Campus

Hiatus calendar

Thursday 2/21/02 Chicago group, Alkaline Trio, is true to its style of hard-rocking punk music. These punks will be supported by Bouncing Souls at ‘Canes Bar & Grill. The show starts at 8 p.m. and tickets are $13.50. Friday 2/22/02 WinterFest has been growing bigger each year. WinterFest 2002 will be in the RIMAC Arena with slick R&B group City High, punk-rockers Fenix TX and local singer/songwriter Jason Mraz. The event starts at 7:30 p.m. and is free to UCSD students. Get a taste of these acts in the hiatus section on page 8. The San Diego Black History Month Celebration will feature Jamaican poet Mutabaruka. This artist will wax poetic and drop the reggae grooves at the WorldBeat Cultural Center. The Able Minded Poets as well as Herb ‘N’ Roots will also perform. Tickets are $10 and the event starts at 8 p.m. Call the WorldBeat Cultural Center at (619) 230-1190 for more information on the event. The Onyx Room presents Oro. This club night features the deep-house sounds of Mauricio Aviles (Naked Music) and Andy Caldwell, who scored a club hit with his sexy deep-house rendition of Antonio Carlos Jobim’s “”Quiet Nights.”” The event starts at 9 p.m. and lasts long into the evening at this comfortable and underground (literally!) club. Check http://www.theonyxroom.com or call (619) 235-6699 for more information. Saturday 2/23/02 Nu-metal? Rap-metal? Alt-Metal? Call it what you want, but this show is sure to rock. Linkin Park headlines the Projek: Revolution tour, and they are accompanied by Cypress Hill, ADEMA and DJ Z Trip. The show is at the Cox Arena and starts at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $29.50. England’s two-step garage hero, Craig David, will be at the Belly Up Tavern. The show is sold out, but if you have tickets, make your way over there by 9:15 p.m. Sunday 2/24/02 Busta Rhymes will throw funky beats and innovative rhymes at you faster than you can blink. Busta is sure to dazzle you with his wild fashion and crazy antics. This cutting edge hip-hop star will be at 4th & B. The show starts at 8 p.m. and for $25 you can get a ticket. Seattle’s Spyglass will be invading The Casbah with lush guitars, sweeping strings and organs. Call (619) 232-4355 for more information. The show starts at 8:30 p.m. For information on their new album, “”Strategies for the Stranded,”” look at page 11. Tuesday 2/26/02 The original Breeders are back. The Breeders with Kim and Kelley Deal are back together to tour and record a new album that will be released this year. Most people will remember their huge hit, “”Cannonball.”” They will play tonight and tomorrow night at The Casbah. The show starts at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. ...

