Campus

Golf grabs first at tourney

UCSD golf began its 2002 season at the Point Loma Invitational last Monday and Tuesday at Riverwalk Golf Course. In the team’s first tournament since early November, the Tritons nabbed first place, finishing three strokes ahead of Master’s College. The difference for UCSD came in the second round of the tournament, as they shot 294 as a team. Master’s College’s shot 297. In the first and third rounds, both teams finished with identical 311 and 301 team scores. California State University San Bernardino and Point Loma Nazarene rounded out the top four finishers, with the Coyotes ending the tournament six strokes behind the Tritons, and the Crusaders finishing seven strokes behind UCSD. California State University Monterey Bay and Claremont McKenna both finished with overall scores of 914 to tie for fifth place. Sophomores Brian Duckworth and Galen Farris led UCSD — both finished in a five-way tie for 5th place with a three-round score of 224 along with Holy Names’ Matt Thornton, Monterey Bay’s Chris Marin, and UC Santa Barbara’s J.R. Reyes. Tritons Alan Scheer and Greg Wilson continued the sophomore sweep of top finishers for UCSD, ending the tournament with overall scores of 228 to end in a three-way tie for 15th place. Sheer battled his way back after hitting an 81 in the first round by posting second- and third-round scores of 73 and 74, respectively. Sophomore Blake Sneider and juniors Andy Thomson and Ryan Gale rounded out the scoring for the Tritons, finishing 25th, 26th and 29th respectively. In the par-72 course, Point Loma’s Josh Colace was the only competitor to finish under par after three rounds, firing a 69, 72, and 72 to end three under par. The closest finishers after Colace were Master’s College’s Ryan Higton and Redlands College’s Jordan Bailey, who both finished at six over par with final scores of 222. Marin had the low round of the tournament, shooting a 68 in the first round to join Colace as the only two competitors to shoot under 70. The Tritons will travel to San Leandro, Calif., to participate in the Holy Names College Tournament from Feb.18 to Feb. 19 at the Monarch Bay Golf Course. ...

Opera Review: Baroque opera makes stunning debut at the Civic Theatre

Ariodante,”” the obscure opera by Handel that has always peered out from the shadow of the venerated “”The Messiah,”” now finds its place in the sun with the San Diego Opera. Courtesy of San Diego Opera With the ebb of baroque-style operas these days, Handel seems to be creeping back on the scene, and with his work follows a surprisingly enthusiastic patronage. This season’s performance proves to be excellent with an emphatic orchestra with talented director John Copely, conductor Kenneth Montgomery and an astounding voice cast. Ariodante, once a castrato role (a part played by a castrated male singer), is now a “”trouser role”” played by a woman, and makes its appearance with mezzo-soprano Vivica Genaux. Genaux steals the show with her impressive octave range, breath control and quick changes in voice. Though slumped in the wake of Genaux’s performance, the rare countertenor David Walker makes his debut playing the villainous Polinesso. In the background of these talented singers is a distracting and puzzling surrealist/post-modernist set design. The brilliant and vivid 18th century-style costumes that adorn each singer do not mesh well with this experimental set design. Traditionalism and surrealism hardly ever go well together, and this production is certainly not an exception to the rule. The arioso’s passages, ensembles and duets all absorb each listener of the audience. With the San Diego Opera now giving student discounts on tickets, “”Ariodante”” is a must-see opera for UCSD students. ...

