News

Lights & Sirens

Sunday, Jan. 21 11:30 a.m.: A 53-year-old male nonaffiliate was ordered off campus for seven days after suspicious activity at Tenaya Hall. Monday, Jan. 22 10:04 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a cellular phone from UC 302. Loss: $250. 11:12 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a license plate from Lot 401. 11:20 p.m.: Officers arrested a 21-year-old male student at 9000 La Jolla Village Drive for being drunk in public. Transported to Detox. Rejected from Detox and transported to Central Jail. Tuesday, Jan. 23 7:46 p.m.: Students reported the theft of wallets from Pacific Hall 6228. Loss: $60. 9:29 p.m.: A male nonaffiliate reported a shooting at an inhabited vehicle, throwing an object at an inhabited vehicle with intent to inflict bodily injury and vandalism in excess of $400 damage to a city bus at the Miramar Street bus turnaround. Total damage $1,200. Wednesday, Jan. 24 12:57 p.m.: Officers arrested a 20-year-old female student for misuse of a disabled placard in Lot 504. Cited and released. 2:30 p.m.: Officers detained a 36-year-old male nonaffiliate at Muir Apartments for being a danger to himself and others. Transported to County Mental Health. Subject later returned and was transported to County Mental Health again. 5:12 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a bicycle seat from the bike rack by the Revelle Conference Room. Loss: $50. Thursday, Jan. 25 12:56 p.m.: Units and paramedics responded to a 19-year-old female student having a seizure at the Price Center food court. Transported to Thornton by paramedics. Friday, Jan. 26 12:25 a.m.: Officers arrested a 31-year-old male nonaffiliate for driving under the influence of alcohol at North Torrey Pines Road and North Point Drive. Transported to Central Jail. 6:10 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a license plate from Lot 502. 6:16 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from RIMAC. Loss: $25. Saturday, Jan. 27 1:07 a.m.: Officers arrested a 21-year-old male student at Pepper Canyon Apartments for being drunk in public. Transported to Central Jail. Sunday, Jan. 28 1:11 a.m.: Officers arrested a 22-year-old male student for misuse of a disabled placard in Lot 113. Cited and released. 2:11 a.m.: Officers arrested an 18-year-old male nonaffiliate for petty theft at Tioga Hall. Subject transported to Detox for being drunk in public. ...