Spirit Night 2002

It was an exciting weekend for the UCSD women’s basketball team, to say the least. Colin Young-Wolff Guardian On Friday night, the Tritons overcame a poor shooting performance in the first half to beat California State University Dominguez Hills 52-48 in front of the Spirit Night crowd. Shooting 4-for-20 from the field in the first half, the Tritons found themselves fortunate to be down by only three points, 23-20, by the end of the half. “”They played us just the way I would have played us,”” said UCSD head coach Judy Malone. “”They took us out of everything we wanted to do.”” Anna MacMurdo Guardian The Toros’ relentless defense kept the Tritons away from the basket and denied them the passing lanes. “”At halftime, we went in and invented some offenses with more dribble penetration,”” Malone said. These new offenses were effective. Forward Danyiel Wortham led the balanced Triton offensive attack with 12 points and eight rebounds. Freshman center Margaret Johnson was the top Triton rebounder with 11, to go along with her nine points. Stacy Gallagher-Bolton also chipped in with seven rebounds off the bench in only 16 minutes. “”Stacy really cleaned the boards underneath tonight,”” Malone said. UCSD improved its shooting to 40 percent in the second half. “”The crowd got us pumped,”” said senior point guard Maya Fok. “”Don’t get me wrong, I love the crowd, but we may have rushed our shots a little.”” The lead changed hands numerous times in the second half until UCSD guard Ali Ginn drove to the basket with just over three minutes left to put the Tritons up for good. Ginn ended the game with nine points and nine rebounds. Saturday night, the Tritons had revenge on their minds. Coming off a 13-point loss to the Eagles on Jan. 4, UCSD looked to return the favor. Both teams came out hot, shooting over 50 percent, and when the halftime horn rang the game was tied at 37. The second half was nip-and-tuck, and with four minutes left the Golden Eagles led 61-59. Down by two, the Tritons began to turn it on. Led by guards Ginn, who scored a team-high 16 points, and Fok (14 points, six assists), UCSD began to pull away. After a no-look pass by Margaret Johnson that resulted in a Triton layup, the Golden Eagles began to foul. Then UCSD found its touch from the free throw line. “”They started fouling way too early,”” Malone said. “”We were struggling to find a shot.”” After making only 21 of 39 free throws in the previous three halves, the Tritons sunk 14 of 19 in the second half including 10 of their last 12 to seal the game. “”Making free throws was the key,”” said Bromley, who finished with 14 points and five rebounds. “”Our coaches stay on top of our conditioning and tonight we were in better physical and mental shape.”” Katie McGann made a layup in the final minute to cap the 76-68 victory. “”This was a good win for us”” Malone said. “”They really took it to us at their place.”” UCSD’s weekend sweep was its first of the season in conference play and moved them into a tie for fifth place in the CCAA with Cal State Los Angeles. Next up is a trip to Cal State San Bernardino on Friday, followed by a visit to defending CCAA and Division II national champion Cal Poly Pomona on Saturday. ...

Tuition break should go to U.S. citizens

Isn’t it funny how any given child seems to have more common sense than your average liberal? One of the most basic concepts a child learns — and will happily regurgitate — is that people who break a law should be punished. If you were to explain that society rewards people who break the law, a child would think either that adults are nuts, or just plain stupid. If we reward illegal immigrants who, by definition, are breaking the law by just being in this country, then I suppose we are those things. Such people are in the United States illegally; they are committing a crime by simply being here. Why on Earth are we rewarding them for breaking the law? They are certainly not entitled to the substantial UC fee break that they will soon receive. California residents at UC schools will save $3,691 in the course of a quarter — not because California citizenship is a mark of nobility, but because they and their parents have contributed to the federal and state income taxes that make such a discount possible. Illegal immigrants do not pay such taxes, and therefore don’t deserve to reap any related benefits. Based solely upon this year’s statistics, upward of 400 students would benefit from the University of California’s new tuition policy, saving each undocumented student approximately $11,000 over the course of the school year. This means that the state will lose $4.4 million, despite a widening deficit, just so illegal immigrants get a free ride. Once the new tuition policy takes effect, more undocumented immigrants may be encouraged apply for admission, costing taxpayers far more money. Think about how much money $4.4 million is — especially in light of the fact that UCSD just can’t seem to find enough money to provide students with adequate parking, facilities or student life activities. Moreover, the tuition break is not fair to students from other states, who will continue to pay the steep nonresident tuition rate. At the very least, they pay federal income taxes — yes, bitter liberals, your tuition is also subsidized by the federal government — and some students pay California income taxes if they work part time while at school. These people work hard just like everybody else to pay their tuition, so I fail to see how it can be fair to grant in-state tuition to those who pay no income taxes. What concerns me most about this new, intrinsically flawed program is that it is yet another state-sponsored encouragement of illegal immigration. Undocumented immigrants reside in the United States and use public services free of charge: We educate their children from kindergarten through 12th grade in our overcrowded public schools. Public services exist through the taxes that we pay, which they do not. Why, some naive liberals ask, don’t we just tear down our borders and let everybody come here freely? I think that Sept. 11 provides any necessary explanation of the role that the international border plays in national security, since there are people who come to this country with the most malicious of intentions. We need to know exactly who is walking into the United States because lax protocol was partially responsible for the Sept. 11 terrorists being in this country in the first place. Not to make anyone feel uncomfortable — God forbid — but all indications have pointed to the U.S.-Mexican border as a major entry point for terrorists, and at San Diego as a base of operations. It especially amuses me when people tell me that we owe undocumented workers for the cheap labor they provide. What an innately flawed argument, especially because it usually stems from self-professed socialists. Such labor could certainly be provided by unemployed U.S. citizens, especially perennial welfare dependents. If Americans were to do the work currently done mostly by illegal immigrants, they might demand higher wages and thus redistribute some of our nation’s wealth for spending in the United States rather than in Mexico — which is where much of the “”cheap earnings”” wind up. Be a good socialist and do what’s good for our nation’s working class and the economy as a whole: Reserve American jobs for Americans. I have a lot of respect for those who come here illegally. Once they arrive, the first thing they look for is a job. Some people in this country legally can trace their own American lineage back for centuries, yet don’t have the least bit of drive to find a job and thus will never succeed. I have nothing against undocumented workers, personally; I would do the same thing if I were in their position. These are hard-working people whose descendants can someday prosper in this country, just as the descendants of the first European settlers in North America did in the 17th century. Yet they must come here through a controlled, legal process and pay for the services they receive, just like any other taxpaying U.S. citizen. ...