Men's tennis wins third-straight

The men’s tennis team continued its domination by picking up its third straight victory with a sweep over Alliant International University on Tuesday. The Tritons won every match taking an amazing 96 games to Alliant’s 29. UCSD’s No. 1 doubles team of Sameer Chopra and Bryan Swatt started the Tritons off on the right foot with an 8-3 victory over their opponents. The No. 2 and 3 Triton teams, Everett Schroeter-Jeff Wilson and Dan Albrecht-Sean Nagel, also picked up easy 8-0 and 8-2 victories for UCSD to give the Tritons the doubles sweep. The Tritons continued to dominate in singles play, as No. 1 freshman Blake Wilson-Hayden earned the straight set victory 6-3, 6-4. UCSD’s Emil Novak played the closest match of the day, going to 10 games in each set before taking the 6-4, 6-4 win. Amir Nejad, Doug Hofmann, Nick Morton and Sean Higginbotham each earned singles victories against their Alliant opponents, with Morton going undefeated with a perfect 6-0, 6-0 victory. With this victory, the Tritons remain undefeated in the season and carry a 3-0 record heading into the Cal Poly Team Tournament Feb. 15 through Feb. 17 in Pomona, Calif. ...

How to find romance in all the right movies

Cinema has a long tradition of evoking powerful emotions and feelings that not only hit the eyes, but also aim for the heart. The right romantic film could turn any ordinary night into an unforgettable event. Here are some of the greatest modern and classic films to see. ‘Casablanca’ (1942) One of the greatest and most romantic classics around, “”Casablanca”” still shines 60 years after its release. Humphrey Bogart plays suave yet troubled Rick Blane, the owner of a Moroccan nightclub in the midst of Nazi occupation and the French resistance. Ingrid Bergman stars as a woman who must decide between the tough, gritty Blane and the heroic Victor Laszlo, played by Paul Henreid. With more catchy and memorable quotes than any other film, “”Casablanca”” remains untouched in romantic endurance. ‘Dirty Dancing’ (1987) Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze team up to star in this sleeper hit about a woman who falls in love with her dance instructor. Although some consider it cheesy, “”Dirty Dancing”” combines a classic storyline with a great soundtrack. ‘My Fair Lady’ (1964) Now a rare genre, musicals used to reach the hearts of audiences everywhere. One of the best musicals produced also happens to be one of the most touching. It’s a “”loverly”” Audrey Hepburn vehicle in which she plays flower-girl Eliza Doolittle, who is transformed into a lady by the soul-less Dr. Henry Higgins. Compared to today’s society, “”My Fair Lady”” appears old-fashioned and sexist, but its beautiful music still touches the heart. Also look for the wonderful, grandiose costumes of Cecil Beaton. ‘Shakespeare in Love’ (1998) This witty portrayal of William Shakespeare (Joseph Fiennes) can not only be translated into modern society, but it also has a touching plot about how a woman named Violet (Gwyneth Paltrow) manages to cure Shakespeare’s writing block and capture his heart. In this film, “”Romeo and Juliet”” was inspired by the romantic affair between Shakespeare and Violet. ‘When Harry met Sally’ (1989) This modern classic tries to answer one of the biggest love questions around: Can two friends sleep together and still be friends the next morning? The film follows Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan as two friends who meet in college and their ensuing love lives as the years pass. One of the most memorable scenes in modern cinema is Ryan faking an orgasm in a diner while Crystal looks on, confusingly amazed. ...

