Campus

Crew prepares to kick off 2002 season

Both men’s and women’s UCSD crew experienced success last year, and the two squads expect to improve even more during the upcoming season. Courtesy of UCSD Crew Men’s varsity crew competed in Division I and proved that it belonged in competition against sports-scholarship schools. UCSD finished in third place last year, only placing behind only UC Berkeley and University of Washington. This year, crew is led by senior varsity member Brian Sullivan and junior varsity member Yukio King. Both Tritons are experienced and have been a part of strong teams in the past. The leadership of Sullivan and King will be important to UCSD’s success this season. Men’s crew head coach Michael Filippone likes how the 2002 Tritons look. “”We have a large group of promising returning athletes that will make this year’s team strong. We have been working very hard,”” he said. “”Our goal is to win the Western Intercollegiate Rowing Association Championships and the Pac-10 Rowing Championships.”” On the women’s side of the water, the Triton lightweights finished ranked seventh in the country last year, while the heavyweights were ranked 21st. Head coach Pattie Pinkerton is excited about her young novice team this year and said that UCSD has several “”excellent”” walk-ons. These incoming members are headed up by freshmen Amanda Milligan and Amber Martin, who are just two of several young women that Pinkerton will look to lead the Triton novice squad. Pinkerton said she has a few goals that she would like her team to meet this year. “”Technique is really critical in the sport of rowing,”” she said. “”We are going to try to improve our technique, depth and endurance this season.”” Looking ahead at the schedule, the National Collegiate Athletic Association Rowing Championships are already highlighted, which will take place in May. Each region will send one team to the meet, and UCSD, competing in the western region, is up against tough competition. The Tritons are looking at UC Davis and Western Washington as key opponents in their region. “”We are certainly a team in the top 10,”” said Pinkerton. “”We have high hopes for this season.”” ...

DVD review: 'O' packs jealousy, rage into a modern story of teen-agers

At first glance, any critic with an ounce of respect for the classics would scoff at the Tim Blake Nelson film “”O.”” After all, the film, which transposes the entire plot of Shakespeare’s “”Othello”” into a modern race-relations setting, replaces swords with basketballs and features a cast of three teenage heart-throbs — all to a backdrop of hip-hop music. However, as the two-disc DVD set of the film makes blatantly clear, the cast and crew behind “”O”” turned hours of careful deliberation and hard work into an awe-inspiring film experience that masterfully weaves in the aforementioned modern elements to take Shakespeare’s message of the dangers of jealousy to a new generation. The DVDs themselves are not anything particularly unbelievable; what brings the product into the realm of must-buy is how the DVD features take an already amazing film and further enhance the viewing experience. The main feature responsible for the incredible quality of the DVD set is Tim Blake Nelson’s full-length commentary, which discusses everything from references to Shakespeare’s original text to the difficulties in releasing the film due to the events in Columbine, Colo., which occurred during the editing process. Similarly, the deleted scenes provide more opportunities to listen and watch the genius of Nelson at work. The DVD set does not falter on a technical level. It includes both widescreen and full-screen versions of the film, as well as Spanish subtitles. The image fidelity and sound quality are nothing to gawk over, but most viewers will be so wrapped up in content of the film that such details will not matter. And as if “”O”” fans did not have enough extra material to enjoy, there is also a full-length version of the original silent “”Othello”” hidden away on the second DVD. A quick comparison of the two films will show how far the film industry has progressed, not only technologically, but in honesty of subject matter as well. When all is said and done, the “”O: 2-Disc Deluxe Edition”” DVD set is an amazing experience on both the film and DVD level. This is a must-buy for anyone interested in the film. ‘O’ *** Starring Mekhi Phifer, Julia Stiles, and Josh Hartnett In stores now Rated R ...