Registries ease adoption turmoil

I am adopted, and I believe that all adoption clinics should provide registries for adopted children. Adoption clinics throughout the United States have decided to keep their records completely closed to adoptees, leaving them no way of contacting their biological parents. Such a ruling is unfair to those who have been adopted. After all, we have the right to know the details of those who brought us into existence. I was adopted through the Gladney Center for Adoption in Fort Worth, Texas, a home where young mothers can have a child in an educational environment and decide for themselves whether they wish to care for the child after its birth. Gladney has been party to several court trials in the process of deciding whether children given up to adoption should be allowed to retrieve information on their biological parents. Recently, it chose to keep all records classified. If it had ended there, I would have been quite upset. I want more information on my biological mother. It’s not that I don’t like my adoptive parents. But there are days when I just want to look like someone I know, days when I want to be able to say, “”I have her hands.”” Fortunately for me and many others, Gladney has opened a registry that adoptees may join upon turning 18 years old. If either biological parent decides to join as well, then counseling and a meeting between the two parties can ensue. This way, no one is forced upon the other. The majority of adoption agencies have no such registry and no such means for adopted people to take any step toward satisfying the deep curiosity inside. There are excellent programs and agencies for birth mothers and families wishing to adopt nowadays. There are counseling services for birth mothers, along with fitness centers and hospital aid for the birth. There are financial programs to help pay for incurred bills. For adoptive families, there is counseling, information sessions, contracts and visits to the agency. However, neither the birth mother nor the adoptive family is typically allowed to see the other in person. All these services call into question the rights of the child around whom all of this is done. In most cases, there are no rights. After all, what child would be guaranteed certain rights to detailed family information under normal circumstances? In my experience, the only information truly necessary for adoptees, up to a point, is the family medical history. But then, around the age of 10, a child can be given the homework assignment of tracing the family tree. I remember telling my teacher that I couldn’t do the assignment because I was adopted and did not know my past. Having to face the teasing of the other kids at school because I did not look anything like my parents — I am the only blonde in a family of brown hair — was difficult enough. I know that the ways of dealing with adoption are different for everyone. My brother is also adopted, and he couldn’t care less about finding his birth parents. I, however, want to know. It is a deep mental and psychological issue, not one that can be eased simply by knowing that the aunt of my birth mother had asthma when she was a child. I still wonder where I would be had it not been for the Gladney registry. Putting my name on that list filled so much of the empty feeling in my chest. I am grateful to the center for providing adopted people with a vital step in dealing with the difficulties that come with not knowing one’s biological parents. However, this is but one adoption agency. There are millions of children who need some extra help coping with feelings of abandonment, which are quite natural, and other emotions. All agencies should follow Gladney’s example and provide a registry for those who have been adopted and wish to know more. ...

