Campus

Editorial

John Muir College recently passed a fee activity referendum that will increase student fees to $7 per quarter. The new revenues are intended to expand the college¹s programming, which is the source of activities such as the Muir college suitcase dance, pizza study breaks during finals week and broomball. Interestingly, however, the only polling place that Muir college cared to operate during the election was located in the Middle of Muir. The Guardian believes that, given the ability to set up online polling through StudentLink, this was an inexcusable method of altering the voter pool so that the referendum would be more likely to pass. Most UCSD students are commuters, and as such, they visit their college campuses less frequently than those who live in on-campus dormitories and apartments. In fact, unless one must complete some sort of academic counseling or unless one has a class in the immediate area, it is unlikely that a person will even set foot on his college¹s campus during an average day. Given that most Muir students are commuters and they typically visit their college campuses infrequently, it is alarming that Muir college failed to allow its students to vote via StudentLink. Providing this option would have made it as easy for commuters to have a say on the fee hike as it was for those living on campus, since the commuters can¹t be offered the luxury of having a polling place outside their front door. Muir college¹s decision regarding the polling place becomes even more suspicious, however, when one considers that commuters stand to gain little from fee referendums that throw more of their money at college programming, and are therefore less likely to vote in favor of such fee increases. Making it less likely that commuters would vote at all ‹ and making it harder for them to do so in general ‹ was a perfect way of largely avoiding their ³no² votes. Another interesting aspect of Muir college¹s referendum comes from Eleanor Roosevelt College. One week before Muir college voted on its fee increase, Roosevelt college¹s similar activity fee referendum failed to pass, and Roosevelt students had voted electronically through StudentLink. Regardless of how much Muir college programming may need that extra $5 per student each quarter, the circumstances surrounding the fee referendum election are questionable. The Guardian hopes that Thurgood Marshall College¹s fee referendum, to be voted on Feb. 25 through Feb. 28, will be treated less questionably, and that when polling locations are decided, commuters¹ needs will be considered equally with those of on-campus residents. ...

