News

Lights & Sirens

Lights & Sirens is a selection of entries compiled from the log book of the UCSD Police Department. UCSD crime statistics can be attained by all persons from the Police Department or at http://police.ucsd.edu Sunday, Nov. 19 5:15 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a black ’95 Ford Explorer in Lot 703. Loss: $500. 11:25 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a white ’98 Acura Integra in Lot 102. Loss: $4,400. Monday, Nov. 20 11:50 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a black and purple Trek B21 bicycle from the south bike racks at the Price Center. Loss: $400. 12:06 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from RIMAC. Loss: $20. 1:00 p.m.: A student reported losing a cellular phone at the Price Center. 3:03 p.m.: Officers arrested a 52-year-old male nonaffiliate for burglary at the Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Booked into Central Jail. 7:53 p.m.: Units and the San Diego Fire Department responded to a fire at Bates 106. Caused by burning food. Tuesday, Nov. 21 9:46 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a parking meter from Lot 113. Loss: $575. 11:00 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a camera from the Argo Hall elevator. Loss: $150. 2:46 p.m.: Officers arrested a 34-year-old female nonaffiliate for petty theft at Geisel Library. Cited and released. 5:19 p.m.: A 24-year-old male student suffered an ankle injury after falling at Humanities and Social Sciences Building. Sought private treatment. Wednesday, Nov. 22 10:45 a.m.: A staff member reported vandalism to a gold ’96 Geo Prism in Lot 753. Loss: $500. 12:15 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a blue B10 Magna Glacier Point bicycle from the racks on the south side of Geisel Library. Loss: $75. 1:30 p.m.: Officers arrested a 19-year-old male student in Lot 104 for misuse of a handicapped placard. Cited and released. 10:18 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a VCR from Thornton Hospital. Loss: $400. Thursday, Nov. 23 1:10 p.m.: Units and the San Diego Fire Department responded to a 20-year-old male nonaffiliate who suffered a head injury while surfing at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. Friday, Nov. 24 9:51 a.m.: A 17-year-old male nonaffiliate suffered a head injury while playing soccer at Warren Field. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. — Compiled by Lauren I. Coartney, News Editor ...

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Founding Biology Dean Appointed Professor Eduardo Macagno, associate vice president of arts and sciences for research and graduate education, and dean of the graduate school of arts and sciences at Columbia University, has been named founding dean of UCSD’s division of biology. Macagno has worked at Columbia since 1973 and will begin his work at UCSD starting Feb. 1, 2001. The division of biology, formerly a UCSD department, was created in July when UCSD’s division of natural sciences split into two divisions, each with its own dean. Mark Thiemens, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry, is the founding dean of the division of physical sciences. Macagno is a developmental neurobiologist and serves as co-editor of the “”Journal of Neurobiology.”” As dean of Columbia’s graduate school of arts and sciences, Macagno oversaw a major improvement in graduate student financial aid and the development of a new endowment for graduate fellowships within Columbia’s capital campaign. Macagno also initiated the development and implementation of several very successful interdepartmental masters degree programs and created several new programs that have significantly enhanced graduate alumni involvement with the school. A.S. President to Wash Chancellor Dynes’ Car Monday A.S. President Doc Khaleghi will wash Chancellor Dynes’ car on Library Walk Monday at noon as part of his defeat in the Chancellor’s 5K Run challenge. The annual stakes between the A.S. president and the chancellor state that if the chancellor finishes before the A.S. president, he must fund the annual A.S. barbecue. If the A.S. president finishes behind the chancellor, he must wash the chancellor’s car. Khaleghi came in 241st out of 719 entries. The chancellor came in 124th, and his wife Frances Dynes Hellman came in 171st. The chancellor pledged to donate $25 for every person who beat him to the finish line donating $3,075. Dynes Hellman pledged to donate $25 for every woman who beat her to the finish line donating $525. Dynes contributed an additional $40,000 in undesignated funds. All proceeds were put toward undergraduate research scholarships. Among the winners in the various 5K categories were Michael Breen, Terri Dowie, James Nielsen, Sally Anderson, Robert Starkey, Kevin Harley and Tamara Mau. Cross Cultural Center to Recognize World AIDS Day The UCSD Cross Cultural Center will present the World AIDS Day Celebration 2000 from Nov. 27 through Dec. 1 with poetry, artwork and informational materials. Included in the celebration will be an AIDS Resource Fair from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 30 on Library Walk in cooperation with Student Health Advocates, the AIDS Research institute and the Women’s Center. A movie screening of “”And the Band Played On”” will be held at 5:30 p.m. at the Cross Cultural Center. Scholarship Office Seeks Goldwater Applicants Science and engineering sophomores and juniors with excellent grades and research experience are encouraged to apply for national Goldwater Scholarships, which provide winners with $7,500 a year for up to two years. The awards are intended for students who plan to pursue graduate studies in engineering and the sciences. UCSD students have been quite successful nationally, winning three awards in 2000, two in 1999 and four in 1998. Applications are available at http://www.act.org/goldwater or at student financial services’ scholarship lobby and must be returned to the UCSD scholarship office by Jan. 16, 2001. Thomas Bond is the UCSD campus representative for the Goldwater Scholarship and can discuss the application with interested students. For more information, call (858) 534-3263. ...

