News

A.S. Council to Fund Anti-Zionism Week

Amid objections from the Union of Jewish Students, the A.S. Council is funding the Muslim Student Association’s Anti-Zionism Week, to be held next week. At last week’s A.S. Council meeting, Vice President Finance Matt Powell suggested funding the event from a fund created in 1994 specifically for controversial issues. The council voted against Powell’s motion, and instead decided to fund the event through the Student Organizations Unallocated fund, the fund through which most student organizations receive money. “”I can definitely understand the council’s reasons for it,”” Powell said. “”What they did is definitely consistent with the rules that we follow.”” The council must fund events and not discriminate based on content that students or council members disagree with. Powell said he wanted to fund the event from a different source because he has not had a chance yet to educate students on the issue of how funding is given to students. “”It may have been easier to address the situation this time if we had the funding source.”” Jonathan Rotter, a recent UCSD graduate, said he feels that many council members do not see how offensive the term “”Anti-Zionism Week”” is to Jewish students. “”Certainly they made the claim that they’re required by law to fund things in a content-independent manner,”” he said. “”But it’s hard for me to imagine that if someone had proposed an anti-Asian week that they would have gotten funding. It’s my feeling that they don’t understand that, to us, Anti-Zionism week is equal to Anti-Semitism week.”” Muslema Purmul, treasurer of the MSA, agreed with the council vote. “”I like the way they voted,”” she said. “”What this club is doing is no different from other clubs.”” Muir Senior Lila Hollman said the Union of Jewish Students has had a booth on Library Walk to educate students on Zionism. She said that Zionism is not a political issue; rather it is an essential part of the Jewish religion. Rotter added that while there is plenty of room for discussion about the current situation in the Middle East, there is a clear distinction between Anti-Zionism Week and current political issues. Purmul said she feels that Anti-Zionism Week is being misunderstood by many. “”I think that the reaction that has been voiced is too harsh considering what Anti-Zionism Week is all about,”” she said. “”I feel we’re being judged before we’ve had a chance to say anything.”” Students who disagree with Anti-Zionism Week, or any other political or religious event that they do not want to fund, can request a refund for the portion of their student activity fee that went to fund the week. UJS members said that as of earlier this week, 40 students had requested refunds. Each student who requests a refund will receive about three cents. “”We are encouraging students to do that if they share our outrage at this program,”” Hollman said. Rotter added he is encouraging students to pool the refund money and donate it to earthquake relief efforts in El Salvador. The A.S. Council provided the MSA $640 for the event. Parts two and three of this series will run next Thursday and the following Thursday. ...

Lights & Sirens

Monday, Jan. 15 6:45 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a cellular phone from Geisel Library. Loss: $150. 7:04 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a green Trek B21 bicycle from the Price Center behind Round Table Pizza. Loss: $300. 7:14 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a vehicle license plate from Lot 406. No loss. 9:23 p.m.: A student reported the theft of bicycle parts from the east side of Pacific Hall. Loss: $210. Tuesday, Jan. 16 9:48 a.m.: A 46-year-old female staff member complained of chest pain at the Bursar’s office. Transported to Thornton by paramedics. 10 a.m.: Officers towed a green ’95 Volkswagen Jetta from Matthews Lane near the Center for Magnetic Recording Research for having registration expired for over six months. Stored at Star Towing. 10:56 a.m.: A staff member reported vandalism at Voigt Drive and Justice Lane. No loss. 11:10 a.m.: A student reported burglary to a gray ’96 Ford Ranger in the Black’s Beach lot. Loss: $10. 3:20 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a red ’92 GMC suburban from Lot 102. Loss: $600. 4:15 p.m.: A student reported the theft of a UCSD identification card from RIMAC. No loss. Wednesday, Jan. 17 12:18 a.m.: A 57-year-old male nonaffiliate was ordered off campus for seven days after creating a disturbance at the Price Center Theater. 3:53 p.m.: A student reported vandalism to a bicycle at RIMAC Arena. Loss: $50. 6:35 p.m.: A 50-year-old faculty member suffered a head injury after falling at Outback Climbing Center. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. Friday, Jan. 19 1:54 a.m.: Officers arrested a 43-year-old male nonaffiliate for driving under the influence of alcohol. Transported to Central Jail. 1:06 a.m.: Officers detained a 22-year-old male student near Canyon Vista for being drunk in public. 9:05 a.m.: Units and paramedics responded to a 51-year-old female staff member having difficulty breathing at the Mesa Daycare Center. Transported to Thornton by paramedics. 1:58 p.m.: A staff member reported the theft of a parking meter from the North Torrey Pines parking structure. Loss: $260. 9:10 p.m.: Officers detained a 21-year-old male student at the Porter’s Pub for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. ...