Enron: the epitome of corruption, politics and greed

The news headlines are saturated by one word these days: Enron. Stocks and Enron, the presidential administration and Enron, California’s energy crisis and Enron. Sheesh. I found myself asking, “”Just who is this Enron guy and why does he have everyone’s panties in a bunch?”” I don’t think I was alone when I asked this question, demonstrating my ignorance toward a situation that seemed about as far removed from me as they come. But then I started to read the first few sentences of the articles following these headlines, I found myself raking through entire articles concerning Enron, and now I find myself looking for Enron articles to dissect — even when they aren’t on the front page. Why the sudden interest, you ask? Well, I didn’t come to the realization that I had millions invested in Enron Corp. Likewise, I have not been subpoenaed to testify about my involvement in the Enron scandal. I realized that even though, like many of my counterparts, I am a lowly college student with hardly enough money to put that extra slice of cheese on my grilled cheese sandwiches, the Enron debacle is extremely relevant to me. In fact, the disintegration of Enron and the corporation’s political involvement should pinch a nerve in all of us because at the end of the day, it isn’t Kenneth Lay, the former CEO of Enron, and other millionaire tycoons who suffer, it is you and I who pay the heaviest price. First, the disintegration of Enron carries significant political implications. After it was noted that Enron was the single largest campaign contributor to the Bush administration — giving over $700,000 — many people began to wonder if such a hefty amount could possibly affect Bush’s policy decisions. Wonder as we may, the Bush administration snubbed such inquiries and flat-out refused to disclose documents concerning meetings between Bush officials and Enron executives. Huh? If Dubya and gang have nothing to hide, then what’s all the hubbub? Congress requested information about meetings between the solvent corporation’s leading men and Vice President Dick Cheney. Cheney, with Bush’s overwhelming support, thumbed his nose at each request. Cheney has long been mixed up in an energy task force that smelled a little foul, but in light of Enron, his involvement with energy is downright fishy. Let’s review: Enron is based in Texas and so is Bush. Enron is an energy company; Bush has the power to draft legislation to make life easier for energy companies, especially if they are big contributors from his home state. Hmmm — interesting. The Bush administration claims no wrongdoing in its dealings with Enron, but refuses to disclose information proving said innocence. In addition, the Enron debacle carries special implications for California residents. Sen. Dianne Feinstein wrote in the Los Angeles Times that she made repeated requests to arrange meetings with Bush and Cheney, and she was denied each time. Last year, California suffered a slew of Stage 3 energy emergencies and Feinstein wrote that she wanted to meet with top energy officials to discuss the state’s energy woes. Conversely, while Feinstein was denied access to top officials, Lay, as CEO of Enron, got several meetings with Cheney and other administration officials. Feinstein wrote, “”Something is wrong when a senator representing 35 million Californians is not able to talk personally to the president or vice president in the midst of a crisis, but executives from a company that contributed millions of campaign dollars have complete access and significant influence.”” I couldn’t have said it better myself. I can’t speak for the rest of America, but I would much rather have my president getting a little fellatio on the side than giving billion-dollar corporations tax breaks or special consideration when no such allowances are made for me. Enron’s descent also took a lot of ordinary folks down with it. The company’s bankruptcy turned many of its workers’ hard-earned savings into thin air. The employees were encouraged to invest their 401(k) retirement accounts into the company’s stocks, even after indicators were showing the company was skating on thin ice. When the company collapsed, the stocks obviously nosedived and the employees were left with 401(k) plans not worth the paper they were printed on. Doesn’t sound very fair, does it? In fact, it isn’t fair that a handful of selfish, money-hungry executives can play Russian roulette with people’s savings and their livelihood only to lose substantially and subsequently cop out by pleading the fifth. We may be college students now, but we are the future workers and investors of America, and there is a valuable lesson to be learned courtesy of Enron. We should not blindly trust our employers, even when they assert everything is on the up-and-up. We shouldn’t over-invest in any one company — even if it is the one we work for. Also, we should be mindful of our futures, because our 401(k) plans and pensions may be all that we have to look forward to if Social Security is continually shaved by Reaganesque administrations. To ensure that this money is not squandered away by big corporations with their own deep pockets in mind, it would behoove us to take a diligent, watchdog approach to our savings and our portfolios so that we do not get caught holding the short end of the stick in old age. When I first saw the word Enron splashed on front pages, I was apathetic, as many college students would be. But after close examination, I realized that Enron indicates a lot about the officials I have elected to lead me and about my financial future. What do you get when you mix one part political corruption with one part corporate greed and sprinkle an enormous amount of hard-working Americans’ money on top? Enron. That is why we would all do well to pay close attention. ...