Disc hosts ultimate tourney

Over 25 men’s and 20 women’s teams descending on UCSD to compete in the largest ultimate disc tournament on the West Coast, the UCSD President’s Day Competition. Far-flung schools such as the University of British Columbia and Harvard University journeyed to UCSD and threw, dove and played hard for three days. Teams started play Saturday, and both UCSD teams availed themselves well. The teams were split into pools and for the first day, the UCSD Squids were in a pool with UC Davis, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the School of Mines from Colorado and Clairemont-McKenna College. The first three games of the day went by fairly easily for the Squids. UCSD defeated UNC, Mines and Clairemont-McKenna while playing good defense and offense, although at alternating intervals. The team’s last game, against UC Davis, was arguably UCSD”s biggest win of the tournament. Davis was ranked No. 1 in its pool and was playing excellent frisbee coming into the tournament. The Squids came out fast in the game and built a huge early lead. The Aggies eventually woke up and made an attempt to pull out a late victory. They came up short and UCSD escaped with a one-point victory. “”We had a huge lead which dwindled toward the end of the game,”” said Squid co-captain Brian Chen, “”but we still won, taking first in our pool.”” The UCSD women’s team also advanced from day one. Sunday proved more relaxed. After a couple of games had been played, rain inundated the fields. Many teams left early. There was not enough playing space or time to make up all of the games, so teams that had traveled the furthest were given preference and local teams were sent packing. Lucas Benhke, a member of the UC Santa Cruz team, commented on the rainout. “”It is really too bad that the rains had to come down today. The fields were just not able to suck up the water,”” Benhke said. “”It would have been nice to stay around and finish the tournament, but it is understandable what UCSD had to do.”” Much of the credit for getting through the rain delay smoothly goes toward tournament directors Chris Stotts, Jake Chang, Alicia White and Laurel Fiske. Play resumed on Monday as the championship pool began to play out. While Saturday belonged to the Squids with their huge upset, Monday belonged to the Harvard team. The UCSD men built a 9-6 lead in their first and only game of the day against Harvard. Critical mental mistakes doomed the Squids and allowed Harvard to come back. Harvard emerged victorious with a 10-9 overtime victory. The women had no such letdown. They fought their way through the competition, making it all the way to the finals where they met up with a very strong team from the University of Colorado at Boulder. After a hard fight, UCSD just did not have enough left and Colorado capitalized, taking home the tournament trophy. Colorado also won on the men’s side, defeating Humboldt State and Oregon State on its way to victory. ...

Hiatus calendar

Thursday 2/21/02 Chicago group, Alkaline Trio, is true to its style of hard-rocking punk music. These punks will be supported by Bouncing Souls at ‘Canes Bar & Grill. The show starts at 8 p.m. and tickets are $13.50. Friday 2/22/02 WinterFest has been growing bigger each year. WinterFest 2002 will be in the RIMAC Arena with slick R&B group City High, punk-rockers Fenix TX and local singer/songwriter Jason Mraz. The event starts at 7:30 p.m. and is free to UCSD students. Get a taste of these acts in the hiatus section on page 8. The San Diego Black History Month Celebration will feature Jamaican poet Mutabaruka. This artist will wax poetic and drop the reggae grooves at the WorldBeat Cultural Center. The Able Minded Poets as well as Herb ‘N’ Roots will also perform. Tickets are $10 and the event starts at 8 p.m. Call the WorldBeat Cultural Center at (619) 230-1190 for more information on the event. The Onyx Room presents Oro. This club night features the deep-house sounds of Mauricio Aviles (Naked Music) and Andy Caldwell, who scored a club hit with his sexy deep-house rendition of Antonio Carlos Jobim’s “”Quiet Nights.”” The event starts at 9 p.m. and lasts long into the evening at this comfortable and underground (literally!) club. Check http://www.theonyxroom.com or call (619) 235-6699 for more information. Saturday 2/23/02 Nu-metal? Rap-metal? Alt-Metal? Call it what you want, but this show is sure to rock. Linkin Park headlines the Projek: Revolution tour, and they are accompanied by Cypress Hill, ADEMA and DJ Z Trip. The show is at the Cox Arena and starts at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $29.50. England’s two-step garage hero, Craig David, will be at the Belly Up Tavern. The show is sold out, but if you have tickets, make your way over there by 9:15 p.m. Sunday 2/24/02 Busta Rhymes will throw funky beats and innovative rhymes at you faster than you can blink. Busta is sure to dazzle you with his wild fashion and crazy antics. This cutting edge hip-hop star will be at 4th & B. The show starts at 8 p.m. and for $25 you can get a ticket. Seattle’s Spyglass will be invading The Casbah with lush guitars, sweeping strings and organs. Call (619) 232-4355 for more information. The show starts at 8:30 p.m. For information on their new album, “”Strategies for the Stranded,”” look at page 11. Tuesday 2/26/02 The original Breeders are back. The Breeders with Kim and Kelley Deal are back together to tour and record a new album that will be released this year. Most people will remember their huge hit, “”Cannonball.”” They will play tonight and tomorrow night at The Casbah. The show starts at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. ...

