht enjoyed 34 Below and supported the band’s inclusion at the upcoming Sun God festival on May 18. “”34 Below is the kind of class act that we would love to see at Sun God,”” Lieberknecht said. Despite the bands and free barbecue sponsored by Muir College Council, some students found the connection to “”420″” offensive. The concert, although running late, was scheduled to start at 4:20 p.m. with reggae band N-Z Rough. Muir freshman Josh Gray was among those who found the “”420″” implications hypocritical. “”I thought it was a pathetic attempt on the school’s part to accommodate the stoner crowd,”” Gray said. “”They are supposed to be throwing a concert on that day, but they kick people out for smoking pot in the dorms.”” Gray was expelled from his fifth-floor room at Tenaya Hall for smoking marijuana earlier this academic year. Sophomore Adam Swenson also viewed the perceived support as a double standard. “”I think it’s stupid that they give us rules to make our lives better and then encourage breaking their own rules to make our lives better,”” he said. Yet the coordinators of Muirstock defended the “”420″” implications as both coincidental and a mere publicity gimmick. Typically, Muir college plans a John Muir Week to coincide with the environmentalist’s birthday on April 21. Festival co-chair Jon Cole defended the plan to start the concert at 4:20 p.m. as a marketing strategy. “”It’s a publicity ploy,”” Cole said. “”As long as it was there, we used it. It is, by no means, the focus of the event.”” The master of ceremonies for the event, Muir student Matt Bechtel, poked fun at the day’s infamous drug reference. “”Attention Muir college: If you’re upstairs smoking, please report to the quad immediately, and if you are upstairs smoking, remember we have RSOs on duty,”” Bechtel announced early in the event. “”If anyone still has the munchies, the barbecue is still serving food.”” Bechtel and the Muirstock coordinators claimed that they were not promoting pot smoking but were having fun with the well-known concept. “”It would be stupid for us to ignore it,”” Bechtel said. “”This is probably one of the most recognized holidays on college campuses. Everyone sitting [at the concert] wasn’t in their right mind.”” Bechtel also said that the event was toned down from ideas that were originally proposed by the Muirstock think tank. A week prior to the event, the Muirstock committee planned to have a beer garden adjacent to Sierra Summit and the Muir Apartments. The beer garden, which was nixed due to funding problems, would have provided free beer to those of legal drinking age. Bechtel also mentioned that the advertisers decided to play down the importance of the “”420″” undercurrent. “”Originally, the flier was just going to read, ‘420: Fire it up,'”” Bechtel said. “”Patty Mahaffey [assistant dean of student affairs for Muir college] said we shouldn’t.”” Other students were concerned with the event’s cost, which came out to nearly $11,000. “”I know it costed over $10,000 to put on. I hope it pays off,”” said Muir sophomore Adam Klekowski prior to the event. Money came from a variety of organizations, including the Muir Organizing Board, which provided $875 from a parking permit fund-raiser. Stephanie Linn was the contest’s winner. ...

