Campus

Tritons win in 14-inning marathon

The Tritons won the first California Collegiate Athletic Association game of their season Friday, but it took them two days and 14 innings to do it. Lyon Liew Guardian UCSD tied the score in the bottom of the ninth inning against California State University Los Angeles Thursday evening, but the end of the game was postponed until Friday due to darkness. After the Tritons jumped out of the gates early with a David Hawk three-run home run, the Golden Eagles erased a 7-1 deficit with a seven-run seventh inning. After both teams traded leads, Cal State L.A. took a 10-9 lead after a squeeze bunt by Denver Berry scored pinch runner Tommy Owen. The Tritons refused to quit and junior center fielder Matt Smith knotted the game at 10 after scoring in the bottom of the ninth on a fielder’s choice by pinch hitter Nigel Miller. On Friday, both teams picked up where they left off and battled into the 14th inning until the Tritons triumphed with an 11-10 victory. In the bottom of the 14th, UCSD left fielder John Bologna reached base on an Eagle error and was brought home for the victory by a Smith single after stealing second base. Triton sophomore Raf Bergstrom tossed five innings of shutout baseball to pick up the win. The following game was hardly as exciting, since the Golden Eagles’ Chris Johnson pitched seven scoreless innings against the Tritons and Cal State L.A. won 7-2. Johnson allowed only five hits to the Triton offense, struck out four and walked none. The Golden Eagles roughed up UCSD starting pitcher Keith Smith for nine hits and five runs in five innings, while the Tritons were only able to muster two runs on seven hits. The Tritons’ only runs of the game came in the ninth inning, when Miller hit a triple to score Matt Kennison and Matt Merriman. Mike Miller had three hits for Cal State L.A., while Troy Young, Tim Wilderson, Rashawn Owens and Rafael Arroyo each contributed two hits to Cal State L.A. coach John Herbold’s school record-tying 397th career victory. After the split, the Golden Eagles move to 4-8 overall and 1-1 in CCAA, while UCSD’s record is now 5-3-1 overall, 1-1 in CCAA. The two teams finish out their four-game series Feb. 10, traveling to Los Angeles for a noon doubleheader. ...

Two wins for men's tennis

The UCSD men’s tennis team capped off its first week of dual meet competition with victories over College of the Desert and Cal Poly Pomona University last weekend. Colin Young-Wolff Guardian The Tritons, off to a 2-0 record, held onto a 5-4 home exhibition win over four-time defending community college state champions College of the Desert Friday at the North Campus Tennis Courts. The Tritons started off slowly, dropping two of three doubles matches. The lone win came when the Jeff Wilson and Dan Albrecht team, down 5-2 at one point, rallied to win six of the next seven games to take the match 8-6. However, things picked up during the singles matches, with UCSD taking four of six matches to decide the meet. Team captain Michael Meyer, Wilson, Blake Wilson-Hayden and Emil Novak all paced the Triton victory with wins. Hayden-Wilson played an impressive match, easily taking the first set 6-1. However, Desert’s Daniel Briseno rallied to take the second set 6-3, and the two played to a tie-breaker that Wilson-Hayden won 7-6 (6). On Saturday, the Tritons finished off a demanding week with a 6-3 victory over visiting Cal Poly Pomona. This time, the Tritons won two of three doubles matches when the Brian Swatt/Sameer Chopra and Michael Meyer/Everett Schroeter teams tallied wins. They were followed with a repeat of the previous day — singles wins by Meyer, Wilson, Wilson-Hayden and Novak. “”[It] was a good win over a good team,”” head coach Eric Steidlmayer said on the team’s Web site. “”We knew it was going to be tough and it certainly was. I think this match also highlighted a few things we can improve on … Our doubles play must get better, and our readiness to begin the matches must improve if we are to be a very good team.”” The Swatt/Chopra team played the nail-biter of the day, since they were down four match points against Cal Poly’s Ryan Terry and Andy Roland before rallying to force a tie-breaker and win the match 9-8 (2). “”It was toward the end when we were down,”” Swatt said. “”I have a tendency to be more up-and-down in my emotions, but Sameer isn’t. I looked to him. Both those guys were really good players … It worked out for us, but Sameer really came through for us today.”” Meyer had a long weekend, with both of his matches going to three sets. On Friday against Desert, he played Rye Kashawabara to a 6-4, 4-6, 6-1 victory. On Saturday, he played another grueling match that went the distance. This time, Cal Poly Pomona’s Ryan Terry fell, 4-6, 7-6 (3), 6-1, in another lengthy battle — a common occurrence for the Tritons this season. “”We’ve won a lot of three-set matches,”” Swatt said. “”[For example], Mike was in better shape against a really good guy and came out on top. Our conditioning helps us win a lot of third-set matches, and I think that will pay off in the later matches of the season.”” The team’s conditioning is not their most important asset, however, because Swatt said its the Tritons’ competitive nature is what has driven them so far this season. “”That we have a competitive attitude is our biggest thing,”” Swatt said. “”Nobody wants to lose; everybody’s fighting. Physically, we have a lot of talent, but it takes that unwillingness to lose — that fighting attitude has helped us in our matches so far.”” Last season, the Tritons lost to the Roadrunners 6-3, and following two rainouts, the Tritons fell to Cal Poly Pomona 5-4 in their meeting last season. The Tritons also defeated Azusa Pacific University 6-3 earlier in the week after losing to them by the same score last season. “”We lost to all of those teams last year, so to come back, we feel the team is a lot deeper and we’re improved,”” Swatt said. “”We proved this week that we’re a much better team than we were last year … We still have a ways to improve, but we’re definitely on the right track.”” The week had its share of success stories, but the team had a scare last weekend at the Cal Poly Individual Tournament when Swatt suffered from heat exhaustion during his draining third-round, three-set victory over College of the Desert’s Kunio Minata. Swatt said he started cramping during the second set but played through it, and as a result, the cramping worsened after the match. He went to a hospital, where several precautionary tests were conducted before his release. ...