Briefly

Cynthia A. Stuenkel, a clinical professor of medicine at UCSD is being honored by the American Heart Association for her role in raising women’s awareness about heart disease. Stuenkel will receive her award at the First Annual Women’s Legacy Luncheon to be held Feb. 2 at the Bristol Hotel in downtown San Diego. The luncheon is put on by the American Heart Association in an effort to bring female family members together to emphasize the dangers of heart disease, which is sometimes called a “”silent epidemic.”” San Diego has recently been chosen by the AHA as one of three U.S. cities to launch a major campaign alerting women to the dangers of heart disease. UCSD Sexual Harassment Office to offer online course The Office of Sexual Harassment Prevention and Policy announced its new online sexual harassment education course titled “”Preventing Sexual Harassment”” Friday. The course covers legal issues and UCSD’s own policies on sexual harassment, and has been built to suit the UCSD community. The online course is not intended to replace on-site sexual harassment classes, but can be used as a valuable tool for those who are unable to attend those sessions. For more information about the online course or any other services offered by the Office of Sexual Harassment Prevention and Policy, call (858) 534-8298 or visit http://oshpp.ucsd.edu. Author Matt Ridley to appear at UCSD Bookstore Matt Ridley, author of “”Genome: the Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters,”” is scheduled to make a stop at the UCSD Bookstore Feb. 6 as part of his book tour. Ridley will discuss his book, which explains the human genome and the importance of mapping it. In his book, Ridley also discusses the lineage of modern genetics, how genetic research is helping to treat Alzheimer’s disease, and how genes influence personality. All Campus College Bowl Tournament coming Jan. 31 The All Campus College Bowl Tournament will take place in the Price Center Theater 7 p.m. Jan. 31. The event will be sponsored by the University Centers, the five colleges, the vice chancellor of student affairs and Imprints. All five colleges will compete in the tournament. The winning teams from the individual college tournaments are Atlantis Hall & Larry’s Angels from Revelle, Organic Chemideath & Cap’n Geech and the Shrimp Shack Shooters from Muir, Off the Heezee Fo’Sheezee & the “”Go”” Team from Marshall, Bushrats & Zoltan from Warren and PRT & Tosch from Roosevelt. Career Services Center presents corporate showcase The Career Services Center’s Corporate Showcase is set to take place at 10:30 a.m. Jan. 31 in the Price Center Ballroom. Companies including Genentech, Inc., Guidant Corp., Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Microsoft, Qualcomm, Sempra Energy and Sun Microsystems will be on hand to meet with students and offer information about career opportunities and internships. For more information, call the UCSD Career Services Center at (858) 534-4472. Grove Gallery to have glass and neon Valentine’s tribute A glass and neon tribute to Valentine’s Day entitled “”Heart Throb”” will open Feb. 6 at UCSD’s Grove gallery. A reception will also be held at 6 p.m. on Feb. 14; the reception is free and open to all who wish to come. Artists displaying their work in the tribute include Clay Logan, Buzz Blodgett, Patty Yockey, Frank Varnell, Bret Daniel, Mike Stanley, Rick Umpierre, Brian Ferrin, Mike Letson and Mike Riley. Among the kinds of art to be displayed are glassblowing, lamp working, functional pieces and wearable art. ...

A.S. Council and Athletic Department Unveil New Mascot

After years of student anticipation for the arrival of an identifiable spirit leader, the A.S. Council and the Athletic Department finally revealed the new Triton Mascot Saturday, Jan. 20 at halftime of the UCSD men’s basketball game against California State University Dominguez Hills. Lyon Liew Guardian Assistant Athletic Director Ken Grosse said that the new costume stands about 6’5″” with an oversized head, a toga-like outfit, flowing hair, a beard and long muscular legs. “”People will really be impressed,”” said A.S. President Doc Khaleghi. “”I am proud to be at a school that has this mascot.”” The Triton has always been the school’s nickname, although no mascot existed until recently. The first costume ideas were designed by previous A.S. President Tesh Khullar, along with A.S. Marketing Director Tracie Davie, Triton Tide leader Matt Deford and Grosse. The final two designs were finalized last summer after Khullar graduated and Khaleghi took over as A.S. President and member of the committee. The two remaining ideas were sent to the Utah-based company Alincoe Costume who made the final product after reviewing the committee’s two designs. The costume cost approximately $5,000 to make. The faculty expressed excitement over the new addition to the school, as it represents a rare joint project between the Associated Students and the athletic department. “”Overall, I think it’s going to be a great addition to the campus and should benefit a lot of people,”” Grosse said. “”The process of making it a reality will hopefully be the first in a long line of collaborative efforts between athletics and the A.S., as well as other UCSD organizations.”” Currently the A.S. Council and the athletic department plan on the mascot performing at halftime shows at basketball games and during intermissions in volleyball. In his first appearance, the mascot drew a large crowd and kept the fans energetic throughout the game. Khaleghi said the mascot’s first appearance was a success. “”I think the students loved him,”” Khaleghi said. “”It was one of the most impressive turnouts I have seen for a home game.”” Khaleghi said that he thinks the response will be even better once a full-time trained mascot is found. Student tryouts will be held sometime in the near future and the winner will attend mascot camp. In addition, Grosse said that once the mascot becomes more mainstream on campus, it will begin to participate in other school activities. “”We anticipate and want to have the mascot do a variety of appearances on and off campus,”” he said. “”The nonathletic and off-campus appearances will probably be limited at first as we get the mascot comfortable in its role, learn what works and what doesn’t and see what opportunities are available.”” Athletic Director Earl Edwards said these appearances are important because they will boost school spirit and give the school something it has never had. “”Most schools have a mascot and we didn’t have one,”” he said. “”We need to start making an identity that is reflected upon our school.”” It is hoped that the mascot will provide the new energy and fan support that Khaleghi believes is needed to compete in Division II. “”Eighty-six percent of students wanted to make the jump to Division II,”” he said. “”Now we need to support our teams in every way possible and the mascot is one of those ways. We need to have the spirit and support that other Division II schools get.”” ...