Whale Day promotes marine awareness

Representatives from several local and nationwide environmental organizations congregated in the Price Center to celebrate Whale Day International on Tuesday. Colin Young-Wolff Guardian “”Whale Day is a group of many people working together to promote awareness of marine life,”” said Mary Chen, vice president of the San Diego Environmental Coalition. Chen was the student coordinator involved in bringing Whale Day to campus; Tuesday was Whale Day’s third annual appearance at UCSD. “”We have live music, booths, speakers, all free to the public,”” Chen said. “”Lively … nice and simple, but with a good heart.”” Whale Day International is a weeklong global campaign from Feb. 12 through Feb. 18 designed to promote an end to whaling and other threats to whales, dolphins and other marine life. Other Whale Day events are occurring this week in cities such as Maui and Ensenada. Colin Young-Wolff Guardian The primary speaker was Jiah Whaleheart Miesel, the founder and director of Whale Day International. Responsible for organizing whale-related conservation efforts worldwide, Miesel will soon be the recipient of the Bob Marley Peace Award, which will be presented to him in front of 18,000 people at the San Diego Sports Arena. “”I started [Whale Day] because of a time when I was in the Mating and Birthing Sanctuary at the San Ignacio Lagoon,”” Miesel said. “”A mother and baby gray whale approached me, looked me in the eye and let me touch them. My life was changed. I knew then that I would commit my life to protecting [whales and dolphins].”” As a result of Whale Day, the Price Center was filled with the sounds of singers, such as The Mama Christy Band and Madcap Otis, as well as the voices of several environmental speakers. A colorful banner spanning the entire bookstore proclaimed, “”Free Corky,”” referring to the Killer Whale featured at San Diego’s Sea World. Miesel said this was only a small section of a larger banner, which reaches half a mile in length once unfurled. Decorating the banner were hundreds of paintings of killer whales, designed by children from 22 countries. “”We are committed to bringing Corky back into the wild … Many [wild] whales have died this way,”” Miesel said. Organizations assembled on Library Walk were not exclusively whale-oriented. Representatives from the UCSD Environmental Coalition, the San Diego Animal Advocates, the Western Service Workers Association and the Campus Greens were also present. Among the tables on Library Walk was a booth for UCSD’s Ocean Awareness Club. Tracy Ebba, the organization’s Education Coordinator, was stationed at the booth selling candy to raise funds. “”Although this is Whale Day, it represents preserving the ocean in general,”” Ebba said. “”It’s about making people on campus aware, and helping them realize that there’s a lot of cleaning up to do.”” Emily Kohl, a Marshall freshman, spent a good portion of Tuesday on Library Walk. “”This campus is fairly liberal-minded,”” Kohl said. “”But students need to be more involved with the environmental movement. College students should focus not only on humanitarian issues, but also on environmental concerns.”” Miesel was optimistic regarding Whale Day events in the near future. For more information, visit http://whaleday.com. ...

Police chase drunk driver; ends in crash at Blake Hall

A UCSD student crashed his 2002 Ford Explorer into Blake Hall at the conclusion of a San Diego Police Department chase at 12:50 a.m. on Feb. 8, awakening Revelle students. Bryce Warwick Guardian According to officer Michael James of the SDPD, a routine accident investigation was taking place on North Torrey Pines Road when the Explorer drove by. The driver turned off his lights, arousing the suspicion of the SDPD. Officers pulled in behind the car and turned on their lights and sirens in an attempt to pull him over, James said. At this point, the driver began driving erratically and tried to outrun the police at a high speed, according to James. He said the driver eventually turned onto the UCSD campus near Pacific Hall and the construction site of the new natural sciences building. According to James, the driver then came up the road and made a hard right turn toward Revelle, cut across the grass, and with tires screeching, slammed his vehicle into the northwest side of Blake Hall. SDPD pulled up a moment later, followed closely by Resident Security Officers, passers-by and startled residents. “”It felt like an earthquake,”” said Blake Hall resident Faye van der Fluit, whose room is above the site of the crash. “”It felt like something was shaking the whole building.”” The building appeared to suffer no major structural damage, but the car was badly smashed. The front right side of the Explorer was the point of impact and the tire on that side was folded under the vehicle with transmission fluid covering the ground. James reported no major injuries to the three passengers or the driver. The passengers were not charged with any crime at the scene, but the driver faces some serious consequences. James confirmed that the driver is a student at UCSD and said that he will face charges of DUI and felony failure to yield. Both charges could carry jail time with the DUI alone allowing for a convicted driver to serve up to six months in jail. The driver’s name was not released. ...