UCSD splits opener with No. 5 Davis

The UCSD women’s softball team started conference play over the weekend by splitting a doubleheader with UC Davis and winning two over Chico State University. Anna MacMurdo Guardian The California Collegiate Athletic Association regular season opened at Triton Softball Field on Friday afternoon when the nationally fifth-ranked UC Davis Aggies came for a doubleheader. Fresh off throwing a no-hitter against Vanguard University, Triton senior Leea Harlan took the mound in the first game, but it quickly became apparent that Davis would not let her repeat that feat. The Aggies opened the scoring in the top of the first inning with one out, then they strung together three consecutive hits to take a 1-0 lead. With runners on second and third and only one out, the Aggies looked poised to break the game open, but the Triton defense picked up when UCSD shortstop Kim Aggabao fielded a grounder and caught the Davis baserunner in a rundown between third and home. Harlan induced a weak groundout back to the mound to end the inning, and then the Triton bats went to work. As she would do many times over the weekend, UCSD third baseman Amy Mettee came up big at the plate, opening the inning with a double off Susan Churchwell. The game was tied on the very next play when an error allowed Mettee to scamper home and sent left fielder Kristina Anderson to second. With two outs and Anderson on third, Christi Martinelli reached on Churchwell’s second throwing error of the inning, allowing Anderson to score. Right fielder Jamie Hurst came through in the clutch with a single to center that brought Martinelli around to score due to a fielding error by Davis catcher Angie Linsenmeyer. The Tritons scored three runs in the inning off two hits and three Davis errors to take a 3-1 lead. Aggie first baseman Suzanne Yale cut into that lead immediately with a towering solo home run to open the second inning. Harlan then settled into a rhythm, retiring six of the next seven batters she faced. Leading off in the top of the fourth, Linsenmeyer broke Harlan’s rhythm with a leadoff double that the Aggies turned into a run to tie the game. UCSD came back with a run in the bottom of the fourth when catcher Kristin Hunstad’s one-out single was manufactured into a run with the help of another Aggie error and a wild pitch. The Davis bats awoke in the last inning when Jenny Hall led off with a double. Two batters later, Aggie center fielder Shyamala White connected with Harlan’s 3-2 offering and sent it soaring over the left field fence to give Davis a 5-4 lead. “”[White] waits really well and I was trying to bust her inside,”” Harlan said afterward. “”But I left the ball a little bit too far over the plate and she turned on it.”” Freshman Breanne Cope started UCSD off with a single and advanced to second when Churchwell committed her third error of the game, allowing Mettee to reach base. A sacrifice bunt moved the runners to second and third with one out. Harlan reached on a fielder’s choice, scoring Cope with the tying run and moving Mettee to third. Aggabao then picked up her first hit of the day, bringing in Mettee and winning the opener for the Tritons. “”We didn’t play our best but we played as a team,”” head coach Patti Gerckens said afterward. “”When we play as a team, we will win games.”” The team effort was less successful in the second game because the Tritons lacked big hits and played somewhat suspect defense en route to a 3-1 loss. White hit her second home run of the afternoon, this one a two-run shot that was enough to provide a lead the Aggies would not relinquish. The lone Triton run came in the sixth when Harlan and Martinelli each doubled. Davis pitcher Amy Rosson was strong, allowing only six hits over seven innings for the win. Despite the split, coach Gerckens felt good about the way her club stacked up against Davis. “”They didn’t impress me that much. I think we’re a better team,”” she said. The Tritons were given an opportunity to prove themselves when they took on the Wildcats of Chico State on Saturday. “”Chico State is not somebody we should ever lose to,”” Harlan said. Harlan allowed only two hits in seven innings for the complete game shutout. Mettee walked in the first inning, was sacrificed to second, went to third on a groundout and scored on a wild pitch for the game’s only run. In the second game, pitcher Martinelli sparkled, striking out 14 Wildcats in the 2-1 victory. Martinelli also picked up an RBI in the sixth inning against Wildcat pitcher Katie Stokx. After five-and-a-half scoreless innings, UCSD capitalized on a Wildcat mistake to get its half of the inning started. Anderson reached base because Chico shortstop Megan Farnham could not handle a sharply hit grounder. Anderson moved to second when Harlan laid down a sacrifice bunt. Aggabao followed with a bunt of her own, beating it out for a single and moving Anderson to third base. Martinelli followed with a clutch single to give the Tritons the lead. Two batters later, Aggabao scored on a Hurst single to center, giving UCSD a two-run cushion. The Wildcats built a rally in the top of the seventh, scoring once and bringing the tying and lead runs to third and second base before the Tritons closed it out. ...

