Campus

The Editor's Soapbox: Marshall's graduation policy fosters unrest

Thurgood Marshall College, high on its horse of self-proclaimed multicultural sensitivity and diversity appreciation, is guilty of fraud against its students. According to its Web site, Marshall college aims to challenge students to “”develop an informed sensitivity to the many cultural perspectives that have shaped modern American society.”” The college also claims to help students critically examine the state of life within “”our diverse American society.”” Politically, I feel that both are extremely important and worthy goals — but Marshall college has carelessly trampled over each of them with its divisive, insensitive and naive plans for the June commencement ceremony. Marshall college allows its graduates to invite two individuals (read: two parents) to cross the stage with them as they receive their diplomas. This concept seems, at first, to be a thoughtful gesture through which a student may “”thank”” two people (read: two parents) for the support, encouragement and financial contributions they lent to his undergraduate education. However, Marshall college’s ceremonial “”thank you”” blatantly ignores the diversity that is today associated with family life in America. Imagine all the Marshall students who come from divorced or never-married families, wherein the parents no longer speak peacefully (remember, 50 percent of all marriages end in divorce these days and many couples never marry). I imagine these students will now approach graduation day with anxiety and added stress, since Marshall administrators have created a series of awkward situations for them: They must choose to bring neither parent in order to avoid a tense situation, effectively disappointing both parents, or they must force their parents’ interaction and demand that it be peaceful. For these students, choosing to bring neither parent across the stage in hopes of avoiding a difficult situation opens a host of other conflicts — will parents be insulted as they watch other students being happily accompanied to the stage, realizing that their child deliberately chose not to be escorted? Students from hostile, “”broken”” or nontraditional families are unlikely to be pleased that Marshall college is forcing them into such clumsy situations on a day that is intended to be one of joy, celebration and reflection. In fact, I already know one student who is so anxious about the prospect of his unpeaceful parents being near each other during graduation that he has opted to take his sister across the stage with him instead. He knows his parents will be disappointed, but the cost of an uncomfortable environment as he crosses the stage is far outweighed by the risk of offending them with this decision. There’s another segment of the student population seemingly disregarded by the escort policy — those who have lost one or both parents. These students will already be sadly reminded of that absence on such a special day, and forcing everyone else’s parents onto the stage for the audience to recognize and celebrate is simply a method of rubbing salt into wounds. What about students whose academic careers are solely the fruits of their own labors? I imagine that to most students and to the parental-aged administrators who probably devised this idea, allowing us to invite two people to cross the diploma threshold must seem like an appreciative gesture that can be extended to whomever has most helped us through our undergraduate education. Realistically, however, some students truly feel that no one in their lives has provided a level of support great enough to merit their participation in the graduation walk. However, telling everyone in your life that this is how you feel isn’t the easiest feat. Marshall college’s graduation policy, then, will force such students either into offending their families and friends or into allowing someone to accompany them in spite of feeling that no one deserves the honor. Not all of us have two parents, let alone two parents who get along well enough to cross the stage with us without adding more stress to the big day. Not all of us have two parents present in our lives, period. Not all of us feel that our parents — or anyone — contributed so much to our education that they should be honored with the chance to cross the stage with us. Not all of us want every Marshall graduate to see that we have only one parent to bring up to the stage with us, or that our parents are nontraditional in any other way. It’s not a far-fetched concept that the two-person escort option will cause distress for some graduates and their families — at least, it isn’t far-fetched if one gives the subject an ounce of thought. That leaves two options: Either Marshall college failed to give the subject an ounce of thought, or Marshall college didn’t care to embrace diversity as it applies to modern American families. Either option leaves me — for the first time in four years — frustrated, disappointed and simply angry to be a Marshall student. ...