Briefly

The UC Board of Regents reviewed a report Thursday that stated that breast cancer still claims the lives of too many California women. Marion Kavanaugh-Lynch, the director of the California Breast Cancer Research program, presented the “”Status of Breast Cancer in California,”” which claimed that 15,000 California women diagnosed with breast cancer this year will still be alive in 10 years due to early detection, but 6,000 others will die within that same 10-year period. The study performed by the program also found that women usually die from the disease because they did not receive early screening and their cancer was advanced beyond the point of treatment when detected. The California Breast Cancer Research Program is managed by the UC Office of the President, which also awarded money to 70 new projects in this research field over the last year. UC improves employee retirement plan The UC Board of Regents updated its retirement benefits on Thursday by improving “”age factors”” in the UC Retirement Plan. The changes take place effective Jan. 1, 2001 and are expected to make employment with the university more appealing to prospective workers. The updated factors will begin at 1.1 percent at age 50 and will increase incrementally each year by 0.14 percentage points. The factors will be between 1 percent and 20 percent higher than the previous factors. The university does not anticipate an increased rate of retirements as a result of the plan but does expect to retain older employees as their accrued retirement adds up. The initiative is just one in a long line of adjustments made in an effort to make the university increasingly competitive in California’s growing job market. Applications now available for new student regent Student regent applications are now available in the A.S. offices on the third floor of the Price Center. Qualifications for the position include undergraduate, graduate or professional student enrollment status. The job requires a two-year commitment. Benefits of the position include free parking on all UC campuses, paid mandatory university fees, paid travel expenses and a resume booster. An information session will be held Thursday, Feb. 15 at 1 p.m. on Library Walk. UCSD professor named news editor of quarterly journal Robert Kaplan, a professor and chair of UCSD’s Department of Family and Preventative Medicine and member of the UCSD Cancer Center, has become the new news editor of the quarterly journal of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, the “”Annals of Behavioral Medicine.”” Kaplan’s service begins with the Feb. 8 issue and will incorporate new features such as editorial commentary, letters to the editor and reviews of intervention applications. Other UCSD members involved with the journal include associate editor Paul J. Mills and consulting editor Donna Kritz-Silverstein. UCSD Athletic Department to sponsor blood drive The UCSD Athletic Department will sponsor its first annual Blood Drive in partnership with the American Red Cross Tuesday, Jan. 23. Blood donations can be made from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and from 2 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the RIMAC Green Room. Reservations can be made and are recommended due to an expected high turnout. For reservations, call (858) 534-8460 or (858) 534-4211. All donors will receive a free Red Cross T-shirt and have their names entered in a drawing. ...

UCSD Researchers to Address Cliff Erosion

The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration is teaming up with UCSD to create a comprehensive guide to cliff stabilization methods. Structural engineers at the Jacobs School of Engineering received a $125,000 Sea Grant from NOAA, which was matched by UCSD for a total of $250,000 to conduct a project titled “”Mitigation of Coastal Bluff Instability in San Diego County, California.”” UCSD undergraduates will work with engineers and graduate students at the Jacobs School on the project, which has significant local implications. The study will examine how to best stabilize cliffs while keeping impact on the natural environment to a minimum, and determine the best way to slow and stop current cliff instability. “”We are approaching a crisis in San Diego County,”” said Scott Ashford, project leader and professor of geotechnical engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering, referring to the stability of coastal cliffs. Ashford also noted that 80 percent of San Diego’s 80 miles of coastline are cliffs. Destabilization of the cliffs and bluffs occurs due to factors such as waves, vegetation and human development. Recent storms have shown that efforts to stop erosion from pulling human development into the ocean have come too late for an effective remedy. “”It’s obvious that a major problem exists, but repairs are typically only approved in emergency situations because of concerns over damaging the bluffs or destroying the natural beauty of the coastline,”” Ashford said. Ashford summarized the project by saying, “”Our major goal is to pinpoint the most efficient and effective ways to resolve this growing crisis, while maintaining the environmental integrity of the landscape.”” The project is divided into three phases. The first phase consists of analyzing aerial photos of San Diego’s cliffs. Photos of past and present will be digitized in order to establish the success of existing mitigation methods. Phase two involves computer modeling and numerical analysis to apply the effects of various mitigation efforts onto different types of slopes. In the final phase, Ashford’s team will publish its findings in a slope stabilization manual, which will be posted on the Internet. The manual will show the cost effectiveness of the various solutions as well as the environmental impact. It will serve as a guide for the numerous coastal regulatory agencies and property owners. With the information from the project, government agencies and property owners will have enough information to take preventive measures before any major destabilization occurs. With the support from the cities of Encinitas, Del Mar, Solana Beach and San Diego along with the San Diego Super Computer Center and the California Coastal Commission, Ashford expects the project to be a success. ...