Watson Refuses to Sign USSA Legislation

Vice Chancellor Joseph Watson said Friday that he will not sign legislation that would increase student tuition by six dollars per year to facilitate increased participation and membership in the United States Student Association and the University of California Student Association, despite a student vote in favor of the change two weeks ago in the A.S. Council election. “”This is a fee increase that students have mandated through a democratic process,”” said A.S. Vice President External Eugene Mahmoud. “”As a student body, we have the right to increase our own Associated Student activity fee for any purpose.”” Watson said that he would not approve the bill because the student body will not directly see the benefits of membership. “”Students have no control over this expenditure,”” he said. “”I have no problem of the [Associated Students] supporting this. In fact, they have been doing so.”” However, Watson said that students can choose what to fund with money allocated by the A.S. Council. They can request a refund if they choose not to support any event or idea. Conversely, once 20 percent of the student body votes, and when more students vote yes on a referendum than no, students have no choice but to give the extra money. In addition, Watson said he would not sign the legislation because he feels there was not adequate discussion of the issue. In contrast, if the money had been allocated by the A.S. Council as opposed to being allocated through elections, then all the senators and commissioners would have a chance to debate the allocation of money. In a letter to Mahmoud on this issue, Watson stated that the USSA referendum question in the election booklet was poorly written, misleading and not a UC-controlled student activity. Mahmoud said he questions the validity of these points. “”His interpretation of the language is of no real importance,”” Mahmoud said of Watson. “”What is important is that ASUCSD understands that the sole function of the referendum was to increase the student activity fees by $2. There is no UC policy that allows vice chancellors the ability to interpret A.S. student activity fee increases to provide a function they do not.”” UC campuses currently contribute to both UCSA and USSA. Increasing the money the organizations receive does not violate any UC policies. Regardless, Watson said the administration told the A.S. Council before the deadline that it would not sign the legislation, even if it passed. “”We can’t take things off the ballot,”” he said. “”But we made it clear that we didn’t support the issue.”” Mahmoud said that he was not notified of the administration’s stance. “”I did not know that he wouldn’t approve it, and I take offense to people suggesting I did,”” he said. “”Why would I waste my time initiating something like this if I thought it wouldn’t even reach the chancellor’s desk?”” Over the course of election week, 2,646 students voted on the issue; 1,478 voted yes and 1,268 students voted no. Although the numbers of students who voted in favor of the legislation will change nothing at this time, Mahmoud is still encouraging other students to lobby to get Watson to sign the bill. “”I think the biggest pressure [Watson] can get is from students,”” he said. “”I think students need to write him letters.”” A.S. Council President Doc Khaleghi believes that even if Watson does sign it, the bill will never be passed by the UC Regents, as they have rejected similar bills from UC Santa Barbara and UCLA. “”The regents have already set the precedent that they won’t sign these,”” he said. Mahmoud said the regents have always been cautious about signing legislation such as this. “”Basically, the UC Regents have had a history of narrowly and conservatively interpreting legislation and court cases regarding student fee autonomy,”” he said. “”Allocations to organizations are to be done in a manner that’s content-neutral, and [the UC Regents] don’t feel that referendums are content-neutral.”” Although the 1993 court case of Smith v. Regents established that students can use their fees to lobby, the UC Regents are against giving money to outside groups such as USSA for this purpose. “”If we are allowed to lobby, we should be able to have access to whatever resources and associations we as students see fit to do the job,”” Mahmoud said. “”We students should not be limited to face-to-face lobbying.”” USSA has been the only student lobbying group in Washington, D.C. for the last 53 years. However, because it is not directly affiliated with the UC campuses, the regents have not allowed money from referenda to go to it. “”To say that USSA is not controlled by UC students is true, but that makes sense because it works at a national level and seeks to involve all students,”” Mahmoud said. “”To say that because it works as national level, it doesn’t focus on issues pertinent to UCSD students is like saying you should only pay state tax, because federal tax goes to the government, and they won’t do anything for you as a California citizen.”” Mahmoud also said that the UC Regents do not feel that USSA has any educational value to the students, although USSA gave UCSD a grant last year to increase voter turnout, in addition to providing staff for the Students of Color Conference in February. “”The UC system only wants students to lobby through UCSA because [its] work is limited to working with them,”” Mahmoud said. “”If we only work within the UC system, we as UC students don’t realize that other school systems interpret national legislation more liberally than the UC system in some cases. Also, they don’t want to see our alliances being stronger than theirs.”” ...

