Campus

Softball takes two from Biola University

The UCSD softball team made it big Tuesday when it won a pair of games over Biola University. The Tritons took the first game from the Eagles 3-2 in 11 innings and then won the second game, scoring four runs in the top of the 7th inning for a come-from-behind 4-2 victory. The Tritons scored in the first inning of the first game when Amy Mettee scored on Kristina Anderson’s RBI single to give UCSD a 1-0 lead. The score did not change until the 5th inning when the Tritons added another run. Biola scored a run in both the 6th and 7th to send the game into extra innings. UCSD’s Christi Martinelli relieved pitcher Leea Harlan after seven innings and continued to put up goose eggs until the top of the 11th when Kim Aggabao batted in Breanne Cope to give the Tritons a 3-2 lead. The Eagles advanced a runner to third base but could not score in the bottom of the 11th as Martinelli finished her fourth scoreless inning in relief for the win. Martinelli would come back to start the second game and continued with another two scoreless innings until Eagles right fielder Joanna Gray hit a two-run homer in the bottom of the 3rd to give Biola a 2-0 lead. The Eagle lead held up until the bottom of the 7th inning when fate found its way into the Triton dugout. With two outs, Mieko McCue and Mettee each got on base to give Anderson a chance to be the hero. Anderson hit a sharp groundball to the Eagle shortstop that took a bad hop off the infield dirt, bounced off the shortstop’s shoulder and rolled into left field. Two runs scored and the game was tied at two. Moments later, Harlan added a two-run double to give the Tritons a 4-2 lead. Martinelli, who pitched a total of 11 innings on the day, commented afterward on the close games: “”We feel real good about taking these games,”” she said. “”We were in the games the whole time but it was a question of whether or not we were going to beat ourselves.”” The 9-1 Tritons will take on conference rival California State University San Bernardino at Triton Softball Field on Feb. 16. ...

Concert Review: Cajun band Beau Soleil brings Southern flair to UCSD

La Jolla is a long way from New Orleans. Taking the former’s culture over that of the latter would be difficult and probably pointless — they already have rich people and college students (La Jolla’s two main cultural fixtures) in N’awlins. However, the trend of bringing Cajun and Creole elements into the rest of America is gaining popularity. But the Louisiana exports aren’t limited to “”Too Hot for TV”” Mardi Gras videos and over-priced, over-spiced carpetbagger Cajun cuisine restaurants. The real heart and soul of New Orleans is its music, and that music’s best-known proponents, Beau Soleil, will bring their bon temps to Mandeville Auditorium on Feb. 15. Cajun and Zydeco music is somewhere in the neighborhood of jazz, bluegrass, swing and Celtic folk songs. It resulted from the unique blending of populations that occurs in Louisiana: Acadiens (Cajuns), who came to the South from Ireland via French Canada, cosmopolitan Yankees and descendants of black slaves. The sound is pure bayou bliss. Nimble-fingered fiddlers and accordion masters embroider unique ballads and dance tunes over catchy beats. The lyrics are often in Acadien French and therefore difficult to understand, but their quirky themes of love are appealing and, if nothing else, it sure sounds nice. Beau Soleil have been making great music for 25 years and are nationally known for their appealing Cajun recordings, most prominently showcased on their 1997 album “”L’Amour ou la Folie”” (“”Love or Folly””). The group is high-energy and sincere at the same time, and promises to keep its audience’s toes tapping in their seats — if they can resist the urge to dance in the aisles. Beau Soleil perform with fiddle master Michael Doucet on Friday at 7:30 p.m. in Mandeville Auditorium. Tickets are $20 general admission, $18 for UCSD faculty, staff and for seniors, and $15 for students. ...