Year of the Snake Hits UCSD

Asian food, sports and arts had a field day at “”The Year of the Snake”” festival, held Friday afternoon at the Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies courtyard. The annual event, presented by IR/PS, was a huge success in spite of some bad weather. “”We’ve had a good turnout, despite the rain,”” said Christine Ha, co-president of South East Asian Link. The four-hour event celebrated Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese and Chinese cultures. Nearly 150 people were in attendance, including those of Asian and non-Asian backgrounds alike. “”The campus here is very diverse,”” Ha said. “”Lots of different backgrounds are here and it’s a lot of fun, especially since Southeast Asia is often unrecognized.”” The linguistics department hosted the festival and helped to put it together with the IR/PS students. “”We did the framework, and the students planned it,”” said Japanese language professor Kuniko Tada. “”It’s a great opportunity for students to show what they’ve learned. We don’t see this great hidden cultural learning in language classes.”” Language classes do not usually discuss the social and political aspects of the countries they are covering, so the festival makes for a good experience of the cultural side of the languages students are learning. The program started with an elaborate Lion Dance and a Bamboo Stick Dance. Students presented kung fu and karate performances, along with presentations of origami (paper folding), shoduo (Japanese calligraphy) and ikebana (Japanese flower arrangement). Cari Wilhem-Motomura, a second-year IR/PS student majoring in international business management, lived in Japan for six years and mastered the art of flower arrangement while learning the language. She was on hand at the festival, teaching the art to attendees. “”The celebration brings our students together to share our cultures,”” Wilhelm-Motomura said. “”We have a small school — only a couple hundred people — so it gives us a chance to really share different aspects of our cultures, besides the politics and business aspects we study.”” Kelly Morphy, a first-year IR/PS student studying Portuguese and Spanish, appreciated a look into Asian culture. “”This school is on the cutting edge of global communication and diversity,”” she said. The event was also featured on KUSI’s Friday evening telecast. ...