Violence Victims Take Back the Night

Over 200 women and men gathered in the Price Center Plaza Thursday night for the 2001 Take Back the Night Rally. The rally, sponsored by the A.S. Women’s Commission and the Women’s Center, was followed by a candlelit march around campus. Leo Der Stepanians Guardian The night began with a performance by singer Tara MacClean. Her performance included an a cappella version of her song “”Silence.”” Speaker Steve Allen from the Men’s Leadership Forum and the Center for Community Solutions took the stage next. He discussed men’s roles in assault prevention and mentioned that he was the first male speaker at a Take Back the Night rally at UCSD. Poet Kim Cook was the keynote speaker for the evening. She opened her speech by reading a few of her poems on different topics, including family, assault and recovery. Cook went on to discuss the hardship she has encountered in her life and how she has overcome it. She rallied women about their roles in society and told the audience that women should not have to be afraid of the night. “”We’re women!”” she said. “”I want to be sexy and cute and all that shit, and yeah, we’re gonna take back the night!”” Cook closed her talk with a reading of a poem she wrote for the occasion, titled “”Take Back the Night.”” “”I beg you, brothers and sisters, wake up to the moment of knowing,”” she said. She read the poem twice, once slowly for the audience to comprehend the words, then quickly to establish the meter and power she intended. “”We live in fear no more, but open the door to the future, when we are seeing a dream we had,”” she read. Cook was acknowledged with a standing ovation after the reading. Following Cook’s performance, Catherine Algeri, chair of the A.S. Women’s Commission, introduced an open microphone for audience members to share testimonials. Twenty women and two men took the stage to share their and others’ stories. Many began their stories by expressing that they had not expected to step up to the microphone. First-year cognitive science graduate student Jelena Jovanovic was one of those who did not expect to share her story. The first testimonial was a poem prepared for the event by a student, then a few of the event’s organizers spoke. “”Then there was this big silence,”” Jovanovic said. “”I thought that a regular person should just go up and let [the audience] know that it wasn’t just the organizers who had these experiences.”” Jovanovic took this task upon herself. “”I was already shaken by the things that had gone on,”” she said. “”I was shaking and on the verge of crying, and I went up there completely unrehearsed. I felt really vulnerable and on the spot as I talked.”” In the end, though, she was glad she had spoken. “”I was glad I had gone up and I was worried about how I came across,”” Jovanovic said. “”The thing that made it worth it was that afterward, other people from the audience started going up.”” The audience found the testimonials to be an extremely moving part of the evening. “”I liked the testimonials,”” Newby said. “”I thought they were really powerful, and really needed, because a lot of people don’t realize what happens, even at UCSD.”” A group of women and men from the rally carried candles and signs on a march around campus following the rally. The path went from the Price Center through the Marshall Upper Apartments, down through Warren Apartments, Pepper Canyon Apartments and the Eleanor Roosevelt College residence halls, and back to the Women’s Center in ERC. Algeri felt the event was a success. “”This has been just an amazing experience,”” she said. “”To open up to that dialogue, to get people hearing and understanding, that’s priceless.”” ...

Lights & Sirens

Monday, April 16 11:07 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a bicycle tire from the Tioga Hall bicycle racks. Loss: $60. 2:07 p.m.: A 20-year-old male student suffered a broken arm from falling off his bicycle near EBU I. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. 6:50 p.m.: A 27-year-old male student suffered a loss of consciousness at Medical Training Facility. Sought private treatment. Tuesday, April 17 4:49 a.m.: A 24-year-old male nonaffiliate was ordered off campus for seven days after creating a disturbance at the Cloud’s Rest Lounge. 5:40 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from Warren Lecture Hall. Loss: $44. 7:16 p.m.: A 21-year-old male student suffered a broken leg while playing softball at RIMAC Field. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Wednesday, April 18 7:09 a.m.: A staff member reported vandalism to a ’93 Ford van in Lot 404. Damage: $500. 10:48 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet and contents at Argo Hall. Loss: $60. 11:06 a.m.: A staff member reported the cultivation of marijuana at La Jolla Del Sol. 12:47 p.m.: Officers arrested a 62-year-old male nonaffiliate at Villa La Jolla Drive and La Jolla Village Drive for an outstanding felony warrant for parole violation and an outstanding misdemeanor warrant for possession of a hypodermic needle. Transported to Central Detention Facility. 1:45 p.m.: A 40-year-old female staff member complained of lightheadedness after inhaling an unknown substance at Scholander Hall. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. Thursday, April 19 1:00 a.m.: A 31-year-old male nonaffiliate was ordered off campus for seven days for creating a disturbance at the Student Center. 8:05 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a video camera from Birch Aquarium. Loss: $1,460. 12:40 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a laptop from Tioga Hall. Loss: $1,200. 3:02 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a green ’98 Lexus RX300 in Lot 356. Loss: $1,650. 3:37 p.m.: A 21-year-old male student suffered an eye injury while playing lacrosse at Warren Field East. Subject transported himself to Thornton Hospital. Friday, April 20 1:20 a.m.: Officers detained a 19-year-old male student, a 19-year-old male nonaffiliate and a 20-year-old male nonaffiliate at the Muir Quad for being drunk in public. Transported to Detox. Saturday, April 21 12:46 a.m.: San Diego Police Department recovered a gold ’91 Honda Accord reported stolen. Vehicle stored at Anytime Towing. 3:08 a.m.: Officers arrested a 25-year-old male nonaffiliate at La Jolla Village Drive for driving under the influence of alcohol. Booked into Central Jail. ...