Banning beach booze

In the upcoming March primary election, voters will have to decide whether they want to ban alcohol at some San Diego beaches 24 hours a day, as opposed to the current ban, which prohibits alcohol from 8 p.m. to noon. This measure, which would affect Pacific Beach and Mission Beach, is known as Proposition G. You are probably thinking, “”Now I won’t even be able to enjoy a simple drink at the beach? F*%# that.”” There’s more to it than that, and you know it. Alcohol in crowded public parks and on beaches creates major public safety problems: underage drinking, drunken driving, violence, vandalism and other disturbances. It is no wonder that every major beach community in Southern California except San Diego prohibits alcohol consumption on the sand. While to some people, prohibition may seem like a crusade against the wiles of alcohol, to many it is an issue of public safety and quality of life. It’s not to punish those who bring champagne as a part of a romantic beach picnic or those who bring a cooler on a hot summer day to enjoy a cold one. Proposition G is there to ensure beachgoers a safer and more pleasant place to hang out. The beach has become the underage scene for drinking. Why? Because it’s easy. Underage drinkers can come out to the beach and ask unsuspecting beachgoers for a share of their booze or keg, and just like that, they leave, having acquired alcohol without identification. According to the Policy Panel on Youth Access to Alcohol and The San Diego Union-Tribune, 733 minors were caught in possession of alcohol in Mission Beach and Pacific Beach in the last two years. Only seven adults were charged for distribution to minors. Of course, that doesn’t include the statistics for other San Diego-area beaches or other alcohol-related arrests. It definitely doesn’t include the minors whose alcohol exploits go undetected. In the last three years, police have made 17,393 arrests and citations for alcohol-related violations in those areas. This comprises over one-third of all of San Diego’s alcohol-related violations in that period. According to research by Mothers Against Drunk Driving, 1,361 of these citations were for drunk driving and 2,583 were for minors in possession of alcohol. According to San Diego City Council statistics, the 92109 ZIP code, which encompasses the areas to be affected by Proposition G, has the highest percentage of drunken driving arrests in San Diego. On busy holiday weekends in Mission Beach and Pacific Beach, 50 or more police officers are often assigned to beach patrol — officers that could be protecting your neighborhood and making more meaningful arrests. In 1991, when La Jolla Shores Beach was made alcohol-free, reported crimes dropped 80 percent and arrests dropped 43 percent. By contrast, in 2000, 18 police officers were injured in the line of duty in Mission Beach and Pacific Beach due to alcohol-related violence. The last two major beach holidays — Labor Day weekend and Independence Day — were also considered the deadliest, because San Diego drunken-driving arrests jumped 8 percent higher than normal, the highest for San Diego since 1993. Banning alcohol 24 hours a day at Mission Beach and Pacific Beach would drastically reduce the staffing of beach patrol officers and the proliferation of crime at the beach. Eventually, the ban could reduce violations and rowdy crowds on major holidays. While everyone cries about the implications of Proposition G, it is important to note that under it, alcohol would not be completely banned: If voters make the proposition law, there will still be a procedure for securing alcohol permits for large beach functions. Additionally, should it be passed, Proposition G would be a short-lived law. The referendum specifically states the dates of effect: June 1, 2001 — yes, 2001 — through Dec. 31, 2002. After that, it could either be extended or abolished. That time would allow for tallying safety numbers and evaluating the true value of alcohol on our beaches. While this ban will undoubtedly ease some concerns about violence, many believe that drunken driving and underage drinking will not be curbed, regardless of the referendum’s passage. They are right. But at least the beach will become one less place to condone alcohol-related problems. Most of us are surely willing to curb our need for alcohol if it means fewer arrests, less vandalism, fewer alcohol-related accidents and fewer deaths around our beach cities. It shouldn’t take personal loss to bring about the realization that an alcohol ban on beaches is not the end of the world. ...