UCSD drops to 4-8

The UCSD men’s basketball team continued its recent struggles, dropping games to California State University teams from Stanislaus and Bakersfield this weekend. The Tritons started the Central Valley swing with a disappointing 67-63 loss to the Warriors of Cal State Stanislaus Friday night. Going into the half leading 35-25, UCSD seemed poised to grab its fifth California Collegiate Athletic Association win, but the Tritons’ lack of depth and lack of inside presence was too much to overcome. Reserve Casey Harrington, who was averaging three minutes a game, came off the bench in the second stanza, leading Stanislaus to a 14-point turnaround and the 67-63 victory. Reasons for the second-half collapse abound. Besides inserting Harrington, the Warriors shot a sizzling 45.2 percent from the field (14-31) in the second half while the Tritons froze inside and out, shooting 32.4 percent (11-34), far below their season average of 41.5 percent. The Tritons fell short on rebounds 43-37. While the starting UCSD frontline of Jody Woods, Ryan Swed and Jordan Watkins added 25 rebounds in total, the Triton guards and reserves failed to pull down their share of rebounds. The starting backcourt for the Warriors pulled down a combined 13 rebounds, but their Triton counterparts only pulled down four, providing the key element in the rebound column. Freshman center Watkins led the Tritons in scoring with 14 points while Woods chipped in 13. Woods and Swed both led the team in rebounds with nine apiece. Saturday night, the Tritons fell to the Roadrunners of Cal State Bakersfield, 89-82, in a difficult match against the nation’s No. 23 team. The Tritons again relied on outside shooting to keep the game close but could not contain the Roadrunners’ guard play. It would be an understatement to say the Tritons live and die by the three: They decisively lead the California Collegiate Athletic Association in three-point field goal attempts. This game was the perfect example of why that strategy has not produced many wins. UCSD missed its first eight three-point attempts and trailed by 10 during the first half. The Tritons made 11 of their next 12 three-point attempts and took their only lead early in the second half after Swed scored the team’s final three-pointer. The Tritons then missed their final three attempts from beyond the arc while watching Bakersfield pull away for the victory. Again, rebounds played a pivotal role in this game when UCSD — the worst rebounding team in the CCAA — managed to pull down only 27 boards against the Roadrunners’ 35. Woods led the Tritons, pouring in a season-high 19 points and a team-high nine rebounds. Swed added 15 points and six rebounds. ...