Vanilla Ice Performs at Club Ritmo

Rain was not enough to stop people from coming to see Vanilla Ice Friday night at Club Ritmo’s second show. The club debuted earlier this month with Tone Loc headlining. Lyon Liew Guardian About 400 people packed the Stage at the Pub despite the wet weather outside. Before the show began, A.S. Assistant Programmer Eisha Christian was optimistic about the night’s headliner. “”I’ve heard really really good reports [about Vanilla Ice] because we do references on whatever act we bring to this campus,”” Christian said. “”Everyone’s pumped up and they love [Ice] and they definitely recommended him … so I’m expecting it to be awesome.”” A.S. Assistant Programmer Anahita Ferasat explained why Vanilla Ice was chosen to perform. “”He has a good name and everyone knows him,”” Ferasat said. “”We wanted a little publicity for our club because we didn’t have a name yet.”” DJ Crazy and DJ Kurt Mueller of the DJs and Vinylphiles Club opened the show around 9 p.m. According to DVC president Andy Livingston, the group is very appreciative toward the club for asking them to play on such a regular basis. “”I kind of like these events … because we get that other half of people who wouldn’t normally hear this kind of music,”” Livingston said. “”You know, if they hate it then they hate it … but if they like it, then that’s just more increased exposure.”” Ferasat praised DVC for its support of the club. “”We absolutely love working with them,”” Ferasat said. “”We’re going to continuously work with them because they’re helping us, we’re helping them, it’s a very good relationship with them.”” Marshall sophomore Joanna Chang was curious to see the club for the first time. “”I heard they turned the Pub into a club and so it sounded like a fun thing to do,”” Chang said. Marshall sophomore Shabani Kapoor was also looking forward to the concert. “”Yeah, sure it’ll be fun to see the ‘Ice Ice Baby’ guy,”” Kapoor said. Ice took the stage at about 10:45 p.m. with guests Zero and Rod-J, who have been with him for over 10 years. Between songs, Ice worked the crowd by poking fun at mainstream music acts like the Backstreet Boys and *NSYNC. “”I want to thank everyone for embracing the real me, not some fucking product made up by the industry,”” Ice said during the show. “”You know I was paid millions of dollars and dressed like that crazy shit and you all would’ve done the same shit … so don’t be talking shit about no Vanilla Ice.”” Marshall senior Han Lee enjoyed Ice’s performance. “”I think it’s good, I like it, he got the crowd into it,”” Lee said. His set included a mix of newer material from his latest album “”Hard to Swallow,”” as well as his most famous hits like “”Ice Ice Baby”” and “”Play That Funky Music, Whiteboy.”” “”For the college deal we came and kind of did like an old school show tonight, so it was pretty fun,”” Ice said. Toward the end of the show, Ice invited students on stage to free-style rap. Although only one person participated, the rest remained on stage to dance for the duration of the concert. “”It was awesome, I had a great time,”” Ice said after his performance. “”I’ve been given like a second chance so I’m very grateful.”” He went on to promote his new album, which will feature guests from Insane Clown Posse, Soul Fly, Wu Tang Clan, Public Enemy and many other musical groups. Ice said he wanted to clarify that his goal is not to make a comeback. “”I let people know that I’m not trying to do what I did before, it’s not like I’m a product of the industry or a puppet on a string, you know, I kind of cut those strings and I’m off doing my own thing now,”” Ice said. “”It’s not so radio-friendly, it’s not so commercial or mainstream, you know, it’s just real.”” Ice said he would like the public to focus more on his music. “”I learned that music is about expression … a lot of people pretty much want to know about my life and what I’ve been through,”” Ice said. “”It’s been a heavy roller coaster, from suicide to loneliness through all kinds of drugs and crazy things. The VH-1 special kind of showed a glimpse of that but the music is a much more personal part of myself … so I’m using music sort of as my release to exorcise my demons.”” After the performance, Christian remarked how Ice was a little more extreme than the A.S. Council had anticipated. She was referring to an incident late in the show in which the artist repeatedly encouraged female concert-goers to flash the rest of the audience. “”I don’t want [the club] to be trashy,”” Christian said. “”But then, we also know that each performer brings his own flavor, and we learned from this experience.”” Ferasat shared a similar sentiment. “”We were a little offended by what he did on stage, we just weren’t expecting anything that kind of explicit,”” she said. “”His performance was a little more than expected.”” As for the Club Ritmo’s future, both Christian and Ferasat are very optimistic. The next show is scheduled for March 2. The off-time in between will allow the club to publicize and better prepare, Christian said. Christian and Ferasat both praised A.S. Co-Festivals Coordinator Scott Mantell for all the work he has done behind the scenes. Calling his efforts “”amazing,”” Ferasat said Mantell continues to play a pivotal role in the development of Club Ritmo. Many non-UCSD students were in attendance Friday night for the concert as well. Mesa College junior Chris Kline has been a fan since the beginning. “”I’ve been waiting 10 years to see this guy in concert ever since I was a little kid and now I’ll finally get a chance,”” Kline said before the show. An San Diego State University freshman who gave his name as “”Kipper”” said he enjoyed the night immensely. “”I originally came out to see the DJs from the DVC spin because those guys have maximum potential,”” Kipper said. “”However, I had to see Vanilla Ice spin that good ol’ ‘Ice Ice Baby’ just for the sentimental factor. It’s a pretty big party … some people may say he kind of strayed from the original message but it’s all good, it’s a lot of fun.”” ...