Stoner steps

Last week as I idly flipped through the channels at 3 a.m. and cursed the brain-numbing, hour-long trout-fishing competition on ESPN, I stopped on CNN to watch its sports update. After covering Mike Tysons umpteenth return to boxing, the announcer mentioned results in “”skeleton”” and I thought to myself, “”shit, the fucking Olympics are going on.”” Then I shrugged and went back to watching “”BattleBots.”” I do not care about the stupid Winter Olympics. I do not care about watching frozen people compete in so-called sports. The “”sports”” are individualized competition, designed to see who is able to not screw up the biggest race out of the thousands in their lives. I do not care about athletes whose names I have trouble reading. I do not care about the skeleton event or the biathlon. I do not want to watch people ski cross country. Why don’t those dumbasses just buy a snowmobile? I don’t care about curling. Do they really call people who have to frantically sweep ahead of the stone “”athletes?”” I don’t care about nordic combined or short track skating. I … don’t … care. Well, there is one exception. Irina Slutskaya, I sincerely wish I knew you and that you were a friend of mine so I could call you “”Slut”” for short. But seriously, my point is nobody cares about these events; few Americans even know what the hell they are. I’ll admit it. I had to look up what the skeleton is, and I know you would too. Where did these events come from? Why include these random competitions when nobody watches them or even cares about them? I think the Olympic committee members should take a few minutes from stuffing their pockets with money and terminate these events. Incorporate some new, exciting things that people might actually want to see. All right, maybe that’s unrealistic, but nobody is ever going to watch the Olympics besides all the men who like to ogle the figure skaters. Seriously though, how about including ice climbing? I don’t know about everyone else, but I would rather watch people crawl up sheer walls of ice than ski across the country for hours. Every year in Canada, there is a “”Sky to Sea”” competition, which includes skiing, mountain biking, running and kayaking into one big race. Half the teams never even finish. Now that’s a real competition, and I guarantee it would draw a bigger audience than the Nordic Combined. Now for all the guys I previously mentioned who like to watch figure skating “”because it’s really a beautiful form of art,”” relax. I’m not saying we should get rid of figure skating or speed skating, or any of the other exciting events. I’m just saying there needs to be something to fill the early morning television spot besides boring old curling. Until something is done about these, these, these … things that can’t even be called sports, people will not be interested in the periphery of the Winter Olympics. But hey, there’s always “”BattleBots”” to keep me entertained. ...