Kings, queens, and divas

It’s 6:45 on Friday night, and in the Price Center Theater, a guy in a cheerleader’s uniform is adjusting his brassiere. Colin Young-Wolff Guardian He looks downstage at one of his similarly attired friends and asks gravely, “”Are my boobs bigger than yours, Todd?”” A girl in boxy, mannish clothes leers, “”Yeah, I want to go out with Todd — he has better tits.”” She laughs, and adds, “”Sorry, I’m being a heterosexual male.”” Divas in Denial, the UCSD Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Association’s seventh-annual drag show, wouldn’t start until 8 p.m., but the gender-bending was already well under way. Colin Young-Wolff Guardian Drag, cross-dressing, transvestism — under any name, the practice of wearing the clothes of the opposite sex and often attempting to “”pass”” as a gender not your own — is nothing new; remember that only men were allowed to perform on stage in ancient Greek theater and in Shakespearian England. The LGBT community has been identifying through drag for quite a while, too — so much so that LGBTA principal member Brian Latham considers the event “”like [the LGBTA’s] culture night, our spirit night.”” He explained, “”This is where the community comes together; we share a part of our culture with each other and the rest of the community. We get to run around and celebrate and do the kind of stuff that people weren’t able to do even 10 years ago.”” Jennifer Hartman, a go-go dancer at the San Diego bar The Flame, was asked to dance to Pink’s “”Get This Party Started”” in the show. She explained drag in terms of theater. “”I think that everyone has their own method of expressing themselves, and whether you’re an artist or a drag king or whatever you are … the whole thing is the theatrics of it all,”” she said. “”It’s whoever you want to be at the moment.”” In the men’s room, with 30 minutes to showtime, participant Mikey Kaufman applied eyeshadow to Revelle sophomore Sean LaPerruque in the men’s room adjacent to the makeshift backstage dressing room. Kaufman explained that his involvement with “”Divas in Denial”” is about more than women’s clothing. “”I got started the first year I came out, and I knew it was something that I’ve always wanted to do: do drag, perform, be in front of an audience, gender-bend, what have you,”” Kaufman said. And how did he choose to lip sync “”Sweet Surrender”” and “”Ice Cream,”” songs by Lilith Fair founder Sarah McLachlan? “”Sarah McLachlan is my goddess, and this is the second year I’m doing her, so it’s not so much drag for me as it is performance art,”” he said. LaPerruque weighed in on the drag experience as well: “”It’s very interesting to feel what a girl feels like, and all the crap that –“” Kaufman interrupted, “”Oh, this is not what a girl feels like …”” and they continued, overlapping: “”I shaved my legs last night, and it was hell!”” “”…Well, what it feels like for a girl to get ready and go out somewhere, and be considered a woman …”” “”Right. Not like, giving birth and stuff …”” “”… Not that you’d be considered a woman.”” “”… [But] all the crap that society makes you go through and stuff.”” “”Yeah.”” Kaufman returned to the task at hand, saying, “”Open. You don’t have much eyelids.”” Outside, LaPerruque looked for the girl who was supposed to finish his makeup; she was missing. “”I’ve never even worn a dress before,”” he confessed, visibly nervous. “”It’s really weird. Never done the makeup and all that before. It’s a lot of work.”” So was obtaining the costumes, according to most of the male performers. Procuring appropriate clothing meant borrowing from friends, finding a way to try on items in stores with women-only dressing rooms, and occasionally sewing from scratch. The finished product, Latham said, can be eerie. “”When I first put on the wig and the makeup a couple weeks ago when we were rehearsing, I looked in the mirror and I thought I looked like my older sister and it scared the hell out of me,”” he said, laughing. Shaun, an LGBTA principal member who wished to be identified only by his first name, couldn’t express how it felt to be in drag for the first time. “”I can’t put it into words right now,”” he said. “”Right now, what I’m thinking is, ‘I hope I look OK.'”” When performers had been hurried behind the curtain and rehearsals had been finished or nixed due to lack of time, the floodgates finally opened and the audience, many of which had been waiting outside the doors already, entered the theater. A nearly full house roared for the MCs, who were members of the San Diego Kings Club, a semi-professional group of drag kings. The performers — UCSD students; the so-called “”Asian drag diva”” Black China; and Kings club performers Tommy Salami, Drake Bottoms, Pan T. Slickers, Al Pachuco and Johnny O. — challenged gender ideas against a background of pop music and careful choreography. The audience, for its part, seemed to love it, applauding and cheering at every turn. As the audience filed out after the show, the performers also filtered into the lobby to confer with friends and each other about the show. LaPerruque said he had “”a blast,”” and hopes to participate again next year in a bigger role. But others worried about their onstage mistakes. “”I fucked up so many times!”” LGBTA principal member Wes Fujimoto said. Eleanor Roosevelt College freshman and “”Divas in Denial”” usher Kara Desert consoled him: “”But you were so damn sexy, it just made up for it.”” ...

Water polo hosts invitational

After winning over Hartwick College to kick off the season, the UCSD women’s water polo team hosted the UCSD NoGrip Invitational this past weekend. The Tritons’ division included University of Hawaii and Indiana. On Saturday, each team played two games, one against each of the other two teams in the same division. In their first game, the Tritons fell to the Rainbows, 8-4. The Tritons managed to keep the game close throughout the first half. At halftime, Hawaii led by only one goal, 4-3. However, UCSD struggled in the final two quarters. The Rainbows played a more aggressive style of defense and allowed just one goal in the second half. On the other end of the pool, the Tritons could not contain the Rainbows, who were able to earn and capitalize on open looks at the goal. Junior Dana Tucker led the Tritons, scoring two goals in the game. Team captain Emma Kudritzki and freshman Lindsay Grossman had one goal each. Playing against Indiana in its second game, UCSD jumped out into an early lead and never let the game get close in its 9-5 victory over Indiana. In the first half, UCSD scored two goals in the opening quarter, and added four more in the second. Indiana could not establish its offense and only managed to score once in the entire first half, which ended with the Tritons leading 6-1. UCSD maintained its advantage in the second half of the game. Indiana never made a threatening comeback, but it did score twice in each of the final two quarters. Kudritzki had four goals in the Tritons’ second game of the tournament, giving her a total of five on the day. Tucker and junior Elizabeth Keesey contributed two goals each, while junior Daniel Boyle scored once. After the first day of invitational, the Tritons were 2-1 in the early season. Results from Sunday’s action were unavailable at press time. ...