Marshall students plan D.O.C. lecture walk-out

Students at Thurgood Marshall College plan to stage a protest during their Dimensions of Culture classes Feb. 15, according to a Web site created anonymously in response to what students call unfair housing treatment at Marshall. The Web site, http://www.geocities.com/ucsdcause, claims Marshall college’s Residential Life Office is taking part in a “”conspiracy to terminate housing contracts,”” among other things. The UCSD Cause site troubled the Marshall Dean’s Office, resulting in a meeting between Marshall Dean of Student Affairs Ashanti Houston-Hands and Marshall freshman Danny Leibowitz, who was one of the organizers of the movement. “”They really wanted to meet with us and find a compromise,”” Leibowitz said. Leibowitz said that since his meeting Monday with Houston-Hands, the students will be “”toning down the protest and making it more of an information session,”” so that students can be aware of their rights. Leibowitz emphasized that his meeting with Houston-Hands was the original goal of organizing the protest, along with attracting the attention of Marshall students and making them aware of their rights as students in Marshall. “”We used the protest as a way to get through the Residential Life Office and go the next step up the ladder,”” he said. “”Mostly, the conspiracy was just a way for us to get people’s attention. We’re not trying to destroy the school. We’re trying to make it nicer.”” The meeting was viewed as a successful negotiation by both Leibowitz and Houston-Hands. “”We came to an understanding and are going to work on getting some new rules drafted, and some new consequences,”” Leibowitz said. Houston-Hands said that it is important that the two met because it allowed them to talk about “”how we can go about voicing some of the concerns that students have.”” Marshall Resident Dean Yolanda Trevino dismisses the Web site’s claims. “”There is a lot of misinformation,”” Trevino said. “”There is also a lot of incomplete information.”” The site also claims resident safety officers and Marshall staff took unfair disciplinary actions against students. Trevino said that discipline is taken on a case-by-case basis and everyone is looked at individually. Among other things, this would mean that the disciplinarian would consider the severity of the offense and any prior offenses that a student had when deciding on punishment. The Web site also states that “”a TMC staff member has admitted that there have been more housing contracts terminated in the first two weeks of winter quarter 2002 than all of the 2000-2001 school year.”” Trevino acknowledges that a high number of students have had their housing contracts terminated, but denies any conspiracy plot. “”There have been a lot of housing contracts terminated this quarter,”” Trevino said. “”There just happened to be more violations. That is it.”” The site also accuses the college of not printing or posting the consequences for breaking specific rules in enough places. However, Houston-Hands said the rules and regulations are printed in the TMC handbook, along with a list of possible sanctions for violations. Another complaint voiced on the Web site is that students are being asked to vacate their dorm rooms within two weeks of their housing contract being terminated. The site claims that this violates a California law that requires evictees to have 30 days to find another living situation. The site cites specific clauses in California Civil Code 1946 saying, “”… As to tenancies from month to month either of the parties may terminate the same by giving at least 30 days’ written notice thereof.”” However, the code goes on to say that if the two parties reach an agreement at the time of the contract, such as the UCSD housing contract, then the owner of the property — UCSD in this case — can legally evict the tenant with a minimum of seven days warning. The protest is scheduled for Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Marshall Field, according to the Web site. ...

Upcoming Events

Feb. 14: Triton Baseball Stadium: Baseball vs. CSUDH, 2:30 p.m. Feb. 15: RIMAC Arena: Women’s basketball vs. CSUDH, 5:30 p.m. Feb. 15: RIMAC Arena: Men’s basketball vs. CSUDH, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 15: Canyonview Pool: Water polo vs. UCSB, 6 p.m. Feb. 16: North Courts: Women’s tennis vs. SSU, 11 a.m. Feb. 16: Triton Softball Stadium: Softball vs. CSUSB, 12 p.m. ...

Examining gender perspectives on 'The Vagina Monologues'

Though a somewhat inaccurate name since there are several group performances, this boldly vaginal theater is a complicated and powerful performance. The most difficult part is the diversity of emotions that is brought forth in the vignettes. Ranging from irreverent to depressing and often very sexual, “”The Vagina Monologues”” is entertaining and eye-opening. I liked it all, but even the most hard of hearts would have to agree that if nothing else, it certainly is exciting. This play has become known for how striking it is with its open sexuality and genitally intimate topics, and the cast is definitely willing to risk shocking you a few times with unexpected words and actions. There is a delicate balance between delightful and provocative, and I would suspect that the most resolute misogynist could still find something interesting about a woman asking the crowd to say “”cunt”” (she does so to reclaim the word). Humor and surprise were brought out equally and with rather easy transitions, but the mood also changed to a more serious tone. Dealing with the issues of female genital mutilation and the raping of women during the war in Bosnia, serious issues were honestly and openly confronted. The accounts of several girls’ first periods and their families’ reactions ran the gamut, painting a compelling image of what it is like to have an unexpected surge of blood start leaking out of your childhood unmentionables. Preventing any sleeping audience members, the rendition of a verity of orgasms grabs your attention, playfully. “”The Vagina Monologues”” gives a full-force production from start to finish that really anyone would be able to enjoy. Daring and perhaps a little brazen, the UCSD cast makes an entertaining and lively performance. Considering the range of attitudes of men, let me just say this: The dance between sexual and erotic will likely keep some longer than if the performance were less up-front about sexuality and, well … moaning. ...

