Campus

Concert Review: Cajun band Beau Soleil brings Southern flair to UCSD

La Jolla is a long way from New Orleans. Taking the former’s culture over that of the latter would be difficult and probably pointless — they already have rich people and college students (La Jolla’s two main cultural fixtures) in N’awlins. However, the trend of bringing Cajun and Creole elements into the rest of America is gaining popularity. But the Louisiana exports aren’t limited to “”Too Hot for TV”” Mardi Gras videos and over-priced, over-spiced carpetbagger Cajun cuisine restaurants. The real heart and soul of New Orleans is its music, and that music’s best-known proponents, Beau Soleil, will bring their bon temps to Mandeville Auditorium on Feb. 15. Cajun and Zydeco music is somewhere in the neighborhood of jazz, bluegrass, swing and Celtic folk songs. It resulted from the unique blending of populations that occurs in Louisiana: Acadiens (Cajuns), who came to the South from Ireland via French Canada, cosmopolitan Yankees and descendants of black slaves. The sound is pure bayou bliss. Nimble-fingered fiddlers and accordion masters embroider unique ballads and dance tunes over catchy beats. The lyrics are often in Acadien French and therefore difficult to understand, but their quirky themes of love are appealing and, if nothing else, it sure sounds nice. Beau Soleil have been making great music for 25 years and are nationally known for their appealing Cajun recordings, most prominently showcased on their 1997 album “”L’Amour ou la Folie”” (“”Love or Folly””). The group is high-energy and sincere at the same time, and promises to keep its audience’s toes tapping in their seats — if they can resist the urge to dance in the aisles. Beau Soleil perform with fiddle master Michael Doucet on Friday at 7:30 p.m. in Mandeville Auditorium. Tickets are $20 general admission, $18 for UCSD faculty, staff and for seniors, and $15 for students. ...

Tritons handed 13-2 loss by Point Loma

UCSD squared off against nonconference rival Point Loma Nazarene University on Tuesday afternoon at Triton Baseball Field. Anna MacMurdo Guardian In their previous battle with the Crusaders just one week ago, the Tritons took a 3-1 decision after two UCSD players blasted solo home runs. However, this was not the case on Tuesday when Point Loma overpowered UCSD and won by a final score of 13-2. Sophomore Raf Bergstrom was on the hill for the Tritons and pitched just three innings. Bergstrom began to struggle in the top of the first when two batters flied out and Crusader Matt Mamula singled to right center field. Matt Thorne then blasted a home run to left field, igniting Point Loma’s offense. UCSD regrouped, and in the bottom of the first, just after Triton left fielder John Bologna grounded out to the shortstop, center fielder Matt Smith singled down the left field line. With a runner on first and two outs, sophomore catcher Jeff Riddle knocked a triple into center field, scoring Matt Smith on the play. UCSD third baseman Ryan Larson was hit by a pitch from Point Loma starter Derek Davis, and then with runners at the corners, freshman designated hitter Garret Riddle smacked a single up the middle to score Jeff Riddle and tie the game at two runs apiece. Though Matt Smith went 3 for 3, Jeff Riddle hit 2 for 4, Garret Riddle went 2 for 3 and Larson went 2 for 3 on the day. The two runs in the first were the end of the scoring drive for UCSD. On the visiting side, Point Loma Nazarene scored in every inning but the sixth in its victory over UCSD. The Tritons used six pitchers in the loss, including Bergstrom, Tommy Sereno, Keith Smith, Robert Bush, Robert Peele and Dan Krefft. With 10 hits and seven runs recorded in Bergstrom’s three innings, he picked up the loss and is now 1-1 on the year. UCSD drops to 6-5-1 overall and remains 2-2 in the California Collegiate Athletic Association, while Point Loma improves to 6-2-1 overall and has yet to begin league play. “”What’s done is done,”” said Triton catcher Jeff Riddle after the loss. “”We’ve got 56 games in a season and some days things won’t go our way. We’ll continue to work hard and push ourselves, approaching [other teams] the same way we approach every game.”” The Tritons face off against Cal State Dominguez Hills in a four-game set this weekend. The first two will be played at Triton Baseball Field Feb. 14 and Feb. 15, followed by a doubleheader on Feb. 16 in Carson. ...