Briefly

The National Academy of Sciences has awarded Charles Cox, a Scripps Institution of Oceanography professor emeritus, with the Alexander Agassiz Medal. Cox will receive the medal and his $15,000 prize during the National Academy of Sciences annual meeting April 3 in Washington, D.C. Cox is being awarded for his studies of oceanic waves and their microstructure, mixing and electromagnetic fields. The Agassiz Medal is given every three years for original contributions to the science of oceanography and was established by a gift from John Murray in 1913. Cox’s research has focused on measuring the fine-scale fluctuations in temperature and salinity within ocean water due to turbulence. In addition to this most recent honor, Cox has also been a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1996. Take Back the Night Rally to be Held Thursday Night The A.S. Women’s Commission, the A.S. Council and the Women’s Center will sponsor the Take Back the Night Rally on Thursday evening in an attempt to draw attention to the problem of domestic violence against women. The rally will start at 7 p.m. in the Price Center and will be followed by a march. The rally will feature a musical performer, followed by two smaller speakers and a keynote speaker. Those in attendance will also have an opportunity to give testimonials about their own experiences in survival of domestic abuse. For more information visit http://geocities.com/takebackthenightucsd/ or contact Catherine Algeri at [email protected] or Emelyn dela Pena at [email protected] Muirstock to Descend Upon UCSD Friday, Free to public Muirstock, an all-day festival sponsored by the Muir College Council, is set to begin in the Muir Quad on Friday, at 2 p.m. Bands come on stage at 4:20 p.m. The concert will feature seven bands, a free barbecue, vendors and more. Common Sense, a band embodying the hybridization of rock, reggae, soul, hip-hop, R&B and ska, will headline the concert. Below 34, a rock group that has made the local radio and news station rounds, and Munkafest, a Los Angeles based band that has been featured on Napster and placed under the “”New and Noteworthy”” section of “”Billboard Magazine,”” will also appear. In addition, NZ Rough, Straight No Chaser, Thrice, Taken and Dueling DJ will all perform at the concert. The event is free and open to all UCSD students. For more information contact Laura Biery at [email protected] UCSD Police Department to Offer Self Defense Class The UCSD Police Department and the Student Safety and Awareness Program are offering Rape Aggression Defense Training. The R.A.D. system of self defense provides a practical strategy to protect oneself by combining threat avoidance strategies and real-world assault resistance tactics for women. The course will last three evenings and be taught at the Police Training Room. There is a $10 fee for all three nights. Participants are encouraged to wear comfortable clothing and footwear and to attend all three nights. Reservations are required. To make reservations call SSAP at (858) 534-5793. ...