Lights & Sirens

Monday, Feb. 11: 8:25 a.m.: Officers impounded a silver 1987 Mitsubishi Starion at 9900 Genessee Ave. for being a traffic hazard. Stored at Star Towing. 9:57 a.m.: Staff member reported a burglary at Urey Hall 2060. Loss: $187.95. 10:44 a.m.: Staff member reported the theft of a wallet at Canyonview Pool. Loss: $57. 2:27 p.m.: Units and SDFD responded to a dumpster fire near Regents Road. 3:12 p.m.: Student reported vandalism to a blue 1993 Saturn near 4059 Miramar St. Loss: $1,000. 4:00 p.m.: Student reported the burglary of a white 1989 Toyota Camry in Lot 608. Loss: $100. Tuesday, Feb. 12: 12:23 p.m.: Staff member reported the theft of a cellular phone from Thornton Hospital. Loss: $350. 7:24 p.m.: Staff member reported the theft of a purse from Main Gym. Loss: $290. 8:43 p.m.: Student reported the theft of a cellular phone from the seventh floor of Tioga Hall. Loss: $70. Wednesday, Feb. 13: 10:24 a.m.: Student reported the theft of a wallet from room 223 of the Medical Teaching Facility. Loss: $30. Thursday, Feb. 14: 12:56 p.m.: 25-year-old female student suffered stomach cramps at the Price Center. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. Friday, Feb. 15: 3:12 p.m.: Student reported the theft of a wallet from Sierra Summit. Loss: $20. Saturday, Feb. 16: 12:33 a.m.: Officers detained a 21-year-old female student at Porter’s Pub for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. 1:32 a.m.: Officers detained a 20-year-old male nonaffiliate on Muir College Drive for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. 2:38 p.m.: 25-year-old male nonaffiliate suffered a head injury while diving at Canyonview Pool. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital by paramedics. 6:39 p.m.: 18-year-old male student suffered a finger injury while cooking at Goldberg Hall. Transported to Kaiser by a residential life staff member. Sunday, Feb. 17: 1:08 a.m.: Officers detained a 20-year-old male student at Pepper Canyon 1800 for being drunk in public. Transported to detox. 2:44 a.m.: 32-year-old student arrested on Regents Road for driving under the influence of alcohol and for violation of a court order. Transported to central jail. 4:45 p.m.: Student reported the theft of a cellular phone and camera from Challenger Hall. Loss: $130. –Compiled by Evan McLaughlin Associate News Editor ...

BRIEFLY

Sara Gille of UCSD’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography has documented an increase in water temperature that has occurred over the past 50 years in the sea region surrounding the Antarctic continent known as the “”Southern Ocean.”” Since 1950, a 0.17-degree Celsius increase was found in the 700- to 1,100-meter depth range, nearly doubling the global average. According to Gille, the implications of warming in the Antarctic region include the probable reduction of sea ice around the Antarctic continent, which could potentially alter the sea levels of water bodies worldwide. Because cold water holds carbon dioxide more efficiently, the temperature rise could have an adverse effect on the earth’s atmosphere, forcing it to store more greenhouse gases. A fleet of marine “”robots”” deployed by the World Ocean Circulation Experiment in the 1990s obtained the evidence for Gille’s report. The robots, known as Autonomous Lagrangian Circulation Explorers, were released into different oceanic regions and at varying depths for 10 to 25 days. After gathering temperature data, the ALACE surfaced to transmit the information to a satellite. Gille used thousands of ALACE data points in her research. Gille’s study was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and can be found in the Feb. 15, 2002 issue of the journal Science. Professor named associate editor for medical publication Martin Stein, a professor of pediatrics at UCSD’s school of medicine, will serve as an associate editor on the newlylaunched Journal Watch Pediatrics and Medicine. The journal will be produced by the Massachusetts Medical Society, which also publishes the renowned New England Journal of Medicine. Stein will serve as an expert of behavioral and developmental medicine on the newly formed editorial board. He will primarily focus his efforts toward articles dealing with the early recognition and intervention of adolescents with developmental delays, behavioral self-control deficiencies and setbacks in educational achievement and considerable family problems. JWPAM will be the newest addition to the Journal Watch project, a series of investigative newsletters that provide clinicians with brief summaries of studies published in other medical journals relating to that area. JWPAM surveys over 28 prestigious medical publications on a monthly basis, seeking out studies that are significant to the field of pediatric medicine. Stein became the first full-time practicing pediatrician to serve on UCSD’s medical school faculty in 1975. He has since worked to develop the medical school’s division of primary care pediatrics. In his work and teaching, he has integrated child development fundamentals into his general pediatric instruction. Stein authored the book “”Encounters with Children: Pediatric Behavior and Development,”” while also contributing work to the newest edition of Dr. Spock’s “”Baby and Child Care.”” JWPAM will be published 10 times per year. For more information about the new journal, you can visit the Journal Watch Web site at http://www.jwatch.org. UC announces naming of new head of University Libraries UC President Richard C. Atkinson announced the appointment of Daniel Greenstein as the new university librarian and executive director of the California Digital Library last week. Greenstein currently acts as the director of the Digital Library Federation in Washington, D.C. Effective May 1, 2002, Greenstein will assume the management of a digital library project that boasts content and services ranking among the largest in the United States. The CDL is a joint program between the 10 UC campuses, and it concentrates on building increased access to content and services electronically for the academic community. Greenstein will also be responsible for library planning for the entire UC system. Greenstein began his academic career as a senior lecturer in modern history at Glasgow University. It was at Glasgow that he became founding director of the university’s Arts Faculty Computing Facility. In 1996, he was appointed founding director of the United Kingdom’s Arts and Humanities Data Service. ...

