Campus

Editorial

A walkout scheduled for Thurgood Marshall College’s Dimensions of Culture classes was averted Friday due to a compromise between Marshall Dean of Student Affairs Ashanti Houston-Hands and Marshall students who were angered over what they deemed to be unfair housing practices. Marshall students claiming that their Residential Life Office was conspiring to unlawfully terminate housing contracts stood by their convictions and acted out against what they thought to be injustice on an otherwise largely apathetic college campus. The Guardian applauds Marshall students for taking a stand in a manner that garnered quick and effective results from their college’s administration. However, it is clear that Marshall students misrepresented their case to sensationalize the matter. First, the UCSD Cause Web site contradicts itself by calling for case-by-case evaluations of housing violations and terminations while simultaneously claiming that the group wanted all students to be treated equally. Second, Marshall students claimed on the site that they were being unfairly charged fire hazard fines because of campus residence overcrowding, which is not under their control; the dean said this is false. Third, the site quoted California law as saying that month-to-month housing agreements require 30 days notice of termination and that Marshall college is not abiding by this. However, the law goes on to say that pre-agreed housing arrangements, such as the housing contracts that students have with UCSD, are only required to give a minimum of seven days for the renter to evacuate the premises after being evicted. UCSD gives 14 days, which is fully in accordance with the law. Instead of publicly exaggerating their allegations in an attempt to draw the attention of the Residential Life Office, the organizers of the walkout should have contacted the dean in the first place. Houston-Hands has proved more than willing to meet with the organizers and make concessions to UCSD Cause; misrepresentations of the so-called injustices against them and a full-blown demonstration were unnecessary. In this case, the Marshall Dean’s Office and the Marshall Dean of Student Affairs acted admirably, recognizing the students’ concerns and extending evictions until the end of the quarter even though they had operated lawfully all along. In being open about the matter, Houston-Hands was able to explain all of the Marshall students’ claims. Had the event organizers simply contacted her first, they would have been given an understanding of why housing terminations are on the rise and where they can find information about the consequences of violations. While it is good to keep a close watch on the administration to ensure that it is acting fairly toward all students, an unwillingness to directly resolve problems using the proper channels is not the most mature or honorable way to initiate change. ...