Letters to the Editor: A.S. vice president clarifies resolution's intent

Editor: One of the foundations of our country that I am most proud of is that we are allowed freedom of speech and freedom of thought. Some students at UCSD are in full support of our government’s current actions and some are not. It was incredibly astute of the A.S. Council to realize this and work to pass a resolution that is not partisan in giving its unconditional support for the victims of Sept. 11, 2001. The intent behind changes to the resolution was to embrace the diversity of opinion of UCSD students. Regardless of politics, the one thing on which we all agree is that we give our love and support to those who are fighting and to those who died in the tragedy of Sept. 11. In this resolution, we promise the men and women who died that they did not do so in vain and that we will never forget the lessons we have learned. The resolution is not a “”waste of paper,”” but rather a heartfelt condolence and support for American victims. The original version of the resolution did not serve the interests of the student body. After taking a vote among the senators who would pass it in its original form, it was clear that the resolution would not pass, because it did not serve to unite us. I am proud of the A.S. Council for being so attuned to the student body and making the changes necessary to better serve all students. To say that any member of the A.S. Council is un-American because we sought to unify our campus in supporting Americans who died and who are fighting is both hypocritical and divisive. It is hypocritical to say that one supports America and unity in the country, and then to rip apart one’s fellow students, who are doing everything they can to support the causes of unity and pride. When I ran for office on the Unity slate, I meant every word that I said. I promised that I would do everything in my power to unite the student body under the causes that we care about. As a leader on the A.S. Council, I promote unity in every possible way. The amended resolution was a good-faith effort to unite the campus. As a student, I am proud that our student government takes all sides into account. I am proud that our student government cares about all students on our campus and works every day to represent as many interests as possible. I am proud that our student government, while facing the political ambition of partisan groups, strives to do what is best for the campus. — Jenn Brown A.S. Vice President Internal Don’t recoup housing’s financial setbacks at students’ expense Editor: I was reading over some of the benefits of the “”one contract, one rate”” meal plan. Besides the fact that many statements were repeats of old statements with only a few words changed around, many of them were simply offensive and inflammatory. A couple of ideas that were particularly offensive to me ran along the lines of, “”Freshmen are not ready for the responsibility of living in an apartment atmosphere,”” and “”Mandatory meal plans are good for freshmen because they cannot cook for themselves.”” The plan went along to mention how ramen noodles and the like were not nutritionally sound meals. I must agree, but the last time I checked, pizza, cheeseburgers and french fries — to name a few of the items served regularly at all dining halls on campus — are not too healthy, either. I am a freshmen who got placed in an apartment this year, and I couldn’t consider myself more lucky. My roommates and I delegate chores, cook nutritious meals on a regular basis and are overall generally happy, as well as about $3,000 richer. As for the comment that most freshmen aren’t ready for the responsibility of living on their own, I say: What the hell are they doing in college? The entire point of college, for a lot of people, is learning to be independent. A lot of freshmen aren’t ready for the responsibility of midterms, finals and bills, but that doesn’t stop the university from administering them. Why is it necessary for UCSD to become increasingly paternal? I moved away from home to escape parents, not to replace them with much more expensive ones. When I asked representatives why this plan was necessary, I was told that UCSD needs more funds to build housing, that apartment funds can only be used to build apartments, and so on. It was a mediocre explanation at best. Then I questioned the representatives on why UCSD continued to admit more and more students when it was obvious that there were building shortages. I was told that the governor was responsible for setting admission quotas. How is it that all of these bureaucracies can exist and not be in working contact with one another? The idea that I pay almost $14,000 a year to help support a system that is completely out of sync with itself and lacking any type of checks or balances sickens me. I don’t receive any type of financial assistance, and I know a lot of people that are in the same situation. That means every dollar I give to this school had to be earned by my family and me. I have a proposal of my own: What if UCSD charges students according to how much their living arrangement costs the university? And as for mandatory meal plans, I think vegetarians would have a hard time spending $1,800 without resorting to salad for every meal. I have to work hard to afford this place, and all the wasted money that seems to be floating around (can we say “”New Student Initiated Outreach and Recruitment?””) seriously makes me reconsider going to a private university. You know, the ones with four-year housing guarantees. — Emilee Cunningham UCSD freshman ...

