Campus

Police chase drunk driver; ends in crash at Blake Hall

A UCSD student crashed his 2002 Ford Explorer into Blake Hall at the conclusion of a San Diego Police Department chase at 12:50 a.m. on Feb. 8, awakening Revelle students. Bryce Warwick Guardian According to officer Michael James of the SDPD, a routine accident investigation was taking place on North Torrey Pines Road when the Explorer drove by. The driver turned off his lights, arousing the suspicion of the SDPD. Officers pulled in behind the car and turned on their lights and sirens in an attempt to pull him over, James said. At this point, the driver began driving erratically and tried to outrun the police at a high speed, according to James. He said the driver eventually turned onto the UCSD campus near Pacific Hall and the construction site of the new natural sciences building. According to James, the driver then came up the road and made a hard right turn toward Revelle, cut across the grass, and with tires screeching, slammed his vehicle into the northwest side of Blake Hall. SDPD pulled up a moment later, followed closely by Resident Security Officers, passers-by and startled residents. “”It felt like an earthquake,”” said Blake Hall resident Faye van der Fluit, whose room is above the site of the crash. “”It felt like something was shaking the whole building.”” The building appeared to suffer no major structural damage, but the car was badly smashed. The front right side of the Explorer was the point of impact and the tire on that side was folded under the vehicle with transmission fluid covering the ground. James reported no major injuries to the three passengers or the driver. The passengers were not charged with any crime at the scene, but the driver faces some serious consequences. James confirmed that the driver is a student at UCSD and said that he will face charges of DUI and felony failure to yield. Both charges could carry jail time with the DUI alone allowing for a convicted driver to serve up to six months in jail. The driver’s name was not released. ...

Marshall students plan D.O.C. lecture walk-out

Students at Thurgood Marshall College plan to stage a protest during their Dimensions of Culture classes Feb. 15, according to a Web site created anonymously in response to what students call unfair housing treatment at Marshall. The Web site, http://www.geocities.com/ucsdcause, claims Marshall college’s Residential Life Office is taking part in a “”conspiracy to terminate housing contracts,”” among other things. The UCSD Cause site troubled the Marshall Dean’s Office, resulting in a meeting between Marshall Dean of Student Affairs Ashanti Houston-Hands and Marshall freshman Danny Leibowitz, who was one of the organizers of the movement. “”They really wanted to meet with us and find a compromise,”” Leibowitz said. Leibowitz said that since his meeting Monday with Houston-Hands, the students will be “”toning down the protest and making it more of an information session,”” so that students can be aware of their rights. Leibowitz emphasized that his meeting with Houston-Hands was the original goal of organizing the protest, along with attracting the attention of Marshall students and making them aware of their rights as students in Marshall. “”We used the protest as a way to get through the Residential Life Office and go the next step up the ladder,”” he said. “”Mostly, the conspiracy was just a way for us to get people’s attention. We’re not trying to destroy the school. We’re trying to make it nicer.”” The meeting was viewed as a successful negotiation by both Leibowitz and Houston-Hands. “”We came to an understanding and are going to work on getting some new rules drafted, and some new consequences,”” Leibowitz said. Houston-Hands said that it is important that the two met because it allowed them to talk about “”how we can go about voicing some of the concerns that students have.”” Marshall Resident Dean Yolanda Trevino dismisses the Web site’s claims. “”There is a lot of misinformation,”” Trevino said. “”There is also a lot of incomplete information.”” The site also claims resident safety officers and Marshall staff took unfair disciplinary actions against students. Trevino said that discipline is taken on a case-by-case basis and everyone is looked at individually. Among other things, this would mean that the disciplinarian would consider the severity of the offense and any prior offenses that a student had when deciding on punishment. The Web site also states that “”a TMC staff member has admitted that there have been more housing contracts terminated in the first two weeks of winter quarter 2002 than all of the 2000-2001 school year.”” Trevino acknowledges that a high number of students have had their housing contracts terminated, but denies any conspiracy plot. “”There have been a lot of housing contracts terminated this quarter,”” Trevino said. “”There just happened to be more violations. That is it.”” The site also accuses the college of not printing or posting the consequences for breaking specific rules in enough places. However, Houston-Hands said the rules and regulations are printed in the TMC handbook, along with a list of possible sanctions for violations. Another complaint voiced on the Web site is that students are being asked to vacate their dorm rooms within two weeks of their housing contract being terminated. The site claims that this violates a California law that requires evictees to have 30 days to find another living situation. The site cites specific clauses in California Civil Code 1946 saying, “”… As to tenancies from month to month either of the parties may terminate the same by giving at least 30 days’ written notice thereof.”” However, the code goes on to say that if the two parties reach an agreement at the time of the contract, such as the UCSD housing contract, then the owner of the property — UCSD in this case — can legally evict the tenant with a minimum of seven days warning. The protest is scheduled for Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Marshall Field, according to the Web site. ...

