News

Lights & Sirens

Sunday, Feb. 11 1:45 p.m.: Units and paramedics responded to an 18-year-old female student who was paralyzed due to a medical condition at Stewart Hall. Transported to Kaiser by paramedics. 5:34 p.m.: Officers arrested a 40-year-old male affiliate for spousal abuse. Transported to Central Jail. Monday, Feb. 12 11:30 a.m.: Officers arrested a 20-year-old female student in Lot 206 for misuse of a disabled person placard. Cited and released. 8:48 p.m.: A 19-year-old female student suffered a seizure and a loss of consciousness at Warren Lecture Hall 2001. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Tuesday, Feb. 13 9:00 a.m.: A staff member reported the theft of food service equipment from the Birch Aquarium. Loss: $2,000. 1:03 p.m.: A 22-year-old female suffered facial lacerations and a broken nose after falling from her bicycle near the shuttle stop at Scholars Drive South. Transported to Thornton by paramedics. 5:20 p.m.: Officers detained a 27-year-old male student at Porter’s Pub for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. Wednesday, Feb. 14 11:20 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a blue Raleigh M50 mountain bike from the bike racks at Galathea Hall. Loss: $350. 12:26 p.m.: A 47-year-old staff member suffered a seizure at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography snack bar. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. 4:01 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a Specialized Hardrock A1 bicycle from behind the Price Center. Loss $550. Thursday, Feb. 15 2:55 a.m.: Officers arrested two 20-year-old male students at the Preuss School for skateboarding in a posted prohibited area. Cited and released. 2:30 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a red Specialized Rockhopper mountain bike from the Bonner Hall bike racks. Loss: $400. Friday, Feb. 16 7:20 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a green ’94 Ford Explorer from Lot 702. Loss: $10,000. Saturday, Feb. 17 12:24 a.m.: Officers detained a 19-year-old male student at Lot 208 for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. 3:49 p.m.: A nonaffiliate reported the theft of a cell phone, car stereo and compact discs from a vehicle parked in Lot 302. Loss: $1,400. 10:25 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a vehicle in Lot 502. Loss: $560. Sunday, Feb. 18 11:56 p.m.: A student reported an attempted burglary to a burgundy ’92 Nissan Sentra in Lot 502. Loss: $250. Monday, Feb. 19 5:14 a.m.: A staff member reported vandalism to a white ’88 Cushman cart. Loss $300. ...

Briefly

William B. Armstrong, whose resume boasts 12 years of directing research activities for the San Diego Community College District, had joined UCSD as the new director of Student Research and Information. Armstrong takes over the position, which was formerly held by the now-retired Darlene Morell, on March 12. In addition to the book and numerous papers, Armstrong has authored concerning institutional research at the university and post-secondary education level, he has also worked as the project director for two nationally funded endeavors on the development of national standards for adult literacy. Author Ruth Morgan-Jones to Appear at UCSD Bookstore Ruth Morgan-Jones will make an appearance at the UCSD Bookstore on Feb. 28 at 5 p.m. to discuss her book, titled “”Hearing Differently: An Investigation into the Impact of Hearing Loss on Family Life.”” The book covers the results of 150 interviews with hearing-impaired people and looks at how their disability has altered their relationships. Morgan-Jones is hearing-impaired herself and used her experience on the subject as inspiration to write the book. The book finds a positive outlook on the topic by drawing from various fields of study, including social psychology, family sociology and linguistics to discover means hearing-impaired people use consciously and unconsciously in every day interaction such as conflict management and communication. For more information about the event, call (858)534-3149. Brain Impairment Discovered in Female Alcoholics Researchers at the UCSD School of Medicine and the Veteran’s Affairs Health Care System have used fMRI studies to confirm that alcoholism negatively affects memory in young, female alcoholics. Previously, only thinking and memory tests were used to test the theory. The researchers published their findings in the February issue of “”Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.”” Susan F. Tapert, who works as an assistant adjunct professor of psychiatry at UCSD and as a clinical psychologist at the Veteran’s Affairs Health Care System, headed the research, which employed functional magnetic reasoning for the first time to study the brains of female alcoholics. Women 18 to 25 years old were tested in order to discover the importance of studying the impaired brain parts individually to see how early alcoholism leads to brain damage. The researchers are planning to do more studies with men and women to determine whether memory loss can improve with abstinence from alcohol or whether it is permanent. Waste Minimization Committee Announces Recycling Awards The Waste Minimization Advisory Commitee announced the 2001 Recycling Heroics Awards last week. The Recycling Heroics Awards were created to cut down on waste and to encourage recycling in all departments at UCSD. Recipients of the award will receive a pin and a certificate for their conservation efforts. Nominations for the awards are accepted all year long with the actual awards being given out some time near Earth Day, which is April 22. March 30 will be the cutoff date to submit nominations for this year’s awards. The ceremony will be held April 27. Award recipients are chosen based on several factors, including fostering recycling in their own department, encouraging others to recycle, and making sure that the recycling continues. ...