Theater Review

“”2 By Shepard”” consists of two separate one-act plays written by Sam Shepard: “”Icarus’s Mother”” and “”Action.”” However, there is only one word to describe “”2 By Shepard”” What? What are the plots, relationships and themes? What is the point? These plays have a lot in common. They both have little or no plot, which makes them rely heavily on characters to carry the stories. However, the characters in both plays are presented with very few clues about their backgrounds and relationships with each other. With plots not being the point of the plays, it seems as though there should have been heavy thematic content. However, once again, these plays fail to deliver. While there are any number of themes that you could drag out of these plays if you wanted to spend hours analyzing them, there are no definite themes apparent. Rather, the apocalyptic ideas running through the dramas just leave the viewer feeling disturbed. Even more upsetting than the apparent lack of purpose to the plays is the lack of information to be found about them. The program lacks any real insight into the productions, and even the UCSD Web site devoted to them reveals only roughly a sentence’s worth of information. The bright spot to these plays were the sets and the lighting, which were designed by Patrick Larsen and M. Scott Garbau. “”Icarus’ Mother”” uses a screen as a background to first show the blue sky and fireworks of the Fourth of July, and then the final apocalyptic blast. “”Action”” was set against a backdrop of metal bars with only a table, chairs and a Christmas tree for scenery. The lighting was dim and the larger-than-life shadows created on the wall were great for setting the somber mood of the play. Overall, the plays are mediocre. If you enjoy in-depth analysis of post-modern theater, this is a great production. Other than that, this play is not one of the better theater experiences at UCSD. ...

Track and field holds alumni meet

The UCSD men’s and women’s track and field teams took to the track Saturday for some friendly competition against the UCSD track and field alumni. Anna MacMurdo Guardian Over 40 alumni competed against the 2002 Triton track team, and with a new format, the Triton alumni were surprisingly close to upsetting the current squad. The format had the men’s and women’s teams mixed then split into equal teams designated as blue and gold to compete against each other and the alumni. With a little help from past and present Triton coaching staff members competing for the alumni team, the alums were just seven points away from defeating the blue squad. “”This was a great way to begin the season,”” said freshman Angelo Vargas. “”The alumni performed well. We can use this performance as a team to get better and see where we are in the big picture.”” Anna MacMurdo Guardian In the javelin, Lynne Brinkman scored an all-time record by posting a 132′-8” throw, the longest in school history. In the men’s 100-meter dash Wale Olagunju beat captain Sam Denes by .06 seconds to take the race, proving that the alumni could compete with the younger Tritons. Another highlight included Meredith Perry’s performance in the 100-meter hurdles as she posted a time of 15.20 seconds, ranking her second in the all-time performances in Triton history. Senior Megan Bergin recorded a hammer throw of 158′ 11″”, ranking her second all-time in Triton history. On the men’s side, the top performer was that of sophomore Marcus Keller, whose 45′-10″” triple jump put him fifth all-time among UCSD track and field athletes. “”Perhaps the biggest benefit of the meet is the chance for our current athletes to meet some of the alumni,”” said head coach Tony Salerno. “”We had over 40 alum show up to compete and help officiate. I think it is really inspiring for our current athletes to put a face to name for the record book.”” When the day was done, the gold team won by 35 points over the blue team, and the Alumni finished a close third, just seven points shy of beating the favored Tritons. For most of the alumni, however, just competing again for their alma mater was enough. “”A lot of the people on the team are still friends so it was fun to see them and compete against them,”” said alumnus Steven Sorensten. “”Experiences in Triton track gave me a lot of friends and taught me how to interact and how to not interact with people in authority.”” Sorensten went on to comment about how difficult it was to get back on the track in full form; that most of the alumni felt the difficulty of competing due to their age and lack of consistent training. Few freshman have been added to the squad this year, and performers such as Ryan Vincent, Jeff Conkey and numerous others will determine how far UCSD will go this season. “”We are definitely a better team than last year on both the men’s and women’s sides because most of the freshman now on the roster are much higher caliber athletes than in the past,”” Salerno said. “”Most of the freshman will be ‘impact’ athletes for us.”” As the Tritons look forward to a long and rewarding season, coach Salerno was quick to note that the team is experiencing no major injuries heading into the major meets. He expects “”to have everybody healthy when it counts for conference championships.”” Another tuneup meet lies ahead for the UCSD teams as they travel to Pomona-Pitzer to face strong competition from Division II opponents. “”I suspect we will send about 75 percent of our squad to Pomona-Pitzer,”” Salerno said. “”We will likely rest many of our higher caliber people and give some of the new people a chance to compete. The meet at Pomona-Pitzer will be a non-scoring meet with all ranges of competition.”” The team acknowledges that its first real test will be Feb. 23 at Cal State Los Angeles when it faces all the Southern California schools from the CCAA. “”Cal State Dominguez Hills on the women’s side and Cal Poly Pomona on the men’s side could challenge us,”” Salerno said. “”We know we are better than last year but we really don’t know what they have.”” With bright, upcoming athletes ready to shine, as well as veterans performing at their peak, the Triton men’s and women’s track and field teams look to eclipse their achievements from last year. But as Vargas remarked, it is “”too early to decide.”” ...