speak up, speak out

“”Let me just say first that the Arabs are different from the Persians, but they’re all Osama bin Laden people.”” I flinched as if I had been punched when I heard this at the San Diego Investigator meeting nearly three weeks ago. I was speechless because the person who said it was an FBI agent. It wasn’t just an ordinary FBI agent, but a special agent in charge of the San Diego Division of the FBI, one who has overseen 500 other agents in the continued investigation into the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Almost immediately, my stunned, speechless disbelief turned into outrage as the man’s hateful words sunk in. All Arabs and Persians are “”Osama bin Laden people””? My father is Persian, and some of my friends are Arab and Persian. Thus we all must be, without a doubt, a part of Osama bin Laden’s network of terrorists. Apparently, no proof or hard evidence is required; just take a look at a person’s ethnic background, and that should be enough to convict entire races of being terrorists and traitors. As much as the FBI special agent believed he was stating a fact, he was not. It was hate, fear and racism speaking. Yet because of the respected stature of this FBI special agent, a statement as racist and erroneous as the one he made can have horrible and far-reaching consequences. The worst of those consequences would be if others believed him. Because of his impressive credentials and the leadership role he plays, it is not too far-fetched to think that he could be believed. Racism breeds fear and hysteria. It is conceivable that what follows would resemble the Salem witch hunts or the days preceding the Japanese-Americans’ internment during World War II. What followed scared me, stunned me and turned my stomach completely. In a chain reaction, the agent’s statement prompted the others participants — who belonged to the FBI, CIA, law enforcement and military — to share their racist stories and suspicions of anyone of Arab or Persian descent, and how the agents immediately reported them to the FBI. As I listened, I could find no basis in fact or truth. Their comments were fueled by nothing more than racist beliefs and fears. Some might argue that the agent just spoke without thinking, or that his quote was taken out of context. Let me refute any doubts so that there can be no question that racism lives inside the FBI, especially within the investigation into the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. That all Persians and Arabs are “”Osama bin Laden people”” was the agent’s preface to his update on the investigation into the Sept. 11 attacks. To be fair, the special agent immediately made the following statement after his first one: “”No offense to those of that background.”” Then the agent continued to debrief the other members about the status of the investigation: which religious organizations in San Diego are funneling money to Muslims and to Afghanistan. I have no doubt that the racist statement was completely genuine and utterly serious. It was spoken as fact and was accepted as fact by the law enforcement officials at the meeting. There is a problem in the FBI if one of its special agents is blatantly racist. It brings up the question as to whether the FBI is conducting a witch hunt, completely disregarding the human rights of the people of Middle Eastern descent. Some might say that what one agent thinks or believes will not have much of an impact on the FBI or its investigations. I strongly disagree. A special agent in charge has enormous control over the leads that are investigated, the decisions concerning whom people to arrest, detain and deport, and the direction of the investigation. I fear that the investigation into terrorist activities by the San Diego branch of the FBI has been compromised, and the investigation has turned into nothing more than a witch hunt for people of Arab and Persian descent. It is clear to me that fairness and impartiality have been compromised by the racist beliefs of that particular FBI agent. Something even scarier: Consider how many FBI agents have similar beliefs to that special agent. It is impossible to know for certain, because racism is not something to which most people will readily admit. The fact that this agent didn’t try to disguise or hide his racist beliefs scares me further. What is in store for those of Middle Eastern descent? Will we be thrown into internment camps like the Japanese during World War II, or will we just be thrown into prisons, detained indefinitely? Look at the news: The roundup has begun. Thousands upon thousands of Middle Eastern men are being questioned and detained. What’s next? ...