Scripps professor appointed to two prestigious spots

John Orcutt, professor of geophysics at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, has been voted president-elect of the American Geophysical Union. He will assume the presidency of the 39,000-member organization July 1, 2004. “”It pleases me greatly,”” Orcutt said of the news. “”It’s a great honor to be elected for an organization with so much history. There have been some great presidents of the AGU over the course of 50 years.”” The AGU is a nonprofit organization established in 1919 by the National Research Council. It has operated for the past 50 years as an unincorporated affiliate of the National Academy of Sciences. One of Orcutt’s top priorities as AGU president will be converting written forms of research to electronic publications. “”The AGU is more than 100 years old and it has published the results of its research on paper,”” Orcutt said. “”We’ve just made the transition to electronic form while continuing paper form, but that transition is very expensive, so selling this idea of electronic publishing is not trivial given these increased costs.”” Orcutt also added that if the transition were to fail, it would be a disaster, because the AGU depends on income from publications to a large extent. Nevertheless, he does not foresee this to be a problem. Serving two terms as head of the publication’s department before being voted president-elect, Orcutt said he is very aware of the dynamics of the situation. “”I’ve been general secretary for four years in this organization, and what I do largely in this job is take care of the money and worry about the bottom line each year,”” Orcutt said. “”So I don’t go into the job of president without knowing that we have a lot of problems to deal with.”” In addition to his involvement in the AGU, Orcutt acts as director of the San Diego Branch of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics. As for his thoughts on the future, Orcutt said he is optimistic of the possibilities in oceanography that today’s advanced technology allows. “”It’s really a great time for oceanography,”” Orcutt said. “”Advances in satellite communications and technology — all these things have come together at a time when it makes it remarkably practical. Technology is there and certainly the scientific need [is there] as well.”” Orcutt added that many scientists would like to see permanent research sites studying the world’s oceans. He said to really understand and study them, something needs to be underwater permanently. Statewide director of the IGPP professor Bernard Minster said Orcutt’s being elected did not surprise him. “”He has an extremely distinguished record,”” Minster said. “”It was no surprise. I think he’s extremely well-respected and has the devotion of everyone at the IGPP.”” Dr. Mark Zumberge, deputy director of the San Diego branch of the IGPP, agrees. “”It’s going to be very good for the AGU because he’s an excellent leader,”” Zumberge said. “”He has high standards of scientific integrity and he just sets a great example of how to be productive in the world of science.”” Orcutt is a fellow of AGU and a member of the Seismological Society of America and Society of Exploration Geophysicists. In addition to serving as AGU president, Orcutt has accepted an appointment on the Scientific Advisory Panel of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. The U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy was mandated by the Oceans Act of 2000, an act that reviews the effects of federal ocean-related laws and programs. This federal legislation requires the commission to make findings and offer recommendations for improving the structure of federal agencies involved in the world’s oceans. Orcutt is among 16 commissioners appointed by President George W. Bush and nominated by Congress. ...