Student Regent Visits UCSD, Discusses Admissions

Student Regent-designate Tracy Davis visited UCSD Thursday to talk to potential student regent candidates at a luncheon concerning the application process. The luncheon took place in the Faculty Club Thursday morning. Davis spoke to six applicants and a few other spectators about the difficulties of the application process and the responsibilities of student regent. Applications for the position are due in the chancellor’s office Feb. 23 by 5 p.m. These applications are for the position of student regent-designate for 2001-2002 and student regent for 2002-2003. Davis is the student regent-designate for 2000-2001 and will be student regent next year. Students from all UC campuses are eligible to apply. Student regents in the past have been undergraduate and graduate students alike. Davis is a graduate student at UCLA. She received her bachelor’s degree in 1995 from UCLA. She moved to New York City and worked for CNN in the investigative documentary department before moving back and becoming an undergraduate adviser at UCLA. She then began her graduate studies and ran for the student regent position. Davis is the first student regent to be elected to a two-year term. Previously, the term was only one year. The year as designate was added to allow student regents to become more involved and versed in the issues. “”Even though you only have two years, you have things to learn, networking,”” Davis said. “”Those don’t take hours, they take months.”” The students present at the luncheon asked questions regarding the position and the application process. Davis informed them of different steps of the process. The first interview for the position is with the UC Student Association. Her advice for this step of the process is to go to the UCSA Web site and find out where the association stands on issues. “”A lot of it is figuring out what you can accomplish and what you can’t accomplish and talking to a lot of people to find out what they think a student regent should be doing,”” Davis said. Davis will not be able to vote until her second year. “”[Next year] I do all the same things as a regular regent does,”” she said. The year as student regent-designate is a nonvoting year. The last interview for the position is with the regents themselves. Only three candidates in the UC system make it to this step. Davis again told applicants to prepare by knowing their audience. She talked about how she prepared by talking things out and realizing where she stood on issues. “”The regents want someone they can spend hours and hours on buses and planes and in meetings with, as well as someone they can work with,”” she said. Davis said she found the second interview intimidating because it was with 24 interviewers and just her as the interviewee. “”[The luncheon] broadened my mind as to the specifics of the job and what role I could have in it and the advantages I would bring to the position,”” said student regent applicant and Warren junior Fady Mikhael. The position of student regent takes up a lot of time, Davis emphasized. She said she is used to working 12 to 14 hours in a day and up to 30 hours a week in addition to her graduate work. “”I’m in my office doing ‘regental’ things between 10 and 20 hours a week,”” she said. She has an assistant who works 10 hours a week, but she does more research, according to Davis. Davis summed up her job by simply saying “”It is to direct people to correct information.”” Revelle junior Seth Silvernail attended the luncheon to obtain more information about the position. “”I’m looking at all the implications of it,”” he said. During the luncheon, Silver-nail asked Davis about the personal impact of her job. “”I think you need to love what you’re doing,”” she said. “”You need to be willing and prepared that your friends and the things you’re doing will be a part of this.”” The duties of a student regent include keeping well-informed of issues affecting education in California, being prepared to represent all students in the system and understanding how the system actually operates. Applications for the position of student regent can be obtained at the A.S. offices on the third floor of the Price Center. Davis urged students to apply for the position. “”It’s learning an amazing internship,”” she said. “”You learn so much about the way things really work.”” ...