Film review: 'Queen of the Damned' leaves bad taste in mouths of audiences

In the dark, lonely world of the vampire Lestat (Stuart Townsend), the prospect of spending all of eternity in isolation presents a daunting and terrible future for the lonely vampire. Awoken by the stylish jammings of an obscure goth band, Lestat promises to deliver to the miscreants of society all they have ever dreamed of, and, as a result, rouses Akasha (Aaliyah), the Queen of the Damned. After the seriousness of “”Interview with the Vampire,”” the concept of a rock star vampire who wakes up an ancient Egyptian vampire seems a bit preposterous, but it might have been successful anyway if it had been more original and less silly. In contrast to the beautifully natural and somewhat tragic atmosphere in the early parts of the film, later moments are remniscent of “”Superman”” and “”The Matrix”” with computer-enhanced fight scenes. These should have added to the overall essence of the film, but instead leave it unrealistic and cartoon-like. Townsend delivers a strong performance as the despondent vampire more welcoming of death than solitude. Vincent Perez adds humor to the serious Marius, the vampire who created Lestat. Beside these more seasoned actors, Aaliyah (although we desperately wish to like her) does not play the evil undead queen mother convincingly and instead moves about akwardly as an exotic temptress. Among the supporting characters, Marguerit Moreau delivers a flawed performance as an orphaned English girl enchanted by Lestat, losing her English accent 10 minutes into the film. Although part of the cast does a decent job of portraying their respective characters, the uneven fluctuations in voices as well as the fantastic depictions of extravagant concerts and superhero powers make the film unrealistic. Instead, it is the soundtrack that best depicts the turbulent atmosphere and has a strong and powerful effect on the audience, with tracks from artists such as Disturbed, Marilyn Manson and Papa Roach. There are some redeeming qualities to the film, including the humorous and witty remarks by Lestat and Marius, as well as the frivolous fans who cannot help but induce laughter. But overall, “”Queen of the Damned”” is unsuccessful for a film that once had potential. ‘Queen of the Damned’ *** Starring Aaliyah, Marguerite Moreau, Vincent Perez and Stuart Townsend In theaters Feb. 22 Rated R ...

Women's tennis beats UC Davis

For the first time since 2000, the UCSD women’s tennis team defeated rival UC Davis 5-2 on Monday at UCSD’s North Campus Courts. Rain postponed the match’s start from noon Sunday until 3 p.m. Three doubles matches were played before rain moved in again and forced postponement until Monday morning. The Tritons’ lone senior, Lyndsey Tadlock, who is No. 11 in the latest Intercollegiate Tennis Association rankings, led UCSD to its impressive victory. She first teamed with Julie Westerman in No. 1 doubles to defeat the Aggies’ Alisse Ali-Christie and Gretchen Schantz 8-5. In singles action, Tadlock easily disposed of Britni Webb 6-1, 6-0. That match was Tadlock’s first win over Webb. Tadlock lost to Webb twice in the 2001 season, once in California Collegiate Athletic Association play and again in the CCAA tournament. “”She’s a really streaky player,”” Tadlock said of Webb. “”Today she just wasn’t in it.”” In doubles, Tadlock and Westerman’s match was suspended Sunday afternoon with the teams even at 4-4. The Triton duo came out with a renewed vigor Monday, breaking the Aggie serve in the 12th game to push the score to 7-5 before finishing them off in the 13th. “”We knew we had to come out strong after the break,”” Tadlock said. “”We served well both days and knew we just needed to break once and we would take it.”” In the other doubles matches, UCSD’s Mary Hung and Ashley O’Neil fell to Aggies Jill Howard and Webb 4-8 with the match postponed at 3-5 on Sunday. The Davis duo broke serve in Monday’s first game to push the score to 3-6, cementing their path to victory. In the best comeback of the match, the No. 3 doubles team of Jasmin Dao and Kristina Jansen defeated UC Davis’ Janice Salomon and Nancy Mok 8-6. The Aggie team opened the match to win the first four games, but the Tritons responded by pushing the score to 3-4 before Sunday’s postponement. On Monday, Davis pushed the match to 5-6 before the UCSD pair won the next three games, breaking on two of them to take the victory. “”It may sound cliched, but [the Tritons] played the bigger points better than we did,”” Aggie coach Bill Maze said of the doubles matches. “”Any time you come out of doubles with two wins, you’re in a good position.”” The momentum gained when the doubles matches carried over into the singles matches and propelled the Tritons to victory. O’Neil cruised to a 6-2, 6-0 victory over Ali-Christie in No. 2 singles. With that win and Tadlock’s victory, the Tritons needed only one more match to win the contest with three matches still undecided (Dao lost to Howard 1-6, 2-6). With Jansen and Hung both losing their first sets, all eyes turned to Westerman and her match against Mok. Westerman easily took the first set 6-0. In the second set, Mok came out strong, breaking serve and jumping out to a 4-1 lead. “”At that point, I knew all I had to do was return serve and keep the ball in,”” Westerman said. “”In the first set, she committed a lot of errors.”” Westerman’s strategy worked because she won the next five games, breaking serve three times to pull out the 6-0, 6-4 victory and give the win to the Tritons. The Aggies needed to leave for another schedule match, so Jansen’s and Hung’s matches were suspended after the first sets with the victory already secure. “”It was a big win for the team,”” Tadlock said. “”Most of the girls on the team are sophomores, so they weren’t around for our last victory against Davis [in the 2000 season]. I’m one of the few who was, so this makes it a little more special.”” UCSD opened the weekend with a 9-0 sweep of Sonoma State University on Saturday afternoon. Using the same lineup as they did in the UC Davis match, the Tritons swept past Sonoma with few problems. Westerman and Tadlock combined to beat their doubles opponent 8-2 before winning their singles matches 6-0, 6-0 and 6-1, 6-1, respectively. UC Davis and UCSD are favored to win the CCAA. UCSD’s victory puts it in position to win the regular-season title. The Tritons are now 7-0 with a 4-0 mark in CCAA play. The Aggies dropped to 4-4 with a 3-1 record in the CCAA. “”We’ve been gearing up for the match all season,”” said Triton head coach Liz LaPlante. “”We are so evenly matched so we knew it would come down to who wanted it more, and today we wanted to win.”” The UCSD women’s team returns to action next weekend, traveling to face Cal State Bakersfield on Saturday. ...