Tritons handed 13-2 loss by Point Loma

UCSD squared off against nonconference rival Point Loma Nazarene University on Tuesday afternoon at Triton Baseball Field. Anna MacMurdo Guardian In their previous battle with the Crusaders just one week ago, the Tritons took a 3-1 decision after two UCSD players blasted solo home runs. However, this was not the case on Tuesday when Point Loma overpowered UCSD and won by a final score of 13-2. Sophomore Raf Bergstrom was on the hill for the Tritons and pitched just three innings. Bergstrom began to struggle in the top of the first when two batters flied out and Crusader Matt Mamula singled to right center field. Matt Thorne then blasted a home run to left field, igniting Point Loma’s offense. UCSD regrouped, and in the bottom of the first, just after Triton left fielder John Bologna grounded out to the shortstop, center fielder Matt Smith singled down the left field line. With a runner on first and two outs, sophomore catcher Jeff Riddle knocked a triple into center field, scoring Matt Smith on the play. UCSD third baseman Ryan Larson was hit by a pitch from Point Loma starter Derek Davis, and then with runners at the corners, freshman designated hitter Garret Riddle smacked a single up the middle to score Jeff Riddle and tie the game at two runs apiece. Though Matt Smith went 3 for 3, Jeff Riddle hit 2 for 4, Garret Riddle went 2 for 3 and Larson went 2 for 3 on the day. The two runs in the first were the end of the scoring drive for UCSD. On the visiting side, Point Loma Nazarene scored in every inning but the sixth in its victory over UCSD. The Tritons used six pitchers in the loss, including Bergstrom, Tommy Sereno, Keith Smith, Robert Bush, Robert Peele and Dan Krefft. With 10 hits and seven runs recorded in Bergstrom’s three innings, he picked up the loss and is now 1-1 on the year. UCSD drops to 6-5-1 overall and remains 2-2 in the California Collegiate Athletic Association, while Point Loma improves to 6-2-1 overall and has yet to begin league play. “”What’s done is done,”” said Triton catcher Jeff Riddle after the loss. “”We’ve got 56 games in a season and some days things won’t go our way. We’ll continue to work hard and push ourselves, approaching [other teams] the same way we approach every game.”” The Tritons face off against Cal State Dominguez Hills in a four-game set this weekend. The first two will be played at Triton Baseball Field Feb. 14 and Feb. 15, followed by a doubleheader on Feb. 16 in Carson. ...

Theater Review

“”2 By Shepard”” consists of two separate one-act plays written by Sam Shepard: “”Icarus’s Mother”” and “”Action.”” However, there is only one word to describe “”2 By Shepard”” What? What are the plots, relationships and themes? What is the point? These plays have a lot in common. They both have little or no plot, which makes them rely heavily on characters to carry the stories. However, the characters in both plays are presented with very few clues about their backgrounds and relationships with each other. With plots not being the point of the plays, it seems as though there should have been heavy thematic content. However, once again, these plays fail to deliver. While there are any number of themes that you could drag out of these plays if you wanted to spend hours analyzing them, there are no definite themes apparent. Rather, the apocalyptic ideas running through the dramas just leave the viewer feeling disturbed. Even more upsetting than the apparent lack of purpose to the plays is the lack of information to be found about them. The program lacks any real insight into the productions, and even the UCSD Web site devoted to them reveals only roughly a sentence’s worth of information. The bright spot to these plays were the sets and the lighting, which were designed by Patrick Larsen and M. Scott Garbau. “”Icarus’ Mother”” uses a screen as a background to first show the blue sky and fireworks of the Fourth of July, and then the final apocalyptic blast. “”Action”” was set against a backdrop of metal bars with only a table, chairs and a Christmas tree for scenery. The lighting was dim and the larger-than-life shadows created on the wall were great for setting the somber mood of the play. Overall, the plays are mediocre. If you enjoy in-depth analysis of post-modern theater, this is a great production. Other than that, this play is not one of the better theater experiences at UCSD. ...