There's something fishy in the Price Center

The Che Cafe cooperative serves food just twice a week, and for only two hours at a time. Wendy’s opens at 7 a.m. on weekdays and closes at midnight. The Student Center Food Co-op doesn’t sell meat, and is open from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. The Price Center Subway offers low-priced sandwiches every day from 9 a.m. until 10 p.m. Canyon Vista, the lone source of nearby hot food for Earl Warren College residents, provides a meager menu except at designated meal times, then closes at 7:30 p.m. The Price Center restaurants are the main source of somewhat good-quality food on campus, and their presence is in the students’ best interests. Corporate food chains are what provide commuters with sustenance, and on-campus residents with the occasional respite from the heinous offerings of the meal-point restaurants. The chains feed campus visitors and students looking for a decent meal. We know what to expect from the chains: fast service, low prices, a varied menu and predictably decent food. Most meal-point restaurants have limited selections except during peak hours, they close at 7:30 p.m. and the prices are somewhat high for the quality of food offered. Ready-made sandwiches vary wildly in quality and size, depending on the competency and generosity of the on-duty sandwich-maker. The best nonbottled drink at Canyon Vista, Passion Orange Guava, is out of stock far too often. The signs on the drink machines advertise an 8 ounce drink that is not even for sale. Lines at meal-point restaurants are long and tend to move slowly. The TVs are frequently tuned to stations showing either lousy 1990s-era cartoons or professional billiards tournaments, which greatly saddens me. Despite the monthly serving of $7 steak, which can be cleverly hidden in a hamburger bun to become a $3 hamburger, and great waffles and eggs for breakfast, restaurants that accept meal points as payment are inferior places for dining. The typical co-op is not open often enough to warrant being dubbed a food establishment. The Che deigns to serve food only on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and only from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The rest of the time, it is an extremely leftist, highly political society of garden-growing activists that protest the construction of storage sheds while fighting for dozens of progressive causes — which is perfectly fine, except that it calls itself a cafe. Cafes usually serve food more often than protesting for living wages for janitors. As a result, the Che Cafe cannot be accurately described as a restaurant in the conventional sense. The Food Co-op actually concentrates on selling good food, if you like nuts, berries and fig bars, which I do. However, like practically every co-op in the Student Center, it does not take TritonPlus or credit cards, which is exceedingly annoying for on-campus residents and those who do not carry cash everywhere. Most co-ops, with the exception of the General Store, do not accept credit cards because of the fees associated with their use. According to sources within the co-ops, they don’t honor TritonPlus because of moral objections to the hegemonic administration and the difficulties students have in withdrawing funds from TritonPlus accounts. Although the reasoning behind that policy is understandable, it is nevertheless an inconvenience. The co-ops operate at their own pace, without the managerial hierarchy found in for-profit corporations. Without the hierarchy, things tend to move slowly. The long lines at Groundwork Books and the inadequate service at the Food Co-op are side effects of the student cooperatives’ strong-mindedness and high sense of morality. The co-ops have little to fear from the Price Center food court. Co-op food is so vastly different from the food sold by Price Center businesses that the two are not really in competition. Discerning students wanting an on-campus job still appreciate the flexible hours and relatively high pay rates of the student co-ops, despite the presence of corporate chains on campus. The only threat to the co-ops posed by a for-profit business on campus would be if a vegan health food store were to move in and replace Wok’s Up, which is unlikely. The corporations on campus provide a necessary function, just as the co-ops do. It is in the best interests of the students, and vital to provide student choice, to have both. ...