Ten UCSD Professors Honored

Ten UCSD professors from the division of social sciences were recently recognized for their achievements in their fields. Diana Deutsch, a professor of psychology, was named a fellow of the division of applied experimental and engineering psychology of the American Psychological Association. “”I was pleased, not in the sense that it was inappropriate, but it wasn’t something I’d worked toward,”” Deutsch said. “”But I was obviously very pleased. I felt good about it.”” Deutsch had previously been named a fellow to two other divisions of the APA: the division of psychology and the arts in 1991 and the general psychology division in 1997. Deutsch’s work is heavily integrated with audio studies, particularly with differences in how music is perceived. She has also done studies involving balance and placement of instruments within an orchestra. Deutsch has been named a fellow to many other societies in areas of psychology and audio engineering. She founded the Society for Music Perception and Cognition and is the founding editor of the journal Music Perception. She gave a speech on perfect pitch at a Mozart festival at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. in 1998. “”The fact that I’m fellow of all these societies really does reflect that my work is interdisciplinary,”” Deutsch said. Economics professor Rob Engle was named a fellow of the American Statistical Association, for his individual contributions to the advancement of statistics. Engle has been a member of this society since 1989. He has been a member of UCSD staff since 1975. Engle is currently working in New York for a year. “”A People’s History of the Supreme Court”” (1999, Viking; 2000, Penguin), by political science professor Peter Irons has received a 2000 Silver Gavel Certificate of Merit from the American Bar Association for its “”contribution to public understanding of law and the legal system.”” Irons, a UCSD staff member since 1982, received his master’s and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Boston University and a J.D. degree from Harvard University. Rebecca Klatch, an associate professor of sociology, received various awards for her book, A Generation Divided: the New Left, the New Right, and the 1960s (1999, UC Press). The book was chosen Book-of-the-Month by the libertarian organization Freedom Network. She was honored by the American Sociological Association with the 2000 Distinguished Scholarship Award from the section on social movements and collective behavior. Klatch was a finalist for the C. Wright Mills Award, which is given to authors whose books are written in the tradition of Mills. “”I’m very happy to have received such recognition from scholars and the larger community,”” Klatch said. “”A Generation Divided”” is currently being translated into Chinese. Andrew Kehler, assistant professor of linguistics, was awarded two grants for his work in the area of computational linguistics. One grant was awarded by the National Security Agency for Leveraging Minimal Training Data to Improve Information Extraction Performance, and the other was from the National Science Foundation for Multimodel Access to Spatial Data. Kehler received his bachelor’s degree in computer science and engineering from the University of Pennsylvania and his master’s and Ph.D degrees in computer science from Harvard. Arend Lijphart, 22-year UCSD faculty member, research professor emeritus in the political science department, and former president of the American Political Science Association, was named a Phi Beta Kappa visiting scholar for 2000-2001. He will travel to several colleges nationwide, meeting with undergraduate students in both informal and classroom settings to give a major address at each campus for the entire academic community. Phi Beta Kappa’s visiting scholars program is designed to enrich the intellectual atmosphere of colleges with chapters and to let undergraduates meet and interact with distinguished scholars of many disciplines. The British Society for the History of Science awarded sociology professor Steven Shapin the Dingle Prize for “”Best Book Bringing the History of Science before a Wider Audience for his book, The Scientific Revolution.”” Shapin holds master’s and Ph.D. degrees in history and sociology of science from the University of Pennsylvania. He has been a member of UCSD’s staff since 1989. Political Science professor Kaare Strom was elected a fellow of the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters. This organization is the oldest scholarly society in Norway, Strom’s country of origin, and it is similar to the United States’ National Academy of Sciences. Strom lived in Norway until 1974, and then again from 1983-1985. The society, which is based in Trondheim, Norway, has meetings six times per year. Strom will be attending a meeting in May for his official induction. Strom received his bachelor’s degree in political science from Saint Olaf College, and his master’s and Ph.D. in the same area from Stanford. He also studied at the University of Oslo, Norway. David Swinney, a professor in the psychology department, was named an honorary university professor at the University of Queensland, Australia. Swinney, a UCSD faculty member since 1992, received his bachelor’s degree in psychology and his master’s in language disorders and speech pathology from Indiana University and his Ph.D. in psycholinguistics and cognition from the University of Texas. Twelve-year UCSD faculty member psychology professor John Wixted received the 2000 George A. Miller award as a co-author of his 1999 paper “”Psychophysics of Remembering,”” which appeared in the “”Journal of Experimental Analysis of Behavior.”” The “”Journal of Experimental Analysis of Behavior”” publishes basic experimental psychological research in animals and humans, with an emphasis on behavior. Wixted, who teaches Psychology 144: Memory and Amnesia, co-authored the paper with K. Geoffrey White, a professor of psychology at the University of Otago in New Zealand. “”I was notified through e-mail first [of winning the award] and I thought it was a joke,”” Wixted said. “”I thought they preferred super high-profile papers.”” Wixted felt his paper was more laboratory-based than most winners of the award. ...