UCSD students keep their dreams of stardom alive with music

What do the resumes of Bruce Springsteen, all four members of U2 and Britney Spears have in common? None include any sort of four-year degree. Obviously, a college degree is not the required ingredient to success in the world of popular music that it is in almost every other industry. In fact, in today’s ultra-competitive music scene, time spent attending college may even hinder success because higher education squanders portions of aspiring musicians’ precious youths. Spencer Pforsich and Brandon Stewart, both of whom are UCSD students and lead singers/guitarists of up-and-coming bands, are exceptions to this increasingly strict rule of popular musical success. For freshman Brandon Stewart, who came to UCSD because of the strong local music scene and because he wanted to continue challenging himself academically, finding time for school and his punk band, Driven, is an absolute necessity. Although Stewart is the only member of his four-person band attending school away from the band’s home in Valencia, Calif., Stewart finds time to make the two-hour trip back home whenever possible to take care of band business. As a testament to his hard work, Driven managed to play six shows last quarter and four so far this quarter to audiences ranging from 20 to 300 people. Nearly all of the shows are in the Los Angeles. area at venues such as the Roxy and the Whisky-A-Go-Go, although Stewart is trying to set up some dates in the San Diego area to satisfy the group’s growing fan base at UCSD. Moreover, Stewart is “”very happy”” with his academic performance so far. In the words of Stewart, “”I love it so much, and the band is so tight as buddies, I make it work.”” Spencer Pforsich, a sophomore writing major, also found a happy balance between his musical and academic goals. Without a doubt, Pforsich’s band, Straight No Chaser, an “”emo-pop”” threesome that plays both locally and on campus, is where Pforsich’s dreams lie. Ironically, Pforsich hopes that one day “”music and school will [indeed] conflict,”” and he will be able to play music for a living. After all, “”school can wait,”” he proclaims. But for now, Pforsich realizes that school is necessary, if nothing else, for the help it gives him in the creative process. Pforsich, the songwriter of the band, finds that his studies in poetry aid his songwriting by helping him “”communicate emotions through music.”” Stewart summed up the daily struggle of student musicians such as himself and Pforisich: “”You have to be dedicated. I mean, that is why we call ourselves ‘Driven’: because we are so driven.”” Look to http://www.drivenmusic.org for Driven information and show dates. The band is planning a tour this summer. Straight No Chaser and its upcoming show dates and times can be found at http://www.sncband.com ...