Ritmo Packed for Opening

Friday night marked the opening of UCSD’s new live entertainment venue, “”Club Ritmo,”” which featured headliner Tone Loc with special guest Candyman. The event, sponsored by the A.S. Council, took place from 8:30 p.m. to midnight at the Stage at Porter’s Pub. After arriving at approximately 10:30 p.m., Tone Loc took the stage to perform perennial favorites and his two most famous songs, “”Wild Thing”” and “”Funky Cold Medina.”” Eisha Christian, A.S. co-assistant commissioner of programming and one of Club Ritmo’s main coordinators, was enthusiastic about its initial success. “”The club did awesome for its opening night,”” Christian said. “”I had tons of people come and say they loved the idea that Friday nights were going to be a happening place at the Pub.”” A.S. Production Manager Steve Evans monitored the club’s ticket count that night and confirmed its high turnout. Evans reported that attendance averaged approximately 500 people throughout the night. Toward the time of Tone Loc’s performance, the number increased as Porter’s Pub neared its maximum capacity, with almost 700 people in attendance. “”It was a packed house and there was a really early crowd from the start — the perfect amount of people, really,”” Evans said. “”A very large majority of the people were UCSD students.”” Opening for the band were DJs from UCSD’s DJs and Vinylphiles Club and the rap group L.A. Symphony. Christian expressed her appreciation of all the night’s talent, especially L.A. Symphony for extending their performance, as Tone Loc arrived later than expected. “”They all did an awesome job,”” Christian said. “”But the response for L.A. Symphony was huge.”” Impressed with the turnout at the event, Pigeon John of L.A. Symphony shared the band’s thoughts before performing. “”We’re pretty honored just to open up,”” John said. “”[All of us] are just thankful that we got booked and we’re gonna give them a great show.”” On opening night, Cassandra Williams, A.S. commissioner of programming and another substantial player in the development of Club Ritmo, credited Christian and Ferasat for being there from the start in Club Ritmo’s evolution. “”I give them mad props just for getting here, to this point where they got a club open on campus,”” Williams said. “”Tonight is for Eisha and Anahita to just be in the clouds because they’ve helped in creating a buzz around all the UC schools, since none of the others has an on-campus night club.”” Anahita Ferasat, A.S. co-assistant commissioner of programming and the other main coordinator of Club Ritmo, said that talks about creating a campus-wide night club were always present among A.S. members in one form or another. Ryan Taylor, a Revelle sophomore, showed his support for the club. “”It’s totally new and it looks like it’ll be cool in the future,”” Taylor said. “”I’m definitely gonna be here next week.”” ...