Students of Color Convene

A record 300 students participated this weekend in the 12th annual “”Students of Color Conference: Politics of Silence Establishing a Voice at the Crossroads of the New Millennium,”” which was hosted by the A.S. Council in cooperation with the UC Student Association. Students from various schools were in attendance during the three-day event, including members from all of the UC campuses, some California State University campuses and some high schools. Among the UC campuses, Davis and Riverside had the highest number of attendees. UC Santa Cruz junior David Harbaugh explained his motivation for making the long commute to attend the conference. “”My motivation as a white ally was to learn my role as one,”” Harbaugh said. “”I wanted to be more familiar with the struggle and I think the people [in the conference] have been really open in trying to educate themselves and learn their role, as well.”” Co-Chair of the SOCC Committee Nneka Udoh said she heard only good things about the conference. “”It was extremely organized,”” Udoh said. “”I think this conference in San Diego totally set a precedent — not to say the ones in the past weren’t successful, because they were. It’s just that this year we had so many people.”” Jesse Coward, a member of the SOCC Committee, agreed. “”It ran very smoothly,”” Coward said. “”The amount of work and energy put into it really paid off.”” Udoh said the high turnout rate was a surprise for everyone involved. According to her, this year’s student participation is a significant increase from last year’s number of approximately 60 students. Before the conference, Co-Chair of the SOCC Committee Alicia Schwartz talked about her goals for the three-day event. “”My big hope is that people will get something from this when they leave,”” Schwartz said. “”After a conference like this, it makes you think of what you really have — you realize just how privileged you are.”” The conference’s first major event on Friday was “”The Arena,”” a concert/dance/art exhibit featuring L.A. Symphony and Medusa. Events sponsored by the conference on Saturday included an opening speech from Hughes Suffren of Claremont-McKenna College, workshops on issues including rally organization, various caucuses including multiple identities and a rally and march with the coalition of Justice for Janitors and Bus Riders’ Union. The evening’s activities included a banquet featuring professor George Lipsitz of the UCSD department of ethnic studies as keynote speaker, and the play “”The Vagina Monologues.”” “”He touched me deeply,”” said Kevin Du, a UC Davis junior, about Lipsitz’s speech. “”He talked so passionately that it made me passionate.”” Sunday, the final day of the conference, wrapped up with more workshops, caucuses addressing women and queers of color, a panel discussion entitled “”The Changing Face of Activism”” and finally, a large group session. Arash Kolahi, a Marshall senior, said he liked how the conference ended. “”It ends on a positive note,”” Kolahi said. “”Speakers talk about solutions and success stories.”” A.S. Vice President External Eugene Mahmoud praised the conference and its participants but wondered why more people did not attend, particularly more members of the administration. “”It’s interesting when something is student-initiated like this conference, Chancellor Dynes, who has deemed himself chief executive officer of diversity, or something to that effect, is not here,”” Mahmoud said. Udoh shared his sentiment. “”Honestly, I wish more people from UCSD could be here,”” Udoh said. “”I wish Joseph Watson and Chancellor Dynes were here. They should totally use this as a resource.”” UC Riverside senior and External Vice President Ryann Nieves mentioned how she thought this year’s conference was better than the ones before. “”This is my third year at the conference, and this year has three times as many students who are just more willing to listen and dialogue,”” Nieves said. “”Touchy subjects usually bring negative connotations, but I’ve seen people [this year] really be open to make it a positive situation.”” Nieves went on to commend the San Diego staff for hosting the event so smoothly. UCLA junior Greg Hom said one of the goals of participants was to network. “”A lot of connections were made that were really important,”” Hom said. “”I definitely met a lot of people, which is sort of the theme of this conference — unity of struggle.”” Mahmoud said most of the credit should be given to Co-Chairs Udoh and Schwartz. Udoh expressed her thanks to all the SOCC staff, including a special thanks to Tom Colley, UCSD operations manager of the University Centers. ...