stoner steps

Occasionally outside phenomena penetrate the well-defined world of sports. Sometimes we see athletes outside of their world, away from their courts, fields, stadiums and arenas. We do a double-take and peer closer to make sure the nattily dressed strangers are really our favorite athletes who scream and push and claw and suffer crushing defeat and ebullient victory all before our eyes. One of these tangentials, these errant strings that pull the sporting world off kilter, is love. Yes, athletes have lives outside of their respective sports, and after placing their hearts and emotions into season after season, some even have enough emotion left to devote to significant others. As a Valentine’s Day special, here is a list of some of the top professional athletes who have managed to battle something much tougher than sinking a shot or making a clutch hit. Joe DiMaggio and Marilyn Monroe: In the 1940s and 1950s, DiMaggio earned the envy of all men, as he not only won championship after championship for the indestructible Yankees, but also married the gorgeous Monroe. Playing America’s sport and dating the blonde bombshell? DiMaggio couldn’t have had it better. Andre Agassi and Brooke Shields, then Andre Agassi and Steffi Graf: Andre traded one tall blond for another, however with Graf, they actually have a chance to produce the world’s first human tennis racket. I can just imagine the arguments in that kid’s house over who picked up more Grand Slam trophies. Dennis Rodman and Carmen Electra: First the two are getting married, then they aren’t, then she gets angry at Rodman, then she falls in love with him again. I don’t know what Rodman’s problem is, but Carmen, if you ever get over your fetish for tattoos and piercings give me a call. Sure I can’t rebound like Rodman, but did you SEE “”Double Team?”” David Justice and Halle Berry: The two seemed happy, but that was back in the day when Justice was actually a decent hitter. Coincidence? I think not. Sergei Fedorov and Anna Kournikova: Sergei has to be the most hated man in professional sports, mainly because he’s dating Kournikova. Of course, she can still pretend to be available in her numerous ads. At least the relationship hasn’t prevented Fedorov from hoisting any Stanley Cups. Now when is Kournikova going to start winning some tournaments? Rick Fox and Vanessa Williams: Evidently the ex-Miss America enjoys Laker players who rarely shave and have ridiculous hair. Man, I don’t know what kept her off Vlade Divac when he was on the Lakers. Curtis Martin and Toni Braxton: The two were definitely serious a couple of years ago, although Braxton now denies the two were ever engaged. Braxton’s likely thought: He wasn’t “”Man Enough for Me.”” And finally, the ultimate sporting couple: Wilt Chamberlain and pretty much every girl he ever came in contact with. According to his biography, “”A View from Above,”” the numerous records he set weren’t limited to the basketball court. So there is evidence that athletes do date and they do love. They are human beings outside of their sports. Now how come there aren’t any supermodels dating sports editors? ...

Share your love with the right music

The music that spills from your speakers can often make or break the mood of the evening with your lover or the person you met at the party a few hours earlier. For true lovers of music, you must select the playlist very carefully. Remember, you can’t play Slayer when you know she’s a huge Beatles fan. You can’t play Dave Matthews Band when the Red Hot Chili Peppers might be more appropriate. Anyone can pick up some Marvin Gaye (“”What’s Going On””) or put some Boyz II Men (“”Cooleyhighharmony””) on the CD player to set the mood. A good Al Green or Barry White medley can ignite the fire for most. For the guitar-inclined, you can always turn to some Chris Isaak (“”Heart Shaped World,”” “”Forever Blue””). And the classic love songs by Frank Sinatra or Dean Martin should always be at your fingertips. But sometimes you have to try something new in the bedroom. Experimenting is the best way to find out what you or your partner prefer. Here are a few suggestions. Blue Six – ‘Beautiful Tomorrow’ (Astralwerks/Naked Music) Blue Six have released sexy tunes such as “”Sweeter Love”” and “”Music and Wine,”” and they recently released a full-length album titled “”Beautiful Tomorrow.”” The warm Blue Six sound embodies the San Francisco deep-house feel that is also characteristic of other Naked Music artists such as Miguel Migs. Deep bass grooves, subtle jazz influences, red-light district horns, airy vocals and the patter of bongos all melt together into one steamy album. You are sure to have a “”Beautiful Tomorrow”” after a run-through with this album. U2 – ‘The Joshua Tree’ (Island) This album might not be the first that comes to mind when thinking about romantic albums. There are various opinions about the context of this album, but one fact still remains: “”The Joshua Tree”” is one of the best albums of all time. There is an epic quality to the music, with Bono’s soaring vocals on tracks such as “”With or Without You”” and the incredible and distinctive jangle of the guitar work by The Edge. Don’t mind the religious overtones and dive into the music of one of the best guitar bands of all time. MJ Cole – ‘Sincere’ (Island) The same old R&B can be boring. MJ Cole might be the answer. MJ Cole and his U.K. garage sound have been introduced stateside by Craig David. Hopefully MJ Cole will be able to continue this trend with the funky syncopation in his two-steppin’ sound. Imagine drum ‘n’ bass slowed down. Sweet diva-vocals (“”Crazy Love””), jazz influences (“”Tired Games””), plaintive violins (“”Crazy Love,”” “”Strung Out””) and coy basslines (“”Attitude””) make for an up-beat, champagne-smooth sound. ...