Briefly

UCSD Chancellor Robert C. Dynes will host a ceremony and reception 4 p.m. Thursday at the Carlsbad Community Library to draw attention to community service programs sponsored by UCSD in the North County. UCSD currently offers a number of services to residents of the North County including Casa de la Clase Magica in Solana Beach, which helps children from the Mexican community prepare to succeed in school, and the Partnership of Immunization Provides, which helps facilitate the immunization of preschool children. Other speakers at the event will include University Art Gallery director Kathleen Stoughton, UCSD alumnus Steve Hart and UCSD Regents Scholar Josh Steele. The visit to Carlsbad is one of five ceremonies Dynes will preside over as part of UCSD’s 40th anniversary celebration. The celebration entails 40 gifts to the community. A directory of UCSD’s community service programs can be obtained by calling (858) 534-UCSD. Two New Safety Programs Implemented for University Employees The office of the chancellor announced Monday that it would implement the new Injury and Illness Prevention Program and the Laboratory Safety Plan, in addition to other programs, as part of an effort to make the university a safe place to work. The Injury and Illness Prevention Program will now be instituted in all departments of the university and will require workplace inspections, hazard abatement, employee safety training and efficient safety communication. The Laboratory Safety Plan will be instituted in all campus laboratories and will require emergency action plans and training for those handling hazardous materials. In an attempt to regulate the new policies, the university will impose a financial penalty for those who are found to be in violation of the new policies. Penalties range from $7,000 for nonserious violations to $25,000 for serious violations. Pan-Asian Council Presents Chinese Lunar New Year Festivities In celebration of Chinese New Year, which was yesterday, the Pan-Asian Council will hold its Lunar New Year celebration today from noon to 2 p.m. in the Price Center Plaza. The celebration will include performances by Lion Dance as well as a traditional fashion show, White Tiger Kung Fu, Aionaga Karate and a lantern contest. Later tonight, they will also sponsor “”Release the Serpent,”” a free performance featuring musical groups Ascension and White Tiger Kung Fu. The Career Services Center is now Offering to Critique Application Essays Expert advisors at the UCSD Career Services Center are now critiquing applications for professional and graduate school. The service is open to people applying for a master’s degree, a doctorate, a degree in teaching, business, law, dentistry, medicine or any part of the health care industry. Typed and double spaced application essays to be critiqued can be dropped off at the Career Services Center and picked up within five working days. The Career Services Center is located on Library Walk and can be reached for further information at (858) 534-4939. Earl’s Place to Hold a Chalk Drawing Contest Earl’s Place in Warren College above Canyon Vista is currently holding a a chalk drawing contest to decorate their new chalkboard covered tabletops. The contest is being held from now until Jan. 31 and judging will take place between Feb.1 and Feb.8. Winners will receive a number of prizes including Triton Plus Account bucks and gifts from Starbucks. ...