Potions might be the alternative

In the memorable words of Ewan McGregor in “”Moulin Rouge,”” “”Love is a many splendid thing. Love lifts us up where we belong. All you need is love.”” Lyon Liew Guardian For some people, love is just like magic, while for others, it takes a little magic to find love. If you’re feeling like Cupid needs a helping hand this Valentine’s Day, a love spell may sound like a more attractive option than a blind date. However, if you decide to call on the help of Venus, the goddess of love, rather then your match-making friends, there are a few things to know before casting a love spell. Andrea Hall, who works at Starcrafts, a metaphysical bookstore in Ocean Beach, Calif., points out that the most important consideration in casting spells is not to focus on a specific person. “”You shouldn’t try to change the will of another person,”” she said. “”If you specifically focus on an individual, you would be changing their will, and that wouldn’t be fair.”” While it is tempting to bewitch the one your heart desires, Hall explains that you should focus on attracting the attributes of that person. The purpose of a love spell is to attract love of any kind into your life and to make it easier for love to find you. However, according to Hall, “”as a Wiccan, you don’t change the will of another person.”” With that disclaimer, there are tons of herbs, flowers, oils and candles that may make it easier for love to find its way to your heart. Rose and jasmine oil are commonly used, as is dragon’s blood oil, which is actually the resin from a drocana palm that is named for its scarlet color. Vanilla is used in love “”magik,”” as is used to refer to ritual magic, as well, and amber greis is used for lust. Also try burning pink and red candles to create some love energy. If you still feel like you need an elaborate ritual, there are hundreds of books on casting spells and attracting love. Hall recommends “”Wicca for the Solitary Practitioner”” by Scott Cunigham for those new to the craft, as well as “”Witches Circle”” by Maria Kay Simms. If love spells are all you’re after, “”Wicca Love Spells”” by Gerina Dunwich ranks high on Hall’s reading list. Or you can stop by Starcrafts at 1909 Cable St. and talk to Hall yourself. She’d be happy to mix up a potion to send Cupid’s arrow flying your way. Visit Starcrafts on the Web at http:www.starcraftsob.com. ...