Briefly

David Artis has been named the new director of the UCSD Academic Enrichment Programs. Artis is the former director of the Michigan School of Public Health in Ann Arbor and has also managed the graduate student retention programs at the University of Michigan’s Rackham School of Graduate Studies. Artis will now be responsible for academically supporting UCSD undergraduates in their studies. Artis will be expected to increase student diversity and to create and improve programs that encourage undergraduates to pursue higher levels of education after graduating college. Artis will also forge communication with local high school seniors about UCSD and its various programs. UCSD Study Finds Gene Therapy Effective in Mature Monkeys UCSD School of Medicine researchers have built upon earlier research with brain cells to report that degenerate brain fibers in older monkeys can be restored using genetically altered tissues that have been modified to create a nerve growth factor, which is found in all vertebrate animals. The fibers, which are called axons, carry messages through the brain and are affected in Alzheimer’s Disease. The researchers believe their discovery could lead to a possible treatment for that disease. They have since received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to develop an Alzheimer’s treatment and are currently seeking human subjects. The researchers published their results, which describe the work they did with 18 rhesus monkeys ranging from 9 to 27 years old, in the Feb. 13 issue of the “”Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences.”” UCSD and San Diego Historical Society to Create Regional Studies Network UCSD, in partnership with the San Diego Historical Society, will establish the San Diego Regional Studies Network, which will act as a clearinghouse for those doing research or are interested in subjects relating to San Diego’s history and culture. The network will present its plans for its first task, a 120-page directory of San Diego’s historical resources, at its first meeting to be held Feb. 20 at the Museum of Man in Balboa Park. The directory will be posted online in the future. The first series of meetings will unite local scholars and citizens to talk about issues concerning San Diego and will address the level of regional knowledge possessed by San Diego residents. Speakers at the meetings will include Robert Witty, the director of the San Diego Historical Society, Bruce Linder, a naval historian and author, Mark Spalding, a UCSD professor and environmental specialist, and Richard Griswald Castillo, an SDSU professor and Mexican American history specialist. Public attendance of the meetings are welcomed, but limited. For more information, call (858) 822-3125. Chancellor Dynes Elected to the Council of the National Academy of Sciences UCSD Chancellor Robert. C. Dynes has been elected to the Council of the National Academy of Sciences. Dynes has been chosen to serve a three-year term as a councilor and is one of 12 elected councilors-at-large. Dynes has been a member of the society since 1989 in the field of Applied Physical Sciences. UCSD to Help Fund Computer Based Programs at Gompers Elementary UCSD in cooperation with California Student Opportunity and Access Program (Cal-SOAP) have created a pilot program called “”Through Windows and Lenses: Technology in Focus”” to help low-income students experience “”hands-on”” exposure to computer technology. Students from Gompers Secondary School in the San Diego Unified District will participate in the program which will link them to math and science tutors at UCSD through live video connections called “”webcams.”” The program is made possible through a $30,000 grant from the Verizon Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Verizon Communications. The grant was established to assist institutions of higher education in recruiting and retaining qualified minority undergraduates in science and mathematics disciplines. ...

Events

Thursday, Feb. 15 Theater: ‘Twelfth Night’ Sponsored by the UCSD Theatre and Dance Department, this William Shakespeare comedy depicts a world of comfortable order wrenched apart by the disease of love. Old lives are rudely discarded in favor of new fantasies as Shakespeare explores the lengths people go to in pursuit of the desires of their hearts. The play is directed by Jonathan Silverman. The performance will take place at the Mandell Weiss Theater at 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and at 7 p.m. Sunday. The cost is $6 for students. For more information, call (858) 534-4574. Theater: ‘Bash’ Neil LaBute’s smash hit explores everyday evil in three short plays about a handful of seemingly normal people whose capacities for violence and hatred border on the sociopathic. In “”Medea Redux,”” a woman takes her 14 year-old boy to a motel to meet his father for the first time. In “”Iphigenia in Orem,”” a businessman lures a stranger to a motel room where he makes a gruesome confession. And in “”A Gaggle of Saints,”” a stylish couple attends a party on Manhattan, but after the soiree their evening turns violent. The performance, directed by Les Waters, will take place at the Mandell Weiss Forum Studio at 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Tickets for students are $6. For more information, call (858) 534-4574. Saturday, Feb. 17 Performing Arts: ‘Pilobolus Dance Theatre’ Formed almost 30 years ago by Moses Pendleton and Jonathan Wolken, today Pilobolus Dance Theatre is a major American dance company of international stature, acclaimed for its unusual mix of physicality and invention. The performance will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Center. The cost for students is $18. For more information, call (858) 534-4119. Theater: ‘The Vagina Monologues’ This Obie Award-winning play will be performed at 8:30 p.m. in the Price Center Theater. The event is sponsored by the Women’s Center. The cost is $5. For more information, call (858) 822-0074. Sunday, Feb. 18 Music: ‘Lunasa’ Young, fresh and progressive, yet steeped in the rhythms and textures of traditional Irish music, Lunasa has emerged in Ireland to take Irish music into the next century. They will perform at 7:30 p.m. in Mandeville Center. The cost for students is $10. For more information, call (858) 534-4119. Music: La Jolla Symphony The La Jolla Symphony will perform their recital entitled “”Music with Art and Love”” at 2 p.m. at the Institute of the Americas Building. The UCSD Music Department will sponsor the event which is open to the public. General and student admission is $40. For more information call (858) 822-3374. ...