AASU Holds UCSD Kwanzaa Celebration

Dozens of students from many cultures gathered at the Price Center ballroom last Monday to share in the African-American Student Union’s celebration of Kwanzaa. The celebration was a three-hour event that featured music, poetry, food and a keynote speaker. Tyler Huff/ Guardian The event’s program was a busy one, beginning with a drum call and other traditions that have been part of the celebration of Kwanzaa since its inception in the 1960s. Owna Cortes performed the Libation ceremony, an ancient African teaching intended to honor one’s ancestors by pouring water into earth. “”Our ancestors suffered a great many hardships to bring us to where we are today,”” Cortes said. “”Let us not forget this; let us be grateful and honor them every day.”” She then invited those present, instead of honoring just those historical heroes of the African culture, to name deceased family members so they might be honored during the pouring of the Libation. Sherman’s Cajun Creole provided dinner, while UCSD catering presented and served the food. Included on the menu were gumbo, red beans and rice, collard greens, sweet potatoes and crawfish, among other dishes. “”Kwanzaa is the celebration of the harvest,”” said AASU Director of Publicity Ashley Winston of the cultural basis for the menu. “”Traditionally the meal has very little meat and is made primarily of grains and vegetables.”” After dinner, the AASU presented its keynote speaker, Mzee (Elder) Kadumu Moyenda. Moyenda, in addition to being an iridologist who has studied under Paul Gross, is a teacher in the San Diego Unified School District and an Elder in the “”Rites of Passage”” for Boys and Girls in San Diego. Moyenda spoke generally about the meaning of Kwanzaa and the motivations behind its creation. “”For 400 years, our culture had been oppressed in America,”” Moyenda said. “”It needed a tradition. It needed something that reflected us as a people.”” Moyenda made it clear that, like other holiday traditions, the idea of Kwanzaa is not to exclude other cultures, but to be specifically representative of the African culture, much as Christmas is specifically representative of the Christian tradition. Moyenda’s oration also focused on the idea of transitions and rites of passage, the steps and stages necessary to properly progress to full adulthood. “”It’s my second time here at UCSD and it’s always nice to see what’s going on on college campuses today,”” Moyenda said. “”That’s because today’s universities are the foundations of the future.”” As much as it was a cultural event, the AASU Kwanzaa celebration was an educational one as well. The program included a history of Kwanzaa as well as a demonstration and explanation of its many traditions, symbols and practices. Entertainment during the evening included several poetry readings and a performance by the hip-hop group PackaBlacks. “”The food was good, so was the entertainment, and the speaker was very poignant,”” UCSD student Antonio Chamberlain said. “”Bravo, AASU.”” Kwanzaa has been celebrated at UCSD for seven years and was first observed at the UCSD Cross Cultural Center. Winston said that the organization begins planning for the annual celebration at the onset of the academic year. Winston and Activities Coordi-nator Amelia Baxter served as masters of ceremony for the evening. ...