UCSD splits on road

After suffering the most disappointing losses of the season the previous weekend, the UCSD women’s basketball team traveled to Central Valley this weekend, splitting games with California State Universities Stanislaus and Bakersfield. Friday night the Tritons traveled to Turlock to take on the Warriors of CSUS, picking up a 75-63 victory. The Tritons used hot three-point shooting (6 for 8) in the first half to build a 36-25 lead. UCSD cooled off in the second half but managed to add another point to the margin of victory. In a balanced attack, Ali Ginn led the team in scoring with 19 points. Maya Fok added 14, while Margaret Johnson and Nicholle Bromley added 12. Bromley led the team in rebounds, picking up eight. Center Shannon Donnley added 25 points and eight rebounds for the Warriors, but her inside dominance was not enough to keep the home side close. The Tritons traveled south to take on the No. 21 Roadrunners of CSUB Saturday night. Unfortunately, UCSD came up on the losing end and was never close to knocking off the California Collegiate Athletic Association’s second-place team. Up 9-8 in the first half, the Tritons fell victim to a 15-0 run that saw the lead jump to 14. UCSD never came within 12 points for the rest of the game. During that run, Bakersfield’s Diane Dittburner shot her 76th three-point field goal of the season, tying the CCAA record. Dittburner added two more before the game ended to give her the record, with six games left to play. UCSD did manage to contain the nation’s leading scorer, center Heather Garay, to 16 points, but Dittburner’s 23 were too much for the Tritons to handle. The Tritons were hindered by poor team shooting going 20-63 (31.7 percent) from the field, well below their season average of 36.7 percent. Ginn led the Tritons in scoring with 13 and in rebounds with six. Sandhal Nelson, in her most minutes of play this season, added six boards and five points. This road trip came on the heels of last week’s heartbreaking losses to San Francisco State University and Sonoma State University. Entering those matches, the Tritons were ranked No. 10 in the west with an outside chance of making the National Collegiate Athletic Association tournament. Their losses to San Francisco, Sonoma and Bakersfield all but ended any chance the Tritons had to compete in post-season play. UCSD is now 7-9 in the CCAA and 11-10 overall. The Tritons return to action Friday night against California State University Dominguez Hills. The annual UCSD Spirit Night game tips off at 5:30 p.m. at RIMAC Arena. ...