UCSD CLUB SPORTS

Competition Dance The UCSD competition dance team traveled to the national dance competition in Las Vegas last weekend and made it to the finals, placing sixth out of the 14 teams competing. The finish is even more impressive considering the UCSD team was the only one in the finals without a professional coach and choreographer. The team will perform its national routine for UCSD Friday at Spirit Night. Equestrian Team Last weekend the UCSD equestrian team hosted University of San Diego, Cal Poly Pomona and University of Southern California at Clark’s Ranch. UCSD’s Kate McComas took second place in the open flat competition, while team captain Lisa Calvino nabbed second place in the open fences category to pace UCSD. In the intermediate division, Meredith Tosta placed first in the flat event and second in the fences event. Tosta also earned the High Point Rider award. Erica Gross, Zoe Jaracki and Sandy Johnson all placed high in the novice division, helping UCSD to a second-place overall finish. Ski & Snowboard The UCSD ski and snowboard team traveled to Mammoth Mountain last weekend to compete in the giant slalom, two slaloms, skiercross and boardercross. Top skiers for UCSD include Danielle Crockett and Sierra Bourne, who finished first and second in the giant slalom. In the slaloms, Crockett and Bourne switched off first and second in both races. For the men, Tom Christensen and Travis Ritchie grabbed second and third places in the skiercross. Rugby The UCSD men’s rugby team raised their league record to 2-1 with a 27-24 win over visiting Long Beach State on Saturday. Long Beach grabbed the lead first, capitalizing on UCSD’s shorthandedness due to penalties, to grab a 5-0 lead. Nick Polsky put UCSD on the board at the 17-minute mark, kicking a penalty goal to narrow the score to 3-5. UCSD capitalized on the momentum as Nick Serrato scored to give UCSD an 8-5 lead. Shuan Cho and a Polsky conversion rounded out the scoring for the first half, with UCSD on top 15-12. Long Beach opened the second half with a score to take a 19-15 lead. However, Polsky came up big for UCSD again, stealing a Long Beach scrum put-in and running 15 meters to give UCSD a slim 20-19 lead. Later Polsky posted another conversion to secure the victory for UCSD. Upcoming Saturday, Feb. 16 Men’s and Women’s ultimate disk host over 20 teams in their President’s Day Tournament. Cycling competes at SDSU. Men and Women’s Lacrosse plays University of Arizona at the Santa Barbara Shootout. Women’s rugby plays Arizona State University at 11 a.m. Men’s rugby plays UCLA at 1 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17 Men’s lacrosse plays Arizona State University at 1 p.m. Women’s rugby plays University of Arizona at 1 p.m. Monday, Feb. 18 UCSD surf team competes at Seaside Reef in Cardiff. — Compiled by Isaac Pearlman Sports Editor ...