Festival Celebrates Latin Culture

UCSD’s first LatinFest commenced at 11 a.m. Friday in the Price Center Plaza. David Pilz/ Guardian The festival was a free, all-ages event that welcomed both students and nonstudents. The event began with a daytime festival in the Price Center Plaza, featuring cultural entertainment and information. The Latin Fest shared a time slot with the university’s 40th birthday celebration, and provided musical accompaniment for the cutting of UCSD’s giant birthday cakes. The entertainment was comprised of Latin musicians and dance groups, including Salsa y Fuego, one of San Diego’s professional dance companies. “”They were awesome,”” said Revelle freshman Gina Tesconi. “”I’d love to see them again.”” The festival ran until 4 p.m. The LatinFest went on hiatus before opening again in the Price Center Ballroom with a concert and dance, featuring more Latin DJs and musicians. The festival featured musicians and performers of varying Latin backgrounds, and their performances ranged from hip-hop to harpists. Michaela Izaguire, a Marshall junior, spoke highly of the day. “”The idea behind today’s event, I think, was to offer aspects of Latin culture to be soaked up by the UCSD community,”” she said. “”What better way to share one’s culture than to come out and celebrate it with an audience.”” The LatinFest will be back next year with more entertainment and the same community focus. Organizers of the event and audience members alike said they recommend that anyone interested should attend. Francesca Cabrillo, a senior who enjoyed a piece of UCSD’s birthday cake during the Latin celebration, spoke out for the event. “”Latin culture is colorful, and it’s alive,”” Cabrillo said. “”It’s fun to learn about and this event is good proof of that fact.”” ...