American vanity, greed and ego spawn retaliation from many foreign nations

Think of the guy who drives around your neighborhood every day in a sport-utility vehicle the size of an armored truck, blasting the stereo at jet-engine decibel levels. Stop signs? Optional, even with children in the street. He doesn’t care about anyone but himself, and why should he? In his eyes, he’s Da Bomb, yo. At any rate, you’d punch him in the eye if you ever got the chance. He’s the biggest jerk on the block and everybody knows it. Well, everybody except him. On a global scale, the United States is that jerk and Sept. 11 was our punch in the eye. Swaggering around the world and pissing on everyone we can to further America’s own economic interests is a quick way to make a lot of enemies, and that’s just what we have done. Nobody has a problem with the ideals of democracy, not even terrorists, I suspect. Democracy by itself — and done right — could save the world. But the attacks were not an attack on democracy, on New Yorkers, or on World Trade Center workers. What happened Sept. 11 was an attack on capitalism. It attacked the people in charge of it — the rich — and the people who make it work — the rest of us. That’s what Osama bin Laden says in his videos. The rest of the world no longer sees a separation between global capitalism and the U.S. government. There is no reason to see anything else. Bush’s presidential campaign received 97 percent of its $100 million from about 800 individuals and corporations. Gore did basically the same thing. Even with campaign-finance reform, the notion that democracy is a privilege still extended to nonmultimillionaires is a joke. How much is $97 million? Take all 3,560 Marshall students, pay them $27,000 per year to work and wait 12 months — just don’t expect them to pay rent or buy anything in the meantime — and there’s your $97 million. What is an entire year’s work to 3,560 people is pocket change to the rich. Rich people don’t care much about you unless you are helping them make money. That’s how they made their money in the first place: by getting you to work for them as cheaply as possible. If finding cheap labor means moving jobs out of America and into Third World countries, that’s fine — it’s more money for them. If you don’t think they would treat you worse if they could, think again. Look at that shirt you’re wearing. Yes, the one with the label that reads “”Made in U.S.A.”” The flag motif is awfully patriotic and misleading for something that was probably made in a Saipan sweatshop. Saipan is a U.S. territory near the Phillipines, but lacks the fancy things associated with our country such as decent labor laws. The United States was recently kicked off the U.N. Human Rights Commission panel. Sudan and Libya were voted in. It was a proud day for America, I’m sure. The corporations that run our nation are responsible for wars, child labor, indentured servitude, and worldwide environmental destruction. They praise “”freedom”” and “”democracy,”” even as they contradict those principles domestically and abroad. And we take their bait. Everybody else in the world sees it, though. Get a European pen pal and ask him about it. Watch the “”BBC World News.”” It’s there. We love knowing that as Americans, we can have anything, take anything, and expect the rest of the world to shine our shoes while we’re doing it. We love that it makes us feel powerful, but that doesn’t make it right. Americans did not deserve what happened Sept. 11 and the rest of the world does not deserve what we do to it, either. We share responsibility for the attacks. Terrorists will not relent until we stop raping the rest of the world. To help explain: Say I was walking down the street and some guy suddenly decked me. He was justified, though, because I’d slept with his girlfriend and he found out. I’d still fight back, even though he had a reason to attack me. But say that I slept with someone else’s girlfriend a few weeks later. Next thing I know, her boyfriend is punching me and so are the two friends he brought to help. I’d still fight back. Another two weeks pass and the same thing happens for the same reason. How would I best avoid getting pounded every week? I would need to change something obvious about my behavior. Nevermind that I can defend myself and beat up my attackers — if what I’m doing to cause them to attack me is wrong, I am responsible. America cannot maintain its attitude of superiority forever. The rest of the world helps sustain us and we’ve given it the short end of the stick for decades. If you’ve ever had someone else take all the credit for a story you helped write or for a project you helped complete, you have a very tiny idea of how the rest of the world feels about America. Some may argue that we have helped rebuild many war-torn nations and think that should count for something. We have rebuilt nations, yes, but corporate America isn’t one big, happy, philanthropic family: If our economic interests were not at stake, we would not have done it. Corporations are not the problem, but the selfishness and abuse that some promote is a problem. Limited liability allows corporations to do almost whatever they please because no one is held personally responsible. Even if a corporation is fined, it writes it off as a cost of doing business. If executives were held personally responsible for their business decisions, I think that “”business ethics”” would no longer be a paradox. Terrorists can destroy the world economy, or we can change it safely ourselves. I’m not about to die for my money — let alone for the money of some super-rich control freak — and neither should you. If you invest in the stocks of abusive corporations, stop. If you don’t have stocks and your bank account is running on fumes, stop buying from them. If you know that you work for one, call them on it. You’re working for them, not the other way around. If you don’t like that idea, fine. Do something else to make a difference. Tell everyone else your idea so they can use it too. America is counting on you. Baking a cake decorated like the U.S. flag doesn’t count. For all the flag-waving, most Americans barely know what we’re fighting to preserve. In recent years, our government has sent troops to support America’s corporate greed and national sloth much more often than it has sent them to support anyone’s freedom or democracy. We need to find the people who attacked us and bring them to justice. But if we’re looking for who was responsible, it is a short search. Just follow the money. ...

Seven hours found to be optimal sleep period

Eight hours is no longer considered the ideal amount of sleep one should receive each night, according to the largest study ever done on the subject. UCSD professor Daniel Kripke, leader of the study, found that people who sleep only six or seven hours each night live longer than those who sleep eight or nine. “”Our main findings were that people who sleep seven, six or five hours a night have nothing to worry about, as long as they are not too tired to work or drive,”” Kripke said. The study surveyed the sleeping habits of 1.1 million adults between the ages of 30 and 102, controlling demographics, habits, health factors and the use of medication. These findings were published in the Feb. 15 issue of the Arichives of General Psychiatry, a journal of the American Medical Association. The six-year study concluded that the best survival rate was found among those who slept seven hours per night. Those who slept eight or more hours per night had a significantly higher mortality rate, which increases with the amount of sleep over seven hours. Those who slept nine or 10 hours had a mortality rate similar to that of people with moderate obesity. However, the study did not establish a distinct causality between mortality rates and sleeping longer. “”It is impossible to be certain of causality with this kind of study,”” Kripke said. Kripke said he would like to see more research done on the topic. “”I hope that one day, someone will restrict long sleepers’ intake to see the health effects. Such studies would be needed to determine direct causality,”” Kripke said. “”We are not ready to say that anyone should set their alarms early.”” Many sleep experts have been highly critical of the study and its findings. The National Sleep Foundation, a nonprofit organization interested in promoting healthy sleeping habits, responded critically to the study, especially to the assertion that the risks associated with sleeping pills are far more dangerous than the risks associated with insomnia. The study showed a 25 percent increase in death risk with daily sleeping pill use. The foundation said that the sleeping pills available during 1982-1988, the time the study was conducted, are different from those available today. The foundation said that this would cause unnecessary alarm among sleeping pill users. Kripke struck back at his critics by stating they have a conflict of interest. “”Much criticism is coming from people who receive money from the sleeping pill industry, which are worried that this study won’t help their profits,”” Kripke said. He also saw hope in the future. “”We appreciate all of the students who help us with our research and we look forward to seeing a new generation of researchers who will answer all of the unanswered sleep research questions,”” he said. ...