Events

Thursday, Jan. 25 Performing Arts: Poetry Reading Tony Lopez will read his poetry at 4:30 p.m. in the Visual Arts Building. The University Events office and the literature department are sponsoring the event. For more information, call the University Events office at (858) 534-4090. Film: “”Meet the Parents”” Ben Stiller stars in the film which will be shown at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. in the Price Center Theater. Tickets are $2. Seminar: Dashen Memorial Colloquium Professor Edward Witten will present the “”2001 Dashen Memorial Physics Department Colloquium on Quark Confinement and Black Holes.”” The event is sponsored by the physics department and will take place at 4 p.m. in the Mandeville Center Auditorium. The event is open to the public and admission is free. For more information, call (858) 822-1468. Saturday, Jan. 27 Performing Arts: Paivikki Nykter and Janos Negyesy Faculty violinists will perform Bartok’s violin duos at 8 p.m. in the Mandeville Center recital hall. UCSD’s music department is sponsoring the event which is open to the public. General admission is $8 and student admission is $6. For more information, call (858) 534-4830. Recreation: Sea Kayaking with the Birch Aquarium The Birch Aquarium at Scripps is sponsoring the event which is open to the public. Admission is $40. For more information and exact location, call (858) 534-7336. Tuesday, Jan. 30 Donation: UCSD Blood Drive UCSD Human Resources is sponsoring the event taking place at 10 a.m. in the Price Center Auditorium. The drive is open to the public and each person donating blood will receive a San Diego Blood bank T-shirt. For more information, call (858) 534-0286. Film: “”Fantasia 2000″” The redone Disney classic will be shown at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. The film is open to the public and tickets are $2. Forum: Improving the Chemotherapy Experience The UCSD Cancer Center is sponsoring the event which will take place at the UTC Westfield Shoppingtown Forum Hall at 5:30 p.m. The event is open to public and admission is free. For more information, call (858) 657-8735. Wednesday, Jan. 31 Seminar: Politically Incorrect with the Diversity Peer Program This forum will allow students to ask questions about anything related to diversity in a safe environment. The Cross Cultural Center, Warren college and the Student Council [A.S. Council?] are sponsoring the event which will take place at 6 p.m. in the Canyon Vista Room at Warren college. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call (858) 534-9689. Performing Arts: Masters of Persian Classical Music featuring Shajarian, Alizadeh and Kalhor This evening of traditional Persian music from Iran is sponsored by the University Events office. The concert will take place at 7:30 p.m. in Mandeville Center. The event is open to the public. General admission is $35 and student admission is $18. ...

Jacob's School Explores Alternative Sources of Energy

In the midst of California’s current energy crisis, scientists throughout the UC system are involved in various energy research projects in an effort to discover new and efficient ways to produce energy. These “”energy research activities,”” as the university calls them, are numerous and varied, dealing with nearly every branch of the physical sciences. The research is taking place entirely on UC campuses and in the national laboratories that the university manages for the U.S. Department of Energy. “”The University of California and its affiliated national laboratories are conducting research across a broad array of energy technologies that represent a marked departure from present methods of generating and transmitting power,”” said UC President Richard C. Atkinson. The innovative research includes a project at Los Alamos National Laboratory in “”Magnetized Target Fusion,”” which could potentially produce cheap fusion energy in a soda-can-sized cylinder. Another innovation is the discovery by UC Berkeley scientists of a metabolic switch in algae that converts sunlight into valuable hydrogen gas. The Lawrence Livermore Labs and the Davis, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and Irvine campuses are also all conducting energy research. “”While not all of these new technologies are going to become reality tomorrow, they do hold out great hope over the longer term for inexpensive and abundant energy supplies,”” Atkinson said. UCSD is also involved in an energy study. Scientists at the Jacobs School of Engineering are exploring ways to use sea water as a fuel for the generation of power. After exposing hydrogen atoms to high temperatures in a fusion reactor, the product of which, an ionized gas called plasma, would generate 1,000 megawatts of energy cleaner, safer and more stable than by methods using fossil fuel. The Office of Fusion Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy is funding research investigating possible methods of containing the volatile plasma. Containment of the ionized gas is one of the most troublesome aspects in the effective production of fusion energy. UCSD’s involvement in the statewide research does not end there. Various projects in pollution control, energy conservation and energy production are currently underway. These projects include the nearly completed cogeneration plant that, once finished, will allow UCSD to generate on-campus electric power. The plant will allow intrastate redirection of energy formerly supplied by San Diego Gas & Electric. The Jacobs School is eager to share its work with the UC community. “”We’re just beginning to implement a program to communicate with the rest of the campus and keep it informed of new developments,”” said Dolores Davies of the Jacobs School of Engineering. ...