Power Crisis Hits UCSD, Threatens Rolling Blackouts

The power crisis that left thousands of Californians in the dark during the past week has forced UCSD to prepare for the possibility of rolling blackouts. Wendy Schiefer, manager of customer relations at Physical Plant Services, said the UCSD campus is in electrical stage three emergency, which means there is a threat to the electrical system reliability and an increased possibility of the campus experiencing rolling power outages. Schiefer says that under stage three emergency, students should reduce electrical usage as much as possible and refrain from any sensitive research that requires electrical power. Schiefer, who is living in the dark and without heat due to skyrocketing energy bills, said she believes it will take an actual blackout to get students to conserve. “”Some people may not take the energy crisis seriously,”” Schiefer said. “”But they may find out the hard way when the power goes out.”” Yolanda Trevino, assistant resident dean of Marshall college, said all the colleges have taken steps to inform residents of the need to conserve energy. “”We’ve sent out e-mails and community bulletins to residents, asking them to conserve energy as much as possible,”” Trevino said. “”because during blackouts there is no heat and no electricity and the elevators will shut off.”” Trevino said that the resident life offices are asking students to turn off their personal computers when they are not in use, back up all computer files, turn off extra lights, and to have flashlights and fresh batteries on hand. Roosevelt sophomore Susan Liem, an on-campus resident, is concerned about the power crisis. “”I try to do my part by turning off extra lights and the heat,”” Liem said. However, she said that she does not think many students are taking the energy crisis seriously. “”I see people leave their lights on all the time and turn up the heater very high,”” Liem said. “”I don’t think students will take it seriously as long as they live on campus because they don’t pay the electricity bills.”” Marshall sophomore Brandon Ito, also an on-campus resident, said his efforts to conserve have been thwarted by his roommates. “”I have tried to conserve energy over the past week, but it seems like I always shut all the lights off in the apartment only to come home to them all on again,”” Ito said. “”I know that my roommates and neighbors have no will to save energy, as they keep their lights on constantly.”” Ito said that even though the campus has yet to experience rolling blackouts, it is important for everyone to do their part and conserve energy. “”I’m not an environmentalist or conservationist by any means, but I believe that we’ve reached a sense of urgency that needs to be attended to,”” Ito said. “”And it’s partly because I feel bad for all the little kids that are home alone when their lights go out.”” Ito said he is bothered by the fact that the lights in many lecture halls and buildings remain on through the night. “”I think it’s absolutely ridiculous and the greatest source of energy loss that a lot of the lecture halls and buildings around campus have their lights left on the entire night,”” Ito said. With the UCSD campus renown for its research and medical communities, measures have been taken to prevent the possibility of power loss to render any effect on their work. Kim McDonald, UCSD director of science communications, said the biology division has taken steps to inform the labs to be prepared in the event of power outage and to conserve energy as much as possible. “”We’ve warned all the labs that they should make sure that critical equipment is on emergency circuits,”” McDonald said. “”Most of the lab buildings have emergency generators that will come on, to keep animal facilities and critical equipment running, but we are mostly hoping that we dodge the bullet somehow.”” Thornton and Hillcrest Hospitals have also undergone measures in order to safeguard against possible rolling blackouts. Director of Facilities Dennis Goodrich said the hospitals have back up emergency generators that ensure all life saving equipment. “”Due to the automatic nature of the emergency generators, all life saving equipment never senses loss of power and so patients are under no danger,”” Goodrich said. ...

Briefly

Charles L. Perrin, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry will be recognized for his teaching record that stretches back 40 years. George Mariscal, an associate professor of literature will receive an award for his outstanding community service and work in fostering diversity at UCSD. Chancellor Dynes and Chancellor’s Associate Chair Darlene Shiley will speak at the ceremony. UCSD biologists discover clues in species divergence UCSD biologists have used the songs and genetics of warblers in central Asia to show how one species can become two. The researchers believe this is the “”missing evidence”” Darwin was unable to find in order to support his theory of natural selection. Darren E. Irwin, a biologist at UCSD, and his colleagues Trevor D. Price and Staffan Bensch published their results in the Jan. 18 issue of the journal “”Nature.”” The researchers studied various breeds of the warbler and saw a small variation in their song patterns, morphology and genetic markers that led them to see how the one species merged into two separate ones that did not even recognize each others’ songs. UC signs contract to avoid rising energy costs UC President Richard C. Atkinson announced Wednesday that the university has avoided millions of dollars in electricity bills by signing a contract with the state Department of General Services. The university began protecting itself against the rising costs of natural gas in 1998 when it signed a similar contract with energy supplier Enron Corp. of Houston. That particular contract saved UCSD $12.3 million during one eight month period. The UC system is the largest energy consumer in California and the new contract is expected to save the university a similar amount of money. New electronic databases to become available to UC The California Digital Library recently announced it purchased two new databases from Alexander Street Press. These databases will be available next month on the California Digital Library, which is accessible to the nine UC campuses. The two full-text databases are “”North American Women’s Letters and Diaries, Colonial-1950″” and “”The American Civil War: Letters and Diaries.”” Both databases include about 100,000 pages of published writings and 4,000 pages of previously unpublished writings. The California Digital Library was created in 1997 and became accessible in 1999 to the UC system. CDL includes the databases of Alexander Street Press, a publisher of electronic databases about Social Sciences and Humanities topics. CDL’s purpose is to provide electronic collections and educational information to the UC schools. The two particular databases were acquired after a thorough selection process among faculty, staff and librarians. The Women’s Letters and Diaries database is the largest electronic collection of women’s diary entries and correspondence ever put together. It was obtained from over 1,000 sources, such as newsletters, pamphlets and conference proceedings. The contents of the writings will include records of the women’s work conditions, what they ate and wore, their personal relationships, among other topics. There will be points of view from all various ethnicities, age groups and life styles. The other database, “”The American Civil War,”” will include the writings of generals, slaves, politicians and other people, expressing their views about different aspects of war. The letters and diaries will include Northern and Southern points of view, as well as perspectives of foreigners. The Women’s Diaries and American Civil War databases can be accessed through the CDL Web site, http://www.cdlib.org, or the UCSD library Web site in the Social Sciences and Humanities Databases under “”New Databases and Trials,”” projected to become accessible starting the third week of February. ...