Track and field holds alumni meet

The UCSD men’s and women’s track and field teams took to the track Saturday for some friendly competition against the UCSD track and field alumni. Anna MacMurdo Guardian Over 40 alumni competed against the 2002 Triton track team, and with a new format, the Triton alumni were surprisingly close to upsetting the current squad. The format had the men’s and women’s teams mixed then split into equal teams designated as blue and gold to compete against each other and the alumni. With a little help from past and present Triton coaching staff members competing for the alumni team, the alums were just seven points away from defeating the blue squad. “”This was a great way to begin the season,”” said freshman Angelo Vargas. “”The alumni performed well. We can use this performance as a team to get better and see where we are in the big picture.”” Anna MacMurdo Guardian In the javelin, Lynne Brinkman scored an all-time record by posting a 132′-8” throw, the longest in school history. In the men’s 100-meter dash Wale Olagunju beat captain Sam Denes by .06 seconds to take the race, proving that the alumni could compete with the younger Tritons. Another highlight included Meredith Perry’s performance in the 100-meter hurdles as she posted a time of 15.20 seconds, ranking her second in the all-time performances in Triton history. Senior Megan Bergin recorded a hammer throw of 158′ 11″”, ranking her second all-time in Triton history. On the men’s side, the top performer was that of sophomore Marcus Keller, whose 45′-10″” triple jump put him fifth all-time among UCSD track and field athletes. “”Perhaps the biggest benefit of the meet is the chance for our current athletes to meet some of the alumni,”” said head coach Tony Salerno. “”We had over 40 alum show up to compete and help officiate. I think it is really inspiring for our current athletes to put a face to name for the record book.”” When the day was done, the gold team won by 35 points over the blue team, and the Alumni finished a close third, just seven points shy of beating the favored Tritons. For most of the alumni, however, just competing again for their alma mater was enough. “”A lot of the people on the team are still friends so it was fun to see them and compete against them,”” said alumnus Steven Sorensten. “”Experiences in Triton track gave me a lot of friends and taught me how to interact and how to not interact with people in authority.”” Sorensten went on to comment about how difficult it was to get back on the track in full form; that most of the alumni felt the difficulty of competing due to their age and lack of consistent training. Few freshman have been added to the squad this year, and performers such as Ryan Vincent, Jeff Conkey and numerous others will determine how far UCSD will go this season. “”We are definitely a better team than last year on both the men’s and women’s sides because most of the freshman now on the roster are much higher caliber athletes than in the past,”” Salerno said. “”Most of the freshman will be ‘impact’ athletes for us.”” As the Tritons look forward to a long and rewarding season, coach Salerno was quick to note that the team is experiencing no major injuries heading into the major meets. He expects “”to have everybody healthy when it counts for conference championships.”” Another tuneup meet lies ahead for the UCSD teams as they travel to Pomona-Pitzer to face strong competition from Division II opponents. “”I suspect we will send about 75 percent of our squad to Pomona-Pitzer,”” Salerno said. “”We will likely rest many of our higher caliber people and give some of the new people a chance to compete. The meet at Pomona-Pitzer will be a non-scoring meet with all ranges of competition.”” The team acknowledges that its first real test will be Feb. 23 at Cal State Los Angeles when it faces all the Southern California schools from the CCAA. “”Cal State Dominguez Hills on the women’s side and Cal Poly Pomona on the men’s side could challenge us,”” Salerno said. “”We know we are better than last year but we really don’t know what they have.”” With bright, upcoming athletes ready to shine, as well as veterans performing at their peak, the Triton men’s and women’s track and field teams look to eclipse their achievements from last year. But as Vargas remarked, it is “”too early to decide.”” ...

Potions might be the alternative

In the memorable words of Ewan McGregor in “”Moulin Rouge,”” “”Love is a many splendid thing. Love lifts us up where we belong. All you need is love.”” Lyon Liew Guardian For some people, love is just like magic, while for others, it takes a little magic to find love. If you’re feeling like Cupid needs a helping hand this Valentine’s Day, a love spell may sound like a more attractive option than a blind date. However, if you decide to call on the help of Venus, the goddess of love, rather then your match-making friends, there are a few things to know before casting a love spell. Andrea Hall, who works at Starcrafts, a metaphysical bookstore in Ocean Beach, Calif., points out that the most important consideration in casting spells is not to focus on a specific person. “”You shouldn’t try to change the will of another person,”” she said. “”If you specifically focus on an individual, you would be changing their will, and that wouldn’t be fair.”” While it is tempting to bewitch the one your heart desires, Hall explains that you should focus on attracting the attributes of that person. The purpose of a love spell is to attract love of any kind into your life and to make it easier for love to find you. However, according to Hall, “”as a Wiccan, you don’t change the will of another person.”” With that disclaimer, there are tons of herbs, flowers, oils and candles that may make it easier for love to find its way to your heart. Rose and jasmine oil are commonly used, as is dragon’s blood oil, which is actually the resin from a drocana palm that is named for its scarlet color. Vanilla is used in love “”magik,”” as is used to refer to ritual magic, as well, and amber greis is used for lust. Also try burning pink and red candles to create some love energy. If you still feel like you need an elaborate ritual, there are hundreds of books on casting spells and attracting love. Hall recommends “”Wicca for the Solitary Practitioner”” by Scott Cunigham for those new to the craft, as well as “”Witches Circle”” by Maria Kay Simms. If love spells are all you’re after, “”Wicca Love Spells”” by Gerina Dunwich ranks high on Hall’s reading list. Or you can stop by Starcrafts at 1909 Cable St. and talk to Hall yourself. She’d be happy to mix up a potion to send Cupid’s arrow flying your way. Visit Starcrafts on the Web at http:www.starcraftsob.com. ...