Awareness Week Aims to Educate Students

In recognition of Valentine’s Day, health advocates across the United States rallied to support Condom Awareness Week. Despite the rain, Student Health Services manned an information booth on Library Walk Tuesday to support sexual health awareness. Condoms and other forms of sexual protection were handed out to students. Student Health Advocate Natalie Lamb spoke of the need for increased awareness of the dangers of unprotected sex. “”The purpose of the awareness week is not to push condoms,”” Lamb said. “”People are already using them and we want them to be aware of the different options available. There are many misconceptions that need to be understood.”” Among the misconceptions noted by the advocates were misunderstandings of the correct functions of protection. “”Many people don’t understand how to be safe,”” said Sara Working, a student health advocate and Marshall senior. “”For example, many condoms are made from lamb intestines which can be used as birth control but not for protection against sexually transmitted diseases such as the AIDS virus.”” Advocates cited other protection failures such as using two condoms, misconceiving oral sex as intrinsically safe from virus transmission and using improper lubricants, such as petroleum jelly or whipped cream, which dissolve the latex condom. Working explained some incorrect assumptions about oral sex. “”Many people think that oral sex is safe,”” Working said. “”The only requirement for the virus to exist is a warm, moist area.”” Working promoted the practice of using a dental dam, a protective latex covering for male and female genitalia, to prevent the transmission of disease during oral sex. The table also offered games and trivia intended to educate people on sexual safety. Students gathered to play “”Pin the condom on the man.”” Students found the distribution of condoms and the games either amusing or embarrassing. Health advocates aimed to erase these sentiments. Debbie Pino-Saballett, outreach coordinator for Student Health Services, spoke of the need for increased awareness without shame. “”Many people find the table offensive,”” Pino-Saballett said. “”The goal is actually to desensitize. If we do some games with condoms, maybe when they need them they won’t be so offended.”” The group also wanted to stress the week as “”Latex Awareness Week”” as opposed to “”Condom Awareness Week,”” so as not to discriminate against relations in which latex protection takes a different form. “”Latex should be used among lesbians as well,”” Pino-Saballett said. Pino-Saballett has worked in sexual education since 1988. For the past three years, she has worked at UCSD at the Student Health Center educating college and high school students. Health advocates hold on-campus information sessions by request. They also hold several assemblies at local high schools, informing high school seniors about sexually transmitted diseases. Students observing the table applauded the efforts to bring awareness of sexual issues. “”I think it’s a good idea that people need to learn about,”” said Roosevelt senior Andrew Culberson. “”College students should be confronted with these issues in a grown-up way.”” Other students spoke of the need for abstinence from sexual activity prior to marriage. Revelle senior Sandra Zipperer promoted abstinence on two grounds. “”Abstinence is not only the ultimate protection but it also allows you to save the gift of sexuality for your lifetime partner,”” Zipperer said. Working concurred with Zipperer on the superior safety of abstinence. “”Abstinence is the only 100 percent form of protection,”” Working said. Another event planned for this week is the play concerning female sexual issues, “”The Vagina Monologues.”” The Student Health Service Center has teamed up with the Women’s Center to bring “”The Vagina Monologues”” to UCSD. “”The Vagina Monologues”” are a series of interviews with women about their vaginas. Money raised by ticket sales will go to end violence against women. The event is extremely popular and is already sold out for the Feb. 17 performance. Student Health advocates stressed the existence of a variety of student resources that are available. Latex and lubricants are available all year long for students. Sexual health information sessions go on every day of the week. There is also help for diet and proper eating, including cholesterol screening and fitness awareness training. HIV tests are offered for a $10 lab fee. There is also a little-known Men’s Center to match the more popular Woman’s Center. Students are encouraged to come to Student Health with any questions concerning their personal health. ...