Softball takes two from Biola University

The UCSD softball team made it big Tuesday when it won a pair of games over Biola University. The Tritons took the first game from the Eagles 3-2 in 11 innings and then won the second game, scoring four runs in the top of the 7th inning for a come-from-behind 4-2 victory. The Tritons scored in the first inning of the first game when Amy Mettee scored on Kristina Anderson’s RBI single to give UCSD a 1-0 lead. The score did not change until the 5th inning when the Tritons added another run. Biola scored a run in both the 6th and 7th to send the game into extra innings. UCSD’s Christi Martinelli relieved pitcher Leea Harlan after seven innings and continued to put up goose eggs until the top of the 11th when Kim Aggabao batted in Breanne Cope to give the Tritons a 3-2 lead. The Eagles advanced a runner to third base but could not score in the bottom of the 11th as Martinelli finished her fourth scoreless inning in relief for the win. Martinelli would come back to start the second game and continued with another two scoreless innings until Eagles right fielder Joanna Gray hit a two-run homer in the bottom of the 3rd to give Biola a 2-0 lead. The Eagle lead held up until the bottom of the 7th inning when fate found its way into the Triton dugout. With two outs, Mieko McCue and Mettee each got on base to give Anderson a chance to be the hero. Anderson hit a sharp groundball to the Eagle shortstop that took a bad hop off the infield dirt, bounced off the shortstop’s shoulder and rolled into left field. Two runs scored and the game was tied at two. Moments later, Harlan added a two-run double to give the Tritons a 4-2 lead. Martinelli, who pitched a total of 11 innings on the day, commented afterward on the close games: “”We feel real good about taking these games,”” she said. “”We were in the games the whole time but it was a question of whether or not we were going to beat ourselves.”” The 9-1 Tritons will take on conference rival California State University San Bernardino at Triton Softball Field on Feb. 16. ...

Concert Review: Cajun band Beau Soleil brings Southern flair to UCSD

La Jolla is a long way from New Orleans. Taking the former’s culture over that of the latter would be difficult and probably pointless — they already have rich people and college students (La Jolla’s two main cultural fixtures) in N’awlins. However, the trend of bringing Cajun and Creole elements into the rest of America is gaining popularity. But the Louisiana exports aren’t limited to “”Too Hot for TV”” Mardi Gras videos and over-priced, over-spiced carpetbagger Cajun cuisine restaurants. The real heart and soul of New Orleans is its music, and that music’s best-known proponents, Beau Soleil, will bring their bon temps to Mandeville Auditorium on Feb. 15. Cajun and Zydeco music is somewhere in the neighborhood of jazz, bluegrass, swing and Celtic folk songs. It resulted from the unique blending of populations that occurs in Louisiana: Acadiens (Cajuns), who came to the South from Ireland via French Canada, cosmopolitan Yankees and descendants of black slaves. The sound is pure bayou bliss. Nimble-fingered fiddlers and accordion masters embroider unique ballads and dance tunes over catchy beats. The lyrics are often in Acadien French and therefore difficult to understand, but their quirky themes of love are appealing and, if nothing else, it sure sounds nice. Beau Soleil have been making great music for 25 years and are nationally known for their appealing Cajun recordings, most prominently showcased on their 1997 album “”L’Amour ou la Folie”” (“”Love or Folly””). The group is high-energy and sincere at the same time, and promises to keep its audience’s toes tapping in their seats — if they can resist the urge to dance in the aisles. Beau Soleil perform with fiddle master Michael Doucet on Friday at 7:30 p.m. in Mandeville Auditorium. Tickets are $20 general admission, $18 for UCSD faculty, staff and for seniors, and $15 for students. ...