hiatus calendar

Thursday 2/14/02 Celebrate Valentine’s Day with “”The Vagina Monologues”” at the Price Center Theater. Tickets are $7. Call (858) 534-8497 for more information. The show starts at 7 p.m. Sick of St. Valentine and his day? Then go watch the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre at The Casbah. The Greenhornes, with their guitar and ’60s organ sound, will play alongside Fireballs of Freedom, who provide dirty rock reminiscent of early AC/DC. The 45’s will also be there. The event starts at 8 p.m. and tickets are only $7. Call (619) 232-4355 for more information. The UCSD theatre and dance depatment’s Two By Shepard continues until Saturday with daily performances at 8 p.m. in the Mandell Weiss Forum Studio. An extra performance on Saturday starts at 2 p.m. Friday 2/15/02 Ready for some spice? Beau Soleil heat up the Mandeville Auditorium with their bluegrass roots spiced with a cajun flavor. Look to the story on page 9 for more. Tickets are $15 for students and $20 general admission and can be purchased at the UCSD Box Office. Call (858) 534-TIXS for more information. Jivewire is at The Casbah. This eclectic club night features a mix of rock, techno and hip-hop. Rotator and Transit Aural Assault will also peform. The event is free, so get there early. Call The Casbah at (619) 232-4355 for more information. The Samples will play tonight and tomorrow night at The Belly Up Tavern. Their appeal is the way they employ their jam-band style with pop sensibilities. They have recently released an album exclusively on the Internet. Both shows start at 9:15 p.m. and tickets are $16. Saturday 2/16/02 For Brazilian bossa-nova fans, go to Dizzy’s for their tribute to Antonio Carlos Jobim. Birth of Bossa will feature several artists, including Kevin Hennessy, Duncan Moore, Peter Sprague and vocalist Andy Villas-Boas. The show runs from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Cover is $10. Call (858) 270-7467 for more information. Sunday 2/17/02 Chris Klich & his quintet will feature jazz classics at Dizzy’s. The show starts at 8 p.m. Cover is $8. For more information call (858) 270-7467. Monday 2/18/02 Bay area jazz vocalist Elaine Lucia will be at Dizzy’s. She will be accompanied by pianist Jonathan Alford, Bill Andrews on the bass guitar, and drummer Tim Shay. The performance starts at 7 p.m. and the cover is $10. Call Dizzy’s at (858) 270-7467. The Bob Marley Day Fest. Any questions? Take the rest of your Monday off and head to the San Diego Sports Arena. The show starts at 1 p.m. Tickets start at $30. Look to the hiatus calendar for events in and around UCSD. All tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (619) 220-8497 or by going to http://www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. ...

Golf grabs first at tourney

UCSD golf began its 2002 season at the Point Loma Invitational last Monday and Tuesday at Riverwalk Golf Course. In the team’s first tournament since early November, the Tritons nabbed first place, finishing three strokes ahead of Master’s College. The difference for UCSD came in the second round of the tournament, as they shot 294 as a team. Master’s College’s shot 297. In the first and third rounds, both teams finished with identical 311 and 301 team scores. California State University San Bernardino and Point Loma Nazarene rounded out the top four finishers, with the Coyotes ending the tournament six strokes behind the Tritons, and the Crusaders finishing seven strokes behind UCSD. California State University Monterey Bay and Claremont McKenna both finished with overall scores of 914 to tie for fifth place. Sophomores Brian Duckworth and Galen Farris led UCSD — both finished in a five-way tie for 5th place with a three-round score of 224 along with Holy Names’ Matt Thornton, Monterey Bay’s Chris Marin, and UC Santa Barbara’s J.R. Reyes. Tritons Alan Scheer and Greg Wilson continued the sophomore sweep of top finishers for UCSD, ending the tournament with overall scores of 228 to end in a three-way tie for 15th place. Sheer battled his way back after hitting an 81 in the first round by posting second- and third-round scores of 73 and 74, respectively. Sophomore Blake Sneider and juniors Andy Thomson and Ryan Gale rounded out the scoring for the Tritons, finishing 25th, 26th and 29th respectively. In the par-72 course, Point Loma’s Josh Colace was the only competitor to finish under par after three rounds, firing a 69, 72, and 72 to end three under par. The closest finishers after Colace were Master’s College’s Ryan Higton and Redlands College’s Jordan Bailey, who both finished at six over par with final scores of 222. Marin had the low round of the tournament, shooting a 68 in the first round to join Colace as the only two competitors to shoot under 70. The Tritons will travel to San Leandro, Calif., to participate in the Holy Names College Tournament from Feb.18 to Feb. 19 at the Monarch Bay Golf Course. ...