Volleyball drops two to Warriors

The men’s volleyball team had the tough assignment of traveling to Honolulu last weekend for a two-game series against the Warriors of the University of Hawaii. Playing in front of a hostile crowd of 4,759, the Tritons fell to the third-ranked Warriors in straight sets, 30-23, 30-20 and 30-18. It was a tough match for UCSD because Hawaii’s Kimo Tuyay had 22 assists and Jose Delgado led all players with 11 kills. In the first set, hitting percentage told the story, since the Tritons hit .024 while University of Hawaii finished the game with a .286 percentage and a 1-0 lead on the Tritons. The next set was similar, with UCSD managing only 10 kills relative to 15 errors, finishing with a -.114 attack percentage in the second set. UCSD head coach Ron Larsen earned a yellow card during the game while the Tritons slipped behind the Warriors 0-2. UCSD saved the best set for last, smacking 16 kills and finishing with a .394 percentage in the third set. However, the Warriors were too much, hitting an astounding .704 to close out the match. The Tritons were led by Jim Waller, who finished with nine kills, and Jordan Hove, who contributed 33 assists to the UCSD effort. The next day was more of the same for the Tritons when they dropped their second-straight game to the Warriors. The Warriors began the game by garnering 16 kills in the first set, while UCSD was only able to pick up six. The Tritons committed nine errors en route to the 15-30 loss. In the second set, the Tritons bounced back for their best set of the trip, playing tough before falling 26-30. The UCSD defense held Hawaii to 12 kills and lowest hitting percentage of the game, yet was unable to take advantage due to the Warrior defense, which held the Tritons to a .206 percentage. The last game of the set was again close for UCSD, but in the end it was tagged with the 24-30 loss. The Tritons were led by Eric Perrine, who ended with a match-high 16 kills. The Warriors finished with three players in double-digits for kills, led by Delgado’s 13. With the two losses, the Warriors improve to 9-2 overall and remain perfect in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation with a 6-0 record. The Tritons drop to 1-9 overall and at 0-8 are still seeking their first MPSF victory of the season. ...

Tritons win in 14-inning marathon

The Tritons won the first California Collegiate Athletic Association game of their season Friday, but it took them two days and 14 innings to do it. Lyon Liew Guardian UCSD tied the score in the bottom of the ninth inning against California State University Los Angeles Thursday evening, but the end of the game was postponed until Friday due to darkness. After the Tritons jumped out of the gates early with a David Hawk three-run home run, the Golden Eagles erased a 7-1 deficit with a seven-run seventh inning. After both teams traded leads, Cal State L.A. took a 10-9 lead after a squeeze bunt by Denver Berry scored pinch runner Tommy Owen. The Tritons refused to quit and junior center fielder Matt Smith knotted the game at 10 after scoring in the bottom of the ninth on a fielder’s choice by pinch hitter Nigel Miller. On Friday, both teams picked up where they left off and battled into the 14th inning until the Tritons triumphed with an 11-10 victory. In the bottom of the 14th, UCSD left fielder John Bologna reached base on an Eagle error and was brought home for the victory by a Smith single after stealing second base. Triton sophomore Raf Bergstrom tossed five innings of shutout baseball to pick up the win. The following game was hardly as exciting, since the Golden Eagles’ Chris Johnson pitched seven scoreless innings against the Tritons and Cal State L.A. won 7-2. Johnson allowed only five hits to the Triton offense, struck out four and walked none. The Golden Eagles roughed up UCSD starting pitcher Keith Smith for nine hits and five runs in five innings, while the Tritons were only able to muster two runs on seven hits. The Tritons’ only runs of the game came in the ninth inning, when Miller hit a triple to score Matt Kennison and Matt Merriman. Mike Miller had three hits for Cal State L.A., while Troy Young, Tim Wilderson, Rashawn Owens and Rafael Arroyo each contributed two hits to Cal State L.A. coach John Herbold’s school record-tying 397th career victory. After the split, the Golden Eagles move to 4-8 overall and 1-1 in CCAA, while UCSD’s record is now 5-3-1 overall, 1-1 in CCAA. The two teams finish out their four-game series Feb. 10, traveling to Los Angeles for a noon doubleheader. ...