Events

Thursday, Jan. 18 Movie: Scary Movie The University Centers will sponsor the film which will be shown at 7 and 10 p.m. in the Price Center Theater. Admission is $2. Friday, Jan. 19 Grand opening: Club Ritmo The A.S. Council presents UCSD’s new night club Club Ritmo. The opening will feature Ton Loc. The event is open to the public and will take place at 8:30 p.m. at the Stage in the Porter’s Pub. UCSD students with a student identification will get in free. General admission is $8. Saturday, Jan. 20 Performing Arts: La Jolla Symphony and Chorus The La Jolla Symphony Chamber Chorus will sponsor the event which will take place at 8 p.m. at the Neurosciences Institute. The event is open to the public. General admission is $18 and student admission is $11. For more information call (858) 534-4637. Performing Arts: St. Lawrence String Quartet The string quartet will perform at 7:30 p.m. in the Mandeville Auditorium. The University Events Office will sponsor the event. General admission is $22 and student admission is $10. The event is open to the public and tickets can be purchased at Ticketmaster and at the UCSD Box Office. For more information call (858) 534-8497. Sunday, Jan. 21 Performing Arts: The Kathie Burg Band The University Centers will sponsor the event which will take place at 8 p.m. at Espresso Roma in the Price Center. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call (858) 534-4022. Tuesday, Jan. 23 Movie: Almost Famous The University Centers will sponsor the film which will be shown at 7 and 10 p.m. at the Price Center Theater. Wednesday, Jan. 24 Seminar: Student Scholars Series Undergraduate Ben Bunyi will present a lecture entitled “”Lincoln and Douglas Hotels: Race, Power, Urban Development.”” The Cross Cultural Center, the Office of Graduate Studies and Research and the Academic Enrichment programs will sponsor the event will sponsor the event which will take place at 4 p.m. at the Cross Cultural Center. The event is open to the public and admission is free. For more information call (858) 534-9689. Performing Arts: Noon Concert A.S. Programming will sponsor the concert which will take place at noon at the Price Center Plaza. The event is free and open to the public. ...