Lights & Sirens

Sunday, Feb. 3 1:02 p.m.: A 20-year-old female student passed out at Warren Field. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla by paramedics. Monday, Feb. 4 10:34 p.m.: Police arrested a 19-year-old student on Equality Lane for being a minor in possession of alcohol. Cited and released. 10:37 p.m.: A student reported vandalism to a maroon 1992 Acura Vigor in Lot 208. Loss: $1,600. Tuesday, Feb. 5 10:30 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from the Guardian office. Loss: $36.80. Wednesday, Feb. 6 7:46 a.m.: Authorities towed a red Honda Spree scooter from 3983 Miramar St. for having registration expired over six months. Stored at Star Towing. 12:04 p.m.: A female volunteer reported the theft of a wallet from the International Center. Loss: $150. 1:22 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a white 1992 Chevrolet Blazer in the Gilman Parking Structure. Loss: $500. 1:50 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a white 1997 Chevrolet S-10 truck in Lot 702. Loss: $1,680. 2:50 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a white 1996 Ford Mustang in Lot 703. Loss: $700. 3:23 p.m.: A student reported the attempted theft of a blue 1992 Ford Mustang in Lot 608. Loss: $800. 3:39 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a blue 1996 Ford Ranger in Lot 502. Loss: $480. 3:53 p.m.: An 81-year-old male nonaffiliate injured his knees after falling in front of the Mandeville Art Gallery. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. 5:14 p.m.: A student reported the attempted theft of a black 1992 Nissan truck in Lot 701. Loss: $300. 11:52 p.m.: Police detained a 51-year-old male nonaffiliate at Gilman Drive near Lot 113 for being a danger to himself. Transported to North Central Mental Health Center. Thursday, Feb. 7 3:28 p.m.: Officer reported a confiscated Blacks Beach gate key. Friday, Feb. 8 7:12 a.m.: A student reported theft of a black 1993 Ford Mustang from 3927 Miramar St. Loss: $6,000. 11:02 p.m.: Police detained a 22-year-old male student for being drunk in public at the Student Center. Transported to detox. Saturday, Feb. 9 12:21 a.m.: An 18-year-old male student reported being battered at Goldberg Hall. Subject refused treatment. 8:51 a.m.: Police arrested a 30-year-old female nonaffiliate at North Torrey Pines Road and Muir College Drive for an outstanding misdemeanor warrant for use of controlled substance. The SDPD believed she was an endangered missing person. Transported to Las Colinas Women’s Detention Facility. Bail: $27,777. 11:18 a.m.: A student reported receiving harassing phone calls on a cellular phone. 11:29 a.m.: A student reported theft of a backpack from Geisel Library. Loss: $210. 2:42 p.m.: A student reported theft of a backpack from Geisel Library. Loss: $25. 3:11 p.m.: Police arrested a 21-year-old male nonaffiliate for unauthorized possession of state property. Cited and released. 3:22 p.m.: A staff member reported robbery at the UCSD Bookstore. Loss: $2.39. Sunday, Feb. 10 1:16 a.m.: Police issued a Admin Per Se order to a 19-year- old male nonaffiliate at Campus Point Drive and Voigt Drive because the driver had a blood alcohol content of .01 or greater. Transported to detox. 1:30 a.m.: Authorities stored the above driver’s silver 1998 Honda Civic. –Compiled by Steve Lehtonen Senior Staff Writer ...

BRIEFLY

Roy D’Andrade of the anthropology department was recently honored by the National Academy of Sciences for his contributions to science over the last 10 years. Awarded for excellence in scientific reviewing, D’Andrade was selected by the NAS for his work merging the fields of anthropology and psychology. He was also cited for his “”insightful interpretations of historical trends shaping the future goals of anthropology. D’Andrade, who received a $10,000 prize for his contributions, was one of 14 individuals selected by the NAS for honors. The NAS has presented the award, which was established by Annual Reviews Inc., the Institute for Scientific Information, and the Scientist in Honor of J. Murray Luck, annually since 1979. D’Andrade has been a professor at UCSD for 22 years. UCSD biologists find first genetic evidence of animal evolution The first genetic evidence showing major changes to the body shapes and body plans of animals has been discovered by UCSD biologists. The research, which is scheduled to be published in the journal Nature, shows how mutations in the genes of crustaceans and fruit flies arose from aquatic crustacean-like arthropods that ended up growing grow limbs. Thus, over 400 million years, sea creatures developed into six-legged insects. Biology professor William McGinnis led the project, which counters the creationist argument that evolution is a fallacy because the lack of a genetic mechanism could not allow for animals to evolve with vastly different body plans. Matthew Ronshaugen and Nadine McGinnis contributed to the research. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development funded the research UCSD Speech and Debate team reaches final in tournament Eddy Shyu and Philip Littlewood took fifth place in the novice division at the 2002 Sunset Cliffs Classic Speech and Debate Tournament held last weekend at Point Loma Nazarene University. The duo won four of six preliminary debates to advance to the final round, which included eight teams. In the finals round they defeated Vanguard University and Carleton College by judges’ decisions of 2-1. Their run ended against the Air Force Academy with a 3-0 defeat while debating “”Justice Delayed is Justice Denied.”” Six teams from the Speech and Debate Club participated in the tournament, which served as preparation for nationals held next month in Colorado. UCSD undergraduates to show research in state capital UCSD undergraduate students Timothy Barder and Etienne Pelaprap were recently selected to present their research at a UC Day luncheon in Sacramento next month. Barder, of the chemistry department, will present “”Synthesis and Fluorescence Studies of Aryl-Substituted Bipyridines and Terpyridines.”” Pelaprap of the cognitive science department will present “”User Activity Histories and Multiscale Visualizations.”” Their respective faculty advisers will co-present the research with them. The UC Office of Research sponsors the competition to highlight undergraduate research efforts throughout the UC system. UC Day, held March 19, seeks to prepare UC students for future careers in California’s high-tech economy. ...