Two wins for men's tennis

The UCSD men’s tennis team capped off its first week of dual meet competition with victories over College of the Desert and Cal Poly Pomona University last weekend. Colin Young-Wolff Guardian The Tritons, off to a 2-0 record, held onto a 5-4 home exhibition win over four-time defending community college state champions College of the Desert Friday at the North Campus Tennis Courts. The Tritons started off slowly, dropping two of three doubles matches. The lone win came when the Jeff Wilson and Dan Albrecht team, down 5-2 at one point, rallied to win six of the next seven games to take the match 8-6. However, things picked up during the singles matches, with UCSD taking four of six matches to decide the meet. Team captain Michael Meyer, Wilson, Blake Wilson-Hayden and Emil Novak all paced the Triton victory with wins. Hayden-Wilson played an impressive match, easily taking the first set 6-1. However, Desert’s Daniel Briseno rallied to take the second set 6-3, and the two played to a tie-breaker that Wilson-Hayden won 7-6 (6). On Saturday, the Tritons finished off a demanding week with a 6-3 victory over visiting Cal Poly Pomona. This time, the Tritons won two of three doubles matches when the Brian Swatt/Sameer Chopra and Michael Meyer/Everett Schroeter teams tallied wins. They were followed with a repeat of the previous day — singles wins by Meyer, Wilson, Wilson-Hayden and Novak. “”[It] was a good win over a good team,”” head coach Eric Steidlmayer said on the team’s Web site. “”We knew it was going to be tough and it certainly was. I think this match also highlighted a few things we can improve on … Our doubles play must get better, and our readiness to begin the matches must improve if we are to be a very good team.”” The Swatt/Chopra team played the nail-biter of the day, since they were down four match points against Cal Poly’s Ryan Terry and Andy Roland before rallying to force a tie-breaker and win the match 9-8 (2). “”It was toward the end when we were down,”” Swatt said. “”I have a tendency to be more up-and-down in my emotions, but Sameer isn’t. I looked to him. Both those guys were really good players … It worked out for us, but Sameer really came through for us today.”” Meyer had a long weekend, with both of his matches going to three sets. On Friday against Desert, he played Rye Kashawabara to a 6-4, 4-6, 6-1 victory. On Saturday, he played another grueling match that went the distance. This time, Cal Poly Pomona’s Ryan Terry fell, 4-6, 7-6 (3), 6-1, in another lengthy battle — a common occurrence for the Tritons this season. “”We’ve won a lot of three-set matches,”” Swatt said. “”[For example], Mike was in better shape against a really good guy and came out on top. Our conditioning helps us win a lot of third-set matches, and I think that will pay off in the later matches of the season.”” The team’s conditioning is not their most important asset, however, because Swatt said its the Tritons’ competitive nature is what has driven them so far this season. “”That we have a competitive attitude is our biggest thing,”” Swatt said. “”Nobody wants to lose; everybody’s fighting. Physically, we have a lot of talent, but it takes that unwillingness to lose — that fighting attitude has helped us in our matches so far.”” Last season, the Tritons lost to the Roadrunners 6-3, and following two rainouts, the Tritons fell to Cal Poly Pomona 5-4 in their meeting last season. The Tritons also defeated Azusa Pacific University 6-3 earlier in the week after losing to them by the same score last season. “”We lost to all of those teams last year, so to come back, we feel the team is a lot deeper and we’re improved,”” Swatt said. “”We proved this week that we’re a much better team than we were last year … We still have a ways to improve, but we’re definitely on the right track.”” The week had its share of success stories, but the team had a scare last weekend at the Cal Poly Individual Tournament when Swatt suffered from heat exhaustion during his draining third-round, three-set victory over College of the Desert’s Kunio Minata. Swatt said he started cramping during the second set but played through it, and as a result, the cramping worsened after the match. He went to a hospital, where several precautionary tests were conducted before his release. ...