Events

Thursday, April 19 Holocaust Memorial 24-Hour Name Reading The Union of Jewish Students is sponsoring the event in commemoration of the Holocaust. The reading will begin at midnight in the Price Center Library Lounge. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-6244. Friday, April 20 Performing Arts: UCSD New Play Festival The UCSD Theater and Dance Department is sponsoring the event, which will premiere productions written and produced by master of fine arts playwrights. The event will be at 8 p.m. in the Mandell Weiss Forum Studio. General admission is $10 and student admission is $5. The event is open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4574. Saturday, April 21 Special Event: LGBTA Nonsexist Dance The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Association is sponsoring a dance that welcomes attendees of all ages, orientations and backgrounds. The event will begin at 9 p.m. at The Stage at Porter’s Pub in the Student Center. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4297. Performing Arts: Emerson String Quartet The University Events Office is sponsoring the event, which will start at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Auditorium. General admission is $25 and student admission is $10. The event is open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4119. Film: ‘Teeny-Tiny Orchestra for Silent Films’ The UCSD Music Library is sponsoring the event, which features classic silent films accompanied by the live music of a novelty orchestra of unusual instruments. The event will take place at 11 a.m. in the Seuss Room of Geisel Library. The showing is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-8074. ...

Global Warming Traced to Humans

Scripps Institution of Oceanography researchers Tim Barnett and David Pierce have pinpointed human-induced global warming in the earth’s oceans. Their recent findings have the potential to solidify the belief that global warming over the past 50 years has been a direct result of human activity. Barnett and Pierce ran a series of studies testing ocean temperatures as deep as 3,000 meters. “”The change is profound,”” Pierce said. The pair found an overall change in ocean temperature of 0.1-degree Celsius, and an average 0.4-degree Celsius rise was found at the ocean’s surface “”The temperature increase may not seem like a lot,”” Pierce said. “”However, it takes a tremendous amount of energy to heat the world’s oceans to that extent.”” Barnett also validated the findings by noting the precision of the thermometers used in the study. The thermometers, according to Barnett, can detect 0.2-degree Celsius changes in temperature. Many scientists attribute these changes in temperature to carbon dioxide and sulfur emissions. In the past 50 years, the emission of these products is said to have heated the atmosphere and, as Barnett and Pierce’s study suggests, the ocean temperatures as well. Most studies regarding the issue of global warming have focused on atmospheric temperatures. Barnett and Pierce’s study concentrated on the effects on the ocean. Barnett said he is confident in the recent findings. “”The initial results are certainly compatible at the 95 percent confidence level with the hypothesis that the warming observed in the global oceans has been caused by anthropogenic sources,”” Barnett said. The study was only meant as a preliminary observation of the effects of global warming. The implications of the heating of the environment are, as of now, somewhat of a mystery. “”We don’t have the programs or the government organization to assess what this is going to mean for the average American,”” Barnett said. “”The average Californian doesn’t care about a three-degree rise in the temperature.”” Barnett said he wished people would take action by urging the government to mobilize and create a better understanding of the greenhouse effect. “”Tell people to write their congressman and ask them what the greenhouse effect is going to do to our lives,”” Barnett said. Pierce also noted the U.S. government’s lagging status compared to other developed nations in terms of greenhouse effect research. “”Germany, Britain and Japan all have programs to assess the greenhouse effect,”” Pierce said. “”I would have thought America would be on the forefront of this endeavor but it is not the case.”” The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Association Climate Change Data and Detection program and the U.S. Department of Energy supported the work of Barnett and Pierce. Barnett and Pierce also worked with colleague Reiner Schnur, who was supported by the Max Planck Institute for Meteorolology. Their findings were published in the April 13 edition of the scientific journal Science. ...