basically

Last weekend, I was blessed by a visit from my younger sister, Allie. Of course, by “”blessed,”” I mean I was driven completely insane and will never fully recover. Same difference. What you need to understand about Allie is that she is very concerned by how she looks. Mind you, she looks good — ask anyone with a penis. But she also cares how her mind looks, and this is where she runs into problems. Most of the time, my sister is so preoccupied with looking smart that she fails to take the time to actually be smart. In other words, she’s so busy arguing that she isn’t stupid that she sometimes fails to realize that she is, at that very moment, acting stupid. Not that I don’t love her. I do. But God help me, when she acts like that, I want to kick her ass. Friday night, after preparing a lovely bed fit for a queen (I put a pillow and blanket on our couch), I instructed Allie on protocol should she wake up before I did. Me (instructing very patiently): “”Allie, pay the fuck attention!”” Allie (not paying attention at all, I can tell): “”I am!”” Me (getting a grip on myself): If you wake up in the morning and you get hungry, this is the only cereal I have. At this juncture, I hold up a bag of plain Cheerios that my mother had sent me, even though I don’t eat cereal and I hate Cheerios. Whatever, it’s the thought that counts. So I am holding a huge bag of cereal Vanna White-style, showing it off to the best of my ability, making it clear that Cheerios are all that is on the menu in the morning. But, knowing my sister as I do, I must stress this point still further. Me (stressing the point and still doing a damn good Vanna White impression): “”Do you see that this is the only cereal you can eat?”” Allie (getting vexed): “”Yes, Carrie, I see the cereal. I get it.”” Me (still hammering the point home): “”I am going to put it here on the counter, so you don’t even have to look in the cabinet for it.”” Allie (working up some serious sass): “”Carrie, I am not an idiot. I get it. Geez!”” Me (just messing with her at this point): “”So, what you’re saying is, you don’t know where the cereal is?”” Allie wasn’t amused. Now, I must point out here that I was not just really eager to get rid of that cereal. My roommates own several varieties of cereal themselves, and they get … let’s just call it “”possessive”” of their food. Not that I blame them. I just don’t want to get bitched out by a hungry woman because my sister can’t tell a cheerio from a lucky charm. OK, so all is secure. The cereal is on the counter. It is all by itself. There is no way Allie can miss that bag. Unless she is struck from behind and consequently blinded (which I totally would do, by the way), Allie’s gonna know where the Cheerios are. Fine. The next morning, I wake up and discover that Allie is still asleep, despite her protests that my waking up at 11 a.m. is “”way too late”” for her. I go to the rice cooker and start making some rice for sushi. (Oh yeah, baby, I can make sushi. I am a freakin’ gourmet.) Allie wakes up a few minutes later. We exchange half-hearted good mornings (she is groggy and I am annoyed that I have no cucumber). Then the moment of truth arrives. Allie gets up. She has that look in her eye that lets me know she is hungry. She moves to … the cabinet. I know it’s coming. I know she is going to make an ass of herself. And do I stop her? Of course not. What kind of sister do you take me for? Allie (pulling out the Corn Pops): “”Can I have this?”” Me (remaining calm): “”Are you fucking kidding me?”” Allie (whipping out that Sklar sass again): “”Carrie, I am sick of you treating me like an idiot. Can I have the Corn Pops or not?”” Well, I lost it. You can’t blame me, really. I went out of my way to make sure she knew what cereal was mine, and it just popped out of that vacant little blonde head anyway. So I called her an idiot (and she was — admit it) and gave her the cereal, and then I made myself some sushi. And then I gave her some, too, because that is the kind of philanthropic elder sibling that I am. So basically, yes, my sister can be dumb. And yes, I call her on it. But the important lesson to learn here is really this: Never send me Cheerios. Just look at the trouble it causes! ...

Blind date opens young couple's eyes

Love at first sight might not necessarily be in the air, but the Guardian Blind Date was trying to at least spark some flames. She was looking for a tall guy who makes her laugh. He was looking for someone with a sense of humor who is fun to be around. Kristen Santerre and Nate Jones were the lucky winners of the Guardian Blind Date contest, and they were just looking to have some fun. “”I’m really excited, and I think it’s going to be really fun,”” Santerre said before meeting Nate. “”Me and my roommates always watch dating shows like ‘Blind Date’ and ‘Fifth Wheel.’ We’re obsessed with them. And when I saw that there was a blind date, it just sounded like a lot of fun and I never thought I would win.”” On the other hand, Nate had some persuasion to sign up. “”My volleyball buddies signed me up for it,”” Jones laughed. “”I just gave them my information and didn’t expect much. I didn’t think I had a chance.”” After the two met each other for the first time, they were swept off into the limousine idling downstairs and treated to the posh La Jolla restaurant, Forever Fondue, which was voted as the best date restaurant in the Guardian readers poll. Hours later, they came back and the two seemed to be happy and in a pleasant mood — a good indication that the blind date wasn’t a disaster. “”The date was great! And he was easy to talk to,”” Santerre said. Jones also seemed to have enjoyed himself. “”The date was lots of fun. We went to a good place and we didn’t run out of anything to talk about. One of the worries I had before was that we’d run out of things to talk about, but eventually we talked about sports, movies and whatever we had in common,”” Jones said. Both agreed that besides the fantastic food, there wasn’t anything exciting, though the date was laid-back. When asked if they would go on a second date, Jones replied, “”She’s lots of fun, for sure. And she’s a cool girl. I don’t know. We’ll see.”” Santerre replied, “”Yes, I think I would if he asks.”” Nate, go for it, man. ...