Color Conference to Come to UCSD

The A.S. Council, in conjunction with the UC Student Association, will host its annual Students of Color Conference Friday in the Price Center. The theme of this year’s conference is “”The Politics of Silence: Establishing a Voice at the Crossroads of the New Millennium.”” According to organizers of the event, the theme encompasses one of its main goals: to encourage more students, particularly those who are typically under-represented, to become active voices in their community. “”It’s going to be a beautiful thing having all these people coming together,”” said A.S. Vice President External Eugene Mahmoud. “”But ultimately you’d want to see even more infusion of students of color in things like student organizations and governments.”” The origins of the conference were at UCSD 12 years ago. In 1990, UCSD hosted the first conference to create a forum in which students could have open discussion with one other about issues concerning higher education within the contexts of race and ethnicity. Mahmoud says the conference gives UCSD students a chance to talk to all sorts of students, including those from all the UC schools, as well as some California State and private universities. Kicking off the conference Friday will be a presentation of the film, “”Malcolm X”” at 2 p.m. in the Price Center Theater. The conference will run until Feb. 18. Activities for Friday will include an evening concert featuring the L.A. Symphony in the Price Center Ballroom. A march and rally with the coalition Justice for Janitors and Bus Riders Union will take place at noon Saturday. A banquet with keynote speaker, Professor George Lipsitz of UCSD’s ethnic studies department and the play “”Vagina Monologues”” will conclude the evening’s activities. Sunday’s events will include various workshops including one on HIV and AIDS in communities of color, as well as a panel titled “”Changing Face of Activism.”” Mahmoud sees the conference as an important opportunity for students to learn from their greatest teachers, their peers. “”It’s a conscience-building conference,”” Mahmoud said. “”Students of all different backgrounds will be able to identity with others on a much more personal level because of their similar backgrounds.”” Organizers of the event expect about 300 students from across California to attend the conference. Some issues that planners anticipate addressing are recent statewide proposals such as SP1 and SP2, which essentially ban the use of affirmative action in the UC system. ...