Campus Life Referendum Sets Deadline

The Campus Life Referendum Committee has chosen Feb. 2 as the deadline for any student organization or group on campus to submit funding requests for the proposed Campus Life Referendum. Commissioned last May by Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Joseph Watson, the Campus Life Referendum Committee was created in the hopes of meeting the needs of the campus in terms of facilities and programming. According to A.S. Council President Doc Khaleghi, who is also co-chair of the committee, the intent is to have one referendum that would benefit all of UCSD at once. “”We assembled about 20 student leaders to form a committee from various organizations over UCSD,”” Khaleghi said. “”The goal was to decide on what the specific needs of the campus were and then from there to put a referendum on the ballot for the students to vote and decide on.”” Khaleghi went on to express his belief in the need for such a referendum. “”I think looking at both the extreme needs in athletics and university centers helped us see that there’s a broader need on campus than any one group,”” Khaleghi said. So far, talks of an increase in graduate and undergraduate quarterly fees of about $75 have been common in the committee. Assistant Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Tom Tucker said no one knows what the final number will be on a proposed student increase because it is still in debate. Khaleghi said that although there is always a fear in raising student fees, generally speaking, the campus has been very supportive. “”Unfortunately the state, which internally funds the UC system, doesn’t fund student affairs projects like our student unions, like athletics, like our programming, so that has to be done through assessment of student fees,”” Khaleghi said. “”But I think what you get out of the referendum will far outweigh however much per quarter you pay, whether it be around $75, give or take a few dollars.”” According to committee members, the increase in funds would provide funding for various groups on campus, including the A.S. Council, the programming council, the Cross-Cultural Center, the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Office, the Women’s Center, the Graduate Student Association, sports clubs as well as individual colleges. Revelle Dean of Student Affairs Renee Barnett-Terry said she thought that this referendum could be the best thing that could happen for UCSD. “”[The Campus Life Referendum] will invigorate this campus,”” she said. Khaleghi said the money would be given automatically to the various organizations and groups on campus were it passed. Allocation of these funds would be determined by their constituencies. In response to allegations that administrators will gain more from the referendum than students, Khaleghi disagreed. He said he believes the administration’s involvement is solely a supportive one. “”[Myself], as A.S. president and co-chair of this referendum, I know that this referendum is meant to benefit UCSD as a whole,”” he said. “”But the money is going directly to students; students will see the most benefit from it.”” Some students have been very critical of the referendum altogether. Opponents are concerned about the prospective and current students who may not be able to afford to attend UCSD with the assessment of another student fee. “”We’re part of a process; student fees have been continuously increased to the point where this institution is not affordable anymore,”” said Vice President Internal of the Graduate Students Association Kris Bohling, also a GSA representative GSA on the Student Life Referendum Committee. “”Look at the students that are here right now. We’re making democratic decisions for students who don’t get to be here because of the fees.”” Bohling went on to express his disapproval of the prevailing attitude among most students already attending UCSD. “”I’m not just against the administration, I’m against the mindset that says, ‘Oh we can afford [an additional] $75 a quarter, it’s not that much, it’s not going to affect us much,'”” Bohling said. “”Well, it may not affect those who have the money, but it’s really going to affect those students who cannot afford it.”” According to Bohling, since UCSD is a public institution, the referendum should acknowledge more of the needs of the community as well as those of students. He questioned the necessity of raising fees, asking why the administration cannot better use fees students already pay. “”In my belief, we have enough fees right now if they were utilized more efficiently to pay for the things we need, and we’d have enough fees with the increased student enrollment,”” Bohling said. Josh Cooper, another GSA member, said he thought the administration had too much control over the committee and the ultimate fate of the referendum. “”It’s obvious … they want control over what’s going on,”” Cooper said. “”They want the money to pay for their little pet projects, like 50-foot water slides and a Price Center Expansion that’s designed to give them more office space, instead of going and building their own building with their own money and letting student money go to things that affect students.”” Revelle Council Chair Jen Chang recalled the origins of the committee. “”I think it seemed kind of intimidating at first because with the first couple meetings there were all these administrators there telling us how good this would be without us really knowing specific details,”” Chang said. “”But now that the meetings have gone on, the administration really doesn’t have a huge part in terms of making us go a certain way.”” According to Chang, administrators cannot vote, and students do have the power to shape the referendum. Watson expressed a similar sentiment saying that although the administration has a deep interest in improving the quality of student life at UCSD, it has kept its distance. “”One can differ on the role the administration has had in this,”” Watson said. “”But effectively, once the administration has put it on the table and put it before the committee it’s in the hands of the students.”” GSA President Lea Marie Ruiz said the GSA has not taken any official standpoint on the referendum. “”Individual members of the GSA have their own opinions, but the council itself cannot take any official stance, because there has to be legislation that is voted on by other members of the GSA,”” she said. Ruiz also said that an increase in student fees was a necessary evil and that alternative sources of money were difficult to find. “”It’s a matter of practicality,”” Ruiz said. “”There’s this concern that we’re turning more and more to students for funding, but without a change in legislation on the state level, we have no other options. We’re doing the best we can with the system we have currently.”” Although in support of the referendum itself, A.S. Vice President Internal Jeff Dodge has been critical of the process by which it has been developed. “”In the beginning there was a strong administrative stronghold on the referendum,”” Dodge said. “”Although the administration is less involved, the chairs are still very responsive to the administration and maybe not as much to the students.”” Dodge said many members of the committee find the referendum process frustrating even though they remain optimistic that in the end, the students will reap the most benefits. ...