Holiday pays homage to materialism

I hate Valentine’s Day. It should be lumped together with all those other made-up holidays like St. Patrick’s Day, Halloween and Winter Solstice, which are just more excuses to bolster the greeting card industry. No, this is not the angry rampage of some bitter, single, self-righteous hag who is merely jealous of the girls with admirers to shower them with flowers, balloons and chocolates. Not entirely, anyway. It’s just that I believe in doing something because you want to, not because there are big, shiny cardboard cupids plastered all over the place telling you that you should. Valentine’s Day has been commercialized so much that it is pointless, self-defeating and vaguely insulting. Love, affection, sentimentality — these are things that should never be degraded into a matter of merchandise. These are the most treasured aspects of relationships and companionship. When they are twisted and morphed into some commercialized mating ritual, it doesn’t serve as a declaration of love, but rather as a tribute to the pathetic nature of our meaningless, consumer-driven lives. That people actually celebrate Valentine’s Day and take it seriously just adds one more contribution to my ever-growing pile of problems with pop culture. If you really care about someone to the point that you are willing to show your affection by purchasing something, then doing so solely in accordance with social custom defeats the purpose. When you grab a card and scribble a generically maudlin note for no reason other than that it’s Feb.14, it eliminates any sincerity behind the gesture, assuming there even was any. How pathetic that we have to designate a day to demonstrate affection. I would argue that instead of being a symbol of how much one cares, buying someone something just because it’s Valentine’s Day is actually a mark of not really caring at all. Surprises and spontaneity mean much more than conforming to social custom. Maybe if it were less of a deal, it wouldn’t be as vexing. Just on campus, Valentine’s Day has taken over with a vengeance. We have our own version of “”Singled Out”” — yes, that oh-so-charming MTV mishap with the epitome of superficiality, Jenny McCarthy, playing co-host, later replaced by every girl’s role model, Carmen Electra. There’s the two-minute date night at Warren college, which is 120 seconds of fake friendliness shared with whatever socially handicapped hopefuls are there. There are frat parties and sorority socials, all aiming to celebrate Valentine’s Day, albeit in a variety of ways. And it is all so utterly ridiculous. What’s the big fuss? Why the big deal? Why cater to someone else’s idea of what it means to be romantic? Why can’t we just treat Feb. 14 like any other day? In a perfect world, Valentine’s Day would be obliterated as an insult to love and companionship. Things like love are supposed to be above our material tendencies. It is so shallow that we are asked to stain the sentimentality of a relationship with obligatory demonstrations of delving into the commercial triviality. Don’t give in to those cardboard cupids. Don’t be a victim of those candy hearts with preservatives and food dyes galore. If you want to demonstrate your affection, don’t wait until some arbitrary day to show it for the perfunctory reason that everyone else is. If your feelings are worth the effort of showing, they are worth the effort of being shown outside the tainted glare of consumerism. Love deserves better than that. ...