Sophomores Will Need to Find Off-Campus Housing

For the first time, UCSD is not guaranteeing its second year students on-campus housing. Approximately 35 percent of continuing second year students will be housed on campus for the 2001-2002 school year, an immense drop from this year’s 80 percent. The reason for the change is the University of California’s need to accommodate 1,000 to 1,500 more students over the its eight campuses. UCSD is already behind in numbers from last year, when it only filled 3,200 of 3,500 spots. The university is admitting more freshmen for next year to make up for this and to compensate for the additional freshmen being admitted into the entire system, which has created the housing crunch. “”UCSD is in a planned growth mode as part of the UC system,”” said Muir Resident Dean Pat Danylyshyn-Adams. There are about 5,100 beds available on campus, while the total undergraduate enrollment is around 17,000. Typically, 90 percent of incoming freshman accept on-campus housing, according to Director of Housing and Dining Services Mark Cunningham. The current first-year class was admitted with the knowledge that they would not have guaranteed second-year housing. Cunningham said this was decided upon last year around this time so potential freshmen could be notified that they would not have the guarantee. Some first-year students believe that they were misled to believe that they would have a chance of living on campus similar to that of past years. “”I don’t think they gave us fair warning that we’d have such a small chance that we’d live in the apartments,”” said Muir freshman Zac Hays. Warren Resident Dean Claire Palmer said the number of continuing students who will be able to get on-campus housing next year is still changing. The ultimate goal of the self-supporting Housing and Dining Services is to return to the two-year guarantee as soon as possible. This year’s freshman class and next year’s incoming freshman do not have a two-year guarantee, and the following year may not either. This is partially due to the construction of the new Eleanor Roosevelt College housing on North Campus. When completed, the structures will hold 1,240 additional beds with 440 in residence halls and 800 in apartments. The project was originally intended to be completed for fall 2002, but it will not be done until fall 2003. Cunningham attributed this to the good economy and the demand for construction. The housing crunch is being dealt with in three ways, Cunningham said. The construction of the new Eleanor Roosevelt College is one part, and more potential building is being considered. This may be made possible with a faster construction process. Housing and Dining Services is also looking into off-campus acquisitions. UCSD currently owns La Jolla Del Sol, an apartment complex off Regents Road. Housing and Dining Services bought it in 1987. The complex has 381 units, 126 of which are undergraduates. The rest of the building is occupied by faculty, staff, graduate students and medical students. In addition to the loss of the two-year guarantee, transfer students will not receive housing next year. Also, Cunningham said that the college Residential Life programs decided to abolish the all-campus housing program so that there could be equality among the colleges in numbers of spaces available. According to Danylyshyn-Adams, Tioga and Tenaya halls will all be freshmen next year, whereas this year they house about 40 continuing students. Fifty-two beds in Tuolomne Apartments will also be allotted for freshmen. Sixty-two spaces for Muir students will be available on the Warren campus. These spaces will be clustered so that students can live in an environment with other Muir students. Revelle sophomores will be housed in the Matthews Apartments. There will be spaces for about 250 students there. Argo Hall currently holds many sophomores, but next year there will be no continuing students in the residence halls. There will be spaces for Revelle students in Pepper Canyon and Warren apartments as well. Warren sophomores will be housed in Douglass and Goldberg Halls, as they have been in the past. “”The other colleges don’t have enough apartments,”” Palmer said. “”It’s not a good situation.”” Students are apprehensive about problems arising from not being able to live on campus. “”We either have to share singles with three people or we have to live off-campus, and that would force people to get cars,”” said Roosevelt student Katie Dalton. “”Parking is already bad as it is. Some people can’t afford cars and living off-campus because La Jolla is really expensive.”” Room selection day will occur April 6. It will be followed by an off-campus housing fair in the Price Center. Off-campus housing facilities will come to campus to allow students to investigate options and prices if they do not receive on-campus housing. “”Groups have priority over singles and doubles in room selection,”” Cunningham said. He advised that one thing students can do to increase their chances of receiving on-campus housing is to form groups and apply for housing in those groups. Most on-campus apartments house four people, though some Muir apartments hold five. Waiting lists will also be formed through all the colleges’ Residential Life Offices for students who do not receive housing in the initial raffle and still want it. “”Don’t be discouraged from going through room selection,”” Cunningham said. “”It’s worth it to go through it and see when you end up.”” All the colleges have been holding off-campus housing informative sessions, and they will continue to do so through the remainder of the year. Warren college is planning socials for students to meet and interact with potential off-campus roommates. “”Take a deep breath and step back and reassess the situation,”” Danylyshyn-Adams said. “”It’s workable. Lots of people do it already.”” On-campus students will be receiving brochures in their mailboxes in the next week. These will include information about on-campus room selection. “”My heart goes out to the students that will be going off-campus,”” Palmer said. “”I know some will be ready to go off-campus and others wish they had another year.”” ...

SIO Engineer Receives Nichol Award

Scripps Institution of Oceanography research engineer and senior lecturer Richard Seymour was recently honored with the 2000 John G. Moffatt and Frank E. Nichol Harbor and Coastal Engineering Award. The prestigious honor is awarded annually by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Seymour received the award in recognition of his lifelong contributions and leadership in the field of coastal engineering. His status with the ASCE was also elevated to Fellow in Commendation for his life work in the field. “”It is very rewarding to be recognized by your peers,”” Seymour said. The rich history of past recipients of the prestigious award is not lost on him. “”I’m very proud to get the award,”” Seymour said. “”The gods of coastal engineering have been past recipient s. I’m very proud to be included.”” Robert Guza, a professor at Scripps, acknowledged Seymour as having a “”long and illustrious career,”” as well as “”being a leader in studying the California wave climate.”” Throughout his career, Seymour’s research has covered a wide range of topics from the practical to the theoretical. On the practical side, he has studied coastal sediment transport and shoreline erosion. He is also renowned for his theoretical work with surface gravity waves. His greatest achievement may be the creation of the Scripps Coastal Data Information Program for furthering the study of surface gravity waves. What started in 1976 with a single buoy off Imperial Beach has blossomed into one of the world’s largest scientific data collection networks. Scripps research associate Ron Flick credits the success of the CDIP to Seymour’s innovative thinking and ability to make the theoretical accessible. Flick noted that Seymour “”was the first to make a practical system to measure statistical properties of ocean waves.”” One of the goals of the project was to bring a research tool to the level of common practicality. Seymour helped make this goal a reality. Currently, he is working on an expansion of CDIP to measure the impact of waves on the shoreline. The research is taking place at North Torrey Pines. It will include monitoring sand movement on and off the beach, all of which is valuable for testing computer models. ...