basically

Last weekend, I was blessed by a visit from my younger sister, Allie. Of course, by “”blessed,”” I mean I was driven completely insane and will never fully recover. Same difference. What you need to understand about Allie is that she is very concerned by how she looks. Mind you, she looks good — ask anyone with a penis. But she also cares how her mind looks, and this is where she runs into problems. Most of the time, my sister is so preoccupied with looking smart that she fails to take the time to actually be smart. In other words, she’s so busy arguing that she isn’t stupid that she sometimes fails to realize that she is, at that very moment, acting stupid. Not that I don’t love her. I do. But God help me, when she acts like that, I want to kick her ass. Friday night, after preparing a lovely bed fit for a queen (I put a pillow and blanket on our couch), I instructed Allie on protocol should she wake up before I did. Me (instructing very patiently): “”Allie, pay the fuck attention!”” Allie (not paying attention at all, I can tell): “”I am!”” Me (getting a grip on myself): If you wake up in the morning and you get hungry, this is the only cereal I have. At this juncture, I hold up a bag of plain Cheerios that my mother had sent me, even though I don’t eat cereal and I hate Cheerios. Whatever, it’s the thought that counts. So I am holding a huge bag of cereal Vanna White-style, showing it off to the best of my ability, making it clear that Cheerios are all that is on the menu in the morning. But, knowing my sister as I do, I must stress this point still further. Me (stressing the point and still doing a damn good Vanna White impression): “”Do you see that this is the only cereal you can eat?”” Allie (getting vexed): “”Yes, Carrie, I see the cereal. I get it.”” Me (still hammering the point home): “”I am going to put it here on the counter, so you don’t even have to look in the cabinet for it.”” Allie (working up some serious sass): “”Carrie, I am not an idiot. I get it. Geez!”” Me (just messing with her at this point): “”So, what you’re saying is, you don’t know where the cereal is?”” Allie wasn’t amused. Now, I must point out here that I was not just really eager to get rid of that cereal. My roommates own several varieties of cereal themselves, and they get … let’s just call it “”possessive”” of their food. Not that I blame them. I just don’t want to get bitched out by a hungry woman because my sister can’t tell a cheerio from a lucky charm. OK, so all is secure. The cereal is on the counter. It is all by itself. There is no way Allie can miss that bag. Unless she is struck from behind and consequently blinded (which I totally would do, by the way), Allie’s gonna know where the Cheerios are. Fine. The next morning, I wake up and discover that Allie is still asleep, despite her protests that my waking up at 11 a.m. is “”way too late”” for her. I go to the rice cooker and start making some rice for sushi. (Oh yeah, baby, I can make sushi. I am a freakin’ gourmet.) Allie wakes up a few minutes later. We exchange half-hearted good mornings (she is groggy and I am annoyed that I have no cucumber). Then the moment of truth arrives. Allie gets up. She has that look in her eye that lets me know she is hungry. She moves to … the cabinet. I know it’s coming. I know she is going to make an ass of herself. And do I stop her? Of course not. What kind of sister do you take me for? Allie (pulling out the Corn Pops): “”Can I have this?”” Me (remaining calm): “”Are you fucking kidding me?”” Allie (whipping out that Sklar sass again): “”Carrie, I am sick of you treating me like an idiot. Can I have the Corn Pops or not?”” Well, I lost it. You can’t blame me, really. I went out of my way to make sure she knew what cereal was mine, and it just popped out of that vacant little blonde head anyway. So I called her an idiot (and she was — admit it) and gave her the cereal, and then I made myself some sushi. And then I gave her some, too, because that is the kind of philanthropic elder sibling that I am. So basically, yes, my sister can be dumb. And yes, I call her on it. But the important lesson to learn here is really this: Never send me Cheerios. Just look at the trouble it causes! ...