Students give analysis of GOP gubernatorial debate

Immediately following the Feb. 13 California Republican gubernatorial debate held at California State University Long Beach, UCSD and UC Irvine students went live on UCTV to give their analyses of the debate. The group analysis, titled “”UC Students React,”” was hosted by Cynthia Gorney of UC Berkeley’s graduate school of journalism and was broadcasted from UCTV’s studio at UCSD. The panel featured students from various majors, representatives of the A.S. Councils at UCSD and UCI, representatives from speech and debate teams, the UCSD Chancellor’s Organization of Allied Students and The UCSD Guardian. The Republican gubernatorial primary debate featured businessman Bill Simon, California Secretary of State Bill Jones and former Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan. The three men are competing for the republican candidacy in the fall elections. “”UC Students React”” presented responses to the candidates’ performances, as well as views on issues important to the next election. Democratic, Republican, independent, liberal, moderate and conservative views were expressed. Heated topics included abortion, education, the economy, the budget, the energy crisis and the way the candidates presented themselves. After watching the gubernatorial debate as a group, most of the student panel agreed that the debate was more of an assault on each candidate’s character than a debate addressing the topics important to voters and to the state of California. “”I was a little disappointed at the first part of the debate,”” said Steve Platt, A.S. president at UC Irvine. “”It seemed as though they were just attacking each other instead of the issues.”” Fellow panelist Jason Fellner of UCSD agreed. “”Some major issues are immigration and campaign finance reform,”” Fellner said, “”neither of which was mentioned.”” Riordan’s moderate views, which present him as more of a democrat that a republican, gave him an advantage over the other candidates, according to some panelists. “”Riordan’s got some more moderate values that are going to help him get elected,”” said UCSD student Amy Kolombatovic. “”Too much GOP conservatism won’t win the electorate in California.”” This was the first time that such a program was produced by UCSD TV. Producers of the program hope that the pilot succeeds and there will be more demand for future political forums. If all goes well, future shows will include other high-profile elections such as the 2004 presidential election. “”We’d like to do it again at UCSD,”” said UCSD TV Public Affairs Producer Shannon Bradley, “”and invite more students from other UC colleges. Hopefully, this pilot will arouse systemwide interest.”” The intent of “”UC Students React”” was to present the panelists with intelligent questions directed in a fair manner, and to allow the students to respond to the issues that viewers should concentrate on in the fall gubernatorial elections, according to Bradley. “”I was very impressed by the caliber of questions and answers given by the host and by the students,”” Bradley said. “”We wanted a nonbiased host, and, being a journalist, Gorney was perfect.”” ...