Athletes Plea for Fee Funds

Athletic Director Earl Edwards said Wednesday that the continued existence of UCSD’s athletic program as it now exists may depend on the passage of the Campus Life Fee Referendum. The referendum, which would implement an increase of $71.40 per student each quarter, would allot $19 of that additional fee to the NCAA athletic program. Edwards warned the athletes from such teams as basketball, crew, and track and field that should the referendum fail to pass, the athletic program would receive a crippling monetary blow from which it may not fully recover. “”If it passes, we will be able to continue with the athletic program as we know it today,”” Edwards said. Edwards went on to say that without the fee increase, “”half our budget would not be available to us.”” Edwards said this would mean that the administration would have to seriously consider eliminating certain sports teams in the near future. “”We might have to downsize our program if we don’t have the revenue,”” Edwards said. There are currently 23 sports teams at UCSD. However, Edwards also said the athletic program has not begun to seriously consider how many or which teams would be considered for cutting. “”We haven’t set up criteria yet,”” he said. “”How expensive the program obviously would be a factor.”” For teams like women’s crew, which recently spent $12,500 on a new four-oared shell, this is a serious warning. Though this most recent purchase was funded by alumni donations, crew has the potential to spend up to $22,000 on each boat. Assistant women’s crew coach Jack Vallerga, however, did not express much concern about the future of his team. “”I’m not taking what Earl Edwards said as a threat just because crew is a very expensive sport, but [the possibility of cuts] is a reality,”” Vallerga said. Another factor Edwards noted as crucial, should the removal of teams become necessary, is the ratio of male to female teams. “”It would be suicide to drop any female sports because of the Title IV lawsuit,”” Edwards said. This said, Edwards and Matthew DeFord, the representative for the athletic program in the student committee that drafted the referendum, launched a plea for all athletes to encourage students to vote next week. Voting will begin Monday, April 23, and end Friday, April 27. Twelve polling booths stationed throughout campus will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. all week. Four thousand students must vote in the special election for the fee to be eligible to pass. Once the required 4,000-vote minimum is reached, a simple majority is needed for the fee to pass. “”Basically, if 3,000 people vote and 2,900 of those votes are in favor of the referendum, it can’t pass,”” DeFord said. “”We have to have 4,000 people vote.”” DeFord said that the athletic program has already acquired powerful allies in its quest to attain the needed votes. “”We already have on our side the sports clubs, the Greek system and several college counsels,”” he said. However, DeFord said that the people who vote “”no”” are not his main concern. “”It’s the people who don’t vote at all who are our biggest threat,”” DeFord stressed. Because the voting will not be available via StudentLink, Edwards warned athletes that encouraging people to vote was a priority. “”We’ve never had 4,000 students vote for anything at UCSD, either for or against,”” he said. DeFord said that in addition to the 500 to 600 athletes urging students to vote, a subcommittee will be handing out literature about the Campus Life Referendum to educate and inform students. “”It’s not an athletic fee,”” Edwards stressed. “”It involves all students.”” Duncan McFarland, women’s volleyball coach, echoed this sentiment. “”It’s certainly very important for our team as well as other teams,”” he said. “”It will increase fees for everyone but it will benefit everyone as well.”” ...

Sir Mix-A-Lot Brings His Act to Ritmo

Approximately 350 students came to see Sir Mix-A-Lot perform at Club Ritmo on Friday night. According to A.S. Programmer -elect Eisha Christian, Sir Mix-A-Lot was booked months ago when the club first started. Christian said that she and co-club creator A.S. Assistant Programmer Anahita Ferasat, wanted to book familiar artists from the past as a good way to introduce Club Ritmo to students. The UCSD DJs and Vinylphiles Club opened, followed by DJ Eli. The Los Angeles-based group the Booty Boys followed DJ Eli and warmed up the crowd before Sir Mix-A-Lot made his entrance. Describing their sound as “”comedy/booty rap,”” the members of the Booty Boys said they were excited to play for their alma mater. “”We just wanted to come back to UCSD and flaunt our rap stardom,”” said Spencer “”sixxxHole”” Yaras, UCSD alumnus and rapper for the group. Sir Mix-A-Lot made his entrance later in the night with a group of fellow rappers. His setlist included songs from his early albums, including 1991’s “”Mack Daddy,”” and his most famous song, “”Baby Got Back,”” which ended the show. After his performance, Sir Mix-A-Lot shared his thoughts about the show. “”It was live,”” Sir Mix-A-Lot said. “”It was crazy.”” “”I like San Diego, it’s all legal,”” Sir Mix-A-Lot joked, referring to how laid back he thinks the police in San Diego are toward drugs. Producing is the next step in his career, according to Sir Mix-A-Lot. “”Fame doesn’t really matter to me right now. If I can produce for others and they succeed, that’s my dream,”” Sir Mix-A-Lot said. “”I want to hand over the mantle, so to speak.”” Christian was optimistic about Club Ritmo’s future. “”I see it definitely expanding because something like this takes time to get better,”” Christian said. Ferasat said that both she and Christian have learned a lot since the club’s opening night. ...