Co-Op Refuses To Sell Cigarettes In Smokeout Day

The Student Co-op General Store joined the nation in recognizing the Great American SmokeOut by not selling any tobacco products last Thursday. The Great American SmokeOut is a day when many stores do not sell cigarettes and numerous programs occur, aimed at educating smokers about the dangers of smoking and the benefits of quitting. Roosevelt alumnus and member of the General Store, George Gonzalez, said the members of the co-op wanted to recognize National Great American SmokeOut to show their support for those quitting. “”It is to show we do support nonsmoking programs, and at the same time that we support a smoker’s right to smoke,”” Gonzalez said. “”This was a way we could do both.”” Currently, the General Store is the only store on campus where students can purchase cigarettes. According to Gonzalez, the store sells anywhere from 50 to 90 packs of cigarettes per day. He also said that for the most part, people were understanding as to why the General Store would not allow cigarettes to be purchased on that day. The fact that it was not selling cigarettes did not deter many smokers from smoking. Warren sophomore David Lee laughed when he learned he could not buy cigarettes at the General Store. “”Oh, my God, this is just wrong,”” Lee said, shaking his head in disbelief. Lee said he would now have to go off campus to get cigarettes. One customer yelled at the cashier when he was told he could not buy cigarettes. “”Are you going to tell me when to smoke?”” the unidentified man yelled as he stormed out. Revelle freshman Allie Umoff, who quit smoking a year ago, was stunned that the one day she craved a cigarette, she couldn’t buy any. “”I had a dream about smoking a cigarette last night. And the only day I want to smoke, I can’t?”” Umoff said. “”Maybe this is a sign or something.”” Umoff said that she stopped smoking a year ago when it began to interfere with playing water polo to the best of her potential. Marshall senior Brian Wheeler, a member of the General Store, said that he supports the Great American SmokeOut because those who want to quit should have the opportunity and support. “”It’s nice to have a day recognizing the dangers of smoking. Those who want to quit should have opportunity to quit if they want to,”” Wheeler said. “”But this day shouldn’t pit people against smokers.”” Revelle junior John Mckenzie said that while he hopes the day saved lives, he did have doubts about it. “”I hope a few lives were saved today. But it’s pretty harsh to tell people what they can and cannot do,”” Mckenzie said. “”People have their rights.”” Personnel from the Student Health Center manned an informational table on Library Walk to promote the benefits of quitting smoking. The Student Health Center sponsored a program to encourage students to turn in their cigarette butts for prizes. A Tobacco Jeopardy game was also played and more prizes were given out. Debbie Pino Saballett, outreach coordinator from the Student Health Center, emphasized the benefits of quitting smoking for even the day. “”Quitting smoking for the day can make an impact on a student’s general health almost immediately,”” Saballett said. She said that within the first 8 hours, carbon monoxide level in the blood drops to normal and oxygen level in blood increases. Within 24 hours, the chance of heart attack decreases. The benefits of quitting smoking increase dramatically within 48 hours to 72 hours. ...

Dynes Recognizes Volunteers

A reception in the Price Center Ballroom Thursday recognized faculty, students and staff involved in community service as part of a year-long program to acknowledge UCSD’s 40th anniversary. David Pilz/ Guardian The ceremony commemorated the Board of Regents’ decision to establish a campus on the former San Diego army base on Nov. 18, 1960. On display was a 40-year timeline, memory boards dedicated to each decade and a video presentation of UCSD in the 1960s. Chancellor Robert Dynes began the ceremony at 3 p.m. by welcoming 130 guests. Among the attendees were Herbert York, UCSD’s first chancellor and current diversity council chairman, as well as Hugo Fisher, a former senator and co-author of the Master Plan for Higher Education, who was also responsible for securing governmental funds for the creation of UCSD. Dynes commented that although it is a relatively young university, UCSD has done well in establishing itself as a fine institution. The 2000 U.S. News and World Report ranked UCSD seventh nationally among public universities. The Irwin and Joan Jacobs School of Engineering was ranked ninth among schools of its type. The 40-year observance’s theme, “”Giving Back to the Community,”” was inspired by all who volunteer, according to Dynes. “”Each of you that works in the community has given UCSD a face, because you represent us as you display your care,”” Dynes said. “”You set an example … for the rest of UCSD.”” Senior Vice Chancellor Marsha Chandler spoke about the Extended Studies for Outreach Program, founded in the 1960s as a way for volunteers to offer support in the community. According to Chandler, this program strengthens the university. “”We can all take enormous pride as we look at the range and depth of the programs that we have here at UCSD,”” Chandler said. “”The Straight Student Volunteers are students who are healing the community, but also helping themselves by going outside of their own interests and spending time with others, which is the time that matters the most.”” Clark Kerr, then-president of the University of California, said at UCSD’s 25th anniversary that “”the advance of [UCSD] to a peak position among the 3,200 institutions of higher education in the United States is one of the few academic marvels in all history. No other major American university has ever grown so remarkable both in quantity and in quality at the same time, and in so short a time.”” York agreed. He spoke about how UCSD was originally named UC La Jolla. The naming became so controversial, according to York, that newspapers coined the name “”UC Here.”” According to Fisher, UCSD was officially named in 1960 when he was asked his opinion at a town meeting. The name UC San Diego was chosen because La Jolla is a community of San Diego. According to Fisher, UCSD “”went on to become one of the greatest universities in the nation. “”I am proud of what it has become, and it is a wonderful idea to put the 40th anniversary together with the community service aspect of the college,”” he said. “”The volunteer work is instrumental in why UCSD is such a fine school.”” The program, represented by the motto “”Celebrating 40 Years of Education, Service and Discovery,”” will encompass over 300 activities and 40 events beginning Nov. 21. UCSD TV will televise two half-hour video segments about UCSD’s 40 years. The first will detail the past, and the second will include an interview with Dynes about the future. “”We care about the well-being of this community because we are a part of it,”” Dynes said. “”The only way that that happens is the time you take to make it happen. “”We are a great university and [are] becoming even greater because of you, and we can make the next 40 years even better than the past 40 years.”” ...