UCSD splits opener with No. 5 Davis

The UCSD women’s softball team started conference play over the weekend by splitting a doubleheader with UC Davis and winning two over Chico State University. Anna MacMurdo Guardian The California Collegiate Athletic Association regular season opened at Triton Softball Field on Friday afternoon when the nationally fifth-ranked UC Davis Aggies came for a doubleheader. Fresh off throwing a no-hitter against Vanguard University, Triton senior Leea Harlan took the mound in the first game, but it quickly became apparent that Davis would not let her repeat that feat. The Aggies opened the scoring in the top of the first inning with one out, then they strung together three consecutive hits to take a 1-0 lead. With runners on second and third and only one out, the Aggies looked poised to break the game open, but the Triton defense picked up when UCSD shortstop Kim Aggabao fielded a grounder and caught the Davis baserunner in a rundown between third and home. Harlan induced a weak groundout back to the mound to end the inning, and then the Triton bats went to work. As she would do many times over the weekend, UCSD third baseman Amy Mettee came up big at the plate, opening the inning with a double off Susan Churchwell. The game was tied on the very next play when an error allowed Mettee to scamper home and sent left fielder Kristina Anderson to second. With two outs and Anderson on third, Christi Martinelli reached on Churchwell’s second throwing error of the inning, allowing Anderson to score. Right fielder Jamie Hurst came through in the clutch with a single to center that brought Martinelli around to score due to a fielding error by Davis catcher Angie Linsenmeyer. The Tritons scored three runs in the inning off two hits and three Davis errors to take a 3-1 lead. Aggie first baseman Suzanne Yale cut into that lead immediately with a towering solo home run to open the second inning. Harlan then settled into a rhythm, retiring six of the next seven batters she faced. Leading off in the top of the fourth, Linsenmeyer broke Harlan’s rhythm with a leadoff double that the Aggies turned into a run to tie the game. UCSD came back with a run in the bottom of the fourth when catcher Kristin Hunstad’s one-out single was manufactured into a run with the help of another Aggie error and a wild pitch. The Davis bats awoke in the last inning when Jenny Hall led off with a double. Two batters later, Aggie center fielder Shyamala White connected with Harlan’s 3-2 offering and sent it soaring over the left field fence to give Davis a 5-4 lead. “”[White] waits really well and I was trying to bust her inside,”” Harlan said afterward. “”But I left the ball a little bit too far over the plate and she turned on it.”” Freshman Breanne Cope started UCSD off with a single and advanced to second when Churchwell committed her third error of the game, allowing Mettee to reach base. A sacrifice bunt moved the runners to second and third with one out. Harlan reached on a fielder’s choice, scoring Cope with the tying run and moving Mettee to third. Aggabao then picked up her first hit of the day, bringing in Mettee and winning the opener for the Tritons. “”We didn’t play our best but we played as a team,”” head coach Patti Gerckens said afterward. “”When we play as a team, we will win games.”” The team effort was less successful in the second game because the Tritons lacked big hits and played somewhat suspect defense en route to a 3-1 loss. White hit her second home run of the afternoon, this one a two-run shot that was enough to provide a lead the Aggies would not relinquish. The lone Triton run came in the sixth when Harlan and Martinelli each doubled. Davis pitcher Amy Rosson was strong, allowing only six hits over seven innings for the win. Despite the split, coach Gerckens felt good about the way her club stacked up against Davis. “”They didn’t impress me that much. I think we’re a better team,”” she said. The Tritons were given an opportunity to prove themselves when they took on the Wildcats of Chico State on Saturday. “”Chico State is not somebody we should ever lose to,”” Harlan said. Harlan allowed only two hits in seven innings for the complete game shutout. Mettee walked in the first inning, was sacrificed to second, went to third on a groundout and scored on a wild pitch for the game’s only run. In the second game, pitcher Martinelli sparkled, striking out 14 Wildcats in the 2-1 victory. Martinelli also picked up an RBI in the sixth inning against Wildcat pitcher Katie Stokx. After five-and-a-half scoreless innings, UCSD capitalized on a Wildcat mistake to get its half of the inning started. Anderson reached base because Chico shortstop Megan Farnham could not handle a sharply hit grounder. Anderson moved to second when Harlan laid down a sacrifice bunt. Aggabao followed with a bunt of her own, beating it out for a single and moving Anderson to third base. Martinelli followed with a clutch single to give the Tritons the lead. Two batters later, Aggabao scored on a Hurst single to center, giving UCSD a two-run cushion. The Wildcats built a rally in the top of the seventh, scoring once and bringing the tying and lead runs to third and second base before the Tritons closed it out. ...