Six honored for contributions to UCSD in annual ceremony

The Chancellor’s Association, composed of alumni and community members seeking to improve UCSD, gave its annual awards to five UCSD professors Feb. 7. Scott Thomas Guardian UCSD’s highest honor, the Chancellor’s Medal of Honor, was awarded at the ceremony to Malin Burnham, the original chairperson of the Chancellor’s Association. “”These faculty members are individuals who truly make a difference in the classroom, in research and in the community,”” said Senior Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs Marsha Chandler. Burnham received the Chancellor’s Medal of Honor for his personal commitment to the improvement of higher education and his leadership contributions to the San Diego community. Associate editor of the San Diego Union-Tribune Neil Morgan introduced Burnham. “”Malin came from a family who didn’t need to give anything back to the community but he spent his life doing it,”” he said. Burnham spoke of his accomplishments in the nonprofit world as a team victory. “”You don’t measure things in the nonprofit world by winning and losing, but through what has been accomplished,”” he said. “”In all of my victories, it has been a team effort. The members of the team are the winners of this medal.”” Burnham said the most important issue currently facing our nation, besides the events of Sept. 11, is education. “”The better education is, the better our world will be,”” he said. “”The theme I would like to emphasize today is cross-disciplinary,”” Chandler said. The faculty members honored reflect UCSD’s growth toward cross-disciplinary studies. Honorees received awards and a $2,500 honorarium from Chancellor’s Association chairperson Dick Hertzberg and Chancellor Robert C. Dynes. The first honoree of the evening’s ceremony, which was held at the Mandeville Auditorium, was Scripps Institution of Oceanography professor Jeremy B.C. Jackson, who was given the award for research in science and engineering. “”He is arguably the leading coral reef biologist and one of the world’s most outstanding marine ecologists,”” said Director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography Charles F. Kennel. Jackson was honored for his historical approach to solving ecological problems. “”My specialty is giving a deeper time perspective to things people think of only in the present,”” Jackson said. One of Jackson’s major contributions is his study of Chesapeake Bay. “”Without historical perspective, people think pollution is the only problem, but the real problem in the Chesapeake Bay has been the over-fishing of oysters,”” Jackson said. “”Millions have been spent to clean up the region without realizing the real problem. It is time to start taking a historical approach in trying to solve these problems.”” Economics professor Halbert L. White Jr. was honored for his research in the arts, humanities and social sciences. Additionally, he was recognized for his work in econometrics and his research of artificial neural networks. Artificial neural networks influence a broad range of subjects, including everyday life. “”Every time you use your credit card, hundreds of very powerful neural networks determine the likelihood of the transaction being valid,”” White said. White also provided the music for the evening. He played the trumpet in a recording as honorees were presented their awards. Assistant professor of psychology Karen R. Dobkins received her graduate teaching award for, according to her students, her “”contagious enthusiasm.”” “”Education is teaching them how to learn,”” Dobkins said. “”A trick is to see the faces out there and see if they are understanding.”” Dobkins’ ultimate goal is for students to graduate knowing how to think for themselves. “”I want for my students to leave here knowing how to think independently and creatively,”” she said. Associate biology professor Radolph Y. Hampton was recognized for his undergraduate teaching style. “”He installs in his students a love of science,”” Chandler said. Hampton explained the importance of biology in modern life. “”Students are in the business of delivering answers and they are extremely good at it, but science is about questions,”” Hampton said. “”There are a lot of things we don’t know. That is why biology is so vital, because we don’t know everything.”” Hampton’s technique for teaching is to make learning interesting for students. “”You have to make it global, make it relevant,”” Hampton said. Professor of pediatrics Vivian M. Reznik received the award for her community service. Reznik has created partnerships between the campus and the San Diego community through initiatives, including school violence prevention, K-12 reform, health and nutrition programs in elementary schools, and science and art programs for youth. As a pediatrician, Reznik attributes her desire to focus on youth enrichment programs to seeing problems arise in her patients’ lives as they reached adolescence. “”We began to look at the community in which these children were living,”” Reznik said. “”The community drove us. I would like to see us spend more money preventing problems rather than locking kids up.”” Burnham concluded the evening by voicing his hopes for UCSD. “”Perhaps more things will be learned or discovered in the next 20 years, even right here on this campus, than have been in all of past history,”” he said. “”This makes me very excited, and I want to be here to help.”” ...