Lights & Sirens

Lights & Sirens is a selection of entries compiled from the log book of the UCSD Police Department. UCSD crime statistics can be attained by all persons from the Police Department or at http://police.ucsd.edu Monday, Nov. 13 11:30 a.m.: A 40-year-old male nonaffiliate complained of breathing difficulties at the Shiley Eye Care Center. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Tuesday, Nov. 14 9:58 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from Tenaya Hall. Loss: $20. 12:31 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a cell phone from a vehicle on Regents Road. Loss: $240. 12:52 p.m.: A staff member reported attempted burglary of a white ’97 Dodge truck in Lot 604. 3:37 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of audio-visual equipment from University Center 111A. Loss: $5,500. 6:30 p.m.: Officers arrested a 24-year-old male student at Geisel Library for petty theft. Cited and released. Wednesday, Nov. 15 12:50 a.m.: A staff member reported vandalism to the Gilman Parking Structure. Loss: $1,800. 1:05 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a cellular phone from Galbraith Hall. Loss: $300. 3:00 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a print from Mandeville Center. Loss: $90. 4:35 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of keys. No monetary loss. 4:21 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of cash from Mandeville Center. Loss: $425. 6:42 p.m.: An 18-year-old female student fainted at York Hall. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. 7:13 p.m.: An 18-year-old female student fainted at Earl’s Place. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Thursday, Nov. 16 11:17 a.m.: A 78-year-old male nonaffiliate suffered facial injuries after falling near the Crafts Center. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. 11:54 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of aquatic life from the Birch Aquarium. Loss: $35. 2:40 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a silver and chrome B21 mountain bike from the Meteor Hall bike racks. Loss: $600. 3:02 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a mobile phone from the Muir quad. Loss: $220. 3:15 p.m.: A student reported vandalism to a black ’94 Toyota Camry in Lot 510. Loss: $500. 4:15 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a black Fisher B24 mountain bike from the Argo Hall bike racks. Loss: $350. Friday, Nov. 17 10:47 a.m.: Units and the San Diego Fire Department responded to a report of smoke at the Warren Literature Building. Caused by burnt plastic in a microwave. 4:07 p.m.: Officers arrested a 59-year-old male nonaffiliate at 3100 La Jolla Village Drive for a misdemeanor warrant for failure to appear. Total bail: $374. Saturday, Nov. 18 3:16 a.m.: Officers detained a 20-year-old male affiliate from Pepper Canyon for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. — Compiled by Lauren I. Coartney, News Editor ...