San Diego honors athletes

The San Diego sports world honored three of its greatest last Wednesday by inducting Tony Gwynn, Russ Washington and Tony Hawk into the Breitbard Hall of Fame, part of the San Diego Hall of Champions. Lyon Liew Guardian The San Diego Sports Arena was the site of the 56th annual Salute to Champions, with the inductions headlining the event. While the night belonged to the three hall of fame inductees, the San Diego Hall of Champions program began by honoring the San Diego area amateur and professional players of the month. The Hall recognizes five to six high-school players and six to 10 college/professional athletes each month, while recognizing all recipients at this banquet. Notable recipients included the Padres’ Phil Nevin and Trevor Hoffman, the Chargers’ LaDanian Tomlinson, and the San Diego Spirit’s Shannon Macmillan. Lyon Liew Guardian Kristin Jones, a starting forward on UCSD’s Division II national champion soccer team, was one of eight players of the month for December. Jones led the Triton attack through the National Collegiate Athletic Association Final Four in the process of picking up UCSD’s third consecutive NCAA championship. Jones was named most valuable offensive player of the tournament, only scoring one goal but dictating the flow of the play in the attacking third. The ceremony, with La Jolla native and CBS broadcaster Dick Enberg serving as master of ceremonies, continued by honoring Melanie Benn as disabledathlete of the year. In 1995, Benn was stricken with bacterial meningitis, which resulted in quadruple amputation of both arms and legs. Fully recovered in 1997, Benn received her inspiration to compete after watching a challenged-athletes triathlon. Within a year, Benn was competing in triathlons before focusing on her swimming career. Her hard work culminated in a silver medal at the Sydney Paralympics. College athletes Spencer Wright and Mark Prior received the award for amateur starts of the year. Wright, a Serra High School graduate, starred in lacrosse at Syracuse University, leading the Orangemen to a second-place finish in the NCAA tournament. In a sport traditionally dominated by East Coast players, Wright’s presence served as a wake-up call to the nation that the West Coast, and particularly San Diego, is a breeding ground for good players. Prior was the most honored collegiate player in any sport in 2001 after helping the University of Southern California to its 21st appearance in the College Baseball World Series. Prior was the most dominant pitcher in the nation, finishing the season with a 15-1 record and a 1.69 ERA. Prior was honored by Baseball America, which said he “”may be the best college pitcher ever.”” A graduate of University of San Diego High School, he was the second overall pick in June’s draft by the Chicago Cubs. San Diego Padres Trevor Hoffman and Phil Nevin were honored by the Hall of Champions as Professional Athletes of the Year. Hoffman has the best save percentage among all current major-league closers. He amazingly blew only three chances on his way to picking up 43 saves last season. Nevin was the heart of the Padres lineup in 2001, belting 41 home runs and picking up 126 runs batted in. The main event of the program featured the induction of Washington, Hawk and Gwynn. Gwynn, the most notable inductee of the class of 2002, spent nearly his entire sports career in the San Diego area. In 1977, the Long Beach Poly High School graduate enrolled at San Diego State on a basketball scholarship. In his four years as an Aztec, Gwynn became the only SDSU player ever to earn All-Western Conference honors in two sports, finding a home in the Aztec outfield when not leading the Aztec basketball team. “”I came to San Diego State as a snot-nosed punk,”” Gwynn said during his induction speech. “”I improved at State because I grew up.”” In 1981, Gwynn signed with the San Diego Padres and within a year had worked his way through the minor league system and was playing full time at Jack Murphy Stadium. In his 20 years as a professional, Gwynn’s career numbers are nothing short of staggering. He batted at least .300 for 19 consecutive seasons, winning eight National League batting titles. Gwynn retired with a career .338 batting average totaling 3,141 total hits. More importantly for Gwynn, however, is that he led the Padres to their only World Series appearances in 1984 and 1998. Gwynn played his entire career as a Padre; something exceedingly rare in today’s baseball world. When asked why, Gwynn responded, “”The most important question you should answer when deciding where to play is not where you can win a title or get the most money, but when you leave the park and you’re driving home, you should ask yourself one question: ‘Am I happy where I’m going?’ My answer was always ‘yes’ when living in San Diego.”” Gwynn now heads up I-8 to coach the baseball team at San Diego State. “”My job now is to promote college baseball, not just San Diego State,”” he said. “”Whether it’s at State, USD, Point Loma or UCSD, I’m here as an ambassador of college baseball.”” Washington is best remembered for his service as the starting right offensive tackle for the San Diego Chargers between 1970 and 1982. He was instrumental in providing the protection for one for the most exciting National Football League offenses in recent history, a passing-heavy scheme dubbed “”Air Coryell”” after head coach Don Coryell. Washington played in perhaps the most memorable NFL game in history, a 41-38 overtime victory over the Miami Dolphins in the 1982 AFC Conference semifinals, a game Sports Illustrated dubbed “”the single greatest team sports event in history.”” Hawk is the first Breitbard Hall of Fame inductee from one of the “”new”” breed of sports. Like the names mentioned above, Hawk dominated the skateboarding world for 18 years, beginning at the ripe age of 14. Starting with National Skateboard Association championships, then progressing to such mainstream events as the X-games, Hawk entered a total of 104 professional contests, winning an astonishing 72 and finishing out of the top three only four times in his career. At the end of his career, Hawk became the first skater ever to complete the 900 — a two-and-a-half rotation spin — in a competition setting at the 1999 X-games. This move alone provided the impetus for skating’s shift toward mainstream acceptance as a sport. Now retired, Hawk is resting on his laurels in Carlsbad, Calif. In total, Hawk has been credited with inventing 85 tricks, and his influence can be seen in a vast number of sports besides skateboarding, from inline-skating to snowboarding. The Breitbard Hall of Fame is located at the San Diego Hall of Champions in the Federal Building at Balboa Park. ...