Activity fee referendum passes at Muir college

John Muir College’s referendum to raise student fees to $7 per quarter, a $5 per quarter increase, passed by a two-thirds margin. A similar referendum at Eleanor Roosevelt College that would have created a Roosevelt student fee of $5 per quarter recently failed by eight votes. The referendums were put on the ballot to expand the programming offered at each college, according to each college’s council chair. Muir’s referendum, which was voted on two weeks ago and will double Muir College Council’s budget, will take effect in fall 2002. Roosevelt’s referendum was voted on three weeks ago. “”[The referendum’s failure] definitely limits the amount of programming we can do and type of programming we can do,”” said Roosevelt College Council Chair David Goodwin. “”[Students] potentially were not aware of the benefits [the fee increase] would bring them.”” Muir College Council Chair Elizabeth Erwin said that nearly every organization received less money than it requested from Muir College Council this year. A similar referendum, which would double the Marshall College Council budget, is set to take place at Thurgood Marshall College, said Marshall College Council Finance Director Kevin Kelly. The election will take place from Feb. 25 through Feb. 28. The location of polling booths has not been decided, Kelly said. Marshall Junior Senator William Tunick stressed the need to educate voters on the referendum in order for it to pass. “”I think it will depend a lot on the amount of education the publicity council is able to do,”” Tunick said. “”If people are informed, know there’s a referendum, understand what it’s about, then it’ll have a pretty good chance of passing.”” “”There are a lot of programs out there that we’d really like to help if we could,”” Tunick said. Revelle College is also considering a fee referendum. Revelle College Council Chair Mark Stickel said in an e-mail that the Revelle council is pursuing a possible referendum, with a likely fee increase of $2. Stickel’s e-mail also stated that many organizations and activities would be improved by the fee increase. “”The money would go to the college council and be distributed to Revelle organizations to improve events and activities,”” he stated. “”Right now, we are just looking at our options and trying to determine what students want, so nothing is set in stone yet.”” But not all colleges are considering sponsoring fee referendums. Warren College Council Chair Jesse Coward said that idea of a Warren referendum had not come up. “”We’ve actually had almost extra money at the end of the year that we need to spend,”” Coward said. “”We haven’t traditionally done larger-scale programs.”” Warren students pay no activity fee, so Warren programming is funded entirely by vending machine profits and the A.S. Council, according to Coward. “”We generally put on a lot of programs throughout the year,”” Coward said. “”I think part of [the reason there is not a Warren referendum] may be that we’re the largest college, so first of all, we get more money.”” Each college council receives money from the A.S. Council proportional to each college’s population, and each council also receives a portion of the vending machine profits. Warren College Council Treasurer Marcus Lee said that the A.S. Council allocated $14,478 to the Warren council this school year. By contrast, Muir received $11,950 from the A.S. Council. Low voter turnout has characterized many past college elections but both Muir and Roosevelt were able to breach the 15 percent mark, which validates an election. Voter turnout for Roosevelt’s referendum, which was done electronically through StudentLink, was over 20 percent according to Roosevelt Dean of Student Affairs Patricia Scott. It failed, 210-202. The Muir referendum had a turnout of “”roughly 18 percent of Muir College’s winter quarter enrollment,”” with 434 students voting for the fee increase and 223 students voting against it, according to m Muir Dean Charles Dreilinger. ...