BRIEFLY

Students who transfer to UCSD through the UniversityLink program will be eligible for one of 30 $1,500 scholarships starting next year. At $249,600, the scholarship fund is the largest of its kind for transfer students in the history of UCSD. Sheldon and Suan Engelhorn of Cardiff by the Sea, Calif., established the Engelhorn Scholarship Fund to encourage high-school students to participate in UniversityLink as a way to enter UCSD. The Engelhorns said they seek to assist UniversityLink students because of their diverse backgrounds and commitment to higher education. The UniversityLink program guarantees high school seniors who attend community college admittance to UCSD if they maintain a 2.8 GPA, complete the 60 necessary units and receive continued academic and college counseling. Currently, the program is established between nine community colleges and UCSD. For more information call the UCSD department of student affairs at (858)822-1536. State, local government officials to address UCSD community Four elected government officials will be speaking on policy proposals and legislative issues they are working on and how they will effect UCSD on Friday, Feb. 22 at 9:30 a.m. at the Institute of the Americas. The Regional Awareness Forum will include State Senator Dede Alpert, State Assemblywoman Christine Kehoe, San Diego City Councilman Scott Peters and San Diego City Attorney Casey Gwinn. There will be a question-and-answer session following each speaker’s opening remarks. UCSD Stroke Center receives high marks The UCSD Stroke Center has been acknowledged as one of the top university-affiliated medical centers in the nation for treatment of strokes by the University Health System Consortium. Medical centers were ranked on complication and death rates, length of patient hospitalization, diagnostic tests and health counseling. The study was conducted last year. Forty patients at the UCSD center participated in the study. UCSD ranked second, following the Medical College of Georgia in a nationwide survey of 33 university-affiliated medical centers. Patients at UCSD were discharged sooner than those of any other medical centers, and the center receives one of the highest numbers of patients with severe stroke in the nation. The UCSD Stroke Center is composed of five physicians, four nurses and two administrators. It is open for around-the-clock care because strokes are the third-highest cause of death among adults in the United States. Researchers simulate attack on Salt Lake City Because the 2002 Winter Olympics are being held in Salt Lake City, researchers at the University of California’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory announced they have developed a three-dimensional computer simulation to demonstrate how a release of biological or chemical airborne substances would flow in the city. Analysis of weather and wind data, topographical maps and buildings were used to portray how the substances would flow throughout the city and outlying areas. The study took into account changing wind patters and the downtown building environment. The lab’s National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center conducted the research, which was finished prior to the start of the Olympics. Los Alamos National Laboratory re-opens to the public The Department of Energy’s Los Alamos National Laboratory Research Library has reopened to the public since being closed to the public because of the Sept. 11 attacks. New security measures have been implemented, including upgrades to computer and physical areas. New staff have also been hired to oversee the implementation of the more rigid guidelines and security. Technical reports in both paper and electronic form will remain off limits to visitors. However, visitors will still be allowed to access electronic databases and journals. Visitors will also be required to bring identification and sign in and out as part of the increased security. The lab is operated by the University of California. ...