Winter Fest 2002

The road to rock stardom has been a long and winding one for Jason Mraz. Born in Virginia, Mraz began playing guitar at the ripe old age of 18. During a brief stint in New York, the streets of Manhattan and a bout of psychic intervention inspired Mraz to write music. When a fortune-teller in Central Park told Jason to “”go with what you know.”” Mraz, in true Horatio Alger fashion, went west, ending up in San Diego onstage at legendary Java Joe’s in Ocean Beach. While performing has long been a part of his life, Mraz’s career could have easily turned out completely different. At age 13, Mraz sang in a wannabe boy-band called Dressed to Kill, and by the time college rolled around, he left Virginia for New York’s American Musical and Dramatic Academy to study — believe it or not — jazz, tap and ballet in hopes of finding a job in musical theater. However, it was the lights of subway tunnels, not Broadway, that eventually beckoned Mraz, and before long, he was moving between the rail lines and jamming in parks. During a trip to Las Vegas, Mraz got lucky — not at the casino — while performing for a group of people that included his future manager Bill Silva. Silva, who was moving to Los Angeles, let Mraz move into his San Diego home and encouraged him to explore San Diego’s music scene. Mraz found his way to the coffee house circuit, hooking up with Toca Rivera, who backs Mraz up with djembe drums and vocal harmonies. On a fateful night at Java Joe’s, Silva convinced owner Joe Flamini that Mraz was worth a shot. He didn’t even have his own guitar with him and had to borrow singer-songwriter Carlos Olmeda’s guitar to play. That was two years ago, and now Mraz is following in the footsteps of San Diego all-stars. Mraz is the next in a long line of San Diego folkies who can recount the good times had at Java Joe’s. Those times, however, have changed. The Java Joe’s that Mraz debuted at is now a Starbucks, and the new Java Joe’s located a couple blocks away on Bacon Street is now serving alcohol and is 21-and-up. Mraz is now splitting his time between playing gigs in San Diego and recording for Elektra records in Los Angeles. Mraz might just be the next big thing, and fortunately for UCSD, WinterFest is another stop on Jason’s winding road to fame. ...