Seniors Make Their Final Contribution

As many seniors prepare to receive their diplomas and move on to life after college, they will have one last opportunity to give back to the UCSD community through their class gift. UCSD’s class of 2001 is in the midst of establishing a scholarship fund as its final contribution to UCSD. It will also donate plaques commemorating gifts given by past classes. “”We felt scholarships were best; they go with the purpose of giving back,”” said Melissa Tsang, chairwoman of the Senior Gift Campaign 2001. Two scholarships will be funded by donations from graduating seniors: Starting next year, the scholarships will be awarded annually: One will be awarded to a transfer student, and the other will go to a graduating senior. The precise financial and logistic criteria for each award are still being worked out. In addition to the scholarships, the class of 2001 will engrave the names of gifts of past graduating classes on their respective Library Walk slabs. This year’s gift is particularly unique, as it celebrates the philanthropy of past classes as well as providing a benefit for future students at UCSD. A.S. President Doc Khaleghi was especially pleased with the choice of gifts. “”I am one of many students that understand the profound effect scholarships have on a student’s life,”” Khaleghi said. “”I think the scholarships represent both giving a student a chance, and, for the outgoing senior, commending the student and supporting their future.”” UCSD Student Foundation President Ping Yeh is partly in charge of organizing the gift. “”These gifts represent an awareness of how lucky we all are to graduate,”” Yeh said. “”Everyone can play a part to make the school better for the future.”” Fund raising for the scholarships will be a joint effort between the UCSD Student Foundation and the A.S. Council. Tsang stressed that the scholarships are “”not a one time deal; working with the Student Foundation will encourage the continuation of the scholarship in the future.”” In the coming weeks, seniors will be asked to contribute to the scholarship and gift funds. The campaign hopes to raise $20,000 as a principal investment to build the scholarship. This year, seniors have the opportunity to donate by phone, by mail and on the Web. Yeh added that the committee is working hard to develop incentives, such as discounts for alumni activities, coupons and freebies for those who donate. Tsang is optimistic about the fund raising. “”The idea of scholarships will hopefully incite people to donate more,”” he said. The two organizations are working hard to better organize the senior gift process. Citing the importance of philanthropy, Khaleghi is determined to broaden involvement in the campaign. “”It gives those leaving a chance to give back to the university and future students,”” Khaleghi said. “”But there exists no institutionalized system. Because of this, there have been classes that have not had the awesome opportunity to participate in a senior gift campaign.”” Khaleghi and Yeh are also working on A.S. legislation to add continuity and structure to the Senior Gift process. “”We can’t reinvent the wheel every year,”” Yeh said regarding the instability of past senior gift campaigns. Although this year’s campaign got off to a delayed start, Khaleghi said he was astonished by the freshman leadership of Tom Chapman and Tsang. “”Campaigns have started late in the past,”” Khaleghi said. “”It would obviously be beneficial if there was a permanent structure in place to have an annual senior gift.”” Yeh hopes to help maximize not only donations but student involvement in the philanthropic process. Recent senior gifts have included recycling barrels on campus and improvements to the nature trails east of RIMAC. The idea of a perpetual scholarships was too much for the campaign to turn down. “”They are the gift that keeps on giving,”” Tsang said. ...