Blind date opens young couple's eyes

Love at first sight might not necessarily be in the air, but the Guardian Blind Date was trying to at least spark some flames. She was looking for a tall guy who makes her laugh. He was looking for someone with a sense of humor who is fun to be around. Kristen Santerre and Nate Jones were the lucky winners of the Guardian Blind Date contest, and they were just looking to have some fun. “”I’m really excited, and I think it’s going to be really fun,”” Santerre said before meeting Nate. “”Me and my roommates always watch dating shows like ‘Blind Date’ and ‘Fifth Wheel.’ We’re obsessed with them. And when I saw that there was a blind date, it just sounded like a lot of fun and I never thought I would win.”” On the other hand, Nate had some persuasion to sign up. “”My volleyball buddies signed me up for it,”” Jones laughed. “”I just gave them my information and didn’t expect much. I didn’t think I had a chance.”” After the two met each other for the first time, they were swept off into the limousine idling downstairs and treated to the posh La Jolla restaurant, Forever Fondue, which was voted as the best date restaurant in the Guardian readers poll. Hours later, they came back and the two seemed to be happy and in a pleasant mood — a good indication that the blind date wasn’t a disaster. “”The date was great! And he was easy to talk to,”” Santerre said. Jones also seemed to have enjoyed himself. “”The date was lots of fun. We went to a good place and we didn’t run out of anything to talk about. One of the worries I had before was that we’d run out of things to talk about, but eventually we talked about sports, movies and whatever we had in common,”” Jones said. Both agreed that besides the fantastic food, there wasn’t anything exciting, though the date was laid-back. When asked if they would go on a second date, Jones replied, “”She’s lots of fun, for sure. And she’s a cool girl. I don’t know. We’ll see.”” Santerre replied, “”Yes, I think I would if he asks.”” Nate, go for it, man. ...

Lights & Sirens

Sunday, Feb. 3 1:02 p.m.: A 20-year-old female student passed out at Warren Field. Transported to Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla by paramedics. Monday, Feb. 4 10:34 p.m.: Police arrested a 19-year-old student on Equality Lane for being a minor in possession of alcohol. Cited and released. 10:37 p.m.: A student reported vandalism to a maroon 1992 Acura Vigor in Lot 208. Loss: $1,600. Tuesday, Feb. 5 10:30 a.m.: A student reported the theft of a wallet from the Guardian office. Loss: $36.80. Wednesday, Feb. 6 7:46 a.m.: Authorities towed a red Honda Spree scooter from 3983 Miramar St. for having registration expired over six months. Stored at Star Towing. 12:04 p.m.: A female volunteer reported the theft of a wallet from the International Center. Loss: $150. 1:22 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a white 1992 Chevrolet Blazer in the Gilman Parking Structure. Loss: $500. 1:50 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a white 1997 Chevrolet S-10 truck in Lot 702. Loss: $1,680. 2:50 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a white 1996 Ford Mustang in Lot 703. Loss: $700. 3:23 p.m.: A student reported the attempted theft of a blue 1992 Ford Mustang in Lot 608. Loss: $800. 3:39 p.m.: A student reported burglary to a blue 1996 Ford Ranger in Lot 502. Loss: $480. 3:53 p.m.: An 81-year-old male nonaffiliate injured his knees after falling in front of the Mandeville Art Gallery. Transported to Thornton Hospital by paramedics. 5:14 p.m.: A student reported the attempted theft of a black 1992 Nissan truck in Lot 701. Loss: $300. 11:52 p.m.: Police detained a 51-year-old male nonaffiliate at Gilman Drive near Lot 113 for being a danger to himself. Transported to North Central Mental Health Center. Thursday, Feb. 7 3:28 p.m.: Officer reported a confiscated Blacks Beach gate key. Friday, Feb. 8 7:12 a.m.: A student reported theft of a black 1993 Ford Mustang from 3927 Miramar St. Loss: $6,000. 11:02 p.m.: Police detained a 22-year-old male student for being drunk in public at the Student Center. Transported to detox. Saturday, Feb. 9 12:21 a.m.: An 18-year-old male student reported being battered at Goldberg Hall. Subject refused treatment. 8:51 a.m.: Police arrested a 30-year-old female nonaffiliate at North Torrey Pines Road and Muir College Drive for an outstanding misdemeanor warrant for use of controlled substance. The SDPD believed she was an endangered missing person. Transported to Las Colinas Women’s Detention Facility. Bail: $27,777. 11:18 a.m.: A student reported receiving harassing phone calls on a cellular phone. 11:29 a.m.: A student reported theft of a backpack from Geisel Library. Loss: $210. 2:42 p.m.: A student reported theft of a backpack from Geisel Library. Loss: $25. 3:11 p.m.: Police arrested a 21-year-old male nonaffiliate for unauthorized possession of state property. Cited and released. 3:22 p.m.: A staff member reported robbery at the UCSD Bookstore. Loss: $2.39. Sunday, Feb. 10 1:16 a.m.: Police issued a Admin Per Se order to a 19-year- old male nonaffiliate at Campus Point Drive and Voigt Drive because the driver had a blood alcohol content of .01 or greater. Transported to detox. 1:30 a.m.: Authorities stored the above driver’s silver 1998 Honda Civic. –Compiled by Steve Lehtonen Senior Staff Writer ...