Upcoming Events

Feb. 14: Triton Baseball Stadium: Baseball vs. CSUDH, 2:30 p.m. Feb. 15: RIMAC Arena: Women’s basketball vs. CSUDH, 5:30 p.m. Feb. 15: RIMAC Arena: Men’s basketball vs. CSUDH, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 15: Canyonview Pool: Water polo vs. UCSB, 6 p.m. Feb. 16: North Courts: Women’s tennis vs. SSU, 11 a.m. Feb. 16: Triton Softball Stadium: Softball vs. CSUSB, 12 p.m. ...

Examining gender perspectives on 'The Vagina Monologues'

Though a somewhat inaccurate name since there are several group performances, this boldly vaginal theater is a complicated and powerful performance. The most difficult part is the diversity of emotions that is brought forth in the vignettes. Ranging from irreverent to depressing and often very sexual, “”The Vagina Monologues”” is entertaining and eye-opening. I liked it all, but even the most hard of hearts would have to agree that if nothing else, it certainly is exciting. This play has become known for how striking it is with its open sexuality and genitally intimate topics, and the cast is definitely willing to risk shocking you a few times with unexpected words and actions. There is a delicate balance between delightful and provocative, and I would suspect that the most resolute misogynist could still find something interesting about a woman asking the crowd to say “”cunt”” (she does so to reclaim the word). Humor and surprise were brought out equally and with rather easy transitions, but the mood also changed to a more serious tone. Dealing with the issues of female genital mutilation and the raping of women during the war in Bosnia, serious issues were honestly and openly confronted. The accounts of several girls’ first periods and their families’ reactions ran the gamut, painting a compelling image of what it is like to have an unexpected surge of blood start leaking out of your childhood unmentionables. Preventing any sleeping audience members, the rendition of a verity of orgasms grabs your attention, playfully. “”The Vagina Monologues”” gives a full-force production from start to finish that really anyone would be able to enjoy. Daring and perhaps a little brazen, the UCSD cast makes an entertaining and lively performance. Considering the range of attitudes of men, let me just say this: The dance between sexual and erotic will likely keep some longer than if the performance were less up-front about sexuality and, well … moaning. ...

UCSD CLUB SPORTS

Competition Dance The UCSD competition dance team traveled to the national dance competition in Las Vegas last weekend and made it to the finals, placing sixth out of the 14 teams competing. The finish is even more impressive considering the UCSD team was the only one in the finals without a professional coach and choreographer. The team will perform its national routine for UCSD Friday at Spirit Night. Equestrian Team Last weekend the UCSD equestrian team hosted University of San Diego, Cal Poly Pomona and University of Southern California at Clark’s Ranch. UCSD’s Kate McComas took second place in the open flat competition, while team captain Lisa Calvino nabbed second place in the open fences category to pace UCSD. In the intermediate division, Meredith Tosta placed first in the flat event and second in the fences event. Tosta also earned the High Point Rider award. Erica Gross, Zoe Jaracki and Sandy Johnson all placed high in the novice division, helping UCSD to a second-place overall finish. Ski & Snowboard The UCSD ski and snowboard team traveled to Mammoth Mountain last weekend to compete in the giant slalom, two slaloms, skiercross and boardercross. Top skiers for UCSD include Danielle Crockett and Sierra Bourne, who finished first and second in the giant slalom. In the slaloms, Crockett and Bourne switched off first and second in both races. For the men, Tom Christensen and Travis Ritchie grabbed second and third places in the skiercross. Rugby The UCSD men’s rugby team raised their league record to 2-1 with a 27-24 win over visiting Long Beach State on Saturday. Long Beach grabbed the lead first, capitalizing on UCSD’s shorthandedness due to penalties, to grab a 5-0 lead. Nick Polsky put UCSD on the board at the 17-minute mark, kicking a penalty goal to narrow the score to 3-5. UCSD capitalized on the momentum as Nick Serrato scored to give UCSD an 8-5 lead. Shuan Cho and a Polsky conversion rounded out the scoring for the first half, with UCSD on top 15-12. Long Beach opened the second half with a score to take a 19-15 lead. However, Polsky came up big for UCSD again, stealing a Long Beach scrum put-in and running 15 meters to give UCSD a slim 20-19 lead. Later Polsky posted another conversion to secure the victory for UCSD. Upcoming Saturday, Feb. 16 Men’s and Women’s ultimate disk host over 20 teams in their President’s Day Tournament. Cycling competes at SDSU. Men and Women’s Lacrosse plays University of Arizona at the Santa Barbara Shootout. Women’s rugby plays Arizona State University at 11 a.m. Men’s rugby plays UCLA at 1 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17 Men’s lacrosse plays Arizona State University at 1 p.m. Women’s rugby plays University of Arizona at 1 p.m. Monday, Feb. 18 UCSD surf team competes at Seaside Reef in Cardiff. — Compiled by Isaac Pearlman Sports Editor ...