Events

Thursday, Feb. 21 Lecture: The Politics of Women’s Health The UCSD history department sponsors “”Carla Bittel: Positively Hysterical: Mary Putnam Jacobi and the Politics of Women’s Health.”” The lecture begins at 4 p.m. at the Humanities and Social Science Building Rm. 4025. The event is free and open the public. Seminar: Emergency Contraception VOX sponsors “”America’s Best Kept Secret — Emergency Contraception”” at 6 p.m. in the Santa Barbara/Los Angeles room in the Price Center. The promotion and education surrounding current legislation and access to emerging contraception will be discussed. The event is free and open to the public. Social Event: Backgammon Tournament The Persian Club sponsors a backgammon tournament at 6 p.m. at the Price Center Game Room. Players will compete in a round-robin tournament. Players are asked to bring their own boards. The event is fee and open to the public. Friday, Feb. 22 Special Event: Engineering Research Review The Jacobs School of Engineering presents its Annual Research Review at 8:30 a.m. in Price Center Ballrooms A and B. There will be information regarding research and technical exhibits. The event is free for UCSD students, staff and faculty. General Admission is $25. Social Event: Electronic Music Club Dance The Electronic Music Club is sponsoring at dance and party at 7 p.m. in Porter’s Pub. The pub will serve alcohol for guests over 21. The event is free and open to the public. Theater: ‘The Duchess of Malfi’ UCSD Theater and Dance presents “”The Duchess of Malfi”” at 8 p.m. at the Mandell Weiss Forum. The play surrounds the attempts of two brothers to ensure that their widowed sister will never fall in love again. Admission is $6 for students, $10 for faculty, staff and senior citizens. Admission is $12 for the general public. Saturday, Feb. 23 Movie: ‘The Yellow Submarine’ The University Centers continues its Cinemaddicts (Movies That Rock) series with The Beatles’ film “”Yellow Submarine”” at 8 p.m. in the Price Center Theater. Admission is $1 and is open to the public. ...

One-rate housing plan set to move forward

The Housing and Dining Services Advisory Committee voted 6-5 last week to approve the “”one-contract, one-rate”” plan for on-campus housing for next year. The 11 members of the committee sit as an advisory board to Director of HD&S Mark Cunningham. The committee consists of eight students and three administrative representatives. The student representatives include one from each of the five colleges, one from the A.S. Council, one from the Inter-Collegiate Residents’ Association and a resident adviser representative. The administrative representatives include a member of the council of deans, a representative of the provosts and a representative of the resident deans. The decision was made quickly because HD&S needs to send housing contracts and room selection information to continuing students. In past years, this information had already been distributed by this point in winter quarter. The one-rate plan is designed to equalize rates in residence halls and on-campus apartments. It will raise costs for on-campus apartments and reduce rates for residence halls starting next year. The plan will also require all residents, including those in apartments, to purchase a meal plan. It will add cleaning services in apartment common areas, much like those in suite common-areas in residence halls. According to Eleanor Roosevelt College representative to the advisory committee David Goodwin, the advisory committee discussed the idea of providing a waiver for students to opt out of the meal plan and/or the cleaning. Goodwin said this idea is being discussed further in committee meetings. He said the committee and Cunningham are working to iron out the details of the plan so it can go into effect and the literature can be distributed to continuing and future residents. ...

Upcoming Events

Feb. 22: North Courts: Men’s tennis vs. Western New Mexico, 9 a.m. Feb. 22: Triton Softball Stadium: Softball vs. CSU Stanislaus, 1 p.m. Feb. 23: Triton Baseball Stadium: Baseball vs. La Verne, 1 p.m. Feb. 23: Triton Softball Stadium: Softball vs. WNM, noon. Feb. 23: Main Gym: Wrestling vs. SDSU and U. of Utah, 6:30 p.m. Feb. 24: RIMAC Arena: Men’s volleyball vs. SSU, 1 p.m. ...