D.O.C. students stay in class, cancel walkout

Dimensions of Culture lectures remained full while Marshall Field, the site of a proposed walkout, was largely vacant of rallyists on Friday. The walkout of Thurgood Marshall College residents from their D.O.C. classes was averted as part of a compromise between the dean’s office and student organizers. Anna MacMurdo Guardian The rally was changed to an information session to rectify reports of what some students allege to be the unfair treatment of Marshall residents. The information session was the result of talks between Dean of Student Affairs Ashanti Houston-Hands and UCSD Cause organizer Danny Leibowitz. Leibowitz and his suitemates created UCSD Cause as part of their campaign to increase the rights of Marshall residents. “”This is a toned-down version of what we were going to do,”” Leibowitz said, referring to the information session held at Marshall Field, which consisted of Leibowitz and his fellow organizers handing out fliers to interested students. “”I certainly respect the students’ right to protest and to hold information sessions. I never like to see it be at the possibility of their grades suffering,”” Houston-Hands said. “”So I’m glad students who were interested were able to come by and get some information.”” Anna MacMurdo Guardian The compromise calls for the redistribution of the regulations that residents are expected to follow to the residents and their resident advisers so everybody is on the same page, according to Houston-Hands. As part of the compromise, some evicted students were given until the end of the quarter to move out instead of the usual 14 days, according to Leibowitz. Additionally, UCSD Cause’s flier, which was handed out to students on Friday, says specific Marshall Residential Life officials and Residential Security Officers will be investigated for unfair treatment of residents, but Houston-Hands disagreed. “”I wouldn’t necessarily call it an investigation because I don’t have any specific information that’s coming directly from the individuals that have been impacted,”” she said. Although the rally was called off, a few students still left class to see what was going on. For the most part, lectures remained full. Marshall freshmen Mark Tate and Kelsey Wiedenhoefer were two of the few who left class for the information session, which consisted of two beach chairs and a box of flyers, to find out what progress was made. “”I’m glad there are people looking out for our interests,”” Tate said. “”I’m very glad it got resolved.”” Tate and Wiedenhoefer’s teaching assistant assured them that they would not have points deducted from D.O.C., which has mandatory lecture attendance, if they bring back a flier from the rally, Wiedenhoefer said. UCSD student Julia Leach showed her support for solving the problem, which she knows all too well. “”I’ve seen firsthand how RSOs and administration can be unfair and inconsistent,”” she said. “”I don’t know how much this will change, but any change will be minimal.”” She described the relationship between the RAs and residents as adversarial and said an “”us-versus-them”” atmosphere exists in the residence halls. UCSD student Alexis Boerger stopped by to get an update on the progress. She said she supports UCSD Cause because the residence halls are no longer a “”healthy living environment.”” Organizers said they are pleased with the progress that has been made. Alex Chou, a suitemate of Leibowitz, said they succeeded because the goal was not to disrupt the school but raise awareness to their cause. “”It shows how much the administration is willing to work,”” Chou said. “”We expected it would be much harder.”” They credit their Web site, www.geocities.com/ucsdcause, with getting the attention of the Marshall administration. The Web site registered over 1,300 hits according to Monte Swank, the site’s designer. “”It gave us a little bit of leverage,”” Leibowitz said. “”Enough to where the dean’s office was willing to compromise.”” Houston-Hands downplayed the significance of the Web site, saying it just made her want to find out more about the situation. “”Had the same student come in to talk to me without that Web site, his concerns and questions would be just as valid,”” she said. The UCSD Cause Web site and fliers consist of quotes from D.O.C. readings. They sought to legitimize some of their complaints by referring to legal statutes such as equal protection, a civil right which is learned winter quarter in the justice segment of the D.O.C series. “”We have used a lot of constitutional arguments; some of it comes from D.O.C., but not all of it,”” Leibowitz said. Other references are to California law and the student handbook. D.O.C. professors did not play a role in helping with the movement, Leibowitz said. Paul Frymer of the sociology department lectures a D.O.C. justice class this quarter. “”Generally, we talk about equal protection, we talk about civil rights,”” Frymer said. “”I point out in my class that equal protection is a pretty narrow construct that applies to specific situations. It wouldn’t apply in this situation.”” Marshall Provost Michael Schudson has taught the justice D.O.C. course in the past. He also disagrees with the application of the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to punishment for violators of the campus’ alcohol policy. “”There is just no connection here; it’s a very giant leap,”” he said. Leibowitz conceded, saying, “”Equal protection, that is a D.O.C. issue … but know it doesn’t apply 100 percent to what we are doing.”” Frymer doesn’t see D.O.C. as causing the movement. “”I don’t think the class is per se galvanizing anybody to go out and do something, but it sounds like they are taking at least some of it,”” he said. “”It’s good people are getting excited about what they learn.”” Frymer and Schudson did, however, say that they are encouraged that the students seem to be taking something away from the class and applying it to their lives. “”If it was the students’ effort to really take seriously the concepts and ideals discussed in D.O.C., then wonderful: That’s what should be happening,”” Schudson said. “”I just don’t think it should be done in a vacuum without talking to the relevant people.”” Schudson said he was somewhat displeased with the situation, and that he felt it was sensationalized by the Web site prior to the students coming to the administration with their complaints. Schudson stressed that the Marshall administration is open to students and willing to meet with them to do discuss all salient issues. Houston-Hands agreed that the best way to resolve differences is to communicate with students. “”Students should find ways to voice their opinions and address their concerns, but I’m a big advocate for sitting down and talking about issues,”” she said. The meeting between Houston-Hands and Leibowitz was enough to resolve the situation for the time being and keep students in class. Although UCSD Cause used some of the basic principles taught by D.O.C. in its arguments on the Web site, organizers said that it was just a part of their argument. Organizers also stressed that the idea to work from within the system for change was simply “”common sense.”” ...