hiatus calendar

Thursday 2/14/02 Celebrate Valentine’s Day with “”The Vagina Monologues”” at the Price Center Theater. Tickets are $7. Call (858) 534-8497 for more information. The show starts at 7 p.m. Sick of St. Valentine and his day? Then go watch the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre at The Casbah. The Greenhornes, with their guitar and ’60s organ sound, will play alongside Fireballs of Freedom, who provide dirty rock reminiscent of early AC/DC. The 45’s will also be there. The event starts at 8 p.m. and tickets are only $7. Call (619) 232-4355 for more information. The UCSD theatre and dance depatment’s Two By Shepard continues until Saturday with daily performances at 8 p.m. in the Mandell Weiss Forum Studio. An extra performance on Saturday starts at 2 p.m. Friday 2/15/02 Ready for some spice? Beau Soleil heat up the Mandeville Auditorium with their bluegrass roots spiced with a cajun flavor. Look to the story on page 9 for more. Tickets are $15 for students and $20 general admission and can be purchased at the UCSD Box Office. Call (858) 534-TIXS for more information. Jivewire is at The Casbah. This eclectic club night features a mix of rock, techno and hip-hop. Rotator and Transit Aural Assault will also peform. The event is free, so get there early. Call The Casbah at (619) 232-4355 for more information. The Samples will play tonight and tomorrow night at The Belly Up Tavern. Their appeal is the way they employ their jam-band style with pop sensibilities. They have recently released an album exclusively on the Internet. Both shows start at 9:15 p.m. and tickets are $16. Saturday 2/16/02 For Brazilian bossa-nova fans, go to Dizzy’s for their tribute to Antonio Carlos Jobim. Birth of Bossa will feature several artists, including Kevin Hennessy, Duncan Moore, Peter Sprague and vocalist Andy Villas-Boas. The show runs from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Cover is $10. Call (858) 270-7467 for more information. Sunday 2/17/02 Chris Klich & his quintet will feature jazz classics at Dizzy’s. The show starts at 8 p.m. Cover is $8. For more information call (858) 270-7467. Monday 2/18/02 Bay area jazz vocalist Elaine Lucia will be at Dizzy’s. She will be accompanied by pianist Jonathan Alford, Bill Andrews on the bass guitar, and drummer Tim Shay. The performance starts at 7 p.m. and the cover is $10. Call Dizzy’s at (858) 270-7467. The Bob Marley Day Fest. Any questions? Take the rest of your Monday off and head to the San Diego Sports Arena. The show starts at 1 p.m. Tickets start at $30. Look to the hiatus calendar for events in and around UCSD. All tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (619) 220-8497 or by going to http://www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. ...

Golf grabs first at tourney

UCSD golf began its 2002 season at the Point Loma Invitational last Monday and Tuesday at Riverwalk Golf Course. In the team’s first tournament since early November, the Tritons nabbed first place, finishing three strokes ahead of Master’s College. The difference for UCSD came in the second round of the tournament, as they shot 294 as a team. Master’s College’s shot 297. In the first and third rounds, both teams finished with identical 311 and 301 team scores. California State University San Bernardino and Point Loma Nazarene rounded out the top four finishers, with the Coyotes ending the tournament six strokes behind the Tritons, and the Crusaders finishing seven strokes behind UCSD. California State University Monterey Bay and Claremont McKenna both finished with overall scores of 914 to tie for fifth place. Sophomores Brian Duckworth and Galen Farris led UCSD — both finished in a five-way tie for 5th place with a three-round score of 224 along with Holy Names’ Matt Thornton, Monterey Bay’s Chris Marin, and UC Santa Barbara’s J.R. Reyes. Tritons Alan Scheer and Greg Wilson continued the sophomore sweep of top finishers for UCSD, ending the tournament with overall scores of 228 to end in a three-way tie for 15th place. Sheer battled his way back after hitting an 81 in the first round by posting second- and third-round scores of 73 and 74, respectively. Sophomore Blake Sneider and juniors Andy Thomson and Ryan Gale rounded out the scoring for the Tritons, finishing 25th, 26th and 29th respectively. In the par-72 course, Point Loma’s Josh Colace was the only competitor to finish under par after three rounds, firing a 69, 72, and 72 to end three under par. The closest finishers after Colace were Master’s College’s Ryan Higton and Redlands College’s Jordan Bailey, who both finished at six over par with final scores of 222. Marin had the low round of the tournament, shooting a 68 in the first round to join Colace as the only two competitors to shoot under 70. The Tritons will travel to San Leandro, Calif., to participate in the Holy Names College Tournament from Feb.18 to Feb. 19 at the Monarch Bay Golf Course. ...