UC spearheads Enron lawsuit, jumps into lead plaintiff position

The University of California has long been the leader in academics and research; in the wake of the Enron collapse, it now leads a corporate lawsuit. On Feb. 15, a Houston judge selected the University of California to lead a multibillion-dollar class-action lawsuit against 29 of Enron Corp.’s senior executives and former auditor Arthur Andersen, LLP. The lead plaintiff in class-action cases helps manage and monitor the litigation. The university’s general counsel James Holst said that participating in the lawsuit is an unusual step for the university, but that it is justified by the “”unique circumstances”” of the Enron collapse. About 60 lawsuits were combined into one class-action case, which the university joined Dec. 21, 2001. The lawsuit alleges that Enron executives profited from misrepresenting the company’s financial situation. The university lost $145 million in the Enron bankruptcy, based on the 2.2 million shares it held. David Russ, the UC treasurer, said that Enron stock composed three-tenths of 1 percent of the UC portfolio, which is valued at $54 billion. “”The loss will have no impact upon [UC] retirement benefits,”” Russ said in a statement. “”Nonetheless, the university feels a strong obligation to recover money that rightfully belongs to the university.”” U.S. District Judge Melinda Harmon chose the University of California over a Florida-New York group and an Ohio-Washington-Georgia-Alabama group. Each group lost about $400 million. In her ruling Harmon said the Florida-New York group did not persuade her that it was “”the kind of cohesive group envisioned by the statute for lead plaintiff.”” The lead plaintiff in class-action cases is typically the party that has suffered most. The Florida state pension fund lost $325 million, the most of any party in the case. Harmon said that because the University of California was a single investor it could coordinate the legislation better than the other groups that sought lead-plaintiff status. San Diego attorney William Lerach will provide lead counsel for the case. He is a partner in class-action law firm Milberg Weiss Bershad Hynes & Lerach, LLP, which has recovered $20 billion for investors in hundreds of securities fraud cases. Lerach’s firm has also been accused of filing frivolous lawsuits and of charging excessive legal fees, and is also being investigated by a federal grand jury for allegedly paying clients to participate in lawsuits. “”The court is aware of the highly publicized criticism of Bill Lerach,”” Harmon stated, but also wrote that the firm “”stands out in the breadth and depth of its research and insights.”” The University of California would not say what it intends to pay Milberg Weiss, but UC spokesman Trey Davis said the expected commission was “”considerably lower than the 15 percent to 18 percent average.”” ...

UCSD CLUB SPORTS

Men’s Rugby Men’s rugby traveled to UCLA this weekend for what turned out to be a tough match. The Bruins capitalized on UCSD mistakes for two penalty kicks, gaining an early 6-0 advantage. UCSD had trouble tackling due to the Bruins’ size advantage and by the end of the half, UCSD trailed 14-0. As the second half started, UCLA picked up where it left off, extending its lead to 24-0 on some quick maneuvering. Nick Polsky finally got UCSD on the board with a penalty kick late and Chris Sanderson added a try but the Bruins’ pace and size flummoxed UCSD, and it fell 29-10. UCSD is now 2-2 on the year. The only thing UCSD took home from Westwood was a second-team win. The second team trounced its UCLA counterparts 38-0. Men’s Lacrosse Men’s lacrosse made its way to the desert during this past fortnight and split two games with University of Arizona and Arizona State University. UCSD, ranked 25th in the nation, took on No. 11 UA. UCSD hopped out to an early lead but an injury to lead-scorer Ross Stensrud pushed the team down 7-6 at halftime. The University of Arizona lived up to its ranking in the second half and proved too much for UCSD. Mike Hunter, however, gave UCSD five assists for the game and kept UCSD within one until the fourth quarter. Arizona then exploded to take the game 13-8. UCSD took on ASU the next day and tired quickly. ASU kept it close into the fourth quarter, but UCSD scored five goals for a 10-6 win. UCSD goalie Jake Lowenstein stymied the ASU attack in the fourth quarter to preserve UCSD’s lead. Women’s Rugby The women’s rugby team traveled to Arizona for a dual match this weekend. UCSD is ranked first in its league with a 4-0 record and destroyed both Arizona teams. ASU got creamed 55-19 and UA did little better, losing to UCSD 37-15. Kriston Hartos had an excellent two-game set kicking seven conversions. Another Triton who played well this weekend was Sunday’s player of the game Tikvah Hayes. Cycling At San Diego State University this weekend, UCSD continued its strong riding in Southern California collegiate cycling. Despite the absence of its top rider, UCSD took first place in all but one event. Brendan O’Brien took first place in the men’s B road race and Esther Mereki took first in the women’s A road race. Upcoming Friday, Feb. 22 Ice hockey versus UC Davis at 10:15 p.m., Vacaville Arena. Friday, Feb. 23 Badminton tournament of Cal Tech. Cycling at UC Davis on Saturday and Sunday. Ice hockey at Sacramento State. Men’s rugby plays Cal Poly San Luis Obispo at 9 p.m. Sailing regatta at UC Irvine. Ski and snowboard regionals Saturday and Sunday at Lake Tahoe. Friday, Feb. 24 Women’s lacrosse plays Cal Poly San Luis Obispo at 1 p.m. Surfing competes in Huntington Beach. — Compiled by Tait Miller Senior Staff Writer ...