A.S. Council to Fund Anti-Zionism Week

Amid objections from the Union of Jewish Students, the A.S. Council is funding the Muslim Student Association’s Anti-Zionism Week, to be held next week. At last week’s A.S. Council meeting, Vice President Finance Matt Powell suggested funding the event from a fund created in 1994 specifically for controversial issues. The council voted against Powell’s motion, and instead decided to fund the event through the Student Organizations Unallocated fund, the fund through which most student organizations receive money. “”I can definitely understand the council’s reasons for it,”” Powell said. “”What they did is definitely consistent with the rules that we follow.”” The council must fund events and not discriminate based on content that students or council members disagree with. Powell said he wanted to fund the event from a different source because he has not had a chance yet to educate students on the issue of how funding is given to students. “”It may have been easier to address the situation this time if we had the funding source.”” Jonathan Rotter, a recent UCSD graduate, said he feels that many council members do not see how offensive the term “”Anti-Zionism Week”” is to Jewish students. “”Certainly they made the claim that they’re required by law to fund things in a content-independent manner,”” he said. “”But it’s hard for me to imagine that if someone had proposed an anti-Asian week that they would have gotten funding. It’s my feeling that they don’t understand that, to us, Anti-Zionism week is equal to Anti-Semitism week.”” Muslema Purmul, treasurer of the MSA, agreed with the council vote. “”I like the way they voted,”” she said. “”What this club is doing is no different from other clubs.”” Muir Senior Lila Hollman said the Union of Jewish Students has had a booth on Library Walk to educate students on Zionism. She said that Zionism is not a political issue; rather it is an essential part of the Jewish religion. Rotter added that while there is plenty of room for discussion about the current situation in the Middle East, there is a clear distinction between Anti-Zionism Week and current political issues. Purmul said she feels that Anti-Zionism Week is being misunderstood by many. “”I think that the reaction that has been voiced is too harsh considering what Anti-Zionism Week is all about,”” she said. “”I feel we’re being judged before we’ve had a chance to say anything.”” Students who disagree with Anti-Zionism Week, or any other political or religious event that they do not want to fund, can request a refund for the portion of their student activity fee that went to fund the week. UJS members said that as of earlier this week, 40 students had requested refunds. Each student who requests a refund will receive about three cents. “”We are encouraging students to do that if they share our outrage at this program,”” Hollman said. Rotter added he is encouraging students to pool the refund money and donate it to earthquake relief efforts in El Salvador. The A.S. Council provided the MSA $640 for the event. Parts two and three of this series will run next Thursday and the following Thursday. ...