ACIU College Bowl Comes to Challenge UCSD Students

The 2001 ACIU college bowl has arrived at UCSD. The annual event challenges students with a knack for trivia to sign up within their college. The individual colleges’ bowls take place this week and next week. The top two teams from each college will compete in the university-wide event Jan. 31 in the Price Center Theater. The winning team will then represent UCSD at the ACIU regional College Bowl tournament at Sacramento State Feb. 16 to Feb. 18. The state winner will then try for the national title. Contestants in the tournaments are asked questions from all realms of academia. Teams must be prepared to grapple with all areas, from the sciences and humanities to sports and entertainment. Patricia Mahaffey, Muir’s assistant resident dean, enjoys the university’s celebration of the mind. “”College Bowl is an event I look forward to every year, she said “”The best and the brightest come out.”” Mahaffey also noted that many students come to watch both the individual college tournaments and the all-campus tournament. Although the Muir event was held on Wednesday night, there is still time to sign up to compete at the other colleges. Revelle college will hold its event Thursday. Warren and Marshall colleges are accepting sign-ups in their dean’s offices. Roosevelt students can sign up in the Residential Life office. The Warren event will be held Jan. 22, followed by Marshall college’s the next day. Finally, Roosevelt will meet for its college bowl Jan. 24. Sign-ups are accepted individually or as a team. Teams consist of four members with an optional alternate. There is no cost to enter. UCSD marketing coordinator and College Bowl overseer Matt Xavier is expecting everyone to have a great time with the tournament. “”The College Bowl is a lot of fun,”” Xavier said. “”It tests people’s intelligence and their ability to think quickly. You can really learn a lot. There is so much info. about art, science and history.”” Xavier predicts that several hundred students and faculty will attend the All-Campus bowl on Jan. 31. Free pizza, cookies and beverages will be provided to those in attendance. Winners of the separate colleges’ tournaments will receive free T-shirts and the winner of the all-campus tournament will be awarded a sweatshirt. The College Bowl seeks to maintain high levels of integrity. Questions are mailed to the college dean’s office the afternoon preceding the match. The questions come in 10 sealed envelopes that are not opened until the commencement of the event. The format of the Bowl game is similar to that of many academic competitions. The game begins with a general toss-up question open to response from both teams. The first player to buzz in gets to attempt to answer. If the player answers correctly, his or her team will be given a bonus question that only their team can answer. After the bonus question, another toss-up question is asked. Stanford University and the University of Southern California are consistent champions at the statewide regional event. These private schools actually offer courses aimed to prepare students for this event. UCSD teams are largely student run, not professionally coached like teams of some other universities. However, UCSD has managed to perform with great deal of success. Last year, a group from Revelle college came in third place in the regional contest. The five colleges, the University Centers, the Vice Chancellor’s Office of Student Affairs, and Imprints are all sponsors of the College Bowl. ...

Flood Wreaks Havoc at Tioga Hall

After days of pounding rain in last week’s winter storms, UCSD is finally dry, with the exception of Tioga Hall. Last Thursday a small flood occurred on the ground floor of Muir college’s Tioga Hall. Water quickly spread throughout the south side of the building in the early hours of the morning, prompting 17 residents to seek higher ground. Susan Rindlaub, a Muir freshman, awoke just after 8 a.m. only to find an inch and a half of water on the floor of her room. “”I jumped out of bed in my socks and [the water] splashed up all around me,”” Rindlaub said. “”My stuff was floating in my room.”” The source of the water was a leaky drainpipe that was supposed to divert precipitation from the roof of the 11- story residence hall to the ground floor. However, a cap that was supposed to have sealed the pipe came loose, causing gallons of rainwater to pour into the common room between two adjoining suites. Campus officials became aware of the problem just after 8 a.m. and immediately advised affected residents to exit the building. Since then, workers have tried to dry the carpets using powerful fans. However, soggy carpets, a musty odor and the constant noise of electric fans forced several of the residents to seek temporary living quarters elsewhere. Consequently, the Muir Residential Life office offered several vacant rooms on the eighth floor to students wishing to relocate temporarily until conditions become once again suitable for living. “”My parents got me a hotel room,”” Rindlaub said. “”I thought that was a better offer.”” Others were not so fortunate. John Lobato, a first-year Muir resident, returned to his dorm after the holiday weekend to find his flooded room still in bad shape. “”Over the weekend it smelled like somebody pissed all over the floor,”” Lobato said. “”Right now it’s smelling better. We’re getting used to the smell.”” At least two affected residents have become frustrated with the Muir Residential Life office’s handling of the flood. Rindlaub claims that campus officials waited more than 14 hours to discuss important matters, such as compensation and relocation, with affected students. “”The whole first day they didn’t even come talk to us,”” Rindlaub said. “”Nobody came to tell us we would get reimbursed or that we could have a room, or anything.”” Still others, such as Lobato, praised the custodians for their efforts in the clean-up process. “”Janitorial services tried their best to take care of this, but the administration’s response has been less than overwhelming,”” Lobato said. Because the flood was not the fault of any of the residents, the Muir Residential Life office will work hard to compensate students for damages incurred. This includes replacing ruined textbooks, soiled garments and possibly damaged computers. Additionally, drain pipes throughout Muir College were inspected by maintenance workers in Tioga and Tenaya Hall so that further rain does not pose similar problems in the future. ...