Charity is emphasized during WinterFest week

More than 30 UCSD clubs and organizations will set up booths and tables on Library Walk this week when they participate in the Associated Students WinterFest 2002 UCSD Cares campaign. Lyon Liew Guardian The idea for the weeklong charity drive was originally conceived by the A.S. Council, which wished to expand the philanthropic nature of WinterFest. “”We have wanted to expand [the charity aspect of WinterFest] for a while,”” said Brandon Freeman, A.S. festivals co-coordinator. “”We wanted to make it more community-based.”” In years past, students donated a can of food as admission to the concert. This year, that policy has been replaced with the weeklong charity drive on Library Walk. Lyon Liew Guardian Emily Marx, a Student Organization and Leadership Opportunities adviser and coordinater of community service efforts, said that the UCSD Cares campaign was a student-initiated event. “”This year, the students wanted a weeklong campaign to benefit local charities,”” Marx said. “”We have been working with the students for a few months to get this event together.”” The theme of the campaign is “”Pick your cause! Choose your charity!”” and incorporates the diverse range of philanthropic causes supported by numerous organizations. On Library Walk, students can participate in any number of charity booths sponsored by different organizations on campus. While each organization ultimately chose its own charity to work for, they all worked with the S.O.L.O. office to find one that was right for them, according to Marx. One common theme throughout the charities represented is that they are all local. That was done intentionally, according to Freeman. “”With the recent events in New York and Washington, D.C., a lot of local charities were hurt by people giving their usual donations to larger charities such as the Red Cross,”” Freeman said. “”We wanted to help out the smaller charities with this event. We have booths for just about everything you could think of.”” While the event runs through Friday, Freeman, who worked with fellow A.S. Festival Co-Coordinator Mike Hayes in organizing the event, is already pleased with the response that the UCSD Cares campaign has received. “”I am very, very impressed with the success so far,”” Freeman said. “”We are really happy with the way that things are going so far.”” Alpha Kappa Psi, a co-ed professional business fraternity, was one of the organizations present. It encouraged passing students to create a bookmark, which it will donate along with school supplies, to its philanthropy. Joelle Abbott, a promoter of Partners at Learning and Future Educators of America, encouraged students perusing the tables on Library Walk to learn more about its unique sponsoring program. Through this program, high-school students from under-represented high schools in San Diego would accompany a UCSD student through his or her typical day, attend classes and walk the campus. In addition to the organizations with tables on Library Walk, the colleges are also representing UCSD students in the general effort to collect canned food, clothing, books, blankets and funds for many local charities. The Warren College Service Club is engaging Warren resident hall and apartment residence advisers to rally student participation and support in its efforts to raise canned food goods. The WCSC is sponsoring a canned-food drive and has placed Warren dorm and apartment dwellers in competition with each other to raise the greatest number of cans. Warren Black Hall Resident Adviser Mike Ficken is tempting his residents with the prospect of a WCSC-sponsored pizza party for the floor of Black Hall that collects the most canned goods. “”I got [my residents] excited because we have the greatest shot of winning,”” Ficken said. “”I have the most apartments in the entire Black Hall and so we should win the pizza party.”” The UCSD Cares campaign is something that the A.S. Council would like to continue in the future, according to A.S. Programmer Eisha Christian. “”When I came into office, there were some people that wanted to get rid of WinterFest,”” Christian said. “”I thought that WinterFest was a good charity event and something that we really needed to work out and expand. I hope that whoever takes over next year will carry on [the UCSD Cares campaign]. I think that to get rid of it would be a pity.”” The campaign will continue through Friday with booths on Library Walk. The WinterFest concert, to be held at RIMAC Arena on Feb. 22, will feature artists Jason Mraz, Fenix TX and City High. It is the climax of the week’s efforts to contribute to UCSD and the greater community. ...