Tritons handed 13-2 loss by Point Loma

UCSD squared off against nonconference rival Point Loma Nazarene University on Tuesday afternoon at Triton Baseball Field. Anna MacMurdo Guardian In their previous battle with the Crusaders just one week ago, the Tritons took a 3-1 decision after two UCSD players blasted solo home runs. However, this was not the case on Tuesday when Point Loma overpowered UCSD and won by a final score of 13-2. Sophomore Raf Bergstrom was on the hill for the Tritons and pitched just three innings. Bergstrom began to struggle in the top of the first when two batters flied out and Crusader Matt Mamula singled to right center field. Matt Thorne then blasted a home run to left field, igniting Point Loma’s offense. UCSD regrouped, and in the bottom of the first, just after Triton left fielder John Bologna grounded out to the shortstop, center fielder Matt Smith singled down the left field line. With a runner on first and two outs, sophomore catcher Jeff Riddle knocked a triple into center field, scoring Matt Smith on the play. UCSD third baseman Ryan Larson was hit by a pitch from Point Loma starter Derek Davis, and then with runners at the corners, freshman designated hitter Garret Riddle smacked a single up the middle to score Jeff Riddle and tie the game at two runs apiece. Though Matt Smith went 3 for 3, Jeff Riddle hit 2 for 4, Garret Riddle went 2 for 3 and Larson went 2 for 3 on the day. The two runs in the first were the end of the scoring drive for UCSD. On the visiting side, Point Loma Nazarene scored in every inning but the sixth in its victory over UCSD. The Tritons used six pitchers in the loss, including Bergstrom, Tommy Sereno, Keith Smith, Robert Bush, Robert Peele and Dan Krefft. With 10 hits and seven runs recorded in Bergstrom’s three innings, he picked up the loss and is now 1-1 on the year. UCSD drops to 6-5-1 overall and remains 2-2 in the California Collegiate Athletic Association, while Point Loma improves to 6-2-1 overall and has yet to begin league play. “”What’s done is done,”” said Triton catcher Jeff Riddle after the loss. “”We’ve got 56 games in a season and some days things won’t go our way. We’ll continue to work hard and push ourselves, approaching [other teams] the same way we approach every game.”” The Tritons face off against Cal State Dominguez Hills in a four-game set this weekend. The first two will be played at Triton Baseball Field Feb. 14 and Feb. 15, followed by a doubleheader on Feb. 16 in Carson. ...

Theater Review

“”2 By Shepard”” consists of two separate one-act plays written by Sam Shepard: “”Icarus’s Mother”” and “”Action.”” However, there is only one word to describe “”2 By Shepard”” What? What are the plots, relationships and themes? What is the point? These plays have a lot in common. They both have little or no plot, which makes them rely heavily on characters to carry the stories. However, the characters in both plays are presented with very few clues about their backgrounds and relationships with each other. With plots not being the point of the plays, it seems as though there should have been heavy thematic content. However, once again, these plays fail to deliver. While there are any number of themes that you could drag out of these plays if you wanted to spend hours analyzing them, there are no definite themes apparent. Rather, the apocalyptic ideas running through the dramas just leave the viewer feeling disturbed. Even more upsetting than the apparent lack of purpose to the plays is the lack of information to be found about them. The program lacks any real insight into the productions, and even the UCSD Web site devoted to them reveals only roughly a sentence’s worth of information. The bright spot to these plays were the sets and the lighting, which were designed by Patrick Larsen and M. Scott Garbau. “”Icarus’ Mother”” uses a screen as a background to first show the blue sky and fireworks of the Fourth of July, and then the final apocalyptic blast. “”Action”” was set against a backdrop of metal bars with only a table, chairs and a Christmas tree for scenery. The lighting was dim and the larger-than-life shadows created on the wall were great for setting the somber mood of the play. Overall, the plays are mediocre. If you enjoy in-depth analysis of post-modern theater, this is a great production. Other than that, this play is not one of the better theater experiences at UCSD. ...