Opera Review: Baroque opera makes stunning debut at the Civic Theatre

Ariodante,”” the obscure opera by Handel that has always peered out from the shadow of the venerated “”The Messiah,”” now finds its place in the sun with the San Diego Opera. Courtesy of San Diego Opera With the ebb of baroque-style operas these days, Handel seems to be creeping back on the scene, and with his work follows a surprisingly enthusiastic patronage. This season’s performance proves to be excellent with an emphatic orchestra with talented director John Copely, conductor Kenneth Montgomery and an astounding voice cast. Ariodante, once a castrato role (a part played by a castrated male singer), is now a “”trouser role”” played by a woman, and makes its appearance with mezzo-soprano Vivica Genaux. Genaux steals the show with her impressive octave range, breath control and quick changes in voice. Though slumped in the wake of Genaux’s performance, the rare countertenor David Walker makes his debut playing the villainous Polinesso. In the background of these talented singers is a distracting and puzzling surrealist/post-modernist set design. The brilliant and vivid 18th century-style costumes that adorn each singer do not mesh well with this experimental set design. Traditionalism and surrealism hardly ever go well together, and this production is certainly not an exception to the rule. The arioso’s passages, ensembles and duets all absorb each listener of the audience. With the San Diego Opera now giving student discounts on tickets, “”Ariodante”” is a must-see opera for UCSD students. ...

Men's tennis wins third-straight

The men’s tennis team continued its domination by picking up its third straight victory with a sweep over Alliant International University on Tuesday. The Tritons won every match taking an amazing 96 games to Alliant’s 29. UCSD’s No. 1 doubles team of Sameer Chopra and Bryan Swatt started the Tritons off on the right foot with an 8-3 victory over their opponents. The No. 2 and 3 Triton teams, Everett Schroeter-Jeff Wilson and Dan Albrecht-Sean Nagel, also picked up easy 8-0 and 8-2 victories for UCSD to give the Tritons the doubles sweep. The Tritons continued to dominate in singles play, as No. 1 freshman Blake Wilson-Hayden earned the straight set victory 6-3, 6-4. UCSD’s Emil Novak played the closest match of the day, going to 10 games in each set before taking the 6-4, 6-4 win. Amir Nejad, Doug Hofmann, Nick Morton and Sean Higginbotham each earned singles victories against their Alliant opponents, with Morton going undefeated with a perfect 6-0, 6-0 victory. With this victory, the Tritons remain undefeated in the season and carry a 3-0 record heading into the Cal Poly Team Tournament Feb. 15 through Feb. 17 in Pomona, Calif. ...

How to find romance in all the right movies

Cinema has a long tradition of evoking powerful emotions and feelings that not only hit the eyes, but also aim for the heart. The right romantic film could turn any ordinary night into an unforgettable event. Here are some of the greatest modern and classic films to see. ‘Casablanca’ (1942) One of the greatest and most romantic classics around, “”Casablanca”” still shines 60 years after its release. Humphrey Bogart plays suave yet troubled Rick Blane, the owner of a Moroccan nightclub in the midst of Nazi occupation and the French resistance. Ingrid Bergman stars as a woman who must decide between the tough, gritty Blane and the heroic Victor Laszlo, played by Paul Henreid. With more catchy and memorable quotes than any other film, “”Casablanca”” remains untouched in romantic endurance. ‘Dirty Dancing’ (1987) Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze team up to star in this sleeper hit about a woman who falls in love with her dance instructor. Although some consider it cheesy, “”Dirty Dancing”” combines a classic storyline with a great soundtrack. ‘My Fair Lady’ (1964) Now a rare genre, musicals used to reach the hearts of audiences everywhere. One of the best musicals produced also happens to be one of the most touching. It’s a “”loverly”” Audrey Hepburn vehicle in which she plays flower-girl Eliza Doolittle, who is transformed into a lady by the soul-less Dr. Henry Higgins. Compared to today’s society, “”My Fair Lady”” appears old-fashioned and sexist, but its beautiful music still touches the heart. Also look for the wonderful, grandiose costumes of Cecil Beaton. ‘Shakespeare in Love’ (1998) This witty portrayal of William Shakespeare (Joseph Fiennes) can not only be translated into modern society, but it also has a touching plot about how a woman named Violet (Gwyneth Paltrow) manages to cure Shakespeare’s writing block and capture his heart. In this film, “”Romeo and Juliet”” was inspired by the romantic affair between Shakespeare and Violet. ‘When Harry met Sally’ (1989) This modern classic tries to answer one of the biggest love questions around: Can two friends sleep together and still be friends the next morning? The film follows Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan as two friends who meet in college and their ensuing love lives as the years pass. One of the most memorable scenes in modern cinema is Ryan faking an orgasm in a diner while Crystal looks on, confusingly amazed. ...