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UCSD and Children’s Hospital to Unite The UC Regents have endorsed an agreement to integrate a children’s health program at Children’s Hospital to create a world-class center for pediatric care, research and teaching in the final stage of discussions between physicians and administrators from UCSD and Children’s Hospital. Combining UCSD’s pediatric services with those of Children’s Hospital would enhance the repute of both parties and would allow both institutions to continue attracting the best pediatricians and pediatric researchers. It would also allow extended community-based programming and outreach. The agreement is an extension of collaborations which are already taking place between the two institutions. Both have successfully established numerous joint patient care, teaching and research programs. Plans for the integration include provisions to establish new research facilities at the Children’s Hospital site in addition to continuing and extending collaboration among researchers and clinicians developing improved diagnostic and treatment approaches to childhood disease. Regents Approve Plan to Admit More Graduate Students The University of California approved a budget last Thursday that focuses on expanding UC’s contributions to the California economy, improving student access to a UC education and preserving high quality teaching, research and public service. UC’s state-funded operating budget would rise 7.7 percent to 3.45 billion under the budget plan. The university’s total budget, which reflects funds from all sources, including federal funds for the three national laboratories managed by UC, would be approximately $15.7 billion. Excluding the labs, the total budget would be approximately $12.5 billion. The university’s state budget request is built on a “”partnership agreement”” reached this year with Gov. Gray Davis. The partnership provides for predictable annual increases in state General Fund support for UC, along with the university’s commitment to meeting accountability goals in specific areas of performance, which the university is currently meeting or exceeding. Regents Make Decision to Admit More Graduate Students In an effort to maintain California’s economic growth and the university’s role in the state’s economy, the University of California announced Thursday that it would meet the state’s future workforce needs by enrolling an additional 11,000 graduate students to the UC system in the next ten years. The University of California will employ several tactics to facilitate its goal to spread the extra graduate students across its ten campuses. These include increased funding dedicated to research assistantships as research grants and contracts grow, including state-funded research initiatives proposed in the 2001-02 budget; more funding for teaching assistantships as undergraduate enrollments grow; increased fee waivers for research assistants and teaching assistants, consistent with the university’s contract with the union representing UC teaching assistants; and examination by UC of other opportunities to augment graduate student financial support from other university fund sources, such as student fees and private gifts. UC Regents Act to Improve Employee Salaries, Benefits The UC Board of Regents approved a budget Thursday that would significantly improve wages and benefits for UC employees by increasing salaries that are not keeping up with the marketplace and by expanding UC’s child care program. The UC Regents also announced the approval of a program that would expand eligibility for UC retirement benefits to “”casual”” employees. This is the second year that the Regents have made actions in an effort to attract and retain qualified and talented personnel. Among the specific improvements to help institute the changes are an average 2 percent employee salary increase, merit increases for eligible employees and a 1 percent parity increase to keep faculty salaries market-competitive. The University of California is also proposing a plan that would grant “”casual”” employees career status after reaching the 1,000-hour threshold at which they would also be able to accumulate retirement benefits in accordance with the new budget. ...

Amnesty International Participates in Campaign Against Torture

Amnesty International, UCSD’s chapter included, launched the Campaign Against Torture on Oct. 18. Amnesty International was founded at UCSD in 1988 and works to raise awareness about human rights issues on campus and in the community. It also instigates campaigns fighting against human rights and political issues through activities such as letter writing, lectures, films and concerts. The organization-wide goals for the Campaign Against Torture are to undertake special joint-action strategies in 21 countries to fight against torture and ill treatment, to require torturers to be held accountable for their actions and be brought to justice in their own countries or elsewhere, to encourage training for police and security forces in proper, humane interrogation techniques, to end the global trade of torture equipment, to confront violence against women that falls under the heading of torture, to lobby for the United Nations to take action against torture at the World Conference on Racism, to expose and end torture inflicted on children, and to challenge governments to implement the U.N. Convention Against Torture. UCSD’s chapter plans to take action to support the campaign over the course of the next two years. Events have so far included a joint press conference at Border Field State Park, organized by chapters of Amnesty in San Diego and Tijuana. After the press conference, an artist reception in Tijuana unveiled an exhibit of paintings by women painters of the area done especially for the campaign. Amnesty at UCSD is currently attempting to have these paintings shown again on campus, and to have the UCSD Art Gallery feature a series of photographs documenting crimes of human rights during the regime of Chilean dictator Agusto Pinochet. The gallery normally books exhibits over a year and a half in advance, but this exhibit may find a place if another falls through. In addition, Amnesty at UCSD is aiming to have one speaker per quarter throughout the campaign. Possible speakers include professors from UCSD, the University of San Diego and San Diego State University, or individuals from organizations such as the San Diego-based Survivors of Torture International, which provides medical and psychological assistance for survivors of torture worldwide. The organization can be contacted at (619) 582-9018. Dec. 10 will be a day to focus on Children and Torture, and March 8, International Women’s Day, will have an emphasis on women and torture. During the month of June, which is Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender Pride Month, the campaign will highlight torture aimed at such persons. The National Week of Student Action will occur April 1 through April 8. ...