BRIEFLY

Roy D’Andrade of the anthropology department was recently honored by the National Academy of Sciences for his contributions to science over the last 10 years. Awarded for excellence in scientific reviewing, D’Andrade was selected by the NAS for his work merging the fields of anthropology and psychology. He was also cited for his “”insightful interpretations of historical trends shaping the future goals of anthropology. D’Andrade, who received a $10,000 prize for his contributions, was one of 14 individuals selected by the NAS for honors. The NAS has presented the award, which was established by Annual Reviews Inc., the Institute for Scientific Information, and the Scientist in Honor of J. Murray Luck, annually since 1979. D’Andrade has been a professor at UCSD for 22 years. UCSD biologists find first genetic evidence of animal evolution The first genetic evidence showing major changes to the body shapes and body plans of animals has been discovered by UCSD biologists. The research, which is scheduled to be published in the journal Nature, shows how mutations in the genes of crustaceans and fruit flies arose from aquatic crustacean-like arthropods that ended up growing grow limbs. Thus, over 400 million years, sea creatures developed into six-legged insects. Biology professor William McGinnis led the project, which counters the creationist argument that evolution is a fallacy because the lack of a genetic mechanism could not allow for animals to evolve with vastly different body plans. Matthew Ronshaugen and Nadine McGinnis contributed to the research. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development funded the research UCSD Speech and Debate team reaches final in tournament Eddy Shyu and Philip Littlewood took fifth place in the novice division at the 2002 Sunset Cliffs Classic Speech and Debate Tournament held last weekend at Point Loma Nazarene University. The duo won four of six preliminary debates to advance to the final round, which included eight teams. In the finals round they defeated Vanguard University and Carleton College by judges’ decisions of 2-1. Their run ended against the Air Force Academy with a 3-0 defeat while debating “”Justice Delayed is Justice Denied.”” Six teams from the Speech and Debate Club participated in the tournament, which served as preparation for nationals held next month in Colorado. UCSD undergraduates to show research in state capital UCSD undergraduate students Timothy Barder and Etienne Pelaprap were recently selected to present their research at a UC Day luncheon in Sacramento next month. Barder, of the chemistry department, will present “”Synthesis and Fluorescence Studies of Aryl-Substituted Bipyridines and Terpyridines.”” Pelaprap of the cognitive science department will present “”User Activity Histories and Multiscale Visualizations.”” Their respective faculty advisers will co-present the research with them. The UC Office of Research sponsors the competition to highlight undergraduate research efforts throughout the UC system. UC Day, held March 19, seeks to prepare UC students for future careers in California’s high-tech economy. ...