Letters to the Editor: A.S. vice president clarifies resolution's intent

Editor: One of the foundations of our country that I am most proud of is that we are allowed freedom of speech and freedom of thought. Some students at UCSD are in full support of our government’s current actions and some are not. It was incredibly astute of the A.S. Council to realize this and work to pass a resolution that is not partisan in giving its unconditional support for the victims of Sept. 11, 2001. The intent behind changes to the resolution was to embrace the diversity of opinion of UCSD students. Regardless of politics, the one thing on which we all agree is that we give our love and support to those who are fighting and to those who died in the tragedy of Sept. 11. In this resolution, we promise the men and women who died that they did not do so in vain and that we will never forget the lessons we have learned. The resolution is not a “”waste of paper,”” but rather a heartfelt condolence and support for American victims. The original version of the resolution did not serve the interests of the student body. After taking a vote among the senators who would pass it in its original form, it was clear that the resolution would not pass, because it did not serve to unite us. I am proud of the A.S. Council for being so attuned to the student body and making the changes necessary to better serve all students. To say that any member of the A.S. Council is un-American because we sought to unify our campus in supporting Americans who died and who are fighting is both hypocritical and divisive. It is hypocritical to say that one supports America and unity in the country, and then to rip apart one’s fellow students, who are doing everything they can to support the causes of unity and pride. When I ran for office on the Unity slate, I meant every word that I said. I promised that I would do everything in my power to unite the student body under the causes that we care about. As a leader on the A.S. Council, I promote unity in every possible way. The amended resolution was a good-faith effort to unite the campus. As a student, I am proud that our student government takes all sides into account. I am proud that our student government cares about all students on our campus and works every day to represent as many interests as possible. I am proud that our student government, while facing the political ambition of partisan groups, strives to do what is best for the campus. — Jenn Brown A.S. Vice President Internal Don’t recoup housing’s financial setbacks at students’ expense Editor: I was reading over some of the benefits of the “”one contract, one rate”” meal plan. Besides the fact that many statements were repeats of old statements with only a few words changed around, many of them were simply offensive and inflammatory. A couple of ideas that were particularly offensive to me ran along the lines of, “”Freshmen are not ready for the responsibility of living in an apartment atmosphere,”” and “”Mandatory meal plans are good for freshmen because they cannot cook for themselves.”” The plan went along to mention how ramen noodles and the like were not nutritionally sound meals. I must agree, but the last time I checked, pizza, cheeseburgers and french fries — to name a few of the items served regularly at all dining halls on campus — are not too healthy, either. I am a freshmen who got placed in an apartment this year, and I couldn’t consider myself more lucky. My roommates and I delegate chores, cook nutritious meals on a regular basis and are overall generally happy, as well as about $3,000 richer. As for the comment that most freshmen aren’t ready for the responsibility of living on their own, I say: What the hell are they doing in college? The entire point of college, for a lot of people, is learning to be independent. A lot of freshmen aren’t ready for the responsibility of midterms, finals and bills, but that doesn’t stop the university from administering them. Why is it necessary for UCSD to become increasingly paternal? I moved away from home to escape parents, not to replace them with much more expensive ones. When I asked representatives why this plan was necessary, I was told that UCSD needs more funds to build housing, that apartment funds can only be used to build apartments, and so on. It was a mediocre explanation at best. Then I questioned the representatives on why UCSD continued to admit more and more students when it was obvious that there were building shortages. I was told that the governor was responsible for setting admission quotas. How is it that all of these bureaucracies can exist and not be in working contact with one another? The idea that I pay almost $14,000 a year to help support a system that is completely out of sync with itself and lacking any type of checks or balances sickens me. I don’t receive any type of financial assistance, and I know a lot of people that are in the same situation. That means every dollar I give to this school had to be earned by my family and me. I have a proposal of my own: What if UCSD charges students according to how much their living arrangement costs the university? And as for mandatory meal plans, I think vegetarians would have a hard time spending $1,800 without resorting to salad for every meal. I have to work hard to afford this place, and all the wasted money that seems to be floating around (can we say “”New Student Initiated Outreach and Recruitment?””) seriously makes me reconsider going to a private university. You know, the ones with four-year housing guarantees. — Emilee Cunningham UCSD freshman ...