Letters to the Editor

Editor: Thank you for your coverage of UCSD’s involvement in the Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade. You referred to some signs carried by a group of students; that group also carried a banner identifying us as representatives of the Campus Peace Coalition. In this letter we would like to correct a small error in your story, to provide some information on our group and to relate a disturbing incident during the march. The sign you referred to read “”Civil Rights are Human Rights”” (emphasis added), not “”is”” as reported (we double-checked). No hard feelings of course. The CPC, formed after Sept. 11, is a registered student organization representing a diverse array of campus groups and individuals. We are opposed to violence in all forms, including both the terrorist acts and the illegal military response of the “”war on terrorism.”” We also oppose scapegoating and discrimination, especially that currently directed at Muslims and people of Middle Eastern and Central Asian descent. Furthermore, we stand in defense of our civil rights, which are under attack under the guise of “”strengthening national security.”” We were proud to participate in this parade, since King himself passionately opposed war, violence and discrimination, and was a champion of civil rights. The CPC meets Wednesdays at 5 p.m. at the Women’s Center and can be reached via e-mail at [email protected] Now for the incident: Civil rights apparently are not pertinent to UCSD, while the San Diego Police Department is. Allow us to explain. The Thurgood Marshall group was marching right behind us, chanting things such as, “”When I say ‘UC,’ you say ‘SD!'”” We briefly discussed the possibility of adding our own chant of, “”When I say ‘civil rights’ you say ‘human rights.'”” An unidentified UCSD staff person overheard this discussion. We were told that since this was the UCSD contingent of the parade, there would be no protesting, and that anything chanted had to be pertinent to UCSD. So, it would seem that civil rights and human rights are rather controversial, since chanting those phrases would have amounted to “”protesting.”” Later, among the high-spirited Thurgood Marshall chants was a call of “”When I say ‘SD,’ you say ”PD!'”” as a nod to nearby San Diego police officers. The UCSD staff person did not react to this or other chants of questionable relevance to UCSD. The prohibition of our chant, coupled with acceptance of the police-related one, struck us as especially ironic, because King lived and died fighting for civil rights and human rights, often in the face of police intimidation. Decades later, we are supposedly “”living his dream,”” and yet a group of students trying to honor his memory was silenced by its own school because King’s own message was too controversial and irrelevant for his own parade. Honoring police officers, meanwhile, was deemed appropriate. We think this suggests something rather disturbing about the values of our university, and that King would have been appalled. — Campus Peace Coalition UCSD ...

Editorial

John Muir College recently passed a fee activity referendum that will increase student fees to $7 per quarter. The new revenues are intended to expand the college¹s programming, which is the source of activities such as the Muir college suitcase dance, pizza study breaks during finals week and broomball. Interestingly, however, the only polling place that Muir college cared to operate during the election was located in the Middle of Muir. The Guardian believes that, given the ability to set up online polling through StudentLink, this was an inexcusable method of altering the voter pool so that the referendum would be more likely to pass. Most UCSD students are commuters, and as such, they visit their college campuses less frequently than those who live in on-campus dormitories and apartments. In fact, unless one must complete some sort of academic counseling or unless one has a class in the immediate area, it is unlikely that a person will even set foot on his college¹s campus during an average day. Given that most Muir students are commuters and they typically visit their college campuses infrequently, it is alarming that Muir college failed to allow its students to vote via StudentLink. Providing this option would have made it as easy for commuters to have a say on the fee hike as it was for those living on campus, since the commuters can¹t be offered the luxury of having a polling place outside their front door. Muir college¹s decision regarding the polling place becomes even more suspicious, however, when one considers that commuters stand to gain little from fee referendums that throw more of their money at college programming, and are therefore less likely to vote in favor of such fee increases. Making it less likely that commuters would vote at all ‹ and making it harder for them to do so in general ‹ was a perfect way of largely avoiding their ³no² votes. Another interesting aspect of Muir college¹s referendum comes from Eleanor Roosevelt College. One week before Muir college voted on its fee increase, Roosevelt college¹s similar activity fee referendum failed to pass, and Roosevelt students had voted electronically through StudentLink. Regardless of how much Muir college programming may need that extra $5 per student each quarter, the circumstances surrounding the fee referendum election are questionable. The Guardian hopes that Thurgood Marshall College¹s fee referendum, to be voted on Feb. 25 through Feb. 28, will be treated less questionably, and that when polling locations are decided, commuters¹ needs will be considered